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Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
Tri-Counties Newspaper Clippings

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Bradford County PA

Chemung County NY

Tioga County PA

 

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Joyce's Search Tip - February 2010 

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Do You Know that you can search just the 700 pages of Clippings and Scrapbooks on the site by using the Clippings button in the Partitioned search engine on the Current What's New Page?  
You'll also find obituary and other newspaper clippings using the three county-level Obits by Cemetery buttons. Additional clippings can be found in the Birth, Marriage, and some other partitions. 

 

Tri County Clippings- Page Twenty - Four

HOW TO SUBMIT OBITUARIES TO THIS SITE - Typed obituaries may be submitted by email to Joyce M. Tice either in the text of the email or by an attached file. PLEASE put OBITUARY SUBMISSION in the subject line of your email to help me sort the several hundred emails I receive weekly. Give your file an eight character name - do NOT call it OBITS or it will overwrite someone else's file. Make sure your full name is included so I know whom to credit. Submissions will be arranged alphabetically by SURNAME AT BIRTH, so make sure I know the correct birth name if you know it. If surname at birth is not known, married name or other alias will be indexed in parentheses. Also include the death date and newspaper if you know it.

Some Clippings from this scrapbook have been moved to the Obits by Cemetery section

CASS, Willis M. Accidentally Shot. A very sad accident occured at Cleveland's Corners last Thursday afternoon. It seems that Willis M. Cass, a son of Mart Cass, Esq. of this place, went out to shoot a chicken and finding a flock together laid his rifle down and took up a stone which he threw into the flock in order to scatter them, and drawing his gun up quickly, the piece was discharged, and the contents passed through his head entering just back of the right ear. The accident occurred about three o'clock and the young man died about five. Dr. Townsend, of Covington, was summoned and the ball was extracted but the poor boy was almost "over the river" before the ball was reached. Willis was a general favorite in this place and his sudden death causes great sorrow. What makes it still more sad is the fact that he was married on Christmas Day to Miss Mertle Cleveland, daughter of O. Cleveland, Esq., of Cleveland's Corners where the sad accident occurred. The funeral took place last Saturday at 2 o'clock in the Christian Church at Canoe Camp, the ceremonies being conducted by Rev. E. E. Morris of Mainesburg, who only twelve days before had united him in marriage as above stated. A large number of his friends from here followed the remains to their last resting place. 


Anniversary dinner - Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo CURRENof Wells, Pa. entertained the following guests at dinner Sunday, February 21: Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Dix and children, Delecea and LaRue; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Peterson and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Eaton. The occasion honored the ninth anniversary of the marriages of Mr. and Mrs. Eaton and Mr. and Mrs. Curren. 


DEWEY--- Orrin Emery Dewey died at his home in Troy, Pa., at 1 o'clock Tuesday morning, Nov. 22d, aged about 30 years. He had been ill of typhoid fever four or five weeks. His recovery was hoped for until about ten days ago. Deceased was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Dewey of Canoe Camp, and made this place his home until about two years ago when he became the owner of a photograph gallery at Troy, in which business he was successfully engaged at the time of his death. He was one of the most popular young men in this locality, and the announcement of his early death will be recieved with universal regret. He leaves a young wife to whom he had been married two years, three sisters and one brother as follows: Mrs. John Kelly, of Mansfield; Mrs. Floyd Phelps, of Covington; Mrs. Urbanis Whiting and Elmer Dewey, of Canoe Camp. The funeral will be held from the M. E. church in this place at 8 o'clock Thursday afternoon. 


FELLOWS - Mrs. Alonzo M. Spencer. Mrs. Alonzo M. Spencer of Canoe Camp died at half past one this Wednesday afternoon. She had been ill a long time of consumption. She was a daughter of Erastus Fellows, deceased, of Wellsboro. Her brother, N. W. Fellows, of Springfield, Mo. is here. She leaves a husband and one son, aged fourteen. The funeral has not yet been arranged.

IN MEMORIAM. March 7, 1888 Mrs. Alonzo M. Spencer, of Canoe Camp, Tioga Co., Pa., was born at Wellsboro, Jan. 19, 18--(illegible), and died Feb. 22, 1888. Her maiden name was Mary Edna Fellows, daughter of Erastus Fellows, who for many years kept a temperance hotel in the county seat of Tioga Co., Pa. In her childhood she with her older sister, now wife of E. J. Purple, Wellsboro, sometimes attended the Methodist church with her mother, who still lives, a charter member of that church and I think the oldest inhabitant born in that town. Her name in early childhood was enrolled a member of the Sabbath School of the Presbyterian church, where I became her pastor and first became acquainted with her. I remember her as a very sweet child there, and very attractive at her old home, the penalty of which she had to pay by receiving many, perhaps some, unwelcome kisses. In 1856, when only sixteen years old, she with more than fifty others, all of them older than her, united with the Presbyterian church of her native town. It is the opinion of her pastor that if her seniors, who joined her on that joyful communion occasion could feel that they had fulfilled the confession they then made as faithfully as she did, they would be quite satisfied. It was a very pleasant occasion on the 5th of January, 1869, when she was united in marriage with Mr. Spencer at the old hotel in the presence of a large company from different parts of the county. The families of both parties had been among the oldest citizens of the county. Official and business relations had accumulated a large acquaintance at the old hostelery, so the invitations were many. No one doubted that the bride of that occasion would fully meet her part of the engagement. Nineteen years has confirmed all good expectations and wishes of her many friends. With health not firm she was a help and comfort to her husband, a good mother to her boy and household and a kind neighbor. A letter from her brother who had come from Missouri to attend her last sickness written by her request just before she died, says: "I want my old minister who baptized me and married me, to bury me if he can do it," and then he adds "Mary has taught me how to live and how to die a triumphant Christian's death. Her last words were the most impressive sermon I ever heard, from the words of her Lord when he was going to the cross, "Thy will be done." She tried at stop them all from weeping for her as she had nothing but thankfulness in her heart for the love of her friends and the infinitely greater love of her Savior. "So fades a summer cloud away, So sinks the gale when storms are o'er, So gently shuts the eye of day, So dies a wave along the shore." J. F. Calkins. East Avon, N. Y., March 7, 1888 


James A. FELLOWS (SRGP 08125) was born in Poultney, Rutland county, Va., June 30th, 1803, and at the age of six came with his parents to Ward township, this county. In 1815 his parents moved to Sullivan, where he continued to reside until his death on Wednesday, June 11th. He was married in 1829 to Mary daughter of Thomas Ballard, of troy, who survives him. He leaves also one daughter, Mrs. George Fletcher, of Springfield, Pa., and three sons; B. A. Fletcher, of the state of Oregon; James, of Henrietta, N.Y.; and T. W. Fellows of Sullivan. 


FERGUSON, Herbert - Died at Burlington, Jan. 24th, Herbert Ferguson. His remains were brought to Austinville for burial on Friday, 27th. He was a member of Austinville Lodge I. O. O. F. also of Illion Encampment at Sullivan and a member of the Grange. All three of these societies were represented at the funeral, the two former draped in regalia, the latter with mourning badges. The burial ceremonies were conducted under the control of the Austinville Lodge and were conducted with great solemnity and respect. There were members present from five subordinate lodges and one encampment, and paid their last respects to their departed brother. The Rev. Dr. Bullock preached the sermon from the 5th chapter of Romans, no particular verse but read the chapter and commented upon such portions as he deemed appropriate. 


Miss Francis R. HILL - Miss Francis R. HILL of 314 Broadway died this morning at 5 o'clock after an extended illness. She was a member of the Tahoma Council, Degree of Pocahontas, and the Patriotic Sunshine Circle. Miss Hill is survived by her parents Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Hill, and a brother, Allen B. Hill of this city. The funeral will be announced. 


Wedding- with large picture of wedding party----- Principles in Local Weddings Occurring During July Above is a picture of the participants in the Merrill-Monroe wedding party, which took place July 28 at the Oakwood Church in Elmira Heights. As they appear in the picture the are, from left Leon Stroud, usher, Miss Arlene Fritsch, bridesmaid; Graydin Monroe, bridegroom; Mrs. Graydon Monroe, the former Miss Elsie Merrill; Miss Bernice Monroe, maid of honor; Orlo Merrill, best man; Miss Mae Merrill, bridesmaid, and Ward Ham, usher. 


SMITH - Mrs. Mary A. Hale - Mrs. Mary A. Hale, 88, a sister of Mrs. Thomas Smith of Elmira, died Wednesday night at the home of Mrs. Margaret Perrin in Batavia. The funeral will be held at the home of Mrs. Perrin in Batavia Sunday afternoon. 


TUTTLE --- At her home at Gifford, McKean county, Pa. Aug. 9, 1887, of hemorrhage of the bowels, Ida Adel, beloved wife of R. E. Sanders, aged 33 years 11 months and 10 days. Deceased was the eldest daughter of Hiram B. and Alida Tuttle, of Canoe Camp, Pa. Her illness extended over a period of thirty-nine days. Of her five children the eldest is fourteen years and the youngest seven months of age. Her husband, to whom she was married Dec. 21, 1870, also survives her. She was a member of the Christian church located near her birth place, a loving wife and a devoted mother. Funeral services were held at Canoe Camp on Saturday, Aug. 13th, Elder M. S. B---- officiating and the remains were taken to Covington- for burial ---------- (remaining illegible). Mansfield Advertiser, 17 Aug 1887, Page 3, Col 6


OBITUARY. MINNIE M. VAN NESS Minnie M. VanNess, youngest daughter of Peter V. and Celia VanNess, died suddenly at her father's home on Main St. in this boro, Wednesday evening, March14, 1888, aged 21 years. She was born in Rutland, Oct. 5, 1866. Minnie was known in her childhood as frail in health and loving in disposition. She graduated at the State Normal School with the class of 1887. Under the pastorate of Rev. H. C. Moyer, she was converted and baptized in 1879, and became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church Sept. 18, 1887. Services of burial were held at her late home and at the M. E. church Saturday afternoon conducted by her pastor, Rev. W. S. H. Hermans, assisted by Rev. W. D. Taylor and Prof. J. T. Ewing. Elaborate and beautiful tributes of flowers by loving hands prepared and offered, and the large gathering of the people manifested the appreciation of the community of her life and character, as well as their sorrow for her unexpected death which was a great loss not only to the family, but to the Alumni of the Normal, the boro of Mansfield and the Church of God.


(VAN VALIN) - Mrs. Sarah A. Van Valin. We find in the Bellefonte Watchman of Feb. 21st, an announcement of the death of Mrs. Sarah A. Van Valin, wife of J. W. Van Valin, aged 62. The family were former residents of Mansfied, having removed from here to Unionville, Pa., some twelve years ago. Six children and the father survive. Deceased was an aunt of Miss Maggie Phillips of this village and many friends still reside here who remember her kindly. The eldest son, Frank J., now residing in Vineland, N.J., thus answered the letter which conveyed to him the sad news: I have read your letter, dear father, And moistned its pages with tears; How memory with fond recollections Runs back to my infantile years.

My mother, shall I see her no more, Has she passed forever away From kindred and loved ones too, To mingle again with the clay!

Shall I never greet her again In the old far-away valley home? 'Mid the pines that beud o'er the door, And form there an evergreen dome.

Can I go to the haunts of my youth, And enjoy all its pleasures once more; Robbed of the form of my mother, Who nursed me in glad days of yore?

Yes, fain would I go home, father, And visit her grave in the dell; 'Neath the tree by the side of our Willie, Under the sound of the church going bell.

But a solace that's greater than all, To her motherless child is given - To know that her spirit is freed, And now safely housed in heaven.

Though my sorrow by now so severe, I will cease to weep or complain, Knowing that a few years at most, Will bring us together again.

Father, a light has now gone from thy home; A dear form has gone from thy room; Her voice you no longer shall hear - A sad stillness deepens the gloom.

But cheer up, faint not by the way, Stand firm to the hard belting blast; In short time you ? ? the port, And life's trails forever be past. 


WHEELER, J.C. Terrible Accident in Wellsboro. On Friday last Wellsboro depot was the scene of a shocking accident by which one of its best citizens, Mr. J.C. Wheeler, was killed almost instantly. The sad circumstance is thus related by the correspondent of the Sunday Telegram: It appears that Mr. Wheeler was standing on the platform or plank walk, between the main track and the switch track, which leads to the round-house. He was watching the "bob-tail", which was running in the freight cars from Stokesdale Junction on the main track. At the same time the engine of train 1, which arives here at 12 o'clock, was slowly backing down the switch. Mr. Wheeler stood facing the "bob-tail" train, near one of the rails of the switch track, and it is supposed that, owing to the deafening noise of the incoming rrain, he failed to hear the approaching engine. He was struck on the side by the tender and knocked toward the main track. It seems as if he realized that he was going to fall under the freight train and in staggering back towards the switch he struck the rail, falling half way across it, the wheels of the train passing over his body near the waist, completely severing the trunk from the lower portion of the body. The tender was thrown from the track and the engine stopped. The remains presented a sickening spectacle, making many a strong heart shudder, and it will be long remembered by those who witnessed it. The different sections of the body were gathered up and removed to the express room in the depot, where they were viewed by large crowds of the friends of the deceased. Some portions of the innards were strewn along the track and were gathered up on a shovel. The annoucement of the terrible accident created considerable excitement and has cast a deep gloom over the entire community. We have been informed that only a few minutes before Mr. Wheeler received the fatal blow, in a reply to a remark made by Mr. Mel Gray (who was standing nearby), that an unusual number of trains were running through Wellsboro now a-days. Mr. Wheeler answered "yes, and a person has to be mighty careful here and look out for his life." Another person who was standing near where Mr. Wheeler fell upon the track heard him exclaim "hold back, for God sake!" 


ANDREWS, Claude - Retired Area Mailman To Be Honored - Gillett - A reception honoring H. Claude Andrews will be held tonight in the South Creek Elementary School from 8 to 10. The affair marks Andrews' retirement, Jan. 1, after 44 years as a rural carrier on Rt. 2 for ---and the area.

Starting with a horse and buggy, or a cutter, he encountered many difficulties in the winter when backroads were seldom ever plowed.

Several times, he recalled, the ---ppletree on the cutter broke and the horse took off. How--- the deep drifts were as disparaging to the mare as to the cutter and she was soon captured and returned to duty.

The deep snow also slowed delivery of the mail and many times he was forced, with the aid of a lantern or flashlight, to continue far into the evening.

When Model T Fords made their appearance he shifted to the mechanized method of transportation. With chains and a shovel he fared pretty well. Seven years ago he purchased a jeep which further alleviated winter trails. But even now he regards the horse and cutter as the most dependable, of much slower, method of delivering mail on snow banked roads.

"Why, when I had a car," Andrews said, "I used to tramp to the nearest farm and get a farmer to pull me out of a drift with horses!"

Andrews, who was 70 Dec. 12, is enjoying his new found leisure and disclaims any hobbies, except fishing in which he expects to indulge this spring and summer.

Mrs. Andrews, he said, keeps him fairly well occupied splitting wood and stoking the kitchen stove. Although most of the cooking is done on an electric range, Mrs. Andrews has clung to a huge, old wood burning stove used for warmth in the winter and on which she prefers to prepare certain items of the family meals.

During the course of his former duties he has lent a hand along the route, pulling others out of snow drifts, helping to round up escaped horses and cows, and doing errands for isolated families whenever possible.

A son, Burton Hall, also is a rural carrier, covering Rt. 1.

The public is invited to attend the reception. Refreshments will be served and a surprise program is planned. - By: Helen Lepkowski 



BEEBE - IN RECOGNITION of 27 years as service as Clerk of Town of Candor, C. Arthur Beebe was presented with a gift by members of the Town Board. l. to r. Mrs. Leo Yeier, Town Clerk; C. Arthur Beebe; John Bartow, making the presentation; and Supervisor of the Town of Candor, Charles Brewer pictured. The presentation took place at a testimonial. 



Ex-Millport resident is ordained

The Rev. Michael Burcynski formerly of Millport, was recently ordained into the Baptist ministry at services held at the Hillcrest Baptist Church in New Albany, Miss.

Mr. Burcynski, following his ordination, began serving as pastor of the Flat Rock Baptist Church near Hickory Flats, Miss. 


Phoenixville Service of Recognition and Installation of The Reverend David J. Burrows as Pastor Church and Gay Streets Phoenixville, Pennsylvania

Meet Our Pastor - David J. BURROWS - Born in Portadown, N. Ireland. Attended the Portadown Public and Technical Schools. Emmanuel Theological College, Birkenhead, England. Immigrated to the USA in 1951. Became a citizen in 1956. Has served three Pastorates in the state of Pennsylvania. He accepted the call to lead our church in December 1972, coming to us from the First Baptist Church of Malvern, a suburban church on the Main Line Philadelphia. He is married, the father of three sons and a daughter. Preaching sincere dynamic messages with a delightful "Brogue". Ready to offer counsel relating Christianity to your problems. Interested in Community Development. 


CRIPPEN - "He practices what he preaches," said a lifelong friend of the Rev. Orey E. CRIPPEN of Roseville.

Children call the 73 year-old circuit preacher "Uncle Orey." Friends say he "belongs to everyone."

After performing 397 wedding ceremonies and officiating at 1, 170 funerals in his 44 years of service the Rev. Mr. Crippen is now "talking about retirement."

The silver-haired Baptist minister began his career in 1919 at the Lawrence Corners and Bailey Creek Baptist churches.

Tioga and Bradford County residents known him well. "I have married couples, their children and now I'm waiting of the grandchildren," quipped Mr. Crippen.

Since he preached his first sermon at the age of 26, the congregations that have known him will attest to the fact that "when you need him, he is always there."

His dedication to the church has not passed unnoticed. In 1956 Mr. Crippen was recipient of the annual Town and County Award.

A citation accompanying the award credited him for creating a "very wholesome Christian atmosphere . . . due to the respect the community has for this Baptist minister."

The award also cited Mr. Crippen for accepting and carrying out "with real dignity many responsibilities in the Pennsylvania Baptist ----.

Born in Rutland Township, the son of farm parents, he developed an interest in church work while serving as a Sunday School superintendent.

Most of the people in Rutland Township know that Mr. Crippen has held the Roseville Baptist Church pastorate for 14 years. Not all realize this is the third time he has served the church.

In 1920 he assumed charge of the Roseville church and the same year served the Coryland Federated Church. In 1922 a third pulpit was added to the circuit preacher's busy schedule - the Austinville Baptist Church.

The early years weren't easy. His wife, the former Martha Frost of Roseville said that at the start of his ministerial career her husband had charge of four pastorates while working as a full time rural mail carrier.

The Crippens have two daughters, Mrs. Rex Faulkner of Tioga and Mrs. Richard DeGeus of Gillett.

It wasn't until 1928, one year after being assigned the Tioga Borough, Holiday and Hammond Baptist Churches, that Mr. Crippen was ordained. His theology training was gained through correspondence courses from Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. He also attended Keuka College while it was a co-educational school.

Some of the many churches he has served are the Wells and Columbia Presbyterian Church of Columbia Cross Roads; the Columbia and Wells Baptist Church; the East Smithfield Circuit which at the time was the East Smithfield, Springfield and Bentley Creek Churches (Bradford County).

A statement made by Mr. Crippen indicates that quitting is actually alien to his philosophy; "There are many hard experiences; problems hard to solve."

Coryland and Roseville Baptist Churches will probably hear Mr. Crippen's interpretation of Christianity for many Sundays. - by Jim Lowman 


DOUGLAS - in San Andreas, May 3, 1968. Georgana L. Douglas, wife of Lynn of San Andreas, mother of Linda and Sharon of San Andreas and Norma Homan of Chinese Camp, Tuolumne County, sister of Coleen Homan, also of Chinese Camp; a native of San Francisco, aged 37 years. Graveside services were held today 



HOLLENBECK - SCOTT - PARENTS KILLED IN CRASH - The Rev. and Mrs. Robert L. HOLLENBECK of Midway, PA, formerly of Candor, were killed in a two-car crash near Pittsburgh, PA Friday night. Mrs. Hollenbeck if the former Virginia SCOTT of Candor. The Hollenbecks had four children. In the background (picture) with Mr. and Mrs. Hollenbeck is their son, Scott, 11. Other members of the family in the foreground are: Shelley, 5; Lucinda, 9; and Steven, 7.

Doris Hollenbeck of Ary, KY; a brother, Gerald Hollenbeck of Catatonk,, and several nieces and nephews.

Mrs. Hollenbeck, formerly Virginia Scott, is also survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Erie Scott, of Zephryhills, FL.

Funeral services will be held at 3 pm, tomorrow at the Richards Funeral Home in Owego, with the Rev. Robert Kern, pastor of the Community Bible Church, in Aliquippa, PA, officiating. Burial will be in Tioga Cemetery. - 


HE PLEADS FOR CHANCE TO SERVE COUNTRY- Lester Judson, Telegraph Operator at Pine Valley, Who still Bears Scars of Serious Injury, Grateful When Accepted for Limited Service. Pleading for an opportunity to do something for his country in spite of the fact that he had been rejected because of physical imperfections, Lester Judson of Pine Valley, telegraph operator for the Pennsylvania Railroad at that place, appeared before the Chemung County Selection Board today. "It is true that I once had a broken spine and a part of the bone in my right was grated into the spine in order that I might recover, but for all of that I am a physically strong man today, and I am a telegraph operator and able to do much for my country. Can't you please find something for me to do? Is there not a place in which I may fit? Women can do the work at the little Pine Valley station just as well as I, and the woman who could work there would not be able to go in the war zone and do the work I am able to do there." Said the Operator Judson to President Wynkoop of the county board this morning. Operator Judson registered for the federal draft in 1917. He is now 25 years old. He did not claim exemption because of dependents, nor did he as for deferred classification. When examined by the physicians they found an enlarged vertebrae near the center of the spine. This was considered sufficient to disqualify the young man for military duty. Today, when Judson appeared before the board, he asked for another examination. He told how he had been injured several years ago, when a boy at his home in Gillett, Pa. He said he had been in a runaway, had sustained a severe injury to his spine, and had been taken to a hospital in Philadelphia where a portion of bone was taken from his right leg and grafted into the injured vertebrae. Judson then went to Millport and there learned telegraph operating. He was at first given extra operating work along the local division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Since he has worked in every office between Canandaigrua and Williamsport, Pa.,. including the Southport yard office in this city. About one year ago he was made the regular operator at Pine Valley. After the young man had made his plea Dr. C. N. Hammond, examining physician for the county board, gave the boy another physical examination and passed him for limited service. "Thank God, I'll get in the service at last," said Judson as he left the rooms of the county board. "Yes," said Chief Clerk Bush, "We'll let you know just as soon as we get a call for limited service telegraph operators and will sent you to service." 


OMAN - Douglas, Georganna - Angles Camp - Graveside services for Georganna L. Douglas, 37, of San Andreas, will be held at 11 am tomorrow at the Altaville Protestant Cemetery.

Mrs. Douglas died late Friday after a long illness in San Andreas. She was a native of San Francisco who had lived in San Andreas for 10 years.

She is survived by her husband, Lynn; two daughters, Linda and Sharon, all of San Andreas; her mother, Mrs. Norma Oman; and a sister, Colleen Oman, both of Chinese Camp. Bigelow-Gualdoni Chapel is in charge of arrangements. 


ROOT, Rev. Charles - Gillett - The Rev. Charles Root is a busy man, probably too busy to realize that from all of his activities and community efforts has evolved a reputation born of his unusual ability to be in so many places in the course of one day.

"He;s one of those 'always willing' kind," says Mrs. Leda Lewis of Gillett. "Some people promise to help at something, then make excuses, but Rev. Root promises and always fulfills then," she explained.

Rev. Root is a perpetually busy man-busy helping others.

His past record supports these statements. He has been a preacher for 28 years. In those years has had been pastor at the Gillett and Fassett Baptist Churches, Bentley Creek and Springfield Baptist Churches and is presently pastor at the Coryland Baptist Church.

Besides this he has been postmaster of the Gillett Post for 10 years.

He came to Gillett 25 years ago. As George Oldroyd friend, remembered it, "He came into town in an old beat up car that barely got him here, and he's been working like crazy ever since."

One of this first projects, Mrs. Anna Mae Welch recalls was when "He dug out the basement of the patronage at Gillett to put a furnace in so there would be central heating. He did it by himself and used to get up at 3:30 am to be able to get it done . . . He installed the furnace himself to save on cost."

Rev. Root also helped build the Fassett churches.

He is a past member of the Gillett Lions Club, and a post secretary for the Board of Supervisors. Presently he is a board member of the White Deer Valley Baptist Camp in Allenwood, PA, treasurer for the Cemetery Association and a master at the Gillett Grange.

"He's always available for any jobs that need to be done and you can't do them yourself," Rev. Dwight Anderson said. "He's not afraid to tackle anything."

"If he's got five minutes - and that's usually all he's got with everything he's in - he'll give you that five minutes, " Oldroyd said.

"It wouldn't be the same town without him," Mrs. Lynn Maynard said. "He's a very nice person to know, and an awful man to work for. I help him sometimes at the post office and I've never seen him get mad - never in my life!"

Mrs. Welch pointed this out, "The first thing that strikes me about him is that whatever time of ay or night you need to help, he is there. Whatever time the call comes in, Rev. Root is the first one to respond." 


ROY-PETERSON

The South Presbyterian Church was the scene of one of the prettiest weddings of the season Wednesday, at high noon, when Miss Mildred Elizabeth , eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wisner Roy, was united in marriage to H. Earl Peterson of Pine City. The church was beautifully decorated with ferns, golden rod, and daisies, the rostrum of the church being blanked with them. At the end of each pew down the center aisle of the church a bouquet of wild flowers was fastened. Professor A. L. Brooks of Kingston-on-the-Hudson, an uncle of the bride presided at the organ and rendered a musical program before the wedding. "The Bridal Chorus" from "Lohengrin" was rendered as the bridal party entered the church, and Mendelssohn's "Wedding March" at the close of the ceremony. Just preceding the ushers were the little ribbon bearers, Donald Keinzie and Florence Fish, dressed in white, who stretched the ribbons down the center aisle through which the bridal party passed to the alter. First came the ushers, Leon and Louis Harrington, Earl Golden and Ira Tuttle: then the bridesmaid, Miss Doris Embler, gowned in canary and white, satin, and carrying white wild flowers, followed by Jeanette Prechtl, in white and she carried the wedding ring in the heart of a large rose. Then the honor maid, Miss Lillian Nimtz, a cousin of the bride, came in dressed in pale green satin and carrying a bunch of yellow wild flowers; following came the little sister of the bride, Clara Louise Roy. Her dress was white organdie. As flower girl, she scattered flowers before the bride. Then the bride came in on the arm of her father, who gave her in marriage. Her gown was of white georgette crepe, with pearl trimmings. Her tulle veil was held in place by white rosebuds. She carried a shower bouquet of Bride roses and white sweet peas. They were met at the altar by the bridegroom, and his best man, Lewis M. Roy, brother of the bride. The Rev. H. A. Depfer, pastor of the church, preformed the ceremony, using the ring service. After the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the bride on upper Pennsylvania Avenue. The house also was beautifully decorated in the same colors as were used in the church, yellow and white. They received their guests before a bank of palms and yellow and white flowers. A wedding dinner followed at which seventy guests were present. At the bride's table, covers were laid for seventeen. The bride was the recipient of many beautiful presents, consisting of linens, cut glass, china, and silver. They left on a wedding trip by auto, going to Buffalo and Niagara Falls. The bride's going away gown was a blue serge suit, with a hat to match. They will be at home after September 1, in Pine City. Among those from out of the city attending the wedding were Professor and Mrs. A. L. Brooks and son, Ralph Stewart Brooks, f Kingston-on-the-Hudson; Mrs. Frank Custard of Central Valley; Mr. and Mrs. George Chamberlain, Buffalo; Mrs. Hannah Rhodes, Big Flats; Mr. and Mrs. Louis Peterson, Big Flats; Mr. and Mrs. George White, Horseheads; Mr. and Mrs. Lyman White, John and Myrtle White, Millerton Pa. 


SULLIVAN, Ruby A. - of 398 W. Morris St., Bath, NY formerly of Elmira. Funeral was held Tuesday at 1 pm, at the Olthof Funeral Home. The Rev. Austin Matthews. Pallbearers: Jerry Canfield, Charles Carlson, Jack Fish and Ralph Rumsey, Woodlawn Cemetery. 



AVERY - Henry M. Avery- of 420 Broadway, died Sunday evening, Feb. 6, 1938/ He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mildred Avery; three daughters, Mrs. {risilla Campbell of Corning; the Misses Patricia and Lucille S. at home; a son Henry JR., at home; the mother Mrs. Maggie r. Avery and brother, William Avery, both of Seeley Creek. The body is in the Wilson funeral home and 


A BASHFUL PROPOSAL MR. DACEY. - Mary Ann! MISS. FLYNN. - Pfwhat is it Conn Dacey? MR. DACEY. - Doan' ye t'ink Father Mc Grath ud be gettin' lonesome wid th' slathers o' funerals he's been havin At th' choorch? 


DAGGETT---- A good many from this place attended the birthday party of Mrs. Ira Daggett and son Edson, at Mosherville, last Friday night. Dacing was the amusement of the evening. It was largely attended and was an enjoyable affair. Brewer's orchectra furnished the music.

DAGGETT, Lewis--- Lewis Dagget of Lawrenceville, having reached the age of 75 years, has drawn half the face of hos policy of insurance in the Equitable Aid Union, amounting to $800.

GARRISON/ SHAW--- Married at Pine City, N.Y., Sunday Oct. 26th, 1800, by Rev. Dewitt Myers, Mr. Jason Garrison, of Job's Corners, and Miss. Delta Shaw of Mansfield, Pa..


BAKER--- Penn Yan, N. Y., March 3,-- A very sad event occurred in our village Sunday, it being the funeral of Mr. And Mrs. Chas S. Baker. The cause of both deaths was pneumonia, the death of Mrs. Baker occurring on Wednesday, and that of Mr. Baker on Friday of last week. The funeral service of both husband and wife were held at St. Marks Episcopal church, from whence the remains were conveyed by special train over the Fall Brook road to Dundee where the interment took place. 


Birth: To Mr. and Mrs. Fred Balmer of Southport, October 7, at St. Joseph's hospital, a daughter, Margaret Lillian.



BLOOD - (SRGP 73421)  Hosea Blood, father of Herbert Blood late of Wells, and Henry Blood, of Roseville, died at Austinville Sept. 26th, in the 72d year of his age.

BOWERS--- George Bowers, a resident of Pine City, died last Saturday. He was well advanced in years, was an invalid, and lived with a son-in-law, Norman Wright. The funeral was held last Monday. 




CURTIS---- The funeral of Mrs. Curtis, who died last Friday, was largely attended on Sunday at Jackson Centre Church, Rev. Paul Smith officiating.

DALRYMPLE--- Mrs. Dalrymple, of Washington avenue died during the past week while her husband and little son were patients at the Arnot-Ogden hospital. The lad is yet unacquainted with his mother's death.


EATON - W. A. Eaton Hit by Auto; Fatally Hurt- Pine City Man Dies after Being Struck by Car Driven by John R. Plate- Victim Struck in Front of Own Home- To Hold Inquest. Struck by an automobile as he was turning into his home with his arms full of groceries, William A. Eaton, 51, of Pine City was killed instantly about 5:40 p.m. Saturday. John R. Plate, (illegible) of Pine City R. D. 3, driver of the car which killed Mr. Eaton, told county police he was driving north on the Elmira-Pine City highway, in Pine City, when the accident occurred. ( A picture of William A. Eaton) Another automobile proceeding south skidded on the slippery road, swerved toward his car and forced him toward the ditch on the west side of the Highway, Plate said. He declared he did not see the victim until the right front fender lifted him from the ground. Mr. Eaton was then thrown toward the top of the Plate car, his head stricking the body of the machine on the right side of the windshield. He then fell to the ground and was dragged about 10 feet. He had been walking in the same direction as the car was traveling and was about to turn into the yard of his home when struck. John Plate and his brother, Fred, who was riding with him, carried Eaton's body into his home, where Mrs. Eaton was watching for her husband and waiting for the groceries. Mr. Plate said he was driving about 30 miles an hour and stopped his car within 40 feet of the spot where he hit Mr. Eaton. County police reported they had examined the automobile and found that the brakes and lighting system were in good condition. To Hold Inquest County Cororner Charles S. Dale, who was called on the case by county police, said the man had died instantly of a fractured skull. He will hold an inquest at a date to be announced later. Deputies Sheriff Grant Thorn and Truman Burnham investigated. 



HULSLANDER - CRIPPEN - The home of Mrs. Florence Crippen was enlivened Wednesday evening, July 27th, 1892 by the marriage of her daughter Helen, to Mr. William E. Hulslander, by Rev. Fisher Wilson of Austinville. Mrs. Lue Seers presided at the organ. The bride was attended by Miss Nellie Andrews. The groom by Mr. Walter Furman. The young couple were placed upon the sunny side of life, by many useful and beautiful presents. The following friends were present, Mr. Elijah Hulslander and wife, Mr. Raymond Gernert and wife. Mr. Andrew Moore and wife, Mr. William Seers and wife, Mr. Elmer Cunningham and wife, Er Frank Cropser, Lydia Buckbee and Lottie Nichols. 


At the house and attended by a large concourse of relatives and friends. It was estimated that four hundred people were in attendance. The Baptist choir of Springfield furnished the music and Rev. Emma E. Bailey, the Universalist minister of Troy, delivered the sermon form the text: "And I am not alone, for the Father is with me." John 16:32. The body was laid to rest in the township cemetery near the home. May those who cared for him so tenderly, the devoted daughter-in-law, the grandson and wife, and all who mourn find consolation in the faith that cheered and strengthened this kind and noble man, and realize in their own experience the truth of the Saviour's words, "Blessed are they that mourn, for they shall be comforted." E.E.B.

Small Boy's Outing. A mother sent her small boy into the country, and after a week of anxiety, received this letter: 'I got here all right and forgot to write before. A feller and I went out in a boat and the boat tipped over and a man got me out and I was so full of water that I didn't know nothin' for a good long while. The other boy has to be buried after they find him. His mother came from Lincoln and she cries all the time. A horse kicked me over, and I have got to have some money to pay the doctor for fixin' my head. We are going to set an old barn on fire tonight, and I should smile if we don't have bully fun. I lost my watch and am very sorry. I shall bring home a tame woodchuck if I can get 'em in my trunk." -The Church Review.

FOSBURG - The funeral of Mrs. Betty Fosburg Teeter, of Elmira, aged 20 years, 8 months, was held at Col. X Roads on the 23rd inst., at 2 o'clock. She died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Dolly Brown, in Sullivan county, Pennsylvania. She left an infant two weeks old. Sermon at her funeral by Rev. T. Mitchell. Text:-1st Thess. 4-18. 


HE PLEADS FOR CHANCE TO SERVE COUNTRY- Lester Judson, Telegraph Operator at Pine Valley, Who still Bears Scars of Serious Injury, Grateful When Accepted for Limited Service. Pleading for an opportunity to do something for his country in spite of the fact that he had been rejected because of physical imperfections, Lester Judson of Pine Valley, telegraph operator for the Pennsylvania Railroad at that place, appeared before the Chemung County Selection Board today. "It is true that I once had a broken spine and a part of the bone in my right was grated into the spine in order that I might recover, but for all of that I am a physically strong man today, and I am a telegraph operator and able to do much for my country. Can't you please find something for me to do? Is there not a place in which I may fit? Women can do the work at the little Pine Valley station just as well as I, and the woman who could work there would not be able to go in the war zone and do the work I am able to do there." Said the Operator Judson to President Wynkoop of the county board this morning. Operator Judson registered for the federal draft in 1917. He is now 25 years old. He did not claim exemption because of dependents, nor did he as for deferred classification. When examined by the physicians they found an enlarged vertebrae near the center of the spine. This was considered sufficient to disqualify the young man for military duty. Today, when Judson appeared before the board, he asked for another examination. He told how he had been injured several years ago, when a boy at his home in Gillett, Pa. He said he had been in a runaway, had sustained a severe injury to his spine, and had been taken to a hospital in Philadelphia where a portion of bone was taken from his right leg and grafted into the injured vertebrae. Judson then went to Millport and there learned telegraph operating. He was at first given extra operating work along the local division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Since he has worked in every office between Canandaigrua and Williamsport, Pa.,. including the Southport yard office in this city. About one year ago he was made the regular operator at Pine Valley. After the young man had made his plea Dr. C. N. Hammond, examining physician for the county board, gave the boy another physical examination and passed him for limited service. "Thank God, I'll get in the service at last," said Judson as he left the rooms of the county board. "Yes," said Chief Clerk Bush, "We'll let you know just as soon as we get a call for limited service telegraph operators and will sent you to service." 


KIMBALL--- Mr. G. W. Kimball, of Bradford, Pa., was a caller at the ADVOCATE office last Wednesday. He came from Bradford on a sad errand, that of burying his wife, who died on Monday of last week at Warren, at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. Dennis Cornen. Mrs. Kimball was a daughter of Charles Edsall, a pioneer of Jackson township who will be well remembered by our older citizens. She was fifty-two years old at the time of her death. The funeral services were held on Thursday of last week at Mrs. Amanda Dunning's, a cousin on Franklin street, Elmira. Mr. Kimdall has since been visiting friends in Elmira, Southport and Jackson. He formerly lived in Elmira, but has been a resident of Bradford for the past thirteen years, where he is highly respected. He ia a veteran of the 141st N.Y. Vols., an old sailor, and was one of the first to reach California when gold was discovered there, a trifle in advance of the "49ers." His has beena most eventful life, and he promises our readers some interesting reminiscences soon. He is the recipient of sincere sympathy in his bereayement, which bears upon him with crushing force.

KNAPP---- Attorney W. E. Knapp, of this city, mourning the death of his father, Elisha Knapp, who died at Wellsburg, Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Knapp was a highly esteemed citizen, having served as justice of the peace for the town of Ashland many years. His death will sincerely mourned. 


MAC NAIR--- Andrew Mac Nair died Thursday at his home, No. 402, South Broadway, aged sixty-nine years and six months. Deceased was born in Philadelphia and was an artist of some re own in both that city and Elmira. He leaves twp children, Rachael G. Mac Nair and Mrs. M.R. Cheisier, of this city. Deceased was member of Southern Tier lodge of Odd Fellows of this city, under whose direction the funeral will be held this afternoon at 2:30 from his late residence. 


SARGENT - STRONG In Springfield, by Rev. T. Mitchell, Feb 18, 1891, Dwight M. Sargent and Mary D. Strong, both of Springfield. 


Married. SHAW-BURRITT - In Elmira, N.Y. June 28th, by Rev. A. G. Cameron, Louis P. Shaw of Altus, Pa., to Miss Verna N. Burritt of Sylvania, Pa. 


(Sitzer) - Mother's Anniversary is Celebrated - Sunday, May 13, a family dinner was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Congdon, Pine City, in honor of the 77th birthday of Mrs. Congdon's Mother, Mrs. Benjamin Sitzer. Mrs. Benjamin Sitzer was born in Bradford County, Pa., May 14, 1851. Mrs. Sitzer was united in Marriage to Benjamin Sitzer Feb. 22, 1866. Mr. Sitzer was born in Schoharie County Dec. 23, 1840, and came to Chemung County in 1864. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Sitzer, Mr. and Mrs. Owen Mc Naney, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Congdon, Helen Congdon, Mr. and Mrs. Jardon Sheive, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Manwaring and daughter, of Johnson City; Mr. and Mrs. William Sharp of Elmira; Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Sitzer, Lynn Sitzer, Pine City; Leah and Ruth Sitzer of Blossburg.


SMITH-----(1895) The Rev. Dr. Samuel Francis Smith, author of the hymn "America" is dead. Death came suddenly to Dr. Smith, without premonition or warning. Accompanied by Mr. Williams, of the Baptist Publication society, he entered a car at the New England railroad station, Boston. The train was to leave at 4 p.m. for Readville, where Dr. Smith was to preach last Sunday, in the interim being the guest of Mr. Williams. The train left on time, but Dr. Smith was dead Five minutes before the starting of the train. Dr. Smith turned round in his seat to address his companion. He half opened his mouth, then gave a gasp, and, throwing his hands up, fell back on the seat. He was carried to the women's waiting room by Conductor Hunt, the gateman, brakeman and Mr. Williams. They laid him carefully down, but he was dead. The crowd tried to force its way into the room where the dead man lay. General Martin, who chanced to be there on his way home, at once ordered Dr. Smith's removal to the Emergency hospital. An ambulance from there came, and the body was taken to the hospital, while Mr. Williams, grief-stricken, went to Newton Center, Dr, Smith's home. Dr. Smith's body was placed in the morgue at the hospital. The morgue ia a little room at the back. The dead man lay there as if he but slept. His face bore a calm, peaceful expression. If death had been sudden, it had also been easy and painless. Dr. Smith's death caused genuine grief throughout the United States. He had thousands of friends all over the country, who admired him for his genial personal qualities and high patriotism. Dr. Smith was a little over eighty-seven years old, having been born in Boston October 21, 1808. He graduated from Harvard in 1829, and was a classmate of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. He then attended Andover Theological seminary, graduating from institution in 1832. During his last year at Andover he wrote "America" and Morning Light is Breaking" and many other poems. He was pastor of the First Baptist church at Waterville, Me., from 1834 to 1841; pastor of the First Baptist church at Newton, Mass., from 1842 to 1854. In the latter year he received the degree of doctor of divinity. He was editor of the Christian Review from 1842 to 1849; and editor of the Baptist Missionary Magazine from 1854 to 1869. He was busy minister of the Gospel and literary worker for more than half a century, and during the time he on more than twenty occasions read original poems on anniversary days. In 1875-76 he spent one year in Europe. In 1880he, with his wife, visited their son, the Rev. D.W. Appleton Smith, missionary at Rangoon, Burmah. In the fall of 1882 Dr. Smith and his wife went to the western states, visiting a son at Davenport, Ia. In January, 1883, they visited another son at Englewood, Ill.. They with that son, visited Mr & Mrs. Edward Roby and other friends in Chicago, until after Decoration day, May 30, when they returned to their home at Newton Center, Mass.. While in Chicago, Dr. Smith made a full copy of patriotic hymn, and presented it to his friends. 


(Stewart)---- Mrs. Eliza Stewart, widow of Chester Stewart, died at her home in West Jackson on Wednesday of last week, aged sixty-seven years. Mrs Stewart was a deserving of the very high esteem in which she held. Her husband was a mayor od Deming Port., A. R. Died a year ago. She was at Dryden, Orange county, N. Y.. For many years has lived in Jackson, with her devotion as a wife and mother and her traits as a neighbor and friend won the affection and esteem that join in sorrow at her death. She leaves five children: Mrs. Charles Anderson and Mrs. Walter H. Dickinson of Jackson, Pa., Charles B. Stewart of Caton, N.Y., Dr. J.W. Stewart of Big Flats, and Dr. Chester F. Stewart of Bath. 


STRYKER - Wm. Stryker, one of Troy's oldest and most respected residents, died Thursday evening, aged 83 years. Mr. Stryker received a stroke of paralysis four years ago this month and has been confined to the house most of the time since. About five weeks ago he was taken with the grip, and in his enfeebled condition he was unable to survive the attack. Probably no man if Troy was more highly thought of and respected than "Uncle Billy." A most kind and generous neighbor, faithful in every duty, fair and square in all business matters, -- and a more honest man never walked our streets. He had a great many friends who will sympathize with his daughter Miss Angie, who is thus left alone. The funeral will be held today, Saturday, at 2 p.m. 


WYVILL--- Mrs. Janet Adams, mother of the editor of the Advertiser, accompanied by her son, E. L. Adams, went to Canamlaiga Wednesday to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. Margaret Gibson Wyvill, who died in Cleveland, Sunday, aged seventy-eight years. 



 

Bradford County PA

Chemung County NY

Tioga County PA

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Published On Tri-Counties Site On 09/25/98
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