Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
1897 Tioga County History
Chapter 64 - Biographical Sketches
Bradford County PA
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1897 Tioga County History Table of Contents
Submitted by Joyce M. Tice
Retyped for Tri-Counties by Norma SMITH Mattison
Part One Part Two Part Three
A P.O.S. of A. Parade in Mainesburg 
past the old Grange and Barber Shop
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Chapter 64 Biographical Sketches -
Richmond Township and Mansfield Borough- Sullivan Township and Mainesburg - Rutland Township

[SRGP 86492] Marcus S. French, proprietor of the Hotel French, of Mansfield, was born in Corning, New York, August 7, 1847.His parents, Luther and Clara ( Shepard )French, native of Otsego county, New York, reared five children, as follows: George E., a resident of Centre county , Pennsylvania; Adeline, wife of Charles White, of Caton, New York; Julia, wife of Henry Wescott, of Lindley, New York; Frances, wife of Alvin K. Linderman, of Troy, Pennsylvania, and Marcus S. In 1854 Mr. French went to California, where he remained eighteen years, engaged in mining and cattle dealing. He then returned to Steuben county, New York, where he died, in June , 1891, aged eighty-nine years, and his wife, in September, 1893, aged eighty-seven years. they were the oldest persons in Caton at the time of their deaths. the subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, later learned the mason’s trade, and became a contractor and builder. In 1875 he came to Mansfield, where he followed contracting and building up to April, 1891, when he took charge of the Allen Hotel. During that period he erected the several brick blocks which formed the business part of Mansfield, the graded school building, and did the masonry work on Alumni Hall, of the State Normal School. He also erected buildings in other parts of the county, all of which attest the faithful performance of his contracts. His successful management of the Hotel Allen made him a popular landlord, and brought him the liberal patronage and good will of the traveling public. He conducted this house until the spring of 1897, when he opened the Hotel French in the same borough. Mr. French was married on December 25, 1871, to Henrietta Nares, daughter of James and Caroline (Lindon) Nares, who has borne him five children, viz: George, deceased; Catherine E., wife of John H. Causer, of Elmira; Stella, deceased; Mabel, and Mark J, In politics, Mr. French is a Democrat and has served several terms as school director. He is a member of Friendship Lodge, No. 247, F.&A.M., and the family are adherents of the Presbyterian church.

[SRGP 88384] Nathaniel Peaseley Moody was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, in 1760. His great-grandfather, William Moody, came from Scotland in 1632. At sixteen years of age Nathaniel P. entered the Continental army and served through the Revolution, at the close of which he took up his residence in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, where he met and married Susan Griffin. He was a graduate of Yale College in which institution he completed his studies after leaving the army. In 1795 he came to Wysox, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, whence he removed to Osceola, Tioga county, where he died in 1832, aged seventy-two years.

[SRGP 88378] Moses Moody was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, October 5,1790, a son of Nathaniel Peaseley Moody, and was five years old when his parents settled in Bradford county, Pennsylvania. He married Phoebe Allen, who became the mother of twelve children, six of whom are living as follows: John A., of Mansfield  ;N.N., a merchant and postmaster of Asylum, Bradford county; H.M. a physician of Smithfield; William W., of Litchfield, Bradford county; Elizabeth, wife of Albert Lent, of Wysox, Bradford county, and Amanda, widow of William Barnes of Ithaca, New York. Mr. Moody died in October, 1873, and his wife, January 1, 1876.

[SRGP 88372] John A. Moody, oldest living child of Moses Moody, was born in Wysox, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, January 11, 1818. When he was twelve years old his parents removed to Rome, in the same county, where he grew to manhood. He followed farming there until 1876, when he went to Canton and engaged in merchandising, also in the insurance business, both of which he followed until 1884, when he removed to Mansfield, Tioga county and has since devoted his entire attention to the latter. Mr. Moody was married January 3, 1841, to Harriet E., a daughter of John and Jemima Dickerson, who bore him three children, viz: Benjamin, a physician of Mansfield; Tillie, wife of G.W. Mills, of Lordsburg, California, and Lewis a resident of Canton, Bradford county. Mrs. Moody died October 16, 1874, and he married for his second wife, Jeannette (Lewis) Moody, widow of his cousin, Horace P. Moody. In politics, Mr. Moody is a Republican, and was elected a justice of the peace in 1892, which position he now occupies. In religion, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

[SRGP 85777] Benjamin Moody, M.D., eldest son of John A. and Harriet Moody, was born in Frenchtown, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, September 28, 1841, and there received his primary education. During the Rebellion he served in Company C, Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Emergency Men, and also Company F, Eighth New York Heavy Artillery. In 1865 he began the study of medicine under Dr. T.F. Madill, of Wysox, Bradford county. He graduated from Geneva Medical College at Geneva, New York, in 1868, and from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia in 1869, in which year he commenced practice with his preceptor, at Wysox. From 1870 to 1875 he practiced in Wyalusing, Bradford county, removing in the latter year to Roseville, Tioga county, and in 1877 to Mansfield, where he has since built up a lucrative practice. Dr. Moody was married September 28,1871, to Adelia Lyon, a daughter of Stephen and Margaret Lyon, of Spring Hill, Bradford county. Four children have been born to this marriage, viz: Eva Grace, Hattie Blanche and Maggie Leone, all deceased, and Dora H. In politics, Dr. Moody is a Republican, and has filled the office of school director several years. In religion, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been steward for a number of years. He is also connected with Mansfield Post, No. 48, G.A.R., of which he was commander in 1883 and 1896. Dr. Moody not only bears the reputation of being a skillful and successful physician, but is regarded as one of the leading citizens of Mansfield.

[SRGP 04173] W.W. Bentley, oldest son of Bethuel Bentley, was born in Rutland township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, December 1, 1827. His grandfather, Major Bentley, came from Chemung county, New York, and settled on the Tioga river, near Mitchell’s Creek, in April, 1806.The subject of this sketch was reared in his native township, and became a farmer and well-known bridge builder. He married Sarah Searls, a daughter of John Searls, and a native of Tompkins ( now Schuyler) county, New York, who bore him the following children: E.N., of Mansfield; Helen wife of E.M. Cass, of the same borough; Mary wife of John H. Luckey, of Troy, Bradford county; G.W., a resident of Mansfield; and Susan, wife of R.E. Longbothum, of the same place. In politics Mr. Bentley is a Republican, and has served as a member of the borough council of Mansfield, where he has lived since 1877.In religion, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. A man of great energy and industry, he has been largely interested in real estate and building enterprises in other places, in addition to his bridge operations.

[SRGP 08254] E.N. Bentley, oldest son of W.W. Bentley, was born in Rutland township, Tioga county, March 1, 1850, and obtained a common school education. In early manhood he became an iron-worker, and in 1875 entered the employ of the Athens Bridge Company, for whom he traveled two years. He next had charge of the erection gang for two years, and then entered the service of the Keystone Bridge Company. While in their employ as foreman, he built the bridge on the Mississippi River at Keokuk, Iowa. He afterwards worked for Dean & Westbrook of New York City, and also for the Groton, New York, company, and for the Elmira Bridge Company. In 1892 he commenced business for himself, as a bridge builder and contractor, and the same year built the highway bridge across the Susquehanna river at Jersey Shore, Lycoming county. Since arriving at manhood he has built thirty-six highway and several railroad bridges in Tioga county. On May 15, 1872, Mr. Bentley married Lois Booth, a daughter of Erastus Booth, of Troy, Bradford county, who bore him one daughter, Louisa, wife of A.M. Armour, of Morrisville New York, a nephew of Philip Armour, the great pork-packer of Chicago. Mrs. Bentley died in January 1880, and December 17, 1885, he married Elsie Odell. In politics Mr. Bentley is a Republican. He devoted his whole attention and energy to bridge building, and is one of the most successful contractors and builders in that line in northern Pennsylvania.

[SRGP 08262] D.C. Burnham, son of Halsey and Anna (Knickerbocker) Burnham, was born August 3, 1859, in Granville, Bradford county, Pennsylvania. His father was a native of Vermont, and his mother of Chemung county, New York. They located in Bradford County in the early forties, where his father followed the profession of civil engineer. He Died November 19, 1864, and his wife April 7, 1891. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Burnham was connected with the Masonic order. The subject of this sketch was their only child, and was reared in his native county. He obtained a good common school education, and in 1877 came to Mansfield, Tioga county, where he found employment as a clerk in Dr. C.V. Elliott’s drug store. He remained in that position until 1890, and then embarked in business for himself, and has since carried on a drug book and stationery store in Mansfield, and enjoys a good trade. On April 15, 1891, Mr. Burnham married Addie E. Curtis, a daughter of Charles and Hannah Curtis, of Norwich, New York. In politics Mr. Burnham is a Republican, and in religion, a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is also connected with Mansfield Lodge, No.526,I.O.O.F. Through one of the younger business men of Mansfield, Mr. Burnham enjoys the confidence and esteem of the people, and is recognized as a good business man and an enterprising citizen.

[SRGP 51594] Joseph Husted was born in Southport, New York, December 17, 1820, a son of James and Catherine (Miller) Husted. His father was born in Burlington, Vermont, August 3, 1782, and settled at Southport at an early day. In 1838 he came to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and located on a farm in Covington, where he resided for a number of years. He afterwards moved to Mansfield where he died November 15, 1865. Joseph grew to manhood in Covington, and August 24, 1843 married Juliet E., a daughter of Everett Winter and Lydia (Walker) Bloss, of Covington, who was born in Blossburg, Pennsylvania, on May 24, 1826. Her father was the oldest child of Aaron Bloss, a native of Killingby, Connecticut, born May 29, 1775, who settled in Chenango county, New York, whence he removed to Covington, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, in 1801, and in 1802 located on the site of Blossburg, then a wilderness, which place was named in his honor. Upon his land was found bituminous coal, the first mine being opened by Mr. Bloss. He died at Covington, March 24, 1843. His son, Everett Winter Bloss, was born in Chenango county, New York, September 20, 1800, was reared in Blossburg, and removed to Covington in early manhood, where he resided until his death, September 29, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Husted are the parents of four children, viz: Cordelia L., deceased wife of David S. Ireland; Wilmot D., of Mansfield; Lyman S., a resident of Pottsville, Pennsylvania, and Lelia I., wife of Burt Coe, of Covington, among the oldest citizens of that borough.

[SRGP 65516] Wilmot D. Husted was born in Covington, Tioga county, April 15, 1856, and is the eldest son of Joseph Husted. He was educated in the public schools and the State Normal School at Mansfield, and at the age of fifteen entered the employ of the Covington Glass Company, where he acted as office boy one year. He then became a clerk in the general store of Edwin Dyer, but in 1874 again entered the office of the Covington Glass Company. After attending the State Normal School until a member of the senior class, he taught school in the factory district of Covington. He next worked a few months for the Tioga Railroad Company. and then became a book-keeper for the Covington Glass Works, and a few months later manager for that concern. In 1878 he came to Mansfield and entered the bank of Ross & Williams, as book-keeper, which position he filled with slight interruption until 1887, when he was promoted to head book-keeper, a position he still occupies. Mr. Husted was married January 20, 1876, to Kate Johnson, of Covington, Pennsylvania. Five children have been born to them, viz: Ray, Harry Lee, deceased; Marcus F., Leah Margaret and Genavene Louisa. In politics Mr. Husted is a Republican, and has served one term as burgess of Mansfield and two terms as a member of the school board. He is a member of Friendship Lodge, No. 247, F.& A.M., and a charter member of the Mansfield Hook and Ladder Company. He is secretary of the board of trade, and has always taken an active interest in promoting the general welfare of the borough.

[SRGP 32122] John Harmanus Vedder, son of Uri and Agnes Ellen Grieves (Joyce) Vedder, was born in Niskayuna, New York, September 2, 1830, the sixth in the line of decent from Harmon Albertse Vedder, a native of Holland, who was a trader at Beverwyck, New York, prior to 1657, and later settled at Schenectady. In 1662, when Schenectady was first laid out, he became one of its landed proprietors. The line of decent runs as follows: Harmon Albertse; Albert born may 10, 1671; Harmanus, born September 3, 1704; Johannes, born September 9, 1750; Uri, born April 12, 1808, and John Harmanus. Albert was captured by the French and Indians at the burning of Schenectady in 1690, but returned to his home in safety. The subject of this sketch was married at Duanesburgh, New York, October 3, 1853, to Catherine Elizabeth McFarlan, to which union were born three children, viz: Darcy Alexander, born July 26, 1854, and died March 9, 1855; Wentworth Darcy, of Mansfield, and Mary Isabella, a resident of Troy, New York. A few years after his marriage Mr. Vedder removed to Oxford, Wisconsin, where he lived about one year. About 1859 he returned to New York state and took up his residence in Schenectady, where he died June 3, 1877. His wife died in the same place. July 19, 1861.

[SRGP 32121] Wentworth D. Vedder, M.D., was born in Oxford, Wisconsin, April 7, 1858, and is the only living son of John H. and Catherine E. Vedder. When he was about a year old his parents removed to Schenectady. He was educated in the common schools and at Union College, attending the latter institution from 1875 to 1877. At the death of his father he entered the office of Dr. Livingston Ellwood, of Schenectady, and subsequently took a course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Maryland, graduating in March, 1880, Prof. Oscar J. Coskery, being his preceptor. He began the practice of medicine at Troupsburg, New York, the same year, whence he removed to Mansfield three months later, where he has since continued in the active duties of his profession. Dr. Vedder has recently taken a post-graduate course in the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital; is a diligent student; keeps well abreast of the progress in medical and surgical science, and is recognized as a successful and skillful physician and surgeon. On January 6, 1885, he married Kate Baldwin, a daughter of Dr. Aaron and Fannie Baldwin, of Washington, D.C., who died April 26, following. On September 12, 1894, he married Cora Mahala Strait, a daughter of M. Sanford and Rhoda F. Strait of Lawrence township, to which union has been born one son, Sanford Elihu, August 19, 1895. In politics, Dr. Vedder is a Republican, and in religion, a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He is one of the most advanced Masons in this section of the State, being Past Master of Friendship Lodge, No.247, of Mansfield; Past High Priest of Westfield Chapter, No. 265, of Westfield; Eminent Commander of Tyagaghton Commandery, No.28, of Wellsboro; a member of Caldwell Consistory, of Bloomsburg, and of Rajah Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., of Reading. He is also Past Noble Grand of Mansfield Lodge, No. 526, I.O.O.F., and Past Chief Patriarch of Sylvania Encampment. Dr. Vedder is an ex-president of the old Tioga County Medical Society, as well as the present medical society. He is a member of the Elmira Academy of Medicine, and also of the Pennsylvania State Medical Society. He has been a member of the pension board of Tioga county, appointed in 1888, and is one of the present consulting surgeons of the Cottage State Hospital, at Blossburg. Dr. Vedder is a member of the Holland Society of New York City, and is the owner of a Holland Dutch Bible that has been in the Vedder Family since 1681. The Doctor is actively interest in the cause of education and is a member of the board of trustees of the State Normal School at Mansfield.

[SRGP 75799] Cephas Bailey was born in Andover, Vermont, May 16,1806, there grew to manhood and married Caroline M. Wright, native of South Londonderry, Vermont, who became the mother of the following children: Romanzo C., a resident of Elmira; Harrison C., of Mansfield; Victoria C., wife of Oscar Simonds, of Middlebury; Joseph O.W., deceased; Nancy A., wife of Horace L. Stevens, and two that died in early youth. They had also an adopted son, Henry C., now deceased. Romanzo C. served in Company F. Sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, whose march through Baltimore was one of the memorable events of the first month of the Rebellion. He also served as first lieutenant in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers; as captain of Company A. Eighth United States Colored Troops, and as first lieutenant of Company E, Thirty-fifth Pennsylvania Militia. The subject of this sketch was a farmer and came to Middlebury township, Tioga county in 1856. After retiring from active work, he made his home with his son, Harrison C., in Mansfield, where he died December 23, 1884. His wife died August 1, 1878.

[SRGP 75796] Harrison C. Bailey was born in Athens, Vermont, October 4, 1837, a son of Cephas Bailey, and came with his parents to Middlebury township, Tioga county, in 1856.He obtained a common school education, and was reared on a farm. On April 21, 1861, within a week of the fall of Fort Sumter, he enlisted in Company G, First Pennsylvania Rifles, known as Bucktails. His regiment was assigned to McCall’s Division, of the Fifth Army Corps. On June 6, 1862, at the battle of Harrisonburgh, West Virginia, he was wounded four times , one of which necessitated the amputation of his left arm. Being thus incapacitated for further service, he remained in the hospitals at Mt. Jackson and Winchester, Virginia, and Baltimore, Maryland, until convalescent, and was honorably discharged at Harrisburg, July 21, 1862.Returning to Tioga county, he served as enrolling officer in Middlebury in 1862 and 1863, and as second quartermaster of the Eighteenth Congressional district, at Williamsport, in 1864-65. His grandfathers, Cyrus Bailey and Joseph Wright, served in the war of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Sylvester Bailey, served in the Revolution. Mr. Bailey was married October 19, 1863, to Minerva L. Stoddard, a daughter of George G. and Louisa (Jackson) Stoddard. She was born in Swansea, Vermont, November 11, 1839, and is the mother of six children, viz: Frank H., a civil engineer, Elmira, New York; Eula I., wife of Frank A. Beach, of Elmira; May H., wife of L.A. Trowbridge, of Jackson township; Earl C., Joseph O.W. and Ralph J. Mr. Bailey is a staunch Republican, was treasurer of Tioga county in 1868-69, and has also served as constable of Middlebury township, and as a member of the borough council of Mansfield, where he has lived since 1877, He is a member of Mansfield Post, No. 48, G.A.R., in which he has filled the office of commander, while his wife is connected with Mansfield Corps, No. 6, W.R.C.

[SRGP 14940] Isaac Strait was born in Vermont, and came with his parents to Columbia township, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, about 1812, and there grew to maturity. About 1830 he removed to Potter county, and became its first prothonotary. In 1841-42 he returned to Bradford county, where he resided until his death, in 1874. Mr. Strait was twice married. His first wife was Maria Benson, a daughter of Doctor Benson, who bore him the following children: Cornelia Sophia, wife of Edmond Case, a resident of Bradford county; William B., who died in early manhood; George France, who died in Minnesota, in 1888; Charles L., and Edward E., a resident of Topeka, Kansas. His second wife was Elizabeth Ayres, a daughter of Abilah Ayres, who bore him four children, viz: Churchill B., deceased; Maria, wife of Edward Reddington, of Bradford county; Lois L., wife of Nelson Maynard, a resident of the same county, and Mary, wife of William Bradford, who lived near Sylvania.

[SRGP 14943] Charles L. Strait, a son of Isaac and Maria Strait, was born in Coudersport, Potter county, September 20, 1835.When eighteen years of age he began clerking in the store of A.D. Austin, of Austinville, Bradford county. In 1859 he came to Roseville, Tioga county, where he carried on a general store for about twenty years. Coming to Mansfield in 1879, he became a member of the hardware firm of Strait & Kohler, with which he was connected up to 1886, when he went to Carter county, Tennessee, and engaged in lumbering, his family however, remaining in Mansfield. In 1890 he returned to Mansfield, where he has since lived. Although not actively engaged in business, he is interest in the hardware store conducted by his son George L. Mr. Strait was married September 10, 1860, to Cordelia M. Watkins, a daughter of W.B. Watkins, of Bradford county, who has borne him four children, viz: George L., Thad B., Edith M., wife of Thomas D. Farrer, of Boise City, Idaho, and Fred W. Mr. Strait is a member of the Universalist church, and in politics, an adherent of the Republican party, his first presidential vote being cast for Abraham Lincoln.

[SRGP 18422] George L. Strait, eldest son of Charles L. Strait, and grandson of Isaac Strait, was born in Austinville, Bradford county, December 2,1865. He obtained a common school education, and became familiar with the practical details of business while clerking in his father’s store. On October 24, 1888, he married Anna E. Westbrook, a daughter of J.H. Westbrook , and had two children, Walter C. and Blanche. Mr. Strait is the head of the hardware and tinsmithing house of George L. Strait, of Mansfield, and is noted for his energy and enterprise. In politics, a Republican, he has served as a member of the borough Council. He is connected with Friendship Lodge, No. 247, F.& A.M.(also had a son Harold)

[SRGP 86676] Levi Hubbard Shattuck was born at Fayston, Vermont, September 1, 1816, a son of Henry and Olive P. (Turner) Shattuck, natives of Massachusetts. He was but two years old when his parents located in Massachusetts , where he received his primary education in the common schools, later supplemented by terms at Deerfield, Hopkins and Amherst Academies. In the meantime he taught school a part of two years. In 1836 he removed to New Brunswick, New Jersey, and three years later to Plainfield , where he found employment as a locomotive fireman on the Elizabethtown and Somerville railroad, now the New Jersey Central. Within three months he became an engineer on the same road , and later took the position of station agent and contractor at Bound Brook, and followed the same business at Somerville, spending two years in this line of work. For the succeeding nine years he filled the position of conductor, three years on freight and six years in passenger trains. On the completion of the road to Easton, in July, 1852, Mr. Shattuck was appointed station agent at that place, which position he filled until November following, when he tendered that of superintendent of the Corning, Blossburg, and Tioga railroad. He accepted the office and made his headquarters at Corning, New York, for nearly fifteen years. In 1866 he removed to Blossburg, Tioga county, where he continued acting as superintendent of the Tioga road. That part of the road from Tioga Junction to Elmira was built under the management of Mr. Shattuck, as was also the section extending from Arnot to Hoytville, of which he was president. On December 1, 1883, he resigned the superintendency of the Tioga road for the purpose of recuperating his failing health, and retired to Mansfield in October, 1884. In a letter announcing the resignation of Mr. Shattuck, J.C. Guthrie, vice-president of the road said:

For thirty-one years-with zeal, energy and honesty, through changes of ownership and administration- Mr. Shattuck has faithfully served the interests of the company, and in retiring bears with him its best wishes for his health and prosperity.

On December 16, 1884, he was again elected to his former position and resumed the duties of superintendent, but finally gave up the office towards the close of 1885. Retiring to his home in Mansfield he resided there up to his death, November 1, 1888, aged seventy-two years. In 1841 Mr. Shattuck married Sarah L. Pack, and reared five children, all of whom are living, viz: Mrs. William F. Fox, of Albany, New York; Mrs. Charles H. Verrill, of Franklin, New York; Henry F., a resident of Buffalo; Mrs. Charles L. Shattuck, of Elmira, and Alfred J., a lawyer of Wellsboro. Mr. Shattuck was originally a Presbyterian, but united with the Baptist church after his marriage. He always took a prominent part in church work, as a teacher of an adult Bible class, and was a deacon in the Mansfield church at the time of his death. He was a man of strong character, strict integrity, and love of truth. Possessing excellent business methods, whatever his hands found to do with his energy, and his success in life was principally due to his industry and faithfulness in the discharge of every duty. Upright and honorable in all his dealings with the men under his charge, he merited and won the confidence of the company and their employees.

[SRGP 14938] Eber VanKeuren, M.D., was born in Showangunk, Ulster county, New York, January 25, 1821. He studied medicine and became a physician of the regular school, and for over forty years practiced in Hammondsport, Bath, Corning and Painted Post, New York. On November 20, 1846, he married Sarah H. Baker, a descendent of Samuel Baker, the first settler of Tioga county, Pennsylvania. She was born in Pleasant Valley, New York, October 7, 1823, and became the mother of three children, viz: Frank, who died in childhood; Nellie B., wife of Samuel J. McCulloch, an attorney of Kansas City, Missouri, and a son of Rev. Samuel J. McCulloch, the first pastor of the Presbyterian church at Tioga, and Frank E., editor of the Mansfield Advertiser. Dr. VanKeuren died in Corning, New York, April 7, 1887, and his wife, December3, 1886.

[SRGP 03786] Frank E. VanKeuren, son of Dr. Eber VanKeuren, was born in Hammondsport, New York, October 26, 1861. He received a common school education and learned the printing trade in the office of the Steuben Courier, Bath, New York, where he worked four and a half years. He then found employment in the job department of the Elmira Advertiser, Elmira, New York, and was afterwards foreman of the same office. Returning to Bath, he worked there for a time, and then went to Wellsboro, Tioga county, where he had charge of the mechanical department of the Advocate. In the spring of 1885 he came to Mansfield and purchased the Advertiser from W.A. Rowland. In July following Sheridan E. Coles became his partner, and the paper has since been published by VanKeuren & Coles. The Advertiser is neutral in politics, and is devoted to the local interest of Mansfield and the eastern portion of the county. It is ably edited, its local columns readable and interesting, and it receives a liberal support. Mr. VanKeuren is well known as a practical printer, and in the spring of 1896 he received the appointment as instructor of the art of printing in the New York Trade School. On September 6, 1888, Mr. VanKeuren married Catherine E. VanNess, a daughter of P.V. and Celia (Reynolds) VanNess, to which union have been born two children, Ralph H., and Helen. In politics Mr. VanKeuren is a Republican, and has served as burgess of Mansfield. In religion, he is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, and is Past Master of Friendship Lodge, No. 247, F.& A.M.

[SRGP 75735] Sheridan E. Coles was born in Elmira, New York, June 14, 1854, a son of Samuel and Sarah J.(Ferry) Coles. His father is a native of England, and his mother of Tioga county, Pennsylvania. They are the parents of six children, viz: Stella, wife of L.L. Flowers, of Lamb’s Creek; Sheridan E., of Mansfield; Arthur and Samuel, both of whom are in the marble business in St. Louis, Missouri; Mary, wife of J.O. Spelman, of Rochester, New York, and William, with Rogers, Peet & Company, of New York. The subject of this sketch was two years old when his parents removed from Elmira to Wellsboro, Tioga county, where they remained until he was twelve years of age. He learned the printing trade in the offices of the Titusville Courier and Oil City Derrick, afterwards worked in Elmira, and for a time in the state printing office , Topeka, Kansas. In December, 1882, he came to Mansfield, and worked in the office of the Advertiser until July, 1885, when he became a partner of Frank E. VanKeuren, under the firm name of VanKeuren & Coles, who have since owned and published the paper. On March 23, 1881, Mr. Coles married Nora A. Stacey, a daughter of Mrs. M.A. Stacey, of Leona, Bradford county, who has borne him four children, viz: Edwin S., Percy A., Inez M., and Lora Aline. In politics, Mr. Coles is a Republican. He is a member of the Friendship Lodge, No. 247, F. & A.M., and of Mansfield Lodge No. 526, I.O.O.F.

[SRGP 86738] Joseph Schusler was born in Delmar township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, May 27,1839, a son of Frederick and Sarah (Sofield) Schusler. His father was a native of Germany and his mother of New Jersey. The former was born August 1, 1801, and came to America in 1819 and worked in a sugar house in New York City for many years. He then removed to Beaver Dam, New York, where he farmed until about the year 1836, when he came to Tioga county. Here he still continued to follow agriculture. He died in Mansfield, February 11, 1890. His wife was born in 1804, and died April 14, 1892. By a former marriage, he was the father of one son, Frederick, who now resides near Wellsboro. Six children were born of his second marriage, viz: Susan, Julia, Joseph, Sarah, Ella and Alice. The subject of this sketch was reared in Tioga county, and in early manhood engaged in railroading, first as fireman for two years and subsequently as engineer for sixteen years on the Tioga railroad. He then settled on a farm in Richmond township, where he lived ten years, when he traded it for property in Mansfield, which has since been his home. Mr. Schusler also owns a farm of forty acres near that borough. On March 4, 1897, he married Mrs. Amy D. Taylor, of Mansfield. In politics, he is a Republican, and has been a member of the borough council four years. He is connected with the Masonic order, and in all the relations of life is an exemplary citizen.

[SRGP 13574] James Argetsinger, a native of Montgomery county, New York, was born December 27, 1798. His wife, Catherine Winnie, a native of the same county, was born September 4, 1798, and became the mother of the following children: Hugh, a resident of Mansfield; Philip, deceased, who was born November 25, 1824; Sarah M., deceased, born November 15, 1826; J.G., a resident of Mansfield, born May 3, 1828; Hannah, born May 16, 1831; Jane M., deceased, born July 29, 1834; and Frank W., born October 18, 1836. Mr. Argetsinger came to Rutland township, Tioga county, about 1838, where he passed the remainder of his life. He died November 8, 1875, and his wife, September 19, 1883.

[SRGP 14846] Hugh Argetsinger was born in Montgomery county, New York, January 6, 1823, and is the oldest child of James Argetsinger. He was about fifteen years old when his parents located in Rutland township, Tioga county, where he grew to manhood on the homestead farm. In March, 1862, he married Sarah Baker, a daughter of Holland Baker, of Rutland township, who bore him one daughter, Nora, deceased wife of Frank Burdick. He married for his second wife, Elmina Prutsman, who died in March, 1871. On January 14, 1873, he married Helen Prutsman, to which union have been born two children, Charles L. and Roy J. Mr. Argetsinger resided on his farm of 150 acres near Roseville, in Rutland township, up to the spring of 1881, when he removed to Roseville, where he resided nine years. He then became a resident of Mansfield for the purpose of educating his children. In religion, he is a member of the Baptist church, and in politics, an adherent of the Republican party.

[SRGP 07670] Vardis Shaw was born in Plainfield, Massachusetts, in 1799, a son of Joshua and Sarah (Hawes) Shaw, who came to Tioga county in 1811. They settled at Lamb’s Creek, where Vardis grew to manhood. He married Eleanor Clark, a sister of Justus B. Clark, and soon after moved into Sullivan Township. He returned to the old homestead in 1838, where the remaining years of his life were passed. He died March 24, 1863, and his wife, April 22, 1859. They were the parents of the following named children: Julia, Cynthia, and Andrew, all deceased; Christina, who married Austin Bell, and after his death David Hart, now also deceased; David Porter, deceased; Maria, wife of William Althouse, of Oregon, Illinois; William M., and Daniel, the last deceased.

[SRGP 08275] William M. Shaw, a son of Vardis Shaw, was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, January 8, 1834, and was reared on the old homestead at Lamb’s Creek. In 1856 he went to Illinois and in 1857 to Doniphan county, Kansas, where he became a member of James Lane’s Free State army. He subsequently lived in Nemaha county. In 1861 he returned to Tioga county, and in October of that year enlisted in the quartermaster’s department of the Army of the Potomac, in which he served two years and seven months. On March 16, 1865, he married Emma Wells, a daughter of Benjamin and Eliza Wells, who bore him eight children, as follows: Benton, deceased; Della, wife of Jesse Garrison, of Job’s Corners; Blanche, wife of Howard Lewis, of Richmond township; Wells, Alfred, Nellie, William and Edna. After his marriage, Mr. Shaw settled on his present farm in Richmond township, where he owns a well-improved property of 180 acres. In politics, he is an ardent Democrat, and has served as supervisor of Richmond for ten years. He is also a member of the Mansfield Grange, and is one of the leading farmers of the township.

Peter Whitteker was born in Canada, April 14, 1796. During the War of 1812, his father was drafted into the British service. Peter went as his substitute, but not liking to fight against the United States, he deserted and took up his residence in Schoharie county , New York. There he met and married Ruth Lownsbery, a daughter of Isaac Lownsbery, October 13, 1816.She was born April 3, 1799. In 1818 Mr. Whitteker, his young wife and her father came to Tioga county and located at Canoe Camp. A Few years later he removed about two miles southeast of his first location, on Canoe Camp creek, which has since been the family homestead. Here he resided until his death, in 1877.To Peter and Ruth Whitteker were born the following children: Catherine, deceased wife of S.L. Barber; Seth, of Richmond township; Plyna, who died March 26, 1895;Ari, deceased; Matilda, wife of Russell Gillet, of Mansfield; Anna Maria, deceased wife of Samuel Goodall; Mrs. Susan Eaton, of Michigan; Barney, who lives on the old homestead; Lydia Jane, widow James Cudworth; Mary, deceased wife of E.W. Phelps; Olive, deceased; Nancy Margaret, wife of Morris Gillet, of Steuben county, New York; Albert Melville, a resident of Thayer, Kansas, and Amanda Melvina, wife of Alexander Mott, of Dalles, Oregon.

Seth Whitteker, eldest son of Peter Whitteker, was born in Canoe Camp, Tioga county, October 25, 1818. He was reared on the homestead farm in Richmond township, and attended the common schools in boyhood. On August 26, 1840, he married Ruhamah Robinson, a daughter of Erastus and Ruhamah Robinson, natives of Rutland county, Vermont. Eleven children have been born to this marriage, as follows: Sarah, Catherine, wife of Walter Phelps, of the Dalles, Oregon; Rosalie, and Candace, both deceased; Helena, deceased wife of Watson Phelps; Almeron, James, a resident of Richmond township; Anna, wife of Edward Thomas, of Amboy, and Lincoln, who lives near his father. In politics Mr. Whitteker is a Democrat, and has served as supervisor two terms, as school director eleven years and as auditor several terms. He has lived on his present farm nearly forty years. It was a part of the Bingham estate, and originally comprised of sixty-one acres, which he has added to by purchase until he now owns over 200 acres. Mr. Whitteker is one of the oldest living persons born in the township, as well as one of its most substantial and respected citizens.

Michael Fralic was born in Unadilla, New York, August18, 1802. Je was a millwright, and also followed rafting. In 1831 he came to Tioga county to erect a saw-mill for Daniel Sherwood and his sons on the Tioga river, one-half mile below Lamb’s Creek bridge. He followed lumbering for several years and then purchased200 acres of land two miles up Lamb’s creek, which he cleared for the timber. He lived on this tract up to 1852, when he removed to Lamb’s Creek. About 1858 he bought the old Gad Lamb water-power saw-mill of Hoard & Beach, and followed the manufacture of lumber until about 1860. He then retired from business, and was succeeded by his sons, Daniel L. and M.H., in 1866. who have since carried on the enterprise under the firm name of Fralic Brothers. Mr. Fralic married Angelina Lamb, a daughter of Daniel Lamb, son of the pioneer, Gad Lamb, to which union were born the following children: Jerusha L. and Rachel, both deceased; Daniel L., a member of the lumber firm of Fralic & Flower, Corning, New York, and of Fralic Brothers, Lamb’s Creek, and M. H., a resident of the latter place. Mrs. Fralic died in August, 1877, and her husband , December 24, 1885, aged eighty-three years.

M.H. Fralic, youngest child of Michael Fralic, was born in Richmond township, Tioga county, September 16, 1844, on what is now known as the Wilson Day farm in Lamb’s Creek Valley. From his youth up to the present he has been engaged in lumbering. The old mill being damaged by water in 1869, they built a new one in 1870, on the west side of the river, substituting steam for water power. Its daily capacity is 10,000 feet and the product consist of Lumber, Lath, Flooring, siding, etc. Mr. Fralic was married December 16, 1869, to Maria J. Doane, a daughter of Julius and Julia Doane, of Covington, Tioga county, who bore him four children, viz: Willard E., who is a setter in the mill of Fralic & Flower, of Corning ; Walter R., George D. and Harry B. Mrs. Fralic died in August , 1889,and he again married July 16, 1894, to Sarah Elizabeth Perry widow of William Perry. During the Rebellion, Mr. Fralic enlisted twice. He served six weeks in Company K, Thirty-fifth Emergency Men, and in the fall of 1864 again enlisted, in Company K, Two Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He served in the battles of Hatcher’s Run, Weldon Railroad and Appomattox. Politically, he was a Republican, and has served several terms as treasurer of Richmond township. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, of Lamb’s Creek, and also of Mansfield Post, No. 48, G.A.R., of Mansfield.

Welcome Jaquish was the oldest son of Joseph and Clarissa M (Reynolds) Jaquish, and was born in Delaware county, New York, May 22, 1816. In June, 1828, the family came to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and settled in Covington township, on the farm where Charles Jaquish now lives. Welcome was then twelve years old, and he assisted his parents in clearing up the homestead, on which he grew to maturity, and subsequently removed to the Cleveland settlement, in Sullivan township. On May 9,1841, he married Roxina Cleveland, a daughter of Aaron and Betsy Cleveland, of Sullivan township, and in 1847 they settled on the farm in the southeastern part of Richmond township, on which their son E.W., now lives. They became the parents of the following children: Avery W., deceased; Horace A., E.W., of Richmond; Permelia E., widow of James S. Jeliff; Clarissa M., who died January 13, 1883; Ada A., who died May 8, 1867; Elias, who died in June, 1886;Ira M., who died March 5, 1858;Ira R., who died in infancy; Floyd D., a resident of Sullivan township; Irene, who died January 3, 1862, and Emma R., who died September 10, 1864.Mr. Jaquish died upon the homestead farm in 1884, in the sixty-ninth year of his age.

E.W. Jaquish, a son of Welcome and Roxina Jaquish, was born on the homestead in Richmond township, Tioga county, June 12, 1847, and obtained a common school education. In 1870 he engaged in the meat business, running a wagon through the mining district for the accommodation of the miners, and five years later opened a meat market in Fall Brook. This he continues until the fall of 1884, when he settled on the old homestead. This farm, which in 1847 consisted of fifty-two acres, has been added to from time to time until Mr. Jaquish now owns 386 acres of land lying in Richmond, Covington, and Sullivan townships. He is one of the largest land owners and heaviest tax payers in the county and has accumulated this property by untiring industry and good management. On April 27, 1881, Mr. Jaquish married Martha Preston, a daughter of Daniel and Mary Preston, of Union township, who has borne him six children, as follows: Orrin W., Daniel P., Elvin W., Francis M., John J., and Harry, the last of whom died in childhood. In politics, Mr. Jaquish is an ardent Republican, and has served as township auditor. He is a member of the K. fo H. and the I.O.O.F. societies.

Orlando W. Watkins was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, August 4, 1860, and is the only son of S. and Sarah (Roblyer) Watkins. His father was a native of Columbia township, Bradford county, and was reared in that and Sullivan township, locating in the southwest county of the latter in 1859, where he made his home until his death, January 16,1889. His widow lives with her son in Richmond township. They were the parents of two children, Viz: Orlando W., of Richmond township, and Nellie, wife of F. W. Horton, of Covington township. The subject of this sketch received a common school education, supplemented later by a two years’ course at the State Normal School, Mansfield. He has devoted his attention to farming and lumbering, and is the owner of two farms, one of fifty acres, a part of the old homestead, and one of sixty-two acres on Canoe Camp creek, in Richmond township. The latter he purchased in 1889, and it is his present home. Mr. Watkins was married March 16, 1887, to Bettie Baity, a daughter of Edson and Rosalie Baity , of Sullivan township, and has two children, Edson and Lyle. In politics, Mr. Watkins is a Republican, and is also a member of Mainesburg Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. He is a progressive and enterprising farmer and stands high in the esteem of his neighbors.

Francis Flower was born in West Springfield, Massachusetts, August 14, 1811, a son of Alfred and Harriet Leonard Flower. His parents reared the following children: Eleanor, deceased wife of William B. Ripley; Sarah, who lives on the old homestead in Massachusetts; Lucius, deceased; Alfred, and Samuel, residents of West Springfield, Massachusetts; Francis and Harriet, the latter deceased. The father was a farmer, and a prominent citizen of Springfield. He served in the Massachusetts legislature, and was for a number of years a justice of the peace and overseer of the poor. He lived to the ripe old age of over ninety years. the subject of this sketch remained with his parents until the age of sixteen when he went to Hartford , Connecticut, where he clerked in a store until he was twenty-five. He then removed to Rochester, New York, and engaged in the grocery business, which he followed a few years later in Buffalo, where he also filled the office of justice of the peace. He spent several years in New Orleans, Cincinnati, and other places, prosecuting business ventures. In 1867 he came to Tioga county and became a member of the milling and lumbering firm of Flower & Waters, of which his brother Lucius was the head. This firm afterwards became Shaw, Flower & Company. They operated a saw-mill about a mile above the village of Lamb’s Creek, on the stream of the same name. About 1875 Mr. Flower located to Lamb’s Creek and opened a grocery store, which he still carries on. In 1881 he married Augusta A. Luther. Politically, Mr. Flower is a Democrat, and in religion, a Presbyterian. He is one of the oldest citizens of Tioga county, notwithstanding which he id in full possession of mind and memory, and quite an active and vigorous man.

B.H. Osgood was born in Chemung county, New York, April 11, 1852, and came with his parents to Charleston township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania in 1857. His father died in that township and his mother still lives there. They were the parents of seven children, as follows: Hannah J., deceased; Nathaniel, a resident of Charleston; Levi, who lives near Keeneyville; Frank a resident of Michigan; B.H., of Richmond township; Elizabeth , wife of Shuble Peters, of Elmira; and Mary, wife of Calvin Nixon, of Lawrenceville. The subject of this sketch received a common school education and in early manhood followed lumbering. About the year 1878 he purchased 113 acres of land on Pickle hill, which he still owns. Twelve years later he rented the old Asa Mann farm, north of Mansfield borough, now the property of R.W. Rose, which he has successfully cultivated in connection with his own homestead, and now ranks among the successful and progressive farmers of the township. Mr. Osgood was married April 6, 1872, to Elizabeth McConnell, a daughter of Henry McConnell, to which union have been born eight children, viz: Ruth, Clarence and Leonard, both deceased; Watson, Irvin, Levina, Eva, and Walter. In politics, Mr. Osgood is a Republican, and has served as a supervisor in Richmond township. He is also a member of the Mansfield Grange, and in religion, an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Sullivan Township and Mainesburg.

Samuel Reynolds came from Vermont about 1803, to Sullivan township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and was one of the first settlers in that part of the county. For the first few years after his settlement he, and sometimes his wife, was compelled to go to Williamsport on horseback to secure provisions and household necessaries for his family. There were no roads through Sullivan at that period, excepting mere bridle-paths cut out by the pioneers. He was married before coming to this county, in 1801, to Anna Mann, of Rhode Island, and brought his young wife into the wilderness of Sullivan township to share his trials and hardships. Ten children were born to them, viz: Mrs. Eliza Austin Draper, Thomas, Mrs. Phoebe Rew, Lyman, Mrs. Leonora Hazard, Mahala, Almeda, Asa and Joshua, all of whom are dead except Mrs. Hazard, who resides in Illinois. Besides rearing this large family, the parents secured a competence to protect them in old age, though it was acquired by the greatest industry and the most rigid economy. Mr. Reynolds and family were firm adherents of the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics, he was a staunch Democrat, and took an active part in political affairs. He died in 1843, aged about sixty years. His wife survived him eleven years, dying in 1854, aged seventy.

Thomas Reynolds second son of Samuel and Anna Reynolds, was born in Sullivan township, t county, February 25, 1808. He died October 3, 1896, and at time of his death was one of the oldest citizens of his native county . In boyhood he had no educational advantages, as there were no schools in his neighborhood at that early day, but through the passing years he obtained that practical knowledge of men and affairs which a man learns as he travels along the pathway of life. In 1832 he married Amelia Webster, of Sullivan township to which union were born four children, viz: VanBuren, Cyrus, a resident of Illinois: Lyman, deceased, and Nelson. Mrs. Reynolds died in 1851, and believing that his children needed a mothers care, he again married April 10, 1853, to Mary Moore, a daughter of James Moore, of Sylvania, Bradford county, who is the mother of one daughter , Mrs. Ella Rumsey. In politics Mr. Reynolds , was always an ardent Democrat, casting his first vote for Andrew Jackson for president. At the time of his death he was the oldest citizen in Sullivan township, and was in full possession of all his faculties, except sight. He possessed a most wonderful; memory, and his reminiscences of pioneer days and events were very interesting. He was postmaster of the office now known as Sullivan during President VanBuren’s administration , and also served as constable, collector , supervisor and justice of the peace. He assisted to clear the land now embraced within the borough of Mansfield , and particularly that portion on which the bank and Hotel Allen now stand. Mr. Reynolds and wife were members of the State Road Methodist Episcopal church, in which he was the first Sabbath- school superintendent, and which he helped to build and maintain. For many years he was class leader and steward of the church, but when his eyesight failed him, he was compelled to give up active church work. Mr. Reynolds was a man of progressive ideas and public spirit, upright in all things, and respected by the people of his native county.

James Gray, Sr., was born in Sharon, Connecticut, in 1760, and there grew to manhood. He resided a few years in Boston, Massachusetts, and then removed to Cooperstown, New York. In 1805 he came to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and located in what is now known as Gray’s valley, which was so named in his honor, where he bought 1,000 acres of land and paid cash for it. The place of his settlement is one of the prettiest and most fertile spots in Tioga county, and he was one of the earliest among the pioneers of the township. Little of his early life is known by his descendents, except that he served seven years in the Continental army, and thus did his full share toward establishing this free government. He was discharged, from the service with the rank of Captain. In 1785, he married Parthenia White, of Norfolk , Connecticut, who bore him a family of nine children, as follows: John, James, Silas, George W., Renssalear, Betsy, Mrs. Aurelia Ripley, Mrs. Evelina Rumsey, and Mrs. Melissa Reynolds. Mr. Gray was originally a Federalist and afterwards a Whig. In religion both he and his wife were of the Episcopalians. He died March 1, 1846, his wife having preceded him to the grave, in May, 1833.

James Gray, second son of James Gray, Sr., was born in Sharon, Connecticut, November 25, 1790, and removed with his parents to Otsego county, New York, in childhood. When he was fifteen years old the family located in Sullivan township, Tioga county, and his subsequent life was passed in Gray’s valley. On September 11, 1817, he married Maria Campbell, of Springfield, Bradford county, who bore him one son, Victor M., since deceased. Mrs. Gray died February 26, 1820, and on December 28, following he married Lorena Doud, who bore him six children as follows: Mrs. Isabella Reynolds, deceased; Lafayette; Mrs. Louisa Robbins, who lives at Corning; Mrs. Henrietta Young, deceased; Delaune, deceased, and Mrs. Lorancy Baker, deceased. Mrs. Gray died October 2,1833, and on May 19,1844, he married Martha Pinkham, of Tioga, who bore him one daughter, Mrs. Ida P. Webster, of Williamsport. Mr. Gray died July 25, 1860. His widow survived until July 10,1877, and died at the residence of her daughter in Williamsport. He was a Whig until 1828, when he supported Andrew Jackson for the presidency, and remained a Democrat until 1856. In that year he became a Republican, and voted that ticket until his death. For nearly twenty-five years he served as a justice of the peace, and was postmaster at Gray’s valley a long period. Mr. Gray and family were members of the Baptist church, in which he filled the office of clerk and deacon for many years.

Lafayette Gray, eldest son of James and Lorena Gray, was born on the homestead in Gray’s valley, Sullivan township, Tioga county, March 20,1824. He obtained a good common school education, and from 1846 to 1855 he taught in the public schools of the county. Since that time he has devoted his attention to farming, making dairying a specialty. On October 3, 1847, he married Amanda V. Haven, of Bradford county, who bore him four children, viz: James E., Wilton D., Mrs. Alice Rose, and Fred L., a resident of California. Mrs. Gray died February 8,1887, and he was again married May 19,1891, to Mrs. Aletta Baker, a daughter of Laben L and Nancy Rockwell, of Rutland township. Prior to 1856, Mr. Gray was a Democrat, since which year he has been an ardent Republican. He filled the office of school director about nine years, and both he and family are connected with the Baptist church.

Wilton D. Gray, second son of Lafayette and Amanda V. Gray, was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, January 31, 1853, and was reared upon the homestead farm. After completing his primary education in the district schools, he attended Wellsboro graded schools until 1870, since which time he has devoted his attention to farming. He was married October 22,1878, to Anna Rose, a daughter of Elliott S. Rose, of Sullivan township, and has two children, viz: Nellie, born October 9,1888, and Jessie, March 21,1892. Mr. Gray is a staunch Republican, and both he and his wife are members of the State Road Baptist church. He is connected with Mainesburg Lodge, No. 754, I.O.O.F., and takes a deep interest in public affairs. Mr. Gray is recognized as one of the progressive young farmers of his native township, in which his entire life has been passed.

Paul Cudworth was born in Massachusetts, there grew to manhood and married Sarah Drinkwater, a native of the same state. Their children were Paul, Apollos, Samuel, James, Mollie, who married Hanover Pitts and Susannah, who married Noah Rumsey, Sr. Mr. Cudworth removed with his family to Vermont, remaining there until about 1808, when he came to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and settled in Sullivan township. He and his wife were pioneers of that locality and passed the remaining years of their lives in Sullivan.

James Cudworth, Sr., son of Paul Cudworth , was born in Massachusetts, August 17,1795, and came with his parents to Sullivan township, Tioga county, when about thirteen years old. He served as a drummer boy in the war of 1812 . Soon after arriving at his majority he married Anna Doud, a daughter of Peleg Doud, one of the pioneers of Sullivan township. She was born September 17,1799, and bore him the following named children: Jerome B., of Mainesburg; Sarah Ann, widow of Edward A. Fish, of Wellsboro; James and William, both deceased; Julia Ann, and Paul C., a resident of Michigan. Mr. Cudworth Died April 18,1836, on the farm now the home of his grandson, James C. Cudworth. His wife died January 16,1866.

James Cudworth, a son of James Cudworth, Sr., was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, August 17,1826, and there grew to manhood. He obtained very little schooling and spent his early life upon a farm. On May 30,1849, he married Lydia J. Whitteker, a daughter of Peter Whitteker, of Richmond township, who became the mother of three children, viz: Julia L., born September 17,1851, wife of J.W. DeWitt; Virginia L., born October 7, 1853, wife of C.F. Parkhurst, and James C. Mr. Cudworth removed to Mainesburg in 1885, entering into partnership with his son-in-law, J.W. DeWitt, in the mercantile business. He remained in that business until March, 1892, when he sold out and returned to his farm, where he died July 16, 1892. His widow resides in Mainesburg. He was a member of the Cherry Flats Baptist church, to which his family also adheres. In politics, he was a staunch Democrat, and during the Rebellion he gave both time and money liberally towards raising troops to defend the flag and preserve the Union.

James C. Cudworth was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, May 3, 1863, on the farm which he now owns and resides upon. He attended the district schools in boyhood, and afterwards the State Normal School at Mansfield. After working on the homestead farm five years, he formed a partnership with J.W. DeWitt and engaged in merchandising at Mainesburg which business he followed for two years. In 1886 he purchased the old homestead and has since given his attention to agriculture. He makes a specialty of dairying, keeps from twenty to twenty-five cows, and is one of the partners in the Mainesburg Co-operative Creamery. Mr. Cudworth was married May 12,1882 to Grace Maine, a daughter of Dr. G.D. Maine, of Mainesburg, and has two children, Katie E. and Charles J. He is an ardent Democrat, and has filled the office of school director. In religion, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, of Mainesburg, to which society his family also belong, and is held in high esteem by his neighbors.

Peleg Doud, a native of Hubbardton, Vermont came to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, about 1808 or 1809, and settled in Sullivan township. He was married in Vermont to Isabella Rumsey, to which union were born ten children, eight in Vermont and two in Sullivan township, viz: Millie, who died in youth; Sally, who married John Gray; Betsey, who married Roswell Webster; Lorena, who married James Gray; Anna who married James Cudworth, Sr.; Lurancy, who married Levi Rexford; Philemon, Munson, Peleg W. and Ripley H. Mrs. Doud died in 1814. Her husband survived until about 1840, dying at a ripe old age. Mr. Doud was one of the first settlers in Sullivan township. For many years he was a deacon in the Baptist church and services were often held at his house. In politics, he was a Whig.

Rev. Peleg W. Doud, was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, May 29,1810, a son of Peleg Doud. He was reared on the farm and obtained his education in the common schools. For many years he was a minister of the Free Will Baptist church, and also a member of the church board of officers. On. December 25,1832, he married Amanda R. Packard, a daughter of John and Rebecca Packard, of Sullivan township. Five children were born to this union, viz: Warren, Hobart R. Omer P., Annie, and Helen, wife of Daniel F. Rumsey, of Sullivan. In early life he was a Whig, but has been a Republican since the organization of that party. He is now one of the oldest living persons born in Tioga County.

Russell Rose was one of the first settlers in what is now Ward township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania. He was born in Connecticut, June 11, 1753. Little is known of his early life , but at the age of twenty-three he enlisted in the Continental army and served throughout that struggle for liberty. While in camp at Valley Forge he was promoted to serve as an aide on Washington’s staff, and did good and efficient service. After the war was over he returned to Connecticut , where he married Phoebe Orvis , who bore him two children, Achsah and Phoebe. Mrs. Rose died in November 1786, and in March, 1788, he married Lydia Orvis. She was born in Norfolk, Connecticut, March 20,1764, and became the mother of eight children, as follows: Daniel, Sophronia, Rexford, Crippin, Enos, Rebecca, the widow of John Packard, who now resides in Covington, Tioga county, at the extraordinary age of 101, being the only survivor of the family; Lydia, and Phoebe. Mr. Rose and family came from Connecticut to Tioga county in 1807, and located in the midst of an unbroken forest, in what is now Ward township, but soon afterward removed to Sullivan township, and settled on the State Road. With the assistance of his children, he rapidly cleared off quite a snug little farm, and at his death, June 1, 1830, he was one of the best known men in the county. In politics, he was originally a Federalist, and afterwards cast his fortunes with the Whig party. Both he and wife were members of the Baptist church. She survives her husband over a quarter of a century, dying June 3, 1857. It is stated of Mr. Rose that during President Monroe’s administration, he went a foot to Washington, D.C., to see why his pension had been withheld from him. On his arrival the officer in charge said he could not attend to his case until the next day, but Mr. Rose threatening to go to the President direct, he promptly rectified the matter, and the old veteran returned home as he had gone, arriving-there none the worse for his long tramp.

Daniel Rose, eldest son of Russell and Lydia Rose, was born in Norfolk, Connecticut, May 16,1789, and there grew to manhood. He came to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, two years after his father, and settled in the eastern part of Sullivan township, on what is now the State road. He enlisted in the war of 1812, and served until May, 1814, when he married Sally Elliott, a daughter of Nathaniel Elliott, of Covington, Tioga county. She taught the first school opened in Richmond township. Eight children were born to this marriage, viz: James M., Elliott S., Mrs. Sally Ely, Russell B., Mrs. Clarissa Wheeler, Daniel , Enos, and one that died in early youth. Of these Elliott S. and Russell B. are living. The family were connected with the State Road Baptist church, in which faith the parents lived and died. In politics, Mr. Rose was an enthusiastic Whig, and a great admirer of Henry Clay. He died February 4,1852, in his sixty-third year. His wife survived him over eighteen years, dying August 26,1870, in the seventy-eighth year of her age.

Elliott S. Rose, second oldest son of Daniel and Sally Rose, was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, June 18, 1817. He attended the districts schools in boyhood, obtaining but a limited education, and later engaged in farming, which with the exception of about twenty years spent in buying and selling cattle, he made his life vocation, his specialty being dairying and sheep raising. Mr. Rose was married October 28,1841, to Laura A. Morgan, a daughter of Dennis and Betsy (Black) Morgan, natives of Blanford, Massachusetts. She was born in Blanford, February 2, 1824, and was only eight years old when her parents settled in Sullivan township, Tioga county. She is the mother of four children, all of whom are living, viz: William Pembrooke, Warren D., Anna, wife of Wilton D. Gray, and Morgan E. Mr. Rose is a leading member of the State road Baptist church, and has been an officer in that body for many years. On October 28, 1891, Mr. and Mrs. Rose celebrated their golden wedding , and it is said by one who was there, that “a more pleasant and happy couple could not be found in Tioga county.” Mr. Rose can look back with pardonable pride on a successful business career and a life filled with good deeds and kind actions.

William Pembrooke Rose was born on the old homestead in Sullivan township, Tioga county, December 4, 1846, and is the eldest child of Elliott S. and Laura A. Rose. After completing the common school course, he attended the State Normal School at Mansfield until 1865. He then entered the Commercial College at Binghamton, New York, from which he was graduated February 3, 1867, thus completing his education. In 1869-70, he conducted a store at Fall Brook, Tioga county. He afterwards returned to the farm in Sullivan township, on which he remained until 1886, when he and M.F. Rose purchased a store in Mainesburg , and carried on the mercantile business there for six years. After retiring from that business, he and his brother, Warren D., under the firm name of Rose Brothers, commenced buying and shipping to the eastern markets hay, Grain and all kinds of farm produce, in which they have been highly successful and still continue. Mr. Rose was married November 25, 1870, to Harriet Palmer, a daughter of Nathan Palmer, of Sullivan township, Tioga county, and has one son, Elmer N. Mr. Rose and wife are members of the Baptist church, in which he fills the office of clerk. He is a staunch Republican, and has held nearly every office in Mainesburg at different periods, including the office of postmaster during Harrison’s administration. He is one of the oldest members and Past Grands of Mainesburg Lodge, No. 754, I.O.O.F., is recognized as a substantial and successful business man, and is held in high esteem by the best people of the community.

Warren D. Rose, second son of Elliott S. and Laura A. Rose, was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, February 2, 1850, and grew to manhood upon the homestead farm. He obtained a common school education, later attended the State Normal School at Mansfield, and began teaching when but sixteen years of age, following that vocation in Sullivan Township six years. In the mean time he devoted some attention to his farm duties, also began buying and shipping live stock. He subsequently entered into partnership with his brother, William P., for the purpose of buying farmers’ produce, in which line they have done a very large business, being to-day among the extensive dealers in the county. Warren D. has also been a successful live-stock buyer for twenty-five years. Mr. Rose was married October 22, 1872, to Alice Gray, only daughter of Lafayette Gray, of Sullivan township, and has four children: Edith, a graduate of the State Normal School at Mansfield , in the class of 1895, who is now engaged in teaching; Fred E., Warren Gray, and an infant son. Mr. Rose is a staunch Republican, and has served as township treasurer for several years . He and family are adherents of the State Road Baptist church, in which he fills the office of trustee. He is looked upon as one of the most energetic and worthy citizens of his native township.

Morgan E. Rose, youngest son of Elliott S. Rose , was born on the homestead in Sullivan township, Tioga county, February 26, 1859. After completing a common school education, he took a course in the State Normal School at Mansfield, and then settled down on the farm life. He manages about 400 acres of land, including his father’s homestead, and has devoted much time to stock raising . He is also engaged in business in Mansfield, as a dealer in coal, wood and builders’ supplies. On December 20, 1882, he married Nellie Miller, a daughter of Darwin D. Miller, of Sullivan township, and has one daughter, Edna. He and his wife are members of the State Road Baptist church, in which he has been superintendent of the Sabbath-school for several years. In politics, Mr. Rose is a Republican, and is one of the progressive farmers of Sullivan township. 


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