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Tri County Clippings- Page One Hundred Eighty One

Obituary and Other Clippings submitted by Alice PEASE Hartford

These obituaries are presented in scrapbook order. I can't think of a better way of understanding a community than by reading an obituary scrapbook.
KIMBLE - MRS. JESSE NEWTON.  Funeral of MRS. MINA R. NEWTON, who died Monday morning (Nov. 5, 1934) at her home on the Post Creek Road following an illness of three months; will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Post Creek School House, with the Reverend Edward Scholtz, of the Beaver Dams Methodist Episcopal Church officiating, assisted by the Rev. Frank B. Hayes, of Chambers.  The service will be preceded by a prayer service at the late home for the immediate family.  Burial will be in Post Creek Cemetery.   MRS. NEWTON was born in the Town of Catlin, May 17, 1866, the daughter of AMOS and MARIE (PAUL), KIMBLE.  She was married July 27, 1889 in Big Flats, to JESSE NEWTON who survives.  Practically all her life was spent in the Town of Catlin with the exception of the past 2 years when she lived in Post Creek.  Possessing a cheerful disposition she was highly regarded by a host of friends.  She was a devoted wife and mother and a generous friend and neighbor.  She was a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church.  Surviving are besides her husband, four daughters,  MRS. PAUL SWARTWOOD of Ithaca, MRS. AMOS KIMBLE of Post Creek, MRS. C. B. TEETER  of Johnson City, MRS. MAX HURD of Elmira Heights, two sisters, MRS. CASSIE MILLER, and MRS. ESTHER BENJAMIN of Big Flats, 3 grandchildren, CARL HURD of Elmira Heights and MYRON and IRENE TEETER of Johnson City.

Also the funeral of MRS. MINA R. NEWTON was held Wednesday afternoon with a prayer service for the members of the late family at the late home in Post Creek followed by services in the Post Creek School House at 2:30 o'clock.  The Rev. Edward Scholtx, paster of the Beaver Dams Methodist Episcopal Church, officiated, assisted by the Rev. Frank Hayes, Wesleyan Mehodist pastor.  The school house was filled to capacity, for the funeral, attesting to the high esteem in which MRS. NEWTON, was held in the community.
 Internment was in Post Creek.  The bearers, all nephews, were, WILLIAM BENJAMIN, LOU SMITH, RAYMOND BENJAMIN, FRANK KIMBLE, SAMUEL KIMBLE, and EARL CANFIELD.  Unknown which newspaper (presumed to be the Corning Leader).

NEWTON, MRS. MANDANA NEWTON KIMBLE, 76, died at the family home on the Middle Road, Town of Veteran, Wednesday, March 16, 1938 at 3 p.m.  After a nice week's illness of pneumonia and complications.  Born DANE NEWTON at Big Flats, MRS KIMBLE was the daughter of JAMES and RACHEL (RANDALL) NEWTON.  She spent most of her life in the Town of Big Flats and had lived at the present residence for more than 15 years.  Before that time she and her husband owned a farm near Big Flats.  She attended the  Wesleyan Church of Odessa.  She is survived by her husband, LEVI KIMBLE, four children, BENJAMIN of Ithaca, SAMUEL of Millport, FRANK and MRS. MABEL K. NORRIS at home; a sister, MRS. AGNES SHERWOOD of Ithaca, 17 grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.  The body is in the Horton Funeral Chapel, Odessa and will be removed to the family home Thursday.  The funeral will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Odessa, the REV. J. FRENCH and REV. CLARK LACELLE will officiate.

NEWTON - JESSE NEWTON
Aged 69, Died at the home of his daughter, MRS. AMOS KIMBLE, Beaver Dams, R.D. #2, Wednesday night, Jan. 26, 1938, at 10:20 o'clock.  He had been in ill health for the past several years, but was not confined to bed until 2 weeks ago when complications arose.  He was born at  South Mountain, Canton, PA., May 9, 1868, son of JAMES and RACHEL RANDALL NEWTON.  Though most of his life was spent in this vicinity, when his health permitted, he followed the occupation of farming.  July 28, 1889 at Big Flats, he married MINA KIMBLE, whose death occurred 3 years ago.  He had resided at the present address for the five years.  Survivors are the following,four daughters, MRS. AMOS KIMBLE at whose home he died; MRS. PAUL SWARTWOOD of Ithaca, MRS. MAX HURD of Elmira Heights, MRS. CALVIN TEETER of Johnson City, 3 grandchildren, CARL HURD of Elmira Heights, MYRON and IRENE TEETER of Johnson City, two sisters, MRS. LEVI KIMBLE of Horseheads and MRS. AGNES SHERWOOD of Ithaca.  The body will be removed Friday morning from the Phillips Funeral Home to the residence at Beaver Dams.  Services will be held at the Wesleyan Methodist Church at Charmbers, Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m.   The REV. JOHN W. LEWIS of the Beaver Dams Methodist Church will officiate, assisted by the REV. W. GURNSEY, pastor of the Wesleyan Church.  Burial will be at Post Creek Cemetery.  The Evening Leader, Corning, Thursday, Jan. 27, 1938.

Submitted by - ahartfor@stny.rr.com (Alice Hartford)

Memorial Tribute published in the pages of the Corning Leader, Nov. 26, 1976.

Ellsworth C. Pease Obit

Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. today at Phillips Funeral Home in Big Flats for Ellsworth C. Pease, 77, of 2068 Harris Hill Road, Big Flats. He died Tuesday in Arnot Ogden Hospital in Elmira following an extended illness(cancer). Born in Big Flats Feb. 18, 1899, he was the son of William N. and Mary A. Helm Pease. He was married to Lulu Brown, who survives. A lifelong resident of Big Flats, he was a retired toomaker with 21 years of service at the former Eclipse Tool and Die Co. Surviving in addition to his wife are two sons, Norman Pease of Big Flats and Robert Pease of Elmira; a stepson, Raymond Brown of Kansas City, Mo.; two step-daughters, Mrs. Pauline Rosensteel of Overland Park, Kan. and Mrs. Frances Mahoney of Kansas City, Mo.; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The Rev. Dr. Joseph Scahill, pastor of the Big Flats United Methodist Church, officiated at the funeral. Burial will be in Rural Home Cemetery. The family requests that memorial donations be made to the American Cancer Society. Submitted by granddaughter, Alice (Pease) Hartford ahartfor@stny.rr.com
Elmira Star-GazeMemorial Tribute published in the pages of the Corning Leader, Nov. 26, 1976.

tte Feb. 12th, 1961Memorial Tribute published in the pages of the Corning Leader, Nov. 26, 1976.

"Hooking Rugs a Hobby at 86"

A whiz at hooked rugs at the age of 86? Yes, you'd be amazed to see how dexterously William N. Pease of Millport RD1, hooks a rug with steady and skillful hands. He'll be 87 in September. In the past 10 years, he has made about 100 rugs--all beautifully done in various designs and colors. And he's fast at it too. It usually takes him about three weeks to complete a 3 by 5 foot piece. He also develops his own designs and dyes the rags.

Living alone at his farm home on the Johnson Hollow Road, Pease picked up the hobby at the age of 76 after his wife died and he was left alone at home. "It has given me something to do," explains Pease, still spry and active. "Besides hooking rugs is an art which gives me the pleasure of creating something." Now his home is filled with the rugs--on the walls, over the fireplace and stacked high on a bed.

The elderly man takes pride in what he has accomplished and gladly shows his creations to visitors. His pride and joy is a rug with the Sermon on the Mount as the theme. The octogenarian can tell a story about each of the rug designs he has created. Some are mountain scenes and others are of animals, Indians, villages and red school houses. One rug was made of rags threaded from 600 stockings he collected from neighbors, friends and relatives.

What's he going to do with the rugs? "Well, just keep them," he replies. "I don't want to sell them. I couldn't get back what I have put into them. Besides I like to look at them and show them to people." Of 100 rugs he has made, he has given away only about 20, mostly for wedding gifts to his children. He has three grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Besides hooking rugs, Pease also raises gladiolus as a hobby. Last year his glads won him a blue ribbon at the Chemung County Fair. Asked about his good health and longevity, Pease, leisurely puffing a cigarette replies, "Hard work won't hurt anybody."

Even at his advanced age, he still walks about a mile a day for exercise. If bad weather prevents him from going outside, Pease is often found pacing back and forth on his own porch.

Born in Big Flats, Pease farmed most of his life and has lived at the present house for 43 years. He still reads a lot each day. He cooks for himself and enjoys canning food. His only son, Ellsworth Pease of Harris Hill Road, brings groceries to him once a week. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, great-grandaughter. ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Published in the pages of the Corning Leader August 11, 1971.

W.N. Pease, 95, Former Big Flats Farmer, Dies

William Nelson Pease, 95, of Johnson Hollow Road, Millport RD 1, one of the oldest Big Flats natives, died the morning in Heritage Park in Elmira where he had been a patient for a month. He had previously been a patient in the Breesport Infirmary since September of 1966.

Born in Big Flats Sept. 23, 1875, he was the son of Wallace W. and Lidia Helen Cowan Pease. His wife, Mary Ann Helme, died Dec. 10, 1950. Mr. Pease was a self employed farmer in Big Flats. He was born where the present New York State Nursery is now located and his farm is now Rural Home Cemetery. He was a former welfare officer for the Town of Catlin and a member of the Moreland Grange.

Surviving are: a son, Elsworth C. Pease of 2068 Harris Hill Road, Big Flats; two grandsons and three great grandchildren. Friends may call at Phillips Funeral Home in Big Flats Friday from 1-2 p.m. Funeral services will follow in the funeral home at 2 p.m. with the Rev. Donald Roe of the Big Flats United Methodist Church officiating. Burial will be in Rural Home Cemetery. Submitted by great granddaughter, Alice (Pease) Hartford ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette, August 18, 1925

"Last of Civil War Vets at Big Flats Wields Hoe on Farm at Ninety-Four"

William W. Pease of Big Flats has the distinction of being the last survivor of the Civil War residing at Big Flats. Mr. Pease is still hale and hearty at 94 years old and was found by the camera-man digging potatoes on his farm!

When the call to arms came in 1861, more than 50 husky young men went to the colors from the village of Big Flats. Among these was Mr. Pease. Today they have all answered the last call, and only Mr. Pease remains to tell the story. He tells it in an interesting manner.

In a few days Mr. Pease will be 94 years old. He still does much of the labor on his farm. A long row of potatoes had been uncovered by his hoe when the reporter interrupted. It is difficult to realize that the man is 94 years old, for he hardly seems 60.

Corporal Pease enlisted in the Third New York Light Artillary, Company K, serving under General Burnside. He was at the first battle of Bull Run, although his company was not called into action at this angagement. After serving his enlistment, he returned home and RE-ENLISTED!

While on line duty, his company was surrounded by hundreds of Confederates and taken prisoner. He was taken to Belle Isle, where he endured the horrors of prison camp for four months, and was then sent to Andersonville. The prisoners were transferred to Savannah and then to Milan, Georgia. As Milan was in the direct route of Sherman's army, the Confederates ran the prisoners out of the "pen."

There were 5,000 prisoners with Corporal Pease. While they were being conveyed out of Sherman's reach, the engine on the train broke down, and they were hidden in a Florida forest.

Without rations for many days, scurvy broke out. Mr. Pease caught the terrible disease, which broke out in his mouth, making his imprisonment horrible. It is miraculous that he survived, for he could not chew food. At the end of the war, they "bummed" their way from Jacksonville, Fla., back to New York State.

Of the 32 men captured from Mr. Pease's company, only three lived to get out of the camps. A soldier named Taylor, of Auburn, enlisted with Pease, fought with him, re-enlisted with him, was captured with him and released with him. They returned home together. A few years ago Taylor was killed by an automobile.

Mr. Pease married when he returned from the war, has two sons and five grandchildren. The Civil War veterans of Big Flats formed the Wallace Cheley Post, No. 40, until their numbers grew so small the post was disbanded. And today only Mr. Pease remains of these gallant warriors.

When the reporter had finished with him, Mr. Pease took up his hoe again and went back into the potato field. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, gr-greatgranddaughter. ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette, Friday August 31, 1928

"Big Flats Vet, 97, is given Birthday Party"

About 60 friends of Wallace Pease attended his 97th birthday party at the family home Monday evening. Talks were given by Prof. N.J. Lowe of Tottenville, Long Island; H.B. Updyke of Elmira; former Mayor Harry Rood of Corning and Oscar Kahler of Big Flats; Mrs. E. Eastabrook told a war story.

Attending were:

Wallace(William)Pease, Mrs. L. Pease, Miss Eucie, Julia, Dorothy Pease, Mr. and Mrs. William Pease, Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth Pease, Mary Helen and Norman Pease, Mrs. W. B. Helm, Millport; Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Rood, Mrs. Lee Force, and Miss Grace Ludwig, Mr. and Mrs. S.J. Stoner, Mr. and Mrs. H. Mitchell, Mrs. A. Fuller, Corning; Mr. and Mrs. George Walsh, Mr. and Mrs. M.R. Dunham, Miss Eleanor Dunham, Mr. and Mrs. William Jones, Robert Jones, Caton; Mr. and Mrs. H.B. Updyke, Mr. and Mrs. S. Ray Updyke, Dudley Updyke, Elmira, Mrs. A.C. Easterbrook, Mrs. M. Conklin, Mrs. D.L. Churcher, Mrs. Mary Allard, Mrs. Arthur Devenport, Mr. and Mrs. E.W. Rhodes, Mr. and Mrs. Burr Ellott, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Markle, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Kahler, C. Wolcott, Ned Voight, Fred Davenport, Ray Easterbrook, Herbert Reasor, J.B Allard, Marion Rhodes, Charles Evans, Samuel Minier, Henry Minier, Jeanette Markle, Clara Wolcott and Hattie Jennings. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, gr-greatgranddaughter.
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette, Tuesday evening, August 27, 1928

"Last of Big Flats G. A. R. Celebrates 98th Birthday; Recounts Horrors Of War"

William W. Pease, last surviving Civil War veteran of Big Flats, celebrated his 98th birthday today. He was boeing potatoes when the cameraman found him in his garden. "I'm not done for yet," he declared when the reporter offered him assistance in walking over a stretch of rough ground. It is difficult to believe the man is 98 years old. He appears to be about 60.

Mr. Pease maintains a garden of his own, covering about an acre of ground, on which he has practically every variety of produce. He does a great deal of the farm work and scorns any assistance whatever.

RETAINS FACULTIES

Despite the fact that he is nearly 100 years old, he has command of all his faculties. The only indication of advanced age is a slight trembling of his hands after he has exercised. Today about 60 friends and relatives of Mr. Pease gathered at the home to honor the nonagenarian. Relatives attended from many of the surrounding towns.

Mr. Pease is the last surviving member of the Wallace Cheley Post, No. 4, G.A.R., of the Town of Big Flats. The post was discontinued some time ago when its members answered the final call, leaving Corporal Pease alone. More than 50 young men went to the colors from Big Flats in 1861.

Corporal Pease was in the Third N.Y Artillery, Co. K, and participated in many battles. Finally he was captured and spent four months in the Confederate prison at Belle Isle. From there he was transferred to Andersonville Prison where he remained nine months.

PRISON HORRORS

Even today the horrors of Andersonville stands out clearly in Corporal Pease's mind. "There were 32 of us from my company when we went in there, and only three of us came out alive," the old man said. From Andersonville, the survivors were sent to Savannah prison and then to Milan, Ga. Milan being in the direct route of Sherman's march to the sea, the Confederates hurriedly placed all the prisoners on a train, bound for Florida. In the midst of the swampy Florida forests, the engine broke down. They were stranded without food for days. Scurvy broke out and Corporal Pease was one of the victims. He nearly died of the disease. After the war, he and his comrades found their way from Florida home.

COMMANDANT EXECUTED

After the Civil War, the commandant of Andersonville Prison, Captain Wirtz, a German doctor, was tried in Washington and executed for his inhuman treatment of prisoners. Andersonville, a blot on the proud military record of the South, was deplored by Confederate commanders. The inspector-general of the Confederate army said of it:

"It is a place the horrors of which it is difficult to describe; it is a disgrace to civilization."

Nine months of such a prison failed to impair Corporal Pease's robust health. Of 44,882 prisoners confined in Andersonville in 13 months, 13,000 of them died. Many lost their reason.

Mr. Pease spends his time quietly working his vegetable garden. Submitted by gr-greatgranddaughter, Alice (Pease) Hartford. ahartfor@stny.rr.com

Elmira Star-Gazette, Friday, January 23, 1931

"Big Flats Man is Dead at 99; Last Member of G.A.R. Post

Big Flats, Jan. 23--William Wallace Pease, 99, one of this village's most prominent and popular residents, died at the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Louise A. Pease, at noon Thursday.

Mr. Pease was born at Windsor, Broome County, but had spent most of his life in this village. He served through the Civil War. He was a member of the local Masonic bodies.

He is survived by one son, William N. Pease of Millport; five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and his daughter-in-law. The funeral will be held Sunday at 3 p.m., the Reb. Mrs. Lillian Chapman officiating. Interment will be in Rural Home Cemetery where services will be in charge of A.J. Carlton Post, American Legion, at Painted Post. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, gr-greatgranddaughter of William Wallace Pease. ahartfor@stny.rr.com

Memorial Tribute published in the pages of the Corning Leader, Nov. 26, 1976.

Ellsworth C. Pease Obit

Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. today at Phillips Funeral Home in Big Flats for Ellsworth C. Pease, 77, of 2068 Harris Hill Road, Big Flats. He died Tuesday in Arnot Ogden Hospital in Elmira following an extended illness(cancer). Born in Big Flats Feb. 18, 1899, he was the son of William N. and Mary A. Helm Pease. He was married to Lulu Brown, who survives. A lifelong resident of Big Flats, he was a retired toomaker with 21 years of service at the former Eclipse Tool and Die Co. Surviving in addition to his wife are two sons, Norman Pease of Big Flats and Robert Pease of Elmira; a stepson, Raymond Brown of Kansas City, Mo.; two step-daughters, Mrs. Pauline Rosensteel of Overland Park, Kan. and Mrs. Frances Mahoney of Kansas City, Mo.; five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The Rev. Dr. Joseph Scahill, pastor of the Big Flats United Methodist Church, officiated at the funeral. Burial will be in Rural Home Cemetery. The family requests that memorial donations be made to the American Cancer Society. Submitted by granddaughter, Alice (Pease) Hartford ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette Feb. 12th, 1961

"Hooking Rugs a Hobby at 86"

A whiz at hooked rugs at the age of 86? Yes, you'd be amazed to see how dexterously William N. Pease of Millport RD1, hooks a rug with steady and skillful hands. He'll be 87 in September. In the past 10 years, he has made about 100 rugs--all beautifully done in various designs and colors. And he's fast at it too. It usually takes him about three weeks to complete a 3 by 5 foot piece. He also develops his own designs and dyes the rags.

Living alone at his farm home on the Johnson Hollow Road, Pease picked up the hobby at the age of 76 after his wife died and he was left alone at home. "It has given me something to do," explains Pease, still spry and active. "Besides hooking rugs is an art which gives me the pleasure of creating something." Now his home is filled with the rugs--on the walls, over the fireplace and stacked high on a bed.

The elderly man takes pride in what he has accomplished and gladly shows his creations to visitors. His pride and joy is a rug with the Sermon on the Mount as the theme. The octogenarian can tell a story about each of the rug designs he has created. Some are mountain scenes and others are of animals, Indians, villages and red school houses. One rug was made of rags threaded from 600 stockings he collected from neighbors, friends and relatives.

What's he going to do with the rugs? "Well, just keep them," he replies. "I don't want to sell them. I couldn't get back what I have put into them. Besides I like to look at them and show them to people." Of 100 rugs he has made, he has given away only about 20, mostly for wedding gifts to his children. He has three grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Besides hooking rugs, Pease also raises gladiolus as a hobby. Last year his glads won him a blue ribbon at the Chemung County Fair. Asked about his good health and longevity, Pease, leisurely puffing a cigarette replies, "Hard work won't hurt anybody."

Even at his advanced age, he still walks about a mile a day for exercise. If bad weather prevents him from going outside, Pease is often found pacing back and forth on his own porch.

Born in Big Flats, Pease farmed most of his life and has lived at the present house for 43 years. He still reads a lot each day. He cooks for himself and enjoys canning food. His only son, Ellsworth Pease of Harris Hill Road, brings groceries to him once a week. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, great-grandaughter. ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Published in the pages of the Corning Leader August 11, 1971.

W.N. Pease, 95, Former Big Flats Farmer, Dies

William Nelson Pease, 95, of Johnson Hollow Road, Millport RD 1, one of the oldest Big Flats natives, died the morning in Heritage Park in Elmira where he had been a patient for a month. He had previously been a patient in the Breesport Infirmary since September of 1966.

Born in Big Flats Sept. 23, 1875, he was the son of Wallace W. and Lidia Helen Cowan Pease. His wife, Mary Ann Helme, died Dec. 10, 1950. Mr. Pease was a self employed farmer in Big Flats. He was born where the present New York State Nursery is now located and his farm is now Rural Home Cemetery. He was a former welfare officer for the Town of Catlin and a member of the Moreland Grange.

Surviving are: a son, Elsworth C. Pease of 2068 Harris Hill Road, Big Flats; two grandsons and three great grandchildren. Friends may call at Phillips Funeral Home in Big Flats Friday from 1-2 p.m. Funeral services will follow in the funeral home at 2 p.m. with the Rev. Donald Roe of the Big Flats United Methodist Church officiating. Burial will be in Rural Home Cemetery. Submitted by great granddaughter, Alice (Pease) Hartford ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette, August 18, 1925

"Last of Civil War Vets at Big Flats Wields Hoe on Farm at Ninety-Four"

William W. Pease of Big Flats has the distinction of being the last survivor of the Civil War residing at Big Flats. Mr. Pease is still hale and hearty at 94 years old and was found by the camera-man digging potatoes on his farm!

When the call to arms came in 1861, more than 50 husky young men went to the colors from the village of Big Flats. Among these was Mr. Pease. Today they have all answered the last call, and only Mr. Pease remains to tell the story. He tells it in an interesting manner.

In a few days Mr. Pease will be 94 years old. He still does much of the labor on his farm. A long row of potatoes had been uncovered by his hoe when the reporter interrupted. It is difficult to realize that the man is 94 years old, for he hardly seems 60.

Corporal Pease enlisted in the Third New York Light Artillary, Company K, serving under General Burnside. He was at the first battle of Bull Run, although his company was not called into action at this angagement. After serving his enlistment, he returned home and RE-ENLISTED!

While on line duty, his company was surrounded by hundreds of Confederates and taken prisoner. He was taken to Belle Isle, where he endured the horrors of prison camp for four months, and was then sent to Andersonville. The prisoners were transferred to Savannah and then to Milan, Georgia. As Milan was in the direct route of Sherman's army, the Confederates ran the prisoners out of the "pen."

There were 5,000 prisoners with Corporal Pease. While they were being conveyed out of Sherman's reach, the engine on the train broke down, and they were hidden in a Florida forest.

Without rations for many days, scurvy broke out. Mr. Pease caught the terrible disease, which broke out in his mouth, making his imprisonment horrible. It is miraculous that he survived, for he could not chew food. At the end of the war, they "bummed" their way from Jacksonville, Fla., back to New York State.

Of the 32 men captured from Mr. Pease's company, only three lived to get out of the camps. A soldier named Taylor, of Auburn, enlisted with Pease, fought with him, re-enlisted with him, was captured with him and released with him. They returned home together. A few years ago Taylor was killed by an automobile.

Mr. Pease married when he returned from the war, has two sons and five grandchildren. The Civil War veterans of Big Flats formed the Wallace Cheley Post, No. 40, until their numbers grew so small the post was disbanded. And today only Mr. Pease remains of these gallant warriors.

When the reporter had finished with him, Mr. Pease took up his hoe again and went back into the potato field. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, gr-greatgranddaughter. ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette, Friday August 31, 1928

"Big Flats Vet, 97, is given Birthday Party"

About 60 friends of Wallace Pease attended his 97th birthday party at the family home Monday evening. Talks were given by Prof. N.J. Lowe of Tottenville, Long Island; H.B. Updyke of Elmira; former Mayor Harry Rood of Corning and Oscar Kahler of Big Flats; Mrs. E. Eastabrook told a war story.

Attending were:

Wallace(William)Pease, Mrs. L. Pease, Miss Eucie, Julia, Dorothy Pease, Mr. and Mrs. William Pease, Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth Pease, Mary Helen and Norman Pease, Mrs. W. B. Helm, Millport; Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Rood, Mrs. Lee Force, and Miss Grace Ludwig, Mr. and Mrs. S.J. Stoner, Mr. and Mrs. H. Mitchell, Mrs. A. Fuller, Corning; Mr. and Mrs. George Walsh, Mr. and Mrs. M.R. Dunham, Miss Eleanor Dunham, Mr. and Mrs. William Jones, Robert Jones, Caton; Mr. and Mrs. H.B. Updyke, Mr. and Mrs. S. Ray Updyke, Dudley Updyke, Elmira, Mrs. A.C. Easterbrook, Mrs. M. Conklin, Mrs. D.L. Churcher, Mrs. Mary Allard, Mrs. Arthur Devenport, Mr. and Mrs. E.W. Rhodes, Mr. and Mrs. Burr Ellott, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Markle, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Kahler, C. Wolcott, Ned Voight, Fred Davenport, Ray Easterbrook, Herbert Reasor, J.B Allard, Marion Rhodes, Charles Evans, Samuel Minier, Henry Minier, Jeanette Markle, Clara Wolcott and Hattie Jennings. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, gr-greatgranddaughter.
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette, Tuesday evening, August 27, 1928

"Last of Big Flats G. A. R. Celebrates 98th Birthday; Recounts Horrors Of War"

William W. Pease, last surviving Civil War veteran of Big Flats, celebrated his 98th birthday today. He was hoeing potatoes when the cameraman found him in his garden. "I'm not done for yet," he declared when the reporter offered him assistance in walking over a stretch of rough ground. It is difficult to believe the man is 98 years old. He appears to be about 60.

Mr. Pease maintains a garden of his own, covering about an acre of ground, on which he has practically every variety of produce. He does a great deal of the farm work and scorns any assistance whatever.

RETAINS FACULTIES

Despite the fact that he is nearly 100 years old, he has command of all his faculties. The only indication of advanced age is a slight trembling of his hands after he has exercised. Today about 60 friends and relatives of Mr. Pease gathered at the home to honor the nonagenarian. Relatives attended from many of the surrounding towns.

Mr. Pease is the last surviving member of the Wallace Cheley Post, No. 4, G.A.R., of the Town of Big Flats. The post was discontinued some time ago when its members answered the final call, leaving Corporal Pease alone. More than 50 young men went to the colors from Big Flats in 1861.

Corporal Pease was in the Third N.Y Artillery, Co. K, and participated in many battles. Finally he was captured and spent four months in the Confederate prison at Belle Isle. From there he was transferred to Andersonville Prison where he remained nine months.

PRISON HORRORS

Even today the horrors of Andersonville stands out clearly in Corporal Pease's mind. "There were 32 of us from my company when we went in there, and only three of us came out alive," the old man said. From Andersonville, the survivors were sent to Savannah prison and then to Milan, Ga. Milan being in the direct route of Sherman's march to the sea, the Confederates hurriedly placed all the prisoners on a train, bound for Florida. In the midst of the swampy Florida forests, the engine broke down. They were stranded without food for days. Scurvy broke out and Corporal Pease was one of the victims. He nearly died of the disease. After the war, he and his comrades found their way from Florida home.

COMMANDANT EXECUTED

After the Civil War, the commandant of Andersonville Prison, Captain Wirtz, a German doctor, was tried in Washington and executed for his inhuman treatment of prisoners. Andersonville, a blot on the proud military record of the South, was deplored by Confederate commanders. The inspector-general of the Confederate army said of it:

"It is a place the horrors of which it is difficult to describe; it is a disgrace to civilization."

Nine months of such a prison failed to impair Corporal Pease's robust health. Of 44,882 prisoners confined in Andersonville in 13 months, 13,000 of them died. Many lost their reason.

Mr. Pease spends his time quietly working his vegetable garden. Submitted by gr-greatgranddaughter, Alice (Pease) Hartford. ahartfor@stny.rr.com
 
 

Elmira Star-Gazette, Friday, January 23, 1931

"Big Flats Man is Dead at 99; Last Member of G.A.R. Post

Big Flats, Jan. 23--William Wallace Pease, 99, one of this village's most prominent and popular residents, died at the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Louise A. Pease, at noon Thursday.

Mr. Pease was born at Windsor, Broome County, but had spent most of his life in this village. He served through the Civil War. He was a member of the local Masonic bodies.

He is survived by one son, William N. Pease of Millport; five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and his daughter-in-law. The funeral will be held Sunday at 3 p.m., the Reb. Mrs. Lillian Chapman officiating. Interment will be in Rural Home Cemetery where services will be in charge of A.J. Carlton Post, American Legion, at Painted Post. Submitted by Alice (Pease) Hartford, gr-greatgranddaughter of William Wallace Pease. ahartfor@stny.rr.com

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

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By Joyce M. Tice
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