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These obituaries Are extracted from various newspaper that are available to us. They are arranged by newspaper and date. If you do not have the time to enjoy the luxury of sifting through our clippings they will be included in the Search Engine which you can reach from the "Front Door" of the Tri-County Genealogy & History sites by Joyce M. Tice. All Newspaper clipping in this section of the site are in the Clippings partition of the Partitioned search engine that you can find at the bottom of the Current What's New page.
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1874  Wellsboro Agitator Obituaries
January to June July to December

Gen. Wm. S. Hillyer
Gen. Wm. S. Hillyer, of New York, died in Washington on Sunday of congestion of the lungs.  Gen. Hillyer was the last of Gen. Grant’s original staff.  (Tuesday, July 7, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Tod R. Caldwell
Tod R. Caldwell, Governor of North Carolina, died last Sunday evening of cholera morbus.  (Tuesday, July 7, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Patrick Foley
Patrick Foley died of cholera in Louisville, Ky., on Saturday last.  His physicians pronounce it the genuine Asiatic.  (Tuesday, July 7, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Carrie Ostrander
Miss Carrie Ostrander, one of the injured in the Syracuse Baptist church disaster of June 22d, died last week, making the 14th victim.  (Tuesday, July 7, 1874, The Wellsboro  Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Moats and one child
At McConnellsburg, Pa., last week Sunday morning, Mrs. John Moats becoming suddenly insane, shot her husband while yet in bed, killing him instantly.  She then with a razor inflicted a horrible wound upon the head and neck of one of her children, and with a pitchfork almost killed another.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Tucker
David Tucker, of Portsmouth, NH, a well known job printer and publisher, died last week aged 57 years.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Fritz Reuter
Fritz Reuter, the German novelist, is dead.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro  Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Barbara DeHart
Barbara DeHart, aged 101 years and 6 months, died on Thursday at Harrisburg.--She was mother of 10 children, 42 grandchildren; 77 great grandchildren, and one great-great grandchild.  She had been blind 20 years.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Agnes Strickland
Miss Agnes Strickland, the author of the History of the Queens of England and Scotland, is dead.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Chancellor Walworth
Mrs. Chancellor Walworth died at Saratoga Wednesday morning.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Pagendorff
Our readers will remember that we published an item a few days ago stating that Mr. William Pagendorff, of Blossburg, a shoemaker, was hurt by having the index finger of his right hand crushed in a crimping machine.  At the time the wound was not supposed to be at all dangerous, but we now learn that the injured man died from the effects of it last Wednesday, his last hours being passed in terrible agony.  The wound to the hand probably resulted in tetanus.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David W. Reese
Mr. David W. Reese, a miner at Morris Run, was instantly killed by a fall of coal in the “Salt Lake Drift,” at that place several days ago.  The deceased was a brother-in-law of Sheriff Bowen, and leaves a wide circle of friends to mourn his loss.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Ruth Van Etten
A fatal accident at Watkins Glen.--The Elmira Advertiser says an accident occurred at Watkins Glen last Thursday afternoon, which resulted in the death of a very estimable young lady, Miss Ruth Van Etten, of Auburn, NY.  She came out with an excursion party of a dozen or more companions, arriving at the Glen about noon.--The accident happened a little above the second stairway from the entrance to the Glen.  The Glen is narrow at that point, with precipitous sides rising many feet from the bottom.  The pathway is quite narrow, too, but we should think sufficiently protected by a stout railing to forbid any fear of danger or anything untoward happening.--Miss Van Etten stood leaning on this railing looking into the abyss below.  In some unaccountable manner, either some loose dirt or a slippery stone being the cause, she lost her footing and slid down between the lower rail of the railing and the edge of the precipice, into the gorge below.  She first struck on the rocks on the opposite side, but bounded back to the same side, down which she fell a distance in all of at least 95 feet.  She was literally dashed to pieces at the bottom, her neck being broken and her brains crushed from her head.  She was taken to her home on the return boat.  The young lady was well connected and highly spoken of, and her untoward fate cast a feeling of gloom through every circle where it was known.  She was about 25 years of age.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. G. Taylor
W. G. Taylor, of Towanda, aged 40, shot himself a few days since, and only lived about an hour.  He leaves a wife and one child.  (Tuesday, July 241, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary Leib
Mary, daughter of G. D. and Edith Leib, July 14th, 1874, aged 25 years and 4 months.  A resident of this county for the past 14 years, she was well and favorably known.  Of a very quiet disposition, and extremely reticent, the passive elements of her character seemed most conspicuously developed.  From early childhood she had loved the Saviour, and four years since connected herself with the Methodist church, at Manchester Farms, then under the pastorate of Rev. O. Compton.  For eight years she was a sufferer, her disease ending in consumption.  All the experiences incident to this flattering and yet insidious malady were hers; but it gave abundant opportunity for reflection, and the development, by grace, of a loveliness of Christian character.  When she found herself obliged to surrender to the “Pale Conqueror,” she called the family together and poured out her heart in tender and affectionate pleadings and loving hopes of a family reunion in the bright and beautiful home to which she so soon was going.  Her end was peace.  And having safely passed the “bridgeless river,” she is at rest with God.  A large concourse of neighbors and friends attended the funeral solemnities, showing thus their sympathy and esteem.  (Tuesday, July 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Admiral Pennock
The wife of Admiral Pennock died at Yokohama, Honshu, Japan, June 29th.  (Tuesday, July 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward P. Kempton
Edward P. Kempton dropped dead of heart disease at Milford on Thursday.  His wife fell dead from the same disease shortly after the arrival home of his body.  (Tuesday, July 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elizabeth Ferguson
The Troy Gazette says a sad accident took place in Granville township a few days ago, which resulted in the death of Elizabeth Ferguson, a young woman aged 26 years.  Her father was busy drawing in wheat, and wanting a hand to load was going to send off after a man, but she insisted that she could load as well as any one.  She was permitted to do this, and after the wheat was loaded drove the team down a slope, and in holding back the horses, slid off with several bundles under the heels of the horses, which started to run.  The wagon passed over her, injuring her very badly though she thought her injuries were not much.  A doctor was called and decided that she was very dangerously hurt, which proved to be the case, as she lingered but a few hours.  (Tuesday, July 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Carey
In Elmira, Sunday morning, July 19th, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Carey, Mary Ann Caulking, aged 81 years.  Deceased was the mother of H. W. Caulking, of Tioga.  (Tuesday, July 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles T. Beke
It is reported that Charles T. Beke, the African explorer, is dead.  (Tuesday, August 4, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Captain Samuel Erwin
Captain Samuel Erwin, formerly of Painted Post, brother of Charles H. Erwin, died at Calvert, Texas, on Tuesday last.  He was something over 50 years of age.  (Tuesday, August 4, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joshua Bowman
Joshua Bowman, Esq., died at his residence in Muncy last Tuesday evening.  He had been a Director of the Lycoming Fire Insurance Company, since its organization in 1840; was its Secretary for more than a quarter of a century, and for the last two years its President, and to his untiring industry and the devotion of his time and talents to the interests of the Company is the great success of the Institution to be attributed.  (Tuesday, August 4, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. S. M. Cooley
At Middle Ridge, on Saturday, July 18, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. S. M. Cooley, Mrs. Elizabeth Hammond Wilson, wife of the late A. J. Wilson, in the 77th year of her age.  (Tuesday, August 4, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Stanton Gould
John Stanton Gould, widely known throughout the country as a man of much learning and many attainments, died at Hudson, NY, on Saturday night.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lord Gordon Gordon
Lord Gordon Gordon, of Manitoba fame, committed suicide by blowing out his brains last week.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Brig. Gen. Joseph A. Haskins
Brig. Gen. Joseph A. Haskins died at Oswego, NY, last week.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Croley
John Croley, one of the oldest printers in the State of New York, died last week, aged 74.  He served apprenticeship in Ireland and worked at the case over 61 years.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel O. Murdock
A fatal accident.--Last Wednesday afternoon a sad accident occurred near Germania, resulting in the death of Samuel O. Murdock, a prominent and highly respected merchant of Westfield.  We are informed that Mr. Murdock and a friend, Mr. George Francis, had been engaged in fishing during the day.  Late in the afternoon they hitched up their team, one horse being a skittish animal, and started for home.  They had not gone far before the horses started to run.  They went at full speed down a hill at the bottom of which was a bridge over the creek.  When the wagon struck the bridge, which was raised a little above the level of the road, the concussion threw both gentlemen out.  Mr. Francis was thrown into the creek and escaped serious injury, but Mr. Murdock fell between the wheel and spring of the wagon.  A subsequent examination showed that his ribs were broken and forced into his lungs.  He was picked up in a state of utter unconsciousness, and remained in that condition until 4 o’clock the next morning when he died. (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Hammond
Death of a patriarch.-- “Through night to light.” -- On the 15th of June last, died Mr. John Hammond, at his home, in Cowanesque Valley of which he was the oldest resident.  John Hammond was born in the town of Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn., on the 8th of July 1791.  His parents were sturdy English people, his father’s brother of the celebrated people, his father Lebbeus Hammond, and young Hammond was brought up and schooled to toil, whilst the rudiments of education were imparted as the wont in those days.--When he was eight years old the family removed to a farm in Chemung county, NY, in which locality many of the descendants reside to-day.  Some time in 1816 he was married to Miss Marilla Stull of Southport, (near Elmira, then known as Newtown, NY).  Three years later he moved with his young bride, into the then wilderness of the Cowanesque Valey, Tioga county, Pa., and began clearing and breaking up the soil near the present village of Elkland.  Here, he continued the remainder of his years, following the pursuit of a farmer with great success until the year 1835 when an untoward accident turned his remaining days into physical darkness and sadness.  This transpired whilst he was husking corn on his farm one day.  An ill-changed shot from a rifle put out both his eyes and plunged him into total blindness.  Although much distressed at the loss of his eyes, he kept up his spirits and never lost sight of the promised light which comes in the morning of our deliverance.  His wife, who survives him, by that wealth of love and sympathy incident to her relation, added much comfort and cheery to his many day journeys through the darkness.  Mr. Hammond was the father of 12 children, 10 of whom lived to the age of maturity and 9 of whom still live, four in the far west.  His descendants are among the most highly respected people of the localities in which they reside.  The subject of this sketch was the last of the early settlers and was always highly esteemed in the Valley, where he became familiarly known as “Uncle John.”  He was very fond of young people and often entertained them with his conversation.  Previous to his death he expressed the firmest hopes of immortal life, having declared an abiding faith in the atonement of our Saviour.  He was, therefore, willing to cross the dark stream and rejoiced to pass from darkness to light.  To his life, and especially to the last 38 years of it, the laconic expression of the German poet very aptly applies: --Through night to light.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Shearer
Mrs. Shearer, probably the oldest resident of Chemung county, died at the residence of her son, Mr. David Shearer, in the town of Chemung, on Saturday week, being within a month of 98 years of age.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga County Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Abram Gross
The Coudersport Journal of last Wednesday says:  “Abram Gross, 80 years old, while at work in a grain field yesterday, fell down and instantly expired.  He resided with his son Andrew Gross, of Allegany, in this county.”  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro  Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Thomas S. Sheardown
On Thursday evening, July 30th, the venerable Rev. Thomas S. Sheardown, of Troy, Bradford county, died at his residence in the 83rd year of his age.  At one time he preached at Tioga in this county, and he was well-known and greatly beloved by many in this region.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Nancy M. Packard
In Covington, July 2, 1874, by the bursting of a blood-vessel near the heart, Nancy M., wife of J. M. Packard, aged 39 years and 7 months.  She has left a bereaved family and many friends to mourn her loss.  But their loss is her gain.  God’s ways are not our ways, and He has called her home to be with those that have gone before.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lydia Starkey
In Richmond, July 23, Mrs. Lydia, wife of Joseph Starkey, aged 78 years, 9 months and 14 days.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry J. Whitehouse
Henry J. Whitehouse, Bishop of Illinois, is dead.  (Tuesday, August 18, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Hussey
The hero of the “Mulligan Guards,” John Hussey, is dead.  His more enduring memory rests in the many lives he saved from drowning as a longshoreman on the Irish coast.  (Tuesday, August 18, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Cuyler Clemons
The Register says that Mr. Cuyler Clemons, one of the oldest residents of Tioga county, died at his home--the well-known Clemons farm, half way between Blossburg and Covington--on Monday, the 10th instant.  Mr. Clemons had resided upon the same farm all his life--64 years, and was well-known to all of the old residents of Covington and Bloss townships.  The deceased was an ardent sportsman, and a fine specimen of the early settlers of Tioga county.  He is said to have been the first man to dig coal from the mines in Blossburg.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Stone
Fatal accident near Millertown.--To the Editor of the Agitator:  On Tuesday, the 4th instant, an accident happened on the plank road about three miles below this place, which resulted fatally on Friday last.  Charles Stone, a young man about 15 years old, was thrown from a buggy against a pile of wood, striking on his stomach and receiving injuries from which he died on the 7th.  He was the son of Orrin Stone, who formerly lived in Jackson, a few miles from Millertown.  Charley was a boy of more than ordinary talents; yet unostentatious and entirely reliable.  His habits of industry were remarkable for one so young; and whatever he undertook to do was done faithfully and well.  It is a sad blow to the family.  He was buried at this place on Saturday, the 8th.  Millertown, August 11, 1874.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Roy Bruce
At Sabinsville, August 5, 1874, Roy, son of Charles F. and Clarissa A. Bruce, aged 1 year and 15 months.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel D. Church
In Chatham, Pa., August 9th, 1874, Mr. Daniel D. Church, aged 64 years, 9 months and 24 days.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane Crandall
In Osceola, July 24, 1874, after a long lingering illness, Jane, wife of Russel Crandall.  (Tuesday, August 11, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Barnes
The Register says a young man named James Barnes, a bricklayer by trade, while going to Roaring Branch in the stage, a few days ago, fell out, striking his head on a stone.  Before he could get out of the way the hind wheel of the coach passed over his stomach, injuring him so severely that he died within two days after the accident.  His remains were taken to East Canton for burial.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John L. Mayer
John L. Mayer, one of the most prominent lawyers of York county, died of heart disease.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lucius French
Mr. Lucius French, an aged and respected citizen of Canton borough, Bradford county died at his residence about 9 o’clock Thursday morning.  He formerly resided in Springfield.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James S. Watson
A man by the name of James S. Watson, was run over and killed by train 7 near Rathboneville a few days ago.  He was a resident of Towanda, Pa., which place he left a few days ago in search of employment, having been out of work since last fall.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Truman Garrett
Truman Garrett, one of the earliest settlers of Elmira, died last week, aged 57 years.  He has been a resident of that place for more than 40 years and was always held in respect by the public.  He was the first police constable of the city and had held the office of constable for years while Elmira was a village.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Nathanial Johnston
On Thursday, the 13th instant, Nathanial Johnston died at his residence in Wellsville, NY, aged 88 years.  Mr. Johnston was born at St. Johnsville, Montgomery county, in April, 1792.  Early in life he moved to Brainbridge and engaged in lumbering.  In 1830(or 1839) he moved to Southport or Elmira, still following the lumber trade, and in 1850 he located permanently at Wellsville.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Amos Brown, D. D.
Rev. Amos Brown, D. D., died at his residence in Havana last week Monday morning, and was buried on Wednesday.  Mr. Brown was a veteran educator, having been for years at the head of Ovid Academy.  He was also at one time, President of the People’s College, and took a leading part in procuring the passage of the act of Congress donating public lands to the different States for the promotion of agricultural schools.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro  Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Byron G. Sanford
Byron G. Sanford, of Troupsburg, Steuben county, NY, was a cattle drover by occupation.  He was out buying cattle a few days ago and had a shot gun with him.--Coming back to the village, toward evening, he went into his brother’s store, and some conversation was had with a neighbor about shooting a dog, which had bit a child a few days before.  During the conversation Mr. Sanford set down the gun with a muzzle upwards, and as he did so it was discharged.  The charge entered his mouth, and he dropped to the floor and died almost instantly.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

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William Jack
A few days ago William Jack, of Richmond, NY, accidentally shot himself through the heart.  He worked in the harvest field in the forenoon as usual, and was in good spirits.  He went to his room about 4 o’clock and soon afterwards the report of a gun was heard, and upon going to his room he was found lying on his face on the floor, dead, shot through the heart, and his gun beside him.  It is supposed that his gun was lying on the bed loaded, and he took hold of it by the muzzle to pull it toward him when the hammer must have caught on the bed clothes and discharged the gun.  The deceased was a young man about 25 years of age.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Ella Willcox
In Delmar, August 17, 1874, Miss Ella Willcox, aged 28 years.  (Tuesday, August 25, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sidney Dobell
Sidney Dobell, the well known English writer, is dead.  (Tuesday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Stephen Smyth
Rev. Stephen Smyth, late agent of the American Bible Society, died on Tuesday in Jersey City.  (Tuesday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. E. S. Gregory
Mr. E. S. Gregory, of Wyalusing, Bradford county, was killed while attempting to get on a moving train of cars, at Lancaster, a few days ago.  (Tuesday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Leonard White
Leonard White, an old and respected citizen of Scranton, died at his residence in that city a few days ago, at the age of 66 years and 11 months.  (Tuesday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Hughes
Mr. John Hughes, an old and well-known resident of Lycoming county, died at his home in Linden a few days ago.  His death was caused by injuries sustained in falling down stairs.  He was about 80 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wilford S. Day
Wilford S. Day, a young man having recently gone into the boot and shoe business in Troy, met with a serious if not fatal accident on Wednesday the 19th ultimo.  He was out driving, in the vicinity of Burlington, when his horse became frightened and ran, throwing him from the carriage and breaking his left arm in three places and bruising his head and right side very badly.  It is thought he will recover if not injured internally.  (Tuesday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Coleman
A little son of John Coleman, of Towanda, some four years old, was so seriously burned on Monday week that he died on Tuesday.  The child was up stairs, and by some means secured matches, which it ignited, setting fire to some cotton near by, and also firing its clothes, and before assistance was rendered it was so badly burned that it died as above stated.  The mother, in attempting to save the child, had her hands badly burned.  (Thursday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Walter Stanley Dockstader
On the 11th of August, 1874, of scarlet fever, Walter Stanley, oldest son of David and Ella E. Dockstader, aged 9 years, 1 month and 16 days.  (Tuesday, September 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas H. Morris
Thomas H. Morris, senior Bishop of the Methodist Church, died at his residence in Springfield, Ohio, last Wednesday.  He was 80 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Brevet Major General John B. Foster
Brevet Major General John B. Foster, U. S. A., died at Nashua, NH, on Wednesday morning.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Babcock
Mr. John Babcock, brakeman on first extra 36, fell from his train near Cameron, Steuben county, a few days since, and was shockingly mangled by two trains passing over his body.  He was a resident of Hornellsville, where his remains were buried.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Washington Singerland
A brakeman by the name of Washington Singerland was killed last Tuesday at Addison, by train two, on the Erie.  He had been riding on the engine, and had been put off from it.  In attempting to climb on the baggage car he slipped and fell under the wheels.  He was taken up much mangled and dead.  It was stated that he was more or less in liquor.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Daniel Mulhollen
Daniel Mulhollen, a soldier of the war of 1812, died Aug. 18th, near Ithaca, and was buried in the town of Erwin, Steuben county, his former residence.  He lost an arm on the Niagara frontier, being a member of a company from the old town of Painted Post.  Old residents will remember “Uncle Dan,” and will regret to hear of his death.  He was a connection by marriage of the Erwin family.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Matthew Marshall
Mr. Matthew Marshall, the Treasurer of Bradford county, died a few days ago at his residence in Franklin.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Jones
A 14-year old lad named John Jones, residing at Hornellsville, was run over and killed by the cars at Addison a few days ago.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert W. English
In Shippen, August 15, 1874, Robert W., only child of Wm. W. and Emma E. English, aged 7 years.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Benjamin Watres
Mr. Benjamin Watres, of Harford, Susquehanna county, was assisting in loading furniture material in the rough from a building into a wagon, when the board that had been laid from the building to the wagon, and upon which Mr. W. was standing slipped, frightened the horses, which started up and threw him between the hind wheel and the bed of the wagon, and with one leg thrust between the spokes of the wheel.  He was carried around the wheel, which passed over his body, crushing his ribs in.  Finally he seized hold of the wagon box--extricated his leg--and in his maimed condition held on to the box until the horses, which ran a quarter of a mile, were stopped.  During this whole distance his leg was so caught between the wheel and wagon that it was fairly ground to shreds, and the wheel had to be removed before his limb could be extricated.  It was found denuded of the flesh, presenting a horrible sight.  He lived four days in unutterable agony, when death relieved him from his sufferings.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Maggie Jones
On Monday morning, says the Pittston Gazette, a little girl named Maggie Jones, four years old, a daughter of Philip Jones, of Hyde Park, died in the most horrible agony, of hydrophobia.  Last June Maggie was bitten by a large Newfoundland dog with which she was playing.  In the course of the frolic she was bitten on the nose, and the wound being but a very slight one, rapidly healed and the circumstance was soon forgotten by all, except the mother, who insisted that the dog should be killed.  She was informed that the dog had been dispatched shortly after he had bitten the child.  This appeared to quiet her.  Maggie became cheerful and played about as usual.  On Sunday morning she accompanied her parents to camp-meeting at Dalton, and upon returning she was attacked by a slight choking sensation which the parents thought was croup.--A physician was summoned who soon discovered that the little one was the victim of hydrophobia.  Quite a number of medical gentleman examined the case, but nothing could be done for the sufferer, who lingered in the most intense agony until she died.--This is the fifth death from the dreadful disease which has happened within two years in Scranton.  (Tuesday, September 8, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wilfred L. Fitts
Wilfred L. Fitts, the Lowell youth whose astonishing feats as a somnambulist have made him famous, died last Thursday evening in Worcester Insane Asylum.  (Tuesday, September 15, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph B. Hall
Very many of our readers of this county will regret to learn of the death of Mr. Joseph B. Hall, although his immediate friends have known for sometime past that his decease could not long be deferred.  He expired at his residence in Catskill, NY, last Monday morning.  Mr. Hall grew up in this county and resides here until about 1853.  He learned the trade of a printer in the old Eagle office in this village.  When gold was discovered in California, the young printer was one of those adventurous spirits who were attracted across the continent to the land of promise.  While making the slow and painful journey overland he wrote to the Eagle a full and interesting narrative of the trip which was then a novel one.  After a time he returned to Wellsboro and entered into trade.  Here he married the daughter of John F. Donaldson, the late Prothonotary of the county, and in 1853 he bade adieu to his old home and moved to Schoharie, NY.  From there he went to Catskill, and became the proprietor and editor of the Recorder of that place, a Democratic paper which he has since built up into a journal of large circulation and influence.  A couple of years ago Mr. Hall was appointed by Gov. Hoffman a member of the Commission to revise the Constitution of the State of New York.  He discharged the duties of the post with credit; but it was evident even then that failing health would soon compel him to relinquish all active pursuits, and on the adjournment of the Commission he hastened to the mountains of Colorado, to recruit if possible his declining vigor.  After some months it became evident, however, that his voluntary exile was doing him no sustaining good, and he returned home.  Since that time he has steadily grown weaker, until he has finally died to the land where there is no weariness nor decay.  He was an able man, a firm friend and an honorable opponent.  Peace to his ashes!  (Tuesday, September 15, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Betsey C. Benedict
Mrs. Betsey C. (or O) Benedict, at the residence of her son, Mr. James Benedict, Esq., of Charleston, Pa., September 3d, 1874, aged 83 years, 4 months and 16 days.  (Tuesday, September 15, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frankie Cramer
Frankie Cramer, infant son of Mr. David Cramer, of East Charleston, Pa., September 3d, 1874, aged nearly 6 months.  (Tuesday, September 15, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wm. N. Smith
Ex-Sheriff Wm. N. Smith, of Bath, NY, died at his residence in that village on Sunday evening, September 6th, after a long and painful illness, in the 63rd year of his age.  (Tuesday, September 15, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Judge R. B. Curtis
Judge R. B. Curtis, of Massachusetts, died at Newport on Tuesday.  (Tuesday, September 22, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Vandervoort
Charles Vandervoort, Grand Master of I. O. O. F., State of New York, died at his residence at Harlem last week Monday.  (Tuesday, September 22, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. P. Damon
Our Lawrenceville correspondent whose letter is crowded out by want of time to set it, writes us that Mr. P. Damon, of that village died last Saturday morning at about 8 o’clock.  Esquire Damon had been a resident of Lawrenceville many years, and had a large circle of friends all of whom will be pained to learn of his death.  He was just and true in all his dealings, and enjoyed the unlimited confidence of all who came in contact with him.  (Tuesday, September 22, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Perkins
Mrs. Julia Perkins, wife of Chas. L. Perkins, of Cincinnati, last Wednesday cut the throat of her only daughter, aged three year, killing her instantly.  She then cut her own throat, but the wound was not sufficiently deep to cause death.  She alleges domestic infelicity as the cause, and appears to be sound in mind.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Commodore Woolsey
Commodore Woolsey, of the Pensacola navy yard, died of yellow fever Friday morning.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Darius L. Wellman
Darius L. Wellman, one of the oldest residents of the town of Hornby, NY, died in that town Sept. 27th, aged 59 years.  He was formerly a Deputy Sheriff during the war, Deputy Marshal and frequently chosen Justice of the Peace of his town.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry W. Dodge
Henry W. Dodge, executive officer of the Hayes Arctic Expedition, died suddenly of apoplexy at Brooklyn last week, aged 74.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George B. Todd
George B. Todd, surgeon at the Pensacola navy yard, died from yellow fever on Sunday week.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Eunice Howell
Eunice Howell, a maiden lady of 70 years of age, living alone in a cottage near Washingtonville, Orange county, NY, was found last week Monday in a dying condition from a wound in the head, and died Tuesday morning.  It is thought the wound was inflicted on the preceding Friday night, as she had not been seen since that time until discovered.  Her gold watch and a large sum of money, known to have been in the house, were missing.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. H. W. Lee
Rev. H. W. Lee, Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Iowa, died on Saturday, aged 60 years.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ann E. McNaughton
In Westfield, Sept. 22nd, 1874, Ann E., wife of Dr. D. McNaughton, aged 50 years, 3 months and 10 days.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Anna Butler
In Blossburg, Sept. 20, 1874, Anna, daughter of Wm. M. and Eliza A. Butler, aged 9 years.  (Tuesday, September 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

D. A. Farnham
Mr. D. A. Farnham, the editor and publisher of the Mansfield Advertiser, died last Tuesday afternoon at Mansfield, of congestion of the brain.  He had resided but a few months in that village, but in that time he had made many friends and had fully demonstrated his ability to edit a spicy local newspaper.  We understand he was in his 37th (?) year, and was unmarried.  The following brief sketch of his career appears in the Elmira Advertiser.  He was the son of Dr. C. Farnham of Hamlin, Monroe county, and was born at Brockport in which village he learned his trade as printer.  He came to Elmira about seven years ago and was employed in the Review office shortly after taking a case in this office.  After remaining here a short time he went to Washington, where he obtained a position in the Government printing office and was afterwards manager of the Washington Transcript.  When that paper went to pieces he returned to Elmira and was employed for two or three years again on the Advertiser.  He took charge of the Mansfield Advertiser in the early part of last summer and has been assiduous in making that journal a bright and entertaining one.  On Saturday last he was out gunning and exposed himself more than one in his health should have done.  He took a cold which rapidly developed the disease of which he died.  He was a quiet, unassuming man but intelligent, thoughtful and painstaking always doing his best and always to be relied upon.  He was a good printer.  When he made a friend he kept him, and none can be found who could speak of him aught save in commendation.  His remains were taken to Hamlin on Wednesday where the funeral ceremonies were held the next day.  (Tuesday, October 20, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Louisa Wetherbee
In Delmar, September 28th, 1874, Mrs. Louisa M., wife of Walter Wetherbee and daughter of the late Ferdinand Stermer, aged 26 years and 2 months.  (Tuesday, October 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Stella May Wetherbee
In Delmar, October 10th, 1874, Stella May, infant daughter of Walter Wetherbee, aged 14(?) months and 1 day.  (Tuesday, October 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jerry Picard
At Terre Haute, Indiana, last Sunday evening, Jerry Picard, a well known citizen, was walking with his wife when two men rushed on them, and one of the men held Mrs. Picard while the other shot her husband in the head, the ball entering the right ear.  The shot will prove fatal.  The murderers then fled.  The motive for the act is not known.  This occurred in a public part of the city.  (Tuesday, October 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Henry E. Montgomery
Rev. Henry E. Montgomery, D. D., rector of the Church of the Incarnation on 35th street, New York, formerly of Philadelphia, dropped dead at his residence last Friday.  (Tuesday, October 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Francis
In Delmar, on the 17th instant, William Francis, aged 62 years.  (Tuesday, October 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Samuel Mourhess
Mrs. Samuel Mourhess, of Tuscarora, died last week Sunday morning.  She was a very aged lady, being over 84 years old.--She was one of the early settlers of that town, and the mother of a large family of children.  (Tuesday, October 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Adaline Retan
To the editor of the Agitator.  It is my sad duty to announce the death of one of our most worthy and highly respected townswomen.  Mrs. Adaline Retan, wife of Levi C. Retan, of this place, October 25, 1874, aged 43 years.  Mrs. Retan was the oldest daughter of the late George Seely, one of the early settlers of Jackson township, in this county.  She was well and favorably known throughout the entire community, and her loss is keenly felt, not only by her immediate friends and relations, but by all her numerous acquaintances. She was a woman of more than ordinary energy and industry, which, combined with the great executive ability for which she was peculiarly remarkable, made her home a model of neatness and order.  She had a remarkably keen sense of the “eternal fitness of things,” and her criticisms, while they were for the most part judicious, were always sharp and incisive. She was liberal without lavishness, frugal without parsimony and pious without ostentation.  It may truly be said of the home over which she presided that it was one of comfort and good cheer, while peace and harmony reigned throughout.  The funeral services were held on Monday, the 26th instant, at the M. E. church in this place, Rev. A. I. Blanchard, of the Jackson charge, preaching the funeral sermon.  A large concourse of people were in attendance, thus testifying their respect for the dead, and their sympathy for the bereaved family.  Her remains were buried in the Millertown church-yard, there to await the sound of the last trump, which shall herald the second coming of Him who said, “I am the Resurrection and the Life.”  Millertown, Pa., October 29, 1874.  (Tuesday, November 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Archibald Campbell
Archibald Campbell, of the Union and Compton Works, Manayunk, Pa., died on Saturday week.  He left and estate valued at $1,000,000.  (Tuesday, November 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Dr. Bacon
Rev. Dr. Bacon of the diocese of Portland, Me., died in New York city last Thursday evening.  (Tuesday, November 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Thornton
The Binghamton Times of the 2d instant says:  One of the most deliberate, heartless and cold-blooded murders that it has become our duty to chronicle, occurred at noon yesterday at Day Hollow, three miles from the village of Union, in this county. The victim was Mrs. Sarah Thornton, wife of Joshua Thornton, a respectable farmer of that place; the murderer being her brother-in-law; Levi Thornton, a brother of her husband.  The deed was committed while the husband was at the barn, the assassin using a common pocket knife, with which he inflicted a horrible gash in the unfortunate woman’s throat, severing the wind-pipe, and probably the carotid artery. The facts and circumstances as reported to us by a gentleman well acquainted with the parties and who was called in soon after the occurrence, are as follows:  The murderer, Levi Thornton, who has always borne a bad character, succeeded some time ago in inducing his sister-in-law to leave her husband to live with him, but after some months’ separation she returned to her husband, was received by him and was determined to have no further thought of her worthless admirer.  He, however, sought every opportunity to induce her to go and live with him, and on yesterday he visited the house with this purpose.  Taking advantage of his brother’s absence he spoke to her upon the subject, threatening that if she refused he would kill her.  The woman begged of him to go away, telling him that she could not leave her husband and children, but to all her entreaties he turned a deaf ear, and when fully convinced that she would not abandon her home and go with him, he attacked her with a pocket knife, inflicting fatal wounds. Having committed the diabolical deed, and while the woman was struggling in his grasp, the cold-hearted fiend placed the knife in her hand, and with his own drew it across his own throat, inflicting a serious but not necessarily fatal wound.  He thereupon fled from the house, and proceeded to Point Hill, a mile away, his wound bleeding freely, so that the neighbors who pursued him were enabled to follow him by the blood stains on the ground.  Arriving at the Hill he was very much exhausted, and in reply to inquiries stated that he had killed his sister-in-law and explained the manner in which he had committed the act, and exhibited the bloody weapon as proof.  An officer was sent for immediately, while a number of men in the vicinity kept watch to prevent his escape.  His statement was corroborated by the murdered woman, who when discovered, was able to explain the whole transaction.  Drs. L. D. Witherell and Wm. Whiting, of Union, were summoned to attend Mrs. Thornton, who was still alive at 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon--at which time our informant left--but there was no hopes whatever of her recovery.  Thornton was also placed under medical care, and although badly injured, will doubtless recover.  It appears that on Saturday the cut-throat in a conversation with parties at Point Hill, said that if his sister-in-law refused to go away with him he would kill her, but the remark did not attract serious attention until his return home in the condition described, and his subsequent confession.  Mr. Joshua Thornton, the husband of the murdered woman, is a farmer, owning a small farm at Day Hollow.  He is highly respected, and his wife, until her unfortunate elopement with the villain who murdered her, was regarded as a very fine woman and above reproach.  She was about 30 years of age and had been married five or six years and was the mother of two children.--Thornton, the murderer, has always been regarded as a dissipated, worthless person.  He is of small stature and between 25 and 30 years.  The woman whom Thornton attempted to murder was still alive at the date of our latest reports.  It is not improbable that she may yet recover, although it would appear almost impossible.  (Tuesday, November 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frederick Carter
The Lockport Journal learns that a terrible accident occurred at Medina on the night of the 3d instant.  As the westward bound train which is due in Lockport at 7:50 p.m., was approaching the depot in Medina, it struck a man named Frederick Carter, knocking him down and cutting off his legs close to his body.  He was otherwise mangled in a terrible manner.  His brother, who was with him at the time, had him removed to a place of quiet.  Medical aid was summoned, but it was of no avail.  The injured man died soon after the accident.  (Tuesday, November 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George S. Wagenor
George S. Wagenor, of Pennsylvania, Senate Librarian, died in Washington last Thursday of congestion of the lungs.  (Tuesday, November 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sarah Thornton
Sarah Thornton, whose throat was cut by Levi Thornton, her brother-in-law, at Day’s Hollow, died on Saturday.  Her murderer lies in jail in a critical condition from his self-inflicted wounds.  (Tuesday, November 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. John W. Head
Hon. John W. Head, Democratic Congressman elect from the 4th District of Tennessee, died at Gallatin, Tenn., last week.  (Tuesday, November 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lydia Holden
Mrs. Lydia Holden, one of the first settlers and oldest residents of Mansfield died last Tuesday morning of congestion of the lungs.  She was in her 82nd year.  (Tuesday, November 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Armour
David Armour, arrested for drunkenness at Ingersol, Ontario, was burned to death in his cell Sunday morning.  It is supposed that he set fire to the woodwork for the purpose of gaining liberty.  (Tuesday, November 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank P. Lewis
In Wellsboro, October 20, 1874, of typhoid fever, Frank P., youngest son of Samuel and Ellen F. Lewis, of Rushford, Allegany county, NY, aged 21 years, 8 months and 20 days.  (Tuesday, November 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Austin [SRGP 09028]
Mr. William Austin, who lived in the edge of Ward township, died last week, and left a large family in poor circumstances. Mainesburg, Nov. 20, 1874.  (Tuesday, November 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Lattimer
The Index says that on the 5th instant, John Lattimer, about 13 years of age, son of Alex. Lattimer, living on the Jamison, was found in the barn dying from a wound in the temple.  It is thought that he fell from the ladder and his head struck on a pitchfork, as a fork with a broken tine was laying near him and the wound was such as a broken fork-tine would make.  When found he was breathing his last and speechless.  (Tuesday, November 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Manville C. Pritchard
At Westfield, Pa., November 11th, 1874, Manville C., son of Morris and Sarah Pritchard, aged 20 years, 8 months and 11 days.  (Tuesday, November 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary Elizabeth Wells
In Elmira, November 6th, 1874, Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Warren Wells, aged 17 years.  Remains taken to Daggett Mills for burial.  (Tuesday, November 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Minnie Hockenberger
In Blossburg, Pa., on Friday morning, Nov. 30th, Minnie, daughter of Wm. Hockenberger, aged 25(oe 26) years.  (Tuesday, November 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John McCord
John McCord, at one time a prominent journalist newspaper writer and contractor, died at his residence in Highland, Bradford county, on Saturday, Nov. 7th, aged 84.--Mr. McCord had been in feeble health for some years.  He was well known in Northern Pennsylvania, and highly respected by a large number of friends.  (Tuesday, November 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

D. B. Frink
D. B. Frink, editor of the Truckee Republican, was shot and instantly killed at Truckee, Nevada, last Tuesday night by an unknown man.  Frink was a member of the Vigilance Committee of that place.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wesley Underwood
Wesley Underwood, sentenced to be hanged at Palmyra, Mo., for the murder of Richard Menafee in 1872, hanged himself in jail last Tuesday night.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. T. B. Mitchell
Hon. T. B. Mitchell, a well-known lawyer of Schenectady, died suddenly last week Monday from heart disease, it is supposed.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Julius A. Spencer
Julius A. Spencer, Assistant Superintendent of the Utica and Schenectady, Syracuse and Utica, and New York Central Railroads since their organization, and recently adjuster of the latter company, died in Utica city last week Monday, aged 72 years.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John M. Read
John M. Read, ex-Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, died on Sunday after a brief illness.  He was father of Gen. J. M. Read, United States Minister to Greece.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eliza A. Cranston
Eliza A. Cranston, while intoxicated, upset a kerosene lamp and was burned to death at Providence, Pa., last Sunday.  Her husband was in bed too drunk to save her.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Brig. Gen. Wm. H. Lawrence
Brig. Gen. Wm. H. Lawrence, aged 40, died suddenly at Boston on Saturday.  He left with Col. Cowdin’s regiment at the beginning of the war as Adjutant, and was subsequently appointed on Gen. Hooker’s staff, and was with him through the war.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Major William H. Fowler
Major William H. Fowler of Elmira, died in the city of New York on Thursday evening.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Richard Kneeland
During a quarrel, Friday afternoon in Boston between two young men, Richard Kneeland and J. W. Gainey, the latter stabbed the former, the knife entering the left lung.  Kneeland died and his assailant was arrested.  He confessed his fault.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Simms
George Simms, colored, was hanged last Friday at Covington, Ga., for the crime of committing an outrage on a white woman in November, 1873.  He confessed his guilt.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Stuart
Joseph Stuart, an eminent New York banker, died from an apoplectic fit Wednesday last.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob L. Michaels
Jacob L. Michaels, Grand Senior Warden of the Grand Encampment of Odd Fellows of New York State, died last Wednesday night in New York city.  He was quite young.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Isaac Butts
Isaac Butts, a wealthy and prominent citizen of Rochester, for many years editor of the Union and Advertiser, died on Friday morning after a painful illness of two weeks.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Joseph
Mr. William Joseph, one of the early settlers of Brookfield township died recently at the advanced age of 83 years.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Michael Hopkins
Last week Monday the dead body of a man, lying face down in a shallow pool of water, was found on the Gulick farm south of Blossburg.  The body was soon identified as that of Michael Hopkins, a miner employed at Morris Run.  An inquest was held before F. Welch, J. P.  The verdict was that deceased came to his death from causes unknown to the jury--probably from exposure to the weather.  We are informed that the word “bottle” might well have been substituted for “weather” in this verdict.  Poor Hopkins died a victim to the demon Alcohol.--But he was not the first, nor will he be the last prey of that demon.  Think of it!  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Day
Last Wednesday a party of young men of this village, consisting of Geo. Sturrock, John McInroy, John Day, Curtis Culver and Hiram Bellinger, started out to hunt deer on Marsh creek.  Arrived on the ground, they separated, Day being left alone near Hiltbold’s, about three miles from this village, at a point in the woods where a fire had been built.  In about half an hour afterwards Mr. Sturrock went back to where Day had been left, and found his body lying on its side on the ground as naturally as though the hunter had simply fallen asleep.  But a glance at the open eye showed that the sleep was one from which there was no awakening in this world, and a short examination rendered it certain that the unfortunate man had been fatally shot by his own gun, although no report had been heard by his comrades. When left alone Day had set his gun down by the roots of a large pine stump, and it is supposed that it either fell or that in reaching for it in a hurry he drew it towards him by the barrel, when the hammer caught and discharged the piece.  The gun was loaded with both small shot and buckshot and the whole charge entered Day’s body about 2”above the navel, the piece being so near at the time that his vest was burned by the powder.  The gun was found lying with its breech toward the dead man and a few feet from him.  It is supposed that he must have thrown it from him by a convulsive movement when shot; but it was evident that the wound must have proved almost instantly fatal, for there was no other evidence of any struggle or movement of the body having taken place after the shot was fired. The body was brought to the village the same evening; and next day Justice Brewster held an inquest, the following gentlemen being called as a jury:  Dr. N. Packer, B. T. Van Horn, N. T. Chandler, Alvarus Smith, S. B. Warriner and A. G. Sturrock.  After hearing the testimony the jury found the following verdict: “That John Day came to his death on the 25th day of November, 1874, in Delmar, by a gunshot would made by himself while hunting, accidentally, casually, and by a misfortune, of which said would he, the said John Day, then and there instantly died, and so the jurors aforesaid do say; and the said John Day, in manner by the means aforesaid, accidentally, casually, and by misfortune, came to his death, and not otherwise.”  The funeral, which was under charge of the Odd Fellows, of which order Day was a member, was held at his late residence in this village Friday morning.  The religious services were conducted by Rev. N. L. Reynolds, and a very large concourse of friends and neighbors were present.  Day was a steady, industrious young man, a son of Solomon Day, of Keeneyville.  He was but 21 years of age, a mason by trade, and had worked for several years past for Mr. McInroy, of this village.  He was married about a year ago, and by his sudden death a young wife and a babe but a few weeks old are deprived of the loving care of a tender husband and father.  The case is truly a sad one, and it has excited the sympathies of the whole village.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Zena L. Hall
In Charleston, November 21, Zena L. Hall, aged 18 years, 4 months, and 21 days.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Catherine Blake
Last Tuesday morning, a widow woman by the name of Catherine Blake, working in the family of Joseph Bartholomew, of Elmira, was found dead in her bed.  Her disease was dropsy of the heart.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Carter
Mr. Joseph Carter, an old and well known citizen of Bath, died at that place on the 16th ultimo.  (Tuesday, December 1, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Phebe Utley
Mrs. Phebe Utley, for many years past the hospital nurse at the Soldiers’ Orphan School at Mansfield, died on the 6th instant.  She is highly spoken of by the local paper.  (Tuesday, December 15, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Allen Webster [SRGP 09339]
In Sullivan, Nov. 23, 1874, Mr. Allen Webster, aged 69 years.  In the death of Mr. Webster his family have lost a kind husband and father, the Baptist Church a worthy member, and society a good neighbor and friend.  Our loss is his gain.  (Tuesday, December 15, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. John B. Rice
Hon. John B. Rice, member of Congress from the First District of Illinois, and formerly Mayor of Chicago, died at Norfolk, Va., last Thursday evening.  (Tuesday, December 22, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Payson
Samuel Payson, Postmaster of North Warren, Me., and his wife were found dead in bed Thursday morning, suffocated by coal gas.  Another couple were nearly dead when discovered.  (Tuesday, December 22, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Clark
John Clark, engineer of the Harrisburg water works, was killed and a laborer by the name of Taylor injured on Thursday by a pressure of water forcing the cap off a 20” main.  (Tuesday, December 22, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Carrie Benson
In Onalaska, Wis., Thursday afternoon, December 3d, 1874, Mrs. Carrie Benson, formerly Mrs. Tutton, daughter of John Aiken, formerly of Middlebury, Tioga county, Pa., aged 39 years and 6 months.  (Tuesday, December 22, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Cottrell Clark
Thomas Cottrell Clark died last Tuesday in Camden, NJ.  He was the first editor of the Philadelphia Saturday Evening Post, and at one time editor of the Saturday Courier.  In 1849 he was associated with Edgar A. Poe, and under the firm of Clark & Poe they published a magazine entitled the Stylus.  While editing the Courier, Mr. Clark engaged the services of Mr. Poe as literary and art critic.  (Tuesday, December 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Venerable James Walker, D. D.
Venerable James Walker, D. D., formerly President of Harvard College, died Wednesday afternoon at his residence in Cambridge, aged 80 years.  (Tuesday, December 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Walter Whitney
A few days since a young man named Walter Whitney, while skidding logs near Holidaytown, met with an accident by which his leg was broken below the knee.  Surgical aid was called, and the bones were found to be badly smashed; but no doubts were felt of the young man’s final recovery.  He was taken home, and in the evening morphine was administered to alleviate the sufferer’s pain.  In the night it was found he was sinking rapidly, and another physician was called; but his efforts proved vain, and Mr. Whitney died the next evening.  He is spoken of as a young man of industrious habits, and was respected by all who knew him.  He was engaged to be married on Christmas day.  (Tuesday, December 29, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 03/08/2003
Content Replaced 11 SEP 2007
By Joyce M. Tice
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