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Tri County Clippings- Page Two Hundred Ten

These obituaries Are extracted from various newspaper that are available to us. They are arranged by newspaper and date. If you do not have the time to enjoy the luxury of sifting through our clippings they will be included in the Search Engine which you can reach from the "Front Door" of the Tri-County Genealogy & History sites by Joyce M. Tice.   All Newspaper clipping in this section of the site are in the Clippings partition of the Partitioned search engine that you can find at the bottom of the Current What's New page.

1874  Wellsboro Agitator Obituaries
January to June July to December

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John Graham
John Graham, of New York, while ascending his stairs with a candle in his hands, set his whiskers on fire, and was so badly burned about the throat and chest that he died shortly after.  (Tuesday, January 20, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mayor Yearger
Mayor Yearger, of Allentown, Pa., died suddenly in that city Wednesday morning.  (Tuesday, January 20, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jacob Stiner
The residence of Mr. Jacob Stiner, a well-known tea merchant in New York, was set on fire by a defective heater early last Tuesday morning.  Mr. Stiner jumped from an upper story and was killed, while his wife and oldest daughter were burned to death in the house.  A servant girl also jumped from an upper window and broke both hips.  (Tuesday, January 20, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Col. Thomas N. Stillwell
Col. Thomas N. Stillwell, who was Minister to Venezuela during President Johnson’s administration, was shot and instantly killed by John E. Corwin, at Andover, Ind., Wednesday afternoon.  (Tuesday, January 20, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Caroline M. Dimmick
At Ansonia, Dec. 31, 1873, Caroline M. Dimmick, wife of George W. Dimmick, aged 37 years, 2 months and 27 days.  (Tuesday, January 20, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Bowers Lewis
John Bowers Lewis, ex-member of Parliament, and the most eminent lawyer of Central Canada, died last Saturday.  (Tuesday, January 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Captain John Johnson
Captain John Johnson, aged 74, a former prominent steamboat builder of Cincinnati, put his head into the elevator tower at the Gibson House on Friday, when the elevator descended upon and severed his head from his body.  (Tuesday, January 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Deboj
Jacob Deboj, of Cambria county, died recently, aged 108 years.  He served under Napoleon when the great General was but 26 years old.  (Tuesday, January 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Oliver Treat Bundy
The subject of this notice was born on the 31st of January, 1801, at Huntington, Fairfield county, Ct.,--removed to Chenango county, NY, with his parents, who settled on a farm in Oxford, about the year 1807.  “Treat,” as he was familiarly called, was the eldest of 10 children, three of whom became members of the three learned professions.  At the age of 22 he entered the office of Dr. Packer, in Oxford, who was then occupying a distinguished place in the profession throughout the State;--was licensed as a practitioner on the 30th of January, 1826, at Bath, Steuben county, NY.  He first practiced at Wellsboro, Pa., where he married Lydia Smith, and lived four years, whence he returned to New York, and settled in Windsor, Broome county, (1830).  Here he soon acquired an extensive practice, and attained a notable degree of influence--being at one time (1840) President of the Broome County Medical Society.  During 1854 he came to Deposit, where his mature years--his best medical and surgical skill have been expended, with singular industry and seeming unweariedness, until the day of his decease.  Though untiring as to the demands upon him professionally,--ready to respond night or day, and as no respecter of persons,--a public mindedness, even zeal for the public good, ever characterized him.  Through his self-sacrificing devotion to this interest, he became a chief founder of the Windsor Academy.  He was, and continued to be, its first President for a number of years, and ever gave the institution his befriending counsel and material support.  As a reformer, he was radical, zealous and consistent.  Here his unusual vitality, in degree second only to his profession, was expended.  This is true especially of his devotion to the temperance cause.  Few men of his professional fidelity and of moderate circumstances have given themselves to any social reform with a spirit so disinterested.  Early and late--at home and in the neighboring towns--in connection with any worthy movement in the local and State convention,--in concerted action and by personal appeal,--hopeful and persistent while others doubted or jeered, his action vied with a humane heart in seeking to save men from what he called an “unmitigated curse.”--The widow and the orphan, made so by a merciless evil, have indeed lost in him a true friend; while remorseful victims may never know the measure of his tireless sympathy.  “His connection with the church of Christ dates 42 years; entering first into covenant with the Presbyterian church of Windsor.  Sound in Christian doctrine, rigid as to religious faith and obligation, charitable to others, bold to rebuke know wrong, he sought the honor of his Lord and Master.  His place in the sanctuary and in the weekly prayer meeting was habitually filled, except when on professional duty,--a fact we are pleased to note to the honor of the medical profession.  His death occurred in Deposit, Jan. 9th, 1874, of angina pectoris, after a brief, but distressing illness, at the age of 73.  As an affectionate husband, a devoted father and friend, an ardent, yoke-fellow, a brother in Christ, a worthy citizen, a friend to humanity, a faithful and sympathizing physician, his removal becomes a deeply afflictive Providence, and an important loss.--A most sincere and heartfelt sympathy is tendered to the family on the part of the community in which he lived and a large circle of acquaintance.  (Tuesday, January 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Aggie Phenix and 2 twins
At Pike Mills, Friday, January 16th, 1874, Mrs. Aggie Phenix, wife of Joshua Phenix, aged 27 years and seven months.  Also twins Aggie and Bernice, children of the above mentioned, aged one day.  (Tuesday, January 27, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Harriet A. Barker
At Chicago, IL., January 19th, 1874, Harriet A., wife of Joseph Barker, aged 51 years.  (Tuesday, February 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Deborah Allen
In Stony Fork, January 30, 1874, Deborah, wife of Thomas Allen, aged 78 years.  (Tuesday, February 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Thomas Layton
Mr. Thomas Layton, of Brookfield township, met with a fatal accident a few days since.  While engaged in skidding logs his team became frightened and started, causing a log to strike and roll over him.  He was so badly crushed that he lingered but a few days and died Saturday morning, the 24th ultimo.  Mr. Layton was about 45 or 50 years of age.  (Tuesday, February 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Moses D. Strait
A correspondent of the Elmira Advertiser says:  Dr. Moses D. Strait was found dead near the creek on the Pomeroy farm, just west of Troy, Pa., on Saturday the 24th, at about 4 o’clock.  It is thought he had been dead about four hours when discovered.  An inquest was held.  The jury rendered this verdict-- “Died of congestion of the brain.”  Dr. Strait was a resident of Gray Valley, Tioga county, Pa.  He was 64 years of age.  (Tuesday, February 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick D. Bunnel
Mr. Frederick D. Bunnel, a resident of this village for a dozen years past, and a man well known to many citizens of the county, died Monday morning of last week at Elizabeth City, NC.  His son James had, a very few days before, left him in excellent health, and spirits and the first intimation his family had that any thing was amiss with Mr. Bunnel was the dispatch of Tuesday announcing his death.  We understand that this sudden calamity was the result of strangulated hernia occasioned by slipping while going down stairs on the Saturday previous to his decease.  So true is it that “in the midst of life we are in death.”  Mr. Bunnel came to this village from Chenango county, NY, and soon made himself known as a most enterprising, public-spirited citizen.  Indeed, his stock of energy seemed exhaustless, and when he entered into any project he allowed no grass to grow under his feet.  In private life he was a genial hearty companion and a faithful friend, and his limitless fund of humor, odd notions and quaint expressions banished dullness wherever “Fred Bunnel” appeared.  He left home for Elizabeth City last fall soon after our County Fair, taking with him some of his finest stock, of which he was very proud, and has been south ever since that time.  His obsequies were attended at his date residence in this village last Sunday afternoon, Rev. Dr. Breck officiating, and a very large number of citizens being present.  We clip the following brief tribute from the Elisabeth City, North Carolinian of January 28th:  It is with sorrow that we are called upon to announce the rather sudden death of Maj. F. D. Bunnel.  His illness was very brief.  He was in his usual health on Saturday.  He had a long talk with us on that day about plans and prospects for the future.  Late that night he was taken sick, and on Monday morning, January 26th, at 6 o’clock he died.  Everything that physicians and friends could do was done, but without avail.  About two years ago he invested pretty extensively in property in and around Elizabeth City, and has been spending a portion of his time here.  Last October he brought a fine lot of blooded stock, horses and cattle, to this State, attended the Fairs at Raleigh and Weldon, and arrived here in time to attend ours in November.  Since then he has remained here, disposing of his stock and looking after his property.  Three of his sons were also here, two of whom left for Pennsylvania a few days ago, leaving the youngest who was the only one of his family with him when he died.  With all his frailties--and who hasn’t some?--Major Bunnel was a man of good impulses.  Brusque as he was in speech and manner, he had a warm heart.  (Tuesday, February 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert K. Potter
Robert K. Potter, State printer of Massachusetts, and long identified with the Boston newspapers, is dead.  (Tuesday, February 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Mehr, 4 children, and man named George
At Indianapolis last Thursday, the house of Mr. Mehr, containing himself, wife, six children, his father-in-law, and a man named George, was burned.  Only the father-in-law and two children escaped.  (February 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Henry Miller
Dr. Henry Miller, President of the Louisville, Ky., Medical College, died last Sunday, aged 74 years.  (Tuesday, February 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Milton Earle
John Milton Earle died on Sunday at Worcester, Mass., aged 79 years.  For 35 years he was editor of the Worcester Spy, from which he retired 15 years ago.  (Tuesday, February 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Mr. Geo. H. R. Shumway
Rev. Mr. Geo. H. R. Shumway, pastor of the Presbyterian church at Painted Post, died at Lawrenceville on the 28th ultimo.  (Tuesday, February 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Annis Smith
Another pioneer gone.-- Mrs. Annis Smith died at the residence of her son in Austinville on the 25th of last month, in the 86th year of her age.  Mrs. Smith together with her husband settled in Rutland in 1806, living there two years before they had any near neighbors in the wilderness.  Their habitation consisted of a log hut without a floor, door, or chimney, erected at the end of a sled road out into the woods.  It was thus that the hardy pioneers began their stern struggle with the rough forces of nature.  But they lived to see the hills and valleys covered with fine farms--the happy homes of contented and thrifty husbandmen.  Mr. Smith died in May, 1871, on the farm on which the first settled, having lived on the same spot for the long term of 65 years.  Soon after beginning their life-work in subduing the wilderness the young couple sought and found the “pearl of great price.”  We understand Mr. Smith was the first person who joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in Tioga county.  Both he and his partner were ever faithful to their professions, and lived and died in the triumph of a living faith.  Verily, their works do follow them.  (Tuesday, February 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Timothy O’Brian
A farmer named Timothy O’Brian, a resident of Athens township, fell from a load of straw a few days ago, and sustained injuries from which he died.  (Tuesday, February 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. James Anthony Froude
The wife of James Anthony Froude died in London on Saturday.  (Tuesday, February 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Eunice Herrington
We learn that Mrs. Eunice Herrington died at the residence of her son, Deroy Herrington, on Pine Creek, on Saturday, the 7th instant.  Mrs. Herrington was in her 80th year but retained her faculties in a wonderful degree, and appeared as well as usual until a few hours before her death.--She was an old resident of the neighborhood, and was much respected and beloved by all who knew her.  (Tuesday, February 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Ira D. Richards
The Honesdale Citizen of the 12th, speaking of Mr. Richards’s death says: We learn with regret that the Hon. Ira D. Richards, Recorder of the Mayor’s Court of Carbondale, died suddenly Monday afternoon from hemorrhage of the lungs.  He was attacked while on the bench, and was conveyed to his residence, where he died in about two hours.  He was a gentleman of unblemished character, and fine legal attainments.  (Tuesday, February 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Philip Church
Philip Church of Belvidere, Allegany county, NY, died in New York at the residence of his sister a few days ago.  He was 59 years of age.  He was one of the sons of Judge Church, one of the earliest settlers of the south-western part of New York.  He was unmarried.  (Tuesday, February 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George W. Blodgett, Esq.
George W. Blodgett, Esq., father-in-law of John R. Anderson, Esq., of this place, at his residence in Le Roy, NY, Feb. 10, 1874, in his 80th year.  (Tuesday, February 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Neil McBride
Neil McBride, a miner, was murdered last Saturday evening, at Beaver Meadow, Pa.  It is supposed the murderer, Neil Paul, escaped.  The victim leaves a wife and four children.  (Tuesday, February 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas and Simon Sturtevant and Mary Buckley
Thomas and Simon Sturtevant and a maiden lady named Mary Buckley were found murdered at their residence in Halifax, Mass., one day last week.  No clue to the murderers.  (Tuesday, February 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Benjamin S. Mulford
At Mitchell’s Creek, Tioga county, Pa., Feb. 16th, after a short but painful illness, Benjamin S. Mulford, aged 62 years.  He was born at Lindley, Steuben county, NY, but came to this county while very young.  For more than 40 years he has been a faithful and consistent member of the M. E. Church, an affectionate husband and father, and an upright citizen of incorruptible integrity and untarnished reputation.  A good man has gone to his reward.  (Tuesday, February 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Perry
The Coudersport Journal of last week says, Nathaniel Perry, of Bingham, with another man, was killed in the lumber woods of Jefferson county a few days ago.  The body of Mr. Perry was brought to his home in this county on Monday.  (Tuesday, February 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Constant Cook
Hon. Constant Cook, a leading citizen of Bath, died in that village last Tuesday morning.  His death could not have been unexpected by his friends, for his illness had been a lingering one.  In him Bath loses the last of her citizens of the older class, who, beginning life in the obscurest poverty, amassed great fortunes by the most patient industry and frugality backed by unerring sagacity and business tact.  The village is largely indebted to Judge Cook for her chief architectural ornament--her beautiful Episcopal church, one of the finest edifices of the kind to be found in Western New York; and if his suggestions and liberal offers had been duly seconded by her citizens, the place would to-day be in the enjoyment of a most efficient and beneficent system, of waterworks.  Bath has many wealthy residents.--she will be fortunate if she hereafter finds among them those as able and as willing to enhance her beauties and add to her conveniences as was Hon. Constant Cook.  (Tuesday, March 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Moyer
In Liberty, Pa., Feb. 20, 1874, of dropsy, Mary, wife of Jacob Moyer, aged 89 years, 8 months and 1 day.  (Tuesday, March 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Margaret Brewster
On Sunday evening, Feb. 22d, Margaret, daughter of C. E. and Ruth Brewster, aged 1 year, 7 months and 22 days.  (Tuesday, March 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Shirley Brooks
Charles Shirley Brooks, the English novelist and dramatic author, is dead.  (Tuesday, March 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Henry Smith
Hon. Henry Smith, President of the New York City Board of Police, died last week.  (Tuesday, March 3, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Abbey L. Merrian
Abbey L. Merrian, daughter of the publisher of Webster’s Dictionary, and a resident of Springfield, Mass., committed suicide last Wednesday by jumping from a 4th story window of the DeBrundage House, a water cure establishment in Madison Avenue, New York, while laboring under a fit of temporary insanity.  (Tuesday, March 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ex-President Millard Fillmore
Ex-President Millard Fillmore died at his residence in Buffalo at 11:10 pm Sunday night.  He was conscious up to the time of his death.  At 8 o’clock, in reply to a question by his physician, he said that “the nourishment was palatable.”  These were his last words.  His death was painless.  (Tuesday, March 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ada M. Noyes
Ada M. Noyes, a New York actress, died in terrible agony on Thursday with hydrophobia from a bite of her favorite poodle dog.  (Tuesday, March 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Susan Clark
Suicide at Nelson.--A correspondent of the Elmira Gazette gives an account of the suicide of a young girl, at Nelson, last week Monday evening.  As the night train on the Corning, Cowanesque & Antrim Road was passing west, when a few rods above the depot a young girl by the name of Susan Clark deliberately threw herself upon the track in front of the approaching engine.  She was discovered by the engineer, but not in time to avoid the fatal result.  The train passed over the unfortunate girl’s thigh in an oblique direction, horribly mutilating and nearly severing them from her body.  She was taken back to the depot and lingered in agony until 2 o’clock the next morning when death put an end to her suffering.  She was conscious after the accident, and stated that she had had some trouble with her mother and had resolved upon self-destruction.  She had hastened to the railroad, awaited the approach of the train, thrown herself upon the track, and thus sought death as a refuge from her real or imaginary woes.  She was about 14 years of age, and was apparently an intelligent girl.  (Tuesday, March 10, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Sumner
The death of Charles Sumner, which took place at Washington last Wednesday, has caused profound sorrow throughout the Republic.  He was one of the most brilliant statesmen the country has ever produced, and his character was unsullied by a breath of suspicion in an age when those most eminent in political life hardly escape open charges of venality and corruption.  His conspicuous services and his not less conspicuous sufferings in the cause of human liberty had endeared him to all lovers of freedom in every land and had won the respect even of that section of our own country against whose “peculiar institution” his strongest efforts had been directed.  He has gone to the grave in fact the victim of the assassin’s bludgeon; but he lived long enough to see the “relic of barbarism” in behalf of which that bludgeon was used blotted from the land by the tears and best blood of the whole nation.  It is hardly necessary to enter upon a detailed statement of the distinguished Senator’s career, for the events of his life are familiar to all who have any interest in the annual of the Republic during the last exciting and important quarter of a century.  His position among successful Americans was singular insomuch as he was born to a competence and was the descendant of a long line of scholars and men of gentle breeding.  And he united in his own person all the good qualities of such a race.  He was a man of imposing and symmetrical proportions and of princely grade, while he was a thorough and persistent student.  Very early in life he achieved local distinction as a lawyer and scholar, and it is to be recorded to his credit that his assured position in the conservative society of Boston in the early days of the anti-slavery agitation did not render him insensible to the universal rights of man, nor stifle his indignant condemnation of a wrong hedged about by law and custom.  But he attacked chattel slavery, not by placing himself outside the Constitution as Garrison and the earlier Abolitionists did, but by taking his stand upon the fundamental law and declaring slavery outside of that law.  “Freedom national, slavery sectional,” was from the first his motto, and under this device he fought all his great battles for liberty, bringing the profoundest legal research and the acutest reasoning to second the appeals of the philanthropist.--His services to the country in thus fortifying the public sentiment of the North by unanswerable arguments drawn from the history and the laws of the land can hardly be overestimated. Mr. Sumner entered upon his public career at a time and in a manner peculiarly fortunate for himself and for the cause nearest his heart.  He was elected to the Senate by a coalition of Free-Soilers and Democrats in 1851.  He took his seat, unfledged to any party, just after the passage of the futile compromise measures of Fillmore’s Administration, and he lost no time in defining his position by an eloquent argument in favor of the repeal of the Fugitive Slave law.  It was in this speech that he argued that slavery existed in violation of the national Constitution.  From this time his speeches inspired much of the more rational anti-slavery sentiment of the country.  When the repeal of the Missouri Compromise called the Republican party into existence, he became one of the most trusted and most faithful champions of that party.  And he became still dearer to all anti-slavery men when, in 1856, the brutal assault in the Senate chamber rendered forever in famous the name of Preston S. Brooks, and crippled and finally quenched the brilliant faculties of the great advocate of human liberty.  It is unnecessary to dwell upon that scene or upon Mr. Sumner’s subsequent career.  The whole story is still fresh in the hearts of his countrymen.  In estimating Mr. Sumner’s position among statesmen it must be admitted that his efforts were often more elevated than practical, and it is an undoubted fact, that he succeeded in placing upon the statute book of the country fewer laws than some men much his inferiors in learning and general ability.  His tendency to carry measures to extremes where few would follow him was exhibited to the country in his management of the Civil Rights bill, during the last Congress, and to the whole world in his position on the question of England’s responsibility for consequential damages for the depredations of the Alabama.  As a legislator, too, his personal influence, was somewhat impaired by a haughty and dictatorial temper and bearing toward his fellows and by his unrestrained impatience at opposition.  But in spite of these defects he filled the important position of chairman of the committee on foreign relations for 10 of the most critical years of our history, and discharged the duties of the post not only with discretion but with conspicuous ability.  As an orator he was without a rival among Americans; but as a practical manager of men he was excelled by more than one of his contemporaries.  But whatever his merits or defects, he has certainly achieved a name and a fame of which Americans may well feel proud.  And his great ability, his profound learning, his untiring and successful labors for the advancement of the race, and his unspotted public and private character have placed his name high on the roll of the great men of the world. (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Christian Sharp
Christian Sharp, inventor of the Sharp’s rifle, died at his residence in Vernon, Conn., on Wednesday night.  (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Campbell
The Register says that Mr. William Campbell, who has been employed until recently at the United States Hotel in Blossburg, died suddenly at Covington on Tuesday afternoon last, by bleeding to death--having burst a blood-vessel in a fit of coughing.  (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James Locke
Mr. James Locke, one of the oldest inhabitants of this village, died last Saturday afternoon after a painful illness of many months’ duration.  Mr. Locke was born in Keene, NH, on the 18th day of May, 1790.  He remained a resident of his native State until after he had reached man’s estate and found a young family growing up around him, when he left the home of his youth and came to Wellsboro.  This village was a mere hamlet when Mr. Locke came here, there being but five frame buildings and a few log houses within the corporation limits.  And here he has resided ever since, witnessing the growth of the place to its present goodly proportions.  In his younger days Mr. Locke learned the watch-maker’s and silver-plating trade, but finding that employment injurious to his health he soon abandoned it.  He was a live Yankee and a born mechanic, and showed wonderful aptness in executing any work when offered.  At one time he was engaged in the manufacture of earthen-ware on the lot in front of the present residence of Mr. William Bache.  During the erection of the Court House he made the doors for that building, and at the same time fashioned and kept in order the stone cutters tools.  He afterwards established a gun shop, and for many years furnished the hunters of this region with excellent weapons.  He was himself a most successful weapons.  He was himself a most successful hunter and a faithful disciple of Isaac Walton until old age and increasing infirmities incapacitated him for the hardy sports of the forest and stream. He was ever a good citizen and a faithful friend, and during his long and useful life enjoyed the confidence and good will of all his neighbors.  A striking evidence of the esteem in which he was held by the older residents of this village was given on his last birthday and the 60th anniversary of his wedding, when a number of them called at his modest residence and presented the aged couple with a beautifully illustrated quarto Bible as a token of respect.  It was evident at that time that the old citizen could not last much longer; and now the event which all anticipated has come, and he has passed from his sufferings and infirmities to the land of immortal youth.  Peace to his ashes.  Mr. Locke has left behind him an aged consort who for more than 60 years has shared his good, and evil fortune, and eight children--six daughters and two sons--remain to keep his memory green.  The funeral services will be held at the Presbyterian church this morning at 11 o’clock.  (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joe Brader
Joe Brader, the dirtiest man in Luzerne county, (according to the Plymouth Index), died at his home in Union township, Luzerne county, a few days ago.  He left $5,000, mostly in hard cash to his friends, and his wardrobe, consisting of a sheep skin suit and wooden shoes--and yet he was not, so to say, a proud man.  (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Ort
Jacob Ort died in Bellefonte, aged 102.  He “ort n’t” to have died until after the nation’s centennial.  (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Fordham
George Fordham, of Waverly, was killed by the cars at Elmira last Thursday.  (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Dunn
An Irishman, named John Dunn, a track-walker was run over and killed, on Thursday last, a short distance below the village.  The working train had changed from one track to the other to be out of the way of a passing train, which change Dunn had not noticed.  He heard the train coming, but did not suppose it was on the same track on which he was walking.  He was killed instantly, his head being severed from the trunk and his body otherwise mutilated.  He leaves a wife and six children--Addison Advertiser, March 11.  (Tuesday, March 17, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Thaddeus I. Mitchell
Mr. Thaddeus I. Mitchell, of Mitchell Creek, died last Wednesday evening of typhoid pneumonia.  Mr. Mitchell was a leading citizen of his neighborhood. (Tuesday, March 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Son of E. Lattimer
A correspondent in Chatham informs us that a few days ago a little son of Mr. E. Lattimer, of Chatham, ran backwards into a kettle of hot water, which sat on the floor, and was so badly scalded that he lingered a few days in great agony, when death put a period to his sufferings.  (Tuesday, March 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Bates
In Canton, March 12th, 1874, of general debility, John Bates, aged 74 years.  (Tuesday, March 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Edith Doud [SRGP 13234]
In Sullivan, March 1st, 1874, of diphtheria, Edith, daughter of Lorenzo and Ann Doud, aged 2 years, 2 months and 15 days.  (Tuesday, March 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Mainesburg Cemetery]

Miss Sadie Robbins [SRGP 82258]
In Sullivan, March 15, 1874, of diphtheria, Sadie, daughter of Levi and Ann Robbins, aged 3 years and ? months.  (Tuesday, March 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ralph G. Rumsey [SRGP 06912]
In Mainesburg, March 4, 1874, of dropsy of the brain, Ralph G., little son of Chas. M. and Matilda E. Rumsey, aged 1 year and 2 months.  (Tuesday, March 24, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Mainesburg Cemetery]

Charles S. Kron
Charles S. Kron was found murdered in a ravine in Hoboken last week, with his head smashed and pockets rifled.  (Tuesday, March 31, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Justus W. Acuff
Justus W. Acuff, of Montgomery county, Pa., an insane patient of Kirkbridge’s Hospital, while in the yard with other patients a few days since, wanted them to box with him.  His companions all fell upon him and beat him in a shocking manner, causing his death.  (Tuesday, March 31, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

H. H. Kittaby
H. H. Kittaby, a prominent Canadian politician and government official, died at Picton on Saturday.  (Tuesday, March 31, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Harvey Myers
Col. W. L. Tyrrell, the correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, shot and killed Hon. Harvey Myers, at Covington, Kentucky, on Saturday.  Both were very prominent men in Kentucky.  The shooting was the result of a grudge of long standing.  (Tuesday, March 31, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Edward N. Kirk
Rev. Edward N. Kirk, who became so well known during his Albany pastorate of the Congregational church, died of apoplexy, in Boston, on Friday last.  (Tuesday, March 31, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ernst Muller
Ernst Muller blew his brains out last Wednesday at Hoboken because a young lady refused to marry him.  He had just arrived from Germany, and letters of credit to a large amount were awaiting him.  (Tuesday, March 31, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Aristides Bienvue
A duel was fought near Montgomery station, Miss., last Saturday, between Aristides Bienvue and B. Phillips, with double-barrel shot guns loaded with a single ball, at 40 paces.  Bienvue was killed at the first fire, being shot through the brain.--Phillips was not hurt.  (Tuesday, April 7, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Campbell
Joseph Campbell, a prominent citizen of Burlington township, Bradford county, died a few days ago of pleuro-pneumonia.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. A. S. Arnold
Hon. A. S. Arnold, one of the oldest and most prominent citizens of McKean county, died at his home in Port Allegany on Wednesday, April 1st.  His loss is one that will be long felt throughout a large section of country.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Michael C. Maloney
Michael C. Maloney committed suicide in Elmira a few days ago by cutting his throat with a razor.  He was 55 years of age and leaves a wife and three children to mourn his suicidal end.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Brogan
On Tuesday, March 31st, Henry Brogan, about 25 or 30 years of age, a native of Ireland, was severely injured in No. 3 drift by a fall of coal and stone falling on to him.  His right foot and ankle were badly bruised, and his left leg was also hurt.  On the Saturday following his right foot was amputated.  Then, again, the limb was amputated a second time on Monday.--He died on Tuesday at 6 o’clock pm.  He was the sole support of widowed mother, who lives in England.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alex. Muir
On the same day, and just about the time the people were congregated together to the funeral of Mr. Brogan, a young man by the name of Alex. Muir, a native of Scotland, was instantly killed in No. 2 drift by a quantity of coal, about two tons’ weight, falling upon him.  The deceased was about 17 years of age, and had a mother residing in Scotland.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Smith
A colored man named Charles Smith was shot dead in “Puddlers Row,” at Elmira recently, by another colored man named George Bowyer.  It is difficult to tell how the affair occurred.  The deceased leaves a wife and one child.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Gardner
Mrs. Mary Gardner, relict of the late Geo. Gardner of Big Flats, died recently at the residence of her son-in-law, L. D. Hughson, of Savona.  She was 78 years of age and was well known among the pioneers of the Chemung valley.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. J. H. Paddock
The little village of Nanticoke, near Wilkesbarre, in Luzerne county, Pa., was thrown into a considerable state of excitement on a recent Monday when it was learned that Rev. J. H. Paddock, minister of the M. E. Church, had committed suicide.  Groups of curious persons and sympathizing friends discussed the sad affair pro and con, and various were the surmises as to the real cause.  Mr. Paddock preached a sermon Sunday, and appeared in his usual health both as to body and mind.  An hour before his death, he took his last drive with his wife, and on his arrival at his house deliberately shot himself with his revolver, causing instant death.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Anna Mott
In Mansfield, April 4, 1874, Mrs. Anna Mott, aged 73 years.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Gaylord
At Canandaigua, NY, after a long and painful illness, Julia, wife of Sanford E. Gaylord, of Blossburg, aged 37 years.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucy Butts
At the residence of her son, O. L. Butts, near Farmington Hill, March 26, 1874, Mrs. Lucy Butts, in the 78th year of her age.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Rowland
In Westfield, on Saturday, April 4th, 1874, John Rowland, aged 36 years.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Deacon Isaac Thompson
At his residence in Harrison, March 26th, 1874, Deacon Isaac Thompson, in the 80th year of his age.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Lena Robbins [SRGP 82259]
In Sullivan, March 24, 1874, of diphtheria, Lena, youngest daughter of Levi and Mary Ann Robbins, aged 9 months.  (Tuesday, April 14, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Buchanan
William Buchanan, for many years a resident of Chemung county, NY, and a cousin of the last Democratic President, died at Elmira last Sunday in the 91st year of his age.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Freddie A. Baskwell
In Blossburg, April 13, 1874, Freddie A., only son of Rev. J. A. and Mrs. C. S. Baskwell, aged 4 years and 9 months.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Georgie Camp
In Lawrenceville, on the 4th instant, Georgie, son of George and Kate Camp, aged 1 year, 3 months and 14 days.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. C. Pickett
In Blossburg, April 11, 1874, Mrs. C. Pickett, daughter of John and Mary Weiss, aged 16 years and 9 months.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Sampson
At Copp Hollow, April 6th, 1874, Mr. Joseph Sampson, a well-known and respected citizen.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Nina Stratton
In Blossburg, April 11, 1874, of measles, Nina, daughter of Daniel H. and Mary C. Stratton, aged 12 years.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Theis
April 3, 1874, at his residence in Germania, Pa., Henry Theis, aged 53 years.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jasen Wadsworth
At the residence of Josiah Fink, in Sinnemahoning, March 17, Jasen Wadsworth, aged 53 years.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hannah Williams
In Troy, Pa., April 4, 1873, of typhoid fever, Mrs. Hannah Williams, aged 74 years.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James McDonald
The Painted Post Times, of last week says:  Mr. James McDonald, a resident of the south-western part of our town died on Monday last.  Within the past three weeks, two of his sons have been buried, and four of his children are now living very ill at his house, with scarlet fever.  Mr. Greek, one of his neighbors, buried a son yesterday, at the same time Mr. McDonald was buried.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Col. Gamble
The Horseheads Free Press says:  Col. Gamble, at one time famous as a hotel keeper in this part of the State, died at Painted Post on the 2d inst.  In 1835 he kept the Clinton House, Bath; in 1849 the Eagle, Elmira; in 1845, the American now the Metropolitan, at Auburn; and only last winter we found him connected with the Jefferson House, Watkins.  During the interval of years in which we had lost sight of him, he had been to Canada and tried his hand, none too successfully, we believe, in keeping hotel in the Queen’s domains, where there is not much admiration for the “blarsted Yankees,” prevailing among the people.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Amma A. Bailey
In Frost Settlement, Covington township, April 14, 1874, Amma A., wife of Conston Bailey, aged precisely 38 years.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Professor John Phillips
Professor John Phillips, the English geologist, is dead.  (Tuesday, April 21, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Allen Leggett
Mrs. Allen Leggett of Cohocton, while engaged in her usual domestic duties, died recently from heart disease.  She was 53 years of age.  (Tuesday, April 28, 1873, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Doney
A little son of Seymour Doney, of Coganhouse township, aged about four years, was instantly killed by the falling of a tree a few days ago.  It appears that Mr. Doney and another man were felling trees and had given his little boy orders to go to the house, being a short distance from where they were at work.  The boy started but did not get far enough away, when the tree, contrary to expectation, fell in the wrong direction and crushed him to death.  (Tuesday, April 28, 1873, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Amy Bailey
In Covington, April 14, 1874, in triumphant hope of eternal life, Mrs. Amy, wife of Constant Bailey, aged 86(?) years.  (Tuesday, April 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Cruttendon
In Morris Run, April 22, 1874, an infant son of Spencer W. and Isabella S. Cruttendon, aged about 13 days.  (Tuesday, April 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Flavius J. Shaw
In Richmond township, April 20, 1874, Flavius J. Shaw, aged 32 years, 4 months.  (Tuesday, April 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George G. Seeley
At his residence in Farmington, Pa., April 9th, 1874, of congestion of the lungs, George G. Seeley, in the 60th year of his age.  (Tuesday, April 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Wm. W. Welch [SRGP 02376]
In Farmington, February 28th, 1874, of bronchial consumption, Wm. W. Welch, aged 44(?). (Tuesday, April 28, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Wood Cemetery]

Jonas C. Heart
Jonas C. Heart, for five years Mayor of Troy, NY, and Speaker of the Assembly in 1851, died in that city on Thursday, aged 81 years.  (Tuesday, May 5, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edmund Morris
Edmund Morris, who for many years edited and published the Trenton Gazette, and was the author of “Ten Acres Enough” and “How to get a Farm,” died at his residence in Burlington, NJ, last week.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Arsene N. Girault
The Navy Department is advised of the death of Arsene N. Girault, Professor of Mathematics.  He had been in the navy since 1845, and at the time of his death was on the retired list.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gen. Wm. Hall
Gen. Wm. Hall, a veteran of 1812, and who commanded the troops that suppressed the Astor Place riots, died in New York on Sunday week, aged 78.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Dodsworth
A lad named John Dodsworth, aged about 15 years, living with Otis L. Butts, of Farmington, committed suicide a few days ago by hanging himself in the barn.  He is said to have been subject to fits of despondency.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James P. Taylor
Mr. James P. Taylor, a well-known citizen of Blossburg, died in that village last Sunday.  His death was not unexpected, as he had been in very poor health for over a year past.  Mr. Taylor had lived in Blossburg for 10 or 15 years, and during most of that time had held the office of Postmaster.  In this position he soon won the confidence and esteem of all his neighbors, and become so popular that when, during the days of Johnson, he was removed from that place because of his uncompromising Republicanism, a large majority of the citizens of the borough of both parties joined in a petition for his re-appointment.  And from that time until the day of his death he held the place by common consent.  Mr. Taylor felt much interest in Masonry, in which order he became a leading member in his locality.  At the time of his death he was about 60 years of age and a bachelor.  His funeral is to be attended this afternoon at 2 o’clock, at Blossburg.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Clara M. Austin
In Charleston, Pa., April 30, 1874, Clara M., wife of James E. Austin, aged 29 years.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Walter G. Bartlett [SRGP 51866]
In Mainesburg, May 1, 1874, of diphtheria, Walter G., son of Albert Bartlett, aged 3 years.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Laverne Dewey [SRGP 05838]
In Mainesburg, April 27, 1874, Laverne, son of George and Helen Dewey, aged 8 years.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Glen Dewey [SRGP 06858]
In Mainesburg, May 3, 1874, Glen, son of George and Helen Dewey, aged four years.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Leonard Miller [SRGP 07158]
In Sullivan, April 30, 1874, Leonard Miller, aged 71 years.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [State Road Cemetery]

Maynard Eugene Kinsbury
In Charleston, Pa., May 4, 1874, Maynard Eugene, son of J. E. and R. M. Kingsbury, of Hamilton, Mo., aged 8 months and 2 days.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Clara G. Malloroy
On Friday, April 24, 1874, Clara G., daughter of James and Sarah Malloroy, of Westfield, aged 8 months.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Alice A. Page
In White Pigeon, Mich., Saturday evening, April 18, 1874, Mrs. Alice A. Page, aged 24 years and eight months, wife of D. C. Page, attorney at law.  The deceased was the daughter of Simon H. Landis, and formerly resident of Wellsboro, Pa.  (Tuesday, May 12, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Admiral Franklin Buchanan
Admiral Franklin Buchanan, late of the Confederate navy, died on Tuesday in Talbot county, Md., 74 years of age.  (Tuesday, May 19, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. A. J. Spink
In Blossburg, May 8th, 1874, Mrs. A. J. Spink, aged 24 years.  (Tuesday, May 19, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Viola Putnam
In Blossburg, May 8th, 1874, Viola, daughter of V. A. and Mary Putnam, aged about 6 years.  (Tuesday, May 19, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Craig
In Westfield township, May 16, 1874, John Craig, aged 58 years, 10 months and 24 days.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Minnie Bartlett [SRGP 51868]
In Mainesburg, May 9th, 1874, of membraneous croup, Minnie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bartlett, aged about four years.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)[Mainesburg Cemetery]

Miss Harriet L. Hubbard
In Richmond, April 30, 1874, of paralysis, Harriet L., eldest daughter of D. W. Hubbard, in the 28th year of her age.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Newell F. Horton
In Antrim, on the 16th inst., Newell F., oldest son of Thomas C. and Mariette Horton, aged 24 years and 6 months.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Julius L. Sherman
A Lancaster, Pa., dispatch says Julius L.(?) Sherman, a member of the Legislature, was shot on Saturday week by Mrs. Wellmer and died at his residence on Monday.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Ellis and daughter
During a storm in Baltimore last Tuesday, the house of George Ellis was blown down and himself and daughter killed.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. David B. Mellish
Sudden death at the Government Asylum for the Insane on Saturday followed closely upon the terrible insanity which overtook Hon. David B. Mellish while pursuing a successful career as a member of the present Congress.  His death will be announced with suitable resolutions in the House today, when eulogies will be delivered.  After the ceremonies five Members will accompany the remains to the residence of his father in Auburn, Mass., where they will be interred.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro  Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Dollard
A brutal murder has been discovered in the Massachusetts State Almshouse.  On the 13th of March, Edward Dollard, an aged cripple, was so mutilated by Daniel Leary, the steward, as to cause his death.  No investigation was made at the time by the superintendent, and the facts were unknown till revealed last week by another inmate who witnessed the ill treatment, and who has since been released from the institution.  Leary has been suspended, and will probably be prosecuted.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rear Admiral Shubrick
Rear Admiral Shubrick died at Washington last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John P. Thomson
John P.(or F) Thomson, President of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company; died in Philadelphia on Wednesday after a protracted illness.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alva Doolittle
Alva Doolittle, at one time a resident of Tioga, died at Orilla, Canada, on the 6th of last month.  (Tuesday, May 26, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gen. Robert Fleming
Gen. Robert Fleming died at his residence in Williamsport on Saturday week.  He was the senior member of the Lycoming county bar, was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1837-8 and finally a member of the State Senate.  (Tuesday, June 9, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James G. Clark
The death of James G. Clark, who achieved some prominence as a writer of poetry and a singer, is announced.  It occurred at Deposit on Monday, the first of June.  One of his poems, “The Evergreen Mountains of Life,” is one of the most musical of productions, and will live long in the memory of those who love melody.  (Tuesday, June 9, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Harriet Kelley
In Cherry Flats, Pa., May 20th, 1874, Harriet, wife of Sylvester Kelley, aged 55 years, 8 months and 23 days.  (Tuesday, June 9, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ann Parsons
In Elmira, on the 4th of June, 1874, Mrs. Ann Parsons, widow of the late Rev. James Parsons, of Canton, Pa., aged 80 years.  (Tuesday, June 9, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Job Willcox
In Delmar, on Sunday, May 31st, 1874, Mr. Job Willcox, aged 67 years.  (Tuesday, June 9, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Jennie Town
In Blossburg, May 5, 1874, Jennie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Town, aged 12(or 14) years.  (Tuesday, June 9, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Wells Ripley
At Lambs Creek, May 28th, 1874, Sarah Wells, wife of Wm. B. Ripley.  (Tuesday, June 9, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lloyd B. Husted
Lloyd B. Husted, a son of Mr. James B. Husted, of Blossburg was killed by accident on the Pittsburgh, Washington & Baltimore Railroad last Tuesday morning.  The deceased was employed as an engineer on that road and was respected as a trustworthy and competent railroad man.  His remains were brought to Blossburg for interment.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Nettie Dewey [SRGP 06372]
Nettie, daughter of George and Helen Dewey, aged six years, died in this place on the 10th instant of diphtheria.  This is the 3rd child that family has lost in the last seven weeks by the same disease.  Mainesburg, June 11, 1874.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro  Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. T. H. Arnold
This stem was crowded out last week.  On Friday, June 5th, Mrs. T. H. Arnold, of Sylvania, Bradford county, purchased some strychnine, chloroform and morphine from a druggist in Troy.  She shortly afterward went to the house of Mr. Newell, where she locked herself into a room.  As soon as the circumstances became known the door was burst open, when she was found in an unconscious state from the effects of the drugs which she had taken.  Physicians were called in and did all they could to save her life, but she died about 3 o’clock in the afternoon.  She has been more or less deranged for some time past.  She was very highly respected by those who knew her.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah M. Ripley
At Lamb’s Creek, Thursday, May 28(?), Sarah M. Ripley, wife of William Ripley, aged 36 years, 5 months and 9 days.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jean Francis Landnot
Jean Francis Landnot, Archbishop of Rheims, is dead.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Cory
William Cory, a wealthy builder of New York city, shot through the head at Fort Hamilton on Monday week.  Despondency and nervous prostration are supposed to have led to the suicide.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horatio N. Wild
Horatio N. Wild, ex-Councilman and a famous candy manufacturer of New York city, died Thursday night.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Louis Francis
Louis Francis, a veteran soldier of Brooklyn, NY, who had his leg shot off and received 14 bayonet wounds during the civil war, died suddenly at his supper table on Saturday night, after his return from decorating his comrades’ graves.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Wilson
Mrs. Wilson, wife of the Rector of Christ church, Corning, died last Thursday evening.  The remains were taken to Lodi for interment.  (Tuesday, June 23, 1874, The Wellsboro County Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Lottie B. Pritchard
In Charleston, April 29, 1874, Lottie B., daughter of Walter B. and Mary I. Pritchard, aged 2 years and 20 days.  (Tuesday, June 23, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jules Janin
Jules Janin, the author, died in Paris last Friday.  (Tuesday, June 23, 1874, The Wellsboro  Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alfred Schieffelin
On Monday, the 15th instant, an accident occurred in Charleston township resulting in the sudden death of Alfred, a son of Mr. Alfred Schieffelin, aged about 11 years.  The boy had been riding a young horse to plow out potatoes.  When the job was completed young Schieffelin’s companion unhitched the plow from the whiffletree, allowing the latter implement to strike against the heels of the horse.  The animal was frightened, and started forward, running against a tree against which the boy struck.  He was thrown from the horse’s back to the ground striking upon his head.  The unfortunate lad was at once picked up and taken to the house, but he lived only about an hour after the accident.  Alfred was an only son, and his sudden and violent death is peculiarly afflicting to his family.  (Tuesday, June 23, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John M. Calkins
In Painted Post, NY, June 17th, 1874, John M. Calkins, aged 42 years.  (Tuesday, June 23, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Nettie Dewey [SRGP 06372]
In Mainesburg, June 10, 1874, of diphtheria, Nettie, daughter of George J. Dewey, aged 5 years.  This is the 3rd child these bereaved parents have lost by this dread disease, within a short time.  (Tuesday, June 23, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John D. Scott and family
The house of John D. Scott, Queen county, Ky., was burned last week Sunday.  The family were all asleep, and the youngest daughter of Scott, when aroused, jumped from a second story window and escaped.--Another daughter aroused the family, and all got out of the house except this daughter and a 16 year old son of Wm. Parker.  After Scott found his daughter was still inside the burning building, he went back into the flames and was never seen again.  Later in the day a few bones were found as all that remained of the three persons.  (Tuesday, June 30, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William McCormick
William McCormick, a butcher of New York city, died from hydrophobiaon Thursday.  (Tuesday, June 30, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Howard Staunton
Howard Staunton, the well known English chess player and Shakespearian editor, died in London, Friday, aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, June 30, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Silas McPherson
A man named Silas McPherson was killed at Baden, Beaver county, Pa., by the falling of a scaffold at a barn raising.  Eleven others were seriously injured.  (Tuesday, June 30, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Kauffer
Edward Kauffer, the poet, died at Leipsie, April 13th.  (Tuesday, June 30, 1874, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 02/17/2004
Content Replaced 11 SEP 2007
By Joyce M. Tice
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