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Do You Know that you can search just the 700 pages of Clippings and Scrapbooks on the site by using the Clippings button in the Partitioned search engine on the Current What's New Page
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Tri County Clippings - Page Two Hundred Forty Six
Obituaries on this page are From the Tioga Eagle and the Wellsboro Agitator 1854 through 1856
1854 - Tioga Eagle

Alice Elliott
At Mansfield, on the 29th ultimo, Alice, infant daughter of D. C. V. and Eliza A. Elliott, aged 17 days.  “Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of Heaven.”  (Thursday, February 16, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Daniel Elliott  Cass
In Chatham, on the 8th instant, Daniel Elliot Cass, infant son of Willard Cass, aged six months.  During her illness she sought refuge in the consolations of religion, with great calmness and resignation looked forward to her approaching change, and died rejoicing in the hope of immortality.  (Thursday, February 16, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mary C. Spencer
In Sullivan, on the 14th ult., Mary C. Spencer, aged 22.  During her illness she sought refuge in the consolations of religion, with great calmness and resignation looked forward to her approaching change and died rejoicing in the hope of immortality.  (Thursday, February 16, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Hobart B. Graves
In this place, on yesterday morning, Mr. Hobart B. Graves, aged 65 years.  (Thursday, March 2, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John R. Guiles
In Sullivan, on the 20th of February, 1854, John R. Guiles, eldest son of Joseph Guiles of Middlebury, in the 22nd year of his age.  (Thursday, March 2, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah M. C. Gordon
At Mainesburg, March 4th, Mrs. Sarah M. C. Gordon, aged 94 years.  (Thursday, March 30, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Phebe E. Adams
In Tioga, March 13th, Phebe E. Adams, daughter of Lyman N. and Caroline Adams, aged 9 years and 4 months.  (Thursday, March 30, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eleanor M. Maine
At Mainesburg, on Sunday, March 9th, of consumption, Eleanor M. Maine, aged 19 years. Few that have lived, have ever left to friends so pure a memory, though lovely in person and amiable in mind, she was not too far a mark for the destroyer.  Death arrested by disease in the bloom of youth, when hope is brightest.--She regarded its advances with the calmness of innocence and conscious purity, and concealing her own sufferings as the end approached, ever strove to comfort mourning friends.  A long and painful illness failed to destroy her cheerfulness and serenity of mind, and when the last sad hour drew near, and with the expiring day her spirit took its flight, it was with the christian hope of a blissful immortality.  (Thursday, April 27, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Acenith Rumsey
At Mainesburg, on the 1st Acenith, wife of Jeremiah Rumsey, aged 80 years and 26 days.  (Thursday, May 11, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah A. Sheffer
In Liberty township, on the 10th inst., Sarah A., wife of Henry H. Sheffer, and daughter of George and Mary Levegood, in the 22d year of her age; leaving a large circle of friends and relatives to mourn her premature death.  But her rest is her eternal gain, as she died with a long assurance of a blessed immortality beyond the grave.
Dearest Sarah, thou hast left us,
Here thy loss we deeply feel.--
But ‘tis God who hath bereft us,
He can all our sorrors heal.

Past her troubles--past her pain,
Cease to weep, for tears are vain--
Calm the tumult of your breast,
She who suffered is at rest.

Oh! Husband, dear, oh do not weep,
She is not dead, but there asleep,
She was not yours, but Christ’s alone.
He loved her, therefore took her home.
(Thursday, May 25, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sarah M. M’Arthur
On the 23d of July last, in the City of New York, of consumption, Sarah M. M’Arthur, aged 20 years, 4 months and 5 days.  Her death has saddened many a heart, and her place upon earth cannot be filled, her loss is irreparable, but her home is now we believe beyond the reach of suffering, her illness was of short duration, and when feeling that her time of departure was near, she was anxious to be with her Saviour.  Her trust-in-life’s last hours, was unfaltering, and she willingly exchanged earth for heaven.  Her remains were brought to Lawrenceville, and now lay entombed in the cold grave beside her once earthly father, there to remain until the last sun shall set, and the last morn arise.  Discourse delivered by the Rev. Sidney Miller, from the 103 Psalm, 15th and 16th verses.  (Thursday, August 10, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Maynard, Esq.
In Iowa City, on Sunday, the 30th ult., Edward Maynard, Esq., late of Wellsboro, Pa.  (Thursday, November 9, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Emeline Parkhurst
In Elkland, on the 29th inst., after a lingering illness, Emeline, wife of J. Parkhurst, at his Residence in Elkland. She died as she lived--a Christian, and with the full hope and assurance of a life beyond the grave where death and sorrow enter not.  The following resolutions were unanimously adopted in Elkland Lodge No. 434, Oct. 30th, 1854:  Resolved, That while we bow in humble submission to the will of Divine Providence in removing by death from our midst the beloved amiable wife of our Brother, Joel Parkhurst, we do sympathise with him his sad bereavement.  Resolved, That we do also deeply sympathize with her numerous friends and dear relatives in their great loss of a loving and dutiful daughter, a kind and worthy sister, and a friend of whom none can say aught.  And most especially would we extend our sympathies to those now motherless children.  Resolved.  That we will ever cherish the memory of her many virtues as worthy of remembrance and imitation by our sisters, wives and daughters.  Resolved, That these resolutions be entered upon the records of our Lodge, and a copy of the same sent to our Brother, Joel Parkhurst, as a testimonial of our kind feelings toward him in this hour of trouble.  And furthermore, it is Resolved, That copies of the above be sent to both the county papers for publication.  J. R. Parkhurst, N. G.  W. M. Evans. P. Sec’y.  (Thursday, November 26, 1854, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)


1854 - Wellsboro Agitator

Lieut. Maxwell
Death of Lieut. Maxwell--His last fight with the Indians.  From the Southern (Ga.) Banner, Aug. 10.  The melancholy tidings of the death of this gallant young officer, reached this place a few days since.  He has many warm friends in this place, where he was well known and esteemed for his noble qualities and brave and generous bearing.  We are sure the bereaved family of the deceased have the sympathies of the whole community.  The following letter, written by one who knew him in boyhood, and a brother officer, gives the particulars of his tragic and untimely end: (Ft. Union, New Mexico, July 2, 1854.)  Dear Sir--For the last few months a severe and deadly war has been waged between the troops in this territory and a warlike though diminished tribe of Indians, called the Tarcarella Apaches.  In one battle we lost two killed and four wounded; in another, 22 killed and 21 wounded.  But, however severe those battles were, (St. Belles and Danson’s), no officers had fallen.  And I now speak of the last fight, which has just occurred, (on the 30th ultimo), and in which our little army has lost a young and promising officer--raised and educated in our town--namely.  J. E. Maxwell, son of Mrs. Maxwell, of Athens, Ga.  Lieut. Maxwell graduated from the Military Academy in 1850, and has served honorably and faithfully as a brevet and second lieutenant in the 3rd regiment of infantry ever since in this country.  In the fight which Lieut. Bell, of the 2nd dragoons, had with the Apaches, Lieut. Maxwell, although it was the first time he had been under fire, he conducted himself most gallantly as a man and a Georgian.  In another skirmish with the same Indians, being adjutant of the commanding officer, he ran the gauntlet with a coolness of a veteran; yet he was to the last degree unassuming, and I, who was a brother officer, stationed at the same post, never but once heard him speak of his deeds, and I firmly believe he was partially unconscious that he had acted so nobly and gallantly.  Mild by nature, yet those who have seen him in conflict ever he was wholly changed, and cast all thoughts of death behind him.  Yet death, without a moment’s warning, has at length overtaken him. On the morning of the 29th ult., Brevet Captain Sykes, and Lieutenant Maxwell, with about 60 dragoons, (there being no dragoon officers on duty at the post), started in pursuit of the party of Apaches, whose trail had been seen the day before, a short distance from the post.  After a hard and vigorous trail, the command came in sight of the savages early on the morning of the 30th.  Captain Sykes sent Lieutenant Maxwell, with 20 dragoons, up a precipitate “mesa,” or small mountain, to cut off the retreat of a band of about 20 Indians, who were attempting to gain difficult and almost impregnable passes of the mountains. Lieutenant Maxwell being well mounted, charged at the head of his men, to cut off the enemy ere they could pass a certain point above him.  Unfortunately--possibly from being better a few moments ere the rest of his troops had closed up.  As soon as Lieutenant Maxwell, (who was ahead), with three men, arrived at the above-mentioned place, the Indians showed themselves above, and commenced a deadly discharge of arrows. Lieut. Maxwell, with a revolver in hand, emptied it with deadly effect, but ere he had done so, he had received an arrow through his body--completely through.  He drew his sabre, and in doing so his bridle arm received another arrow, which passed through, and glanced against his left breast.  He still used his sabre, and when he received his last shot, he was in the act of sabring an Indian, but in the act, while his head was bowed to his horse’s main, he felt--an arrow in his brain--and fell like a knight of old, in his harness--his sword grasped in his hand, and a smile upon his face.  The Indians fled.  Then came the troops thundering up the hill--but too late, alas!  for poor young Maxwell had fallen!  And as Captain Sykes saw him, with upturned face, lying stark dead, whom but a moment since he viewed in the prime and bloom of manhood, he bowed his head and wept, as none but a warrior can. Lieutenant Maxwell was buried at his post, with military honors, and around his lonely grave were heard sobs and were seen tears adown weather-beat visages, where tears were strangers.  I who had known him from boyhood, followed him to his long home, and although tears were to me a stranger, still, when I heard the soldier’s requiem and the fusilade--over his grave, they did burst forth uncontrolled, and even now, while I pen this sad memorial of his fate, they come unbidden. He died without an enemy.  He died as a soldier should, and lies wrapt in his martial shroud, as is a soldier’s due.  Peace to him, my friend and brother soldier.  May it be my lot thus to die a glorious death.  W. C. A.  First Lieutenant, 2d Art. U. S. A.  (Thursday, August 24, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Phelps
Died, in Windsor, Vt., on the 12th ult., Mrs. Mary Phelps, wife of Dr. Thaddeus Phelps, of Attleborough, Mass., and formerly of Knoxville, in this County, aged 44 years and 8 months.  (Thursday, September 7, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles N. Wilcox
Charles N. Wilcox, died of cholera in Watertown, Jefferson Co., Wisconsin, July 11, 1854.  In the death of brother Wilcox, the community have lost a useful citizen and interesting neighbor.  The Christian church one of its most stable and reliable members, the Sunday school a faithful and efficient superintendent.  Resolved, That we deeply and truly sympathize with our beloved sister in the sorrow, and we assure her that she sorrows not alone.  That while her heart mourns the loss of a companion we, her brother and sister Templars, also feel bereaved of a brother who was ever faithful to the cause of temperance, and that as neighbors we mourn the loss of a kind friend and obliging neighbor. Resolved, That we extend to our bereaved sister not only our sympathy, but also our old and patronage as long as she sees fit to reside among us as a neighbor and citizen.  Revolved, That we cordially invite sister Wilcox to take up her permanent residence among us, pledging ourselves to do all we can to render her residence among us as pleasing as lies in our power and to make her forget her loss as much as possible by out acts of sympathy and kindness.  W. B. Bailey, W. S.  (Thursday, September 7, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Susan Rissinger
Love, Crime and Suicide.  On last Saturday morning a young lady named Susan Rissinger, then on a visit to her brother, near Brickersville, this county, attempted to commit suicide by cutting her throat with a razor.  When discovered she was lying upon the floor in her room, with a deep gash in her throat from which the blood was pouring in large quantities, her whole person and the floor being completely covered.  A messenger was immediately dispatched for Dr. Sheaffer, who arrived soon after and dressed the wound, with no hope, however, of her recovery. Previous to the arrival of the doctor, she made signs for paper and ink, which being procured, she wrote out, notwithstanding the great exhaustion under which she labored, a history of her wrongs, and the motives which prompted her to commit the act. From this statement, it would appear that source three years ago, she was enticed away from her home and seduced under a promise of marriage by a man named ---,agent either of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company or an officer on the Columbia Railroad.  During his time she ascertained from some source, that ---- was a married man, although he had invariably contradicted it, still promising her marriage whenever some matters connected with his business were finally settled.  In this way he allayed her fears, and induced her to remain with him, introducing her everywhere as his wife, and living with her as such at whatever place they boarded.  Finally, however, growing weary of his victim--or having perhaps, imposed upon some other, he sought an opportunity to quarrel with her--charging her with crime of a heinous nature, and threatening her with exposure and the severest penalties of the law, if she ever dared to importune him for support, or by any means sought to connect his name with her own.  Under these circumstances, friendless and unprotected, abandoned and accused of crime by one for whom she gave up all--friends--relatives and home, she impiously, it may be, but still anguish and bitterness of soul resolved to end her troubles and life together. The dark feature in the whole transaction, and one which stamps ---- as a villain of the most infamous cast, is the crime which he intimated he would fasten upon her.--His object in doing, this was doubtless to terrify her, and to prevent her from making any disclosures which might criminate him. In the statement which she made, under the circumstances before alluded to, she states, that at three several times was she enciente; that ---took her to a female doctress named Shaw who resides at No. 110 North 16 street, Philadelphia, where abortion was produced through the agency of Mrs. Shaw, and that she was compelled to submit through fear of -. This is in substance the statement she made, and which was subsequently placed in proper form and subscribed to before Esq., Erb.  We learn that a warrant has been issued for the arrest of ---, and it is to be hoped that he will soon be arrested, and made to suffer in connection with his vile associate Mrs. Shaw, the extreme penalty of the law for their outrage and crimes. Miss Rissinger has been represented to us, as a young lady of more than ordinary intelligence, and highly prepossessing appearance, and her unhappy connection with the wretch who ruined her, together with the act, which in all probability has ere this terminated her life, has caused a deep and universal gloom in the neighborhood where she long resided.  The guilty party to the above transaction not having been arrested yet, we have thought proper to suppress his name for the present.--Lancaster Examiner.  (Thursday, October 12, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Clymer
In this place, on the 2d inst., Henry, son of W. B. and Mary Clymer, aged 1 year, 4 months and 22 days.  (Thursday, November 16, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Emeline Parkhurst
Died, Oct. 29, of consumption, after a lingering illness, Emeline, wife of Joel Parkhurst, at his residence in Elkland.  She died as she lived, a christian, and with the full hope and assurance of a life beyond the grave, where death and sorrow enter not.  The following Resolutions were unanimously adopted by Elkland Lodge, No. 434, I. O. of O. F., Oct. 30, 1854.  Resolved, That while we bow in humble submission to the will of Divine Providence, in removing by death from our midst, the beloved and amiable wife of our Brother Joel Parkhurst, we do deeply sympathize with him in his sad bereavement.  Resolved, That we do also deeply sympathize with her numerous friends and dear relatives in their great loss of a loving and dutiful daughter, a kind and worthy sister, and a friend of whom none can say aught; and most especially would we extend our sympathies to those now motherless children.  Resolved, That we will ever cherish the memory of her many virtues as worthy of remembrance and imitation by our sisters, wives and daughters.  Resolved, That these resolutions be entered upon the Records of our Lodge, and a copy of the same be sent to our Brother Joel Parkhurst, as a testimonial of our kind feelings toward him in this hour of trouble.  And furthermore, Resolved, That copies of the above be sent to both the county papers for publication.  R. Hurlbut, N. G. W. M. Evans, P. Sec’y.  (Thursday, November 16, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Maria Pearson
At the Marsh Farm, on the 20th inst., Maria, wife of Mr. John Pearson, aged 36 years.  (Thursday, November 23, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Maynard
Died in Iowa City, Iowa, on the 30th ult., Edward Maynard, late of Wellsborough, Pa.  At a meeting of the Bar of Johnson county called at Iowa City on the 21st day of October at 10 o’clock, W. Penn Clarke called to the chair, and B. Clarke appointed Secretary.  The President stated that this meeting had been called as a testimony of respect to the memory of Edward Maynard, Esq., late a member of the Bar of Pennsylvania, who recently came to this State, and died at the Crummy House in this city on yesterday.  On motion of Mr. Woodin a committee consisting of Messrs. Woodin, Whicher and G. W. Clark was appointed to report resolutions expressive of the sense of this meeting.  The following resolutions were read and adopted.  Whereas, it has released an Allwise Providence to call from as a brother in our profession, Edward Maynard, Esq., recently of Tioga Co., Penn’s Bar, therefore, Resolved, That our short acquaintance with the deceased has been sufficient to impress upon us the belief that he was a man whose talents were an ornament to the profession of which he was a member; whose honesty and morality adorned it; and whose gentlemanly deportment would have endeared him to us in more than the ties of friendship.  Resolved, That we sympathize with the family of the deceased, who by this dispensation found themselves with none but strangers to condole with their bereavement.  Resolved, That we commend his wife and his little ones to the care of Him who has promised to be the orphan’s Friend, and whose kind protection is withheld from none.  Resolved, That the chairman of this meeting request the District Court of Johnson county now in session to have copy of the proceedings of this meeting placed upon the record thereof; and request an adjournment of said court for the purpose of attending the funeral of the deceased this afternoon.  Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be published in the Iowa City papers, and a copy thereof sent to the family of the deceased, and one to the publishers of Tioga Co., Pa.  On motion a committee was appointed by the chair to make a suitable arrangement relative to the funeral of the deceased.  Adjourned to meet at the Crummy House at 2 o’clock this afternoon.  W. Penn Clark, Pres’t.  R. Clark, Sec’y.  (Thursday, November 23, 1854, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)


1855 - Wellsboro Agitator
Willie Nevius
In Brooklyn, NY, on Christmas day of inflamation of the brain, Willie, only son of Henry and Margaret Nevius, aged about four years.  (Thursday, January 10, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Caroline Knox
At Knoxville, on the 29th ult., Mrs. Caroline Knox, relict of the late Archibald Knox, Esq., aged 59 years.  She was an early settler and consequently long a resident of Knoxville and for many years a devout follower of the Savior.  (Thursday, May 10, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

N. W. Goodrich, Esq.
We are pained to learn of the death of N. W. Goodrich, Esq., late of Smethport, M’Kean county, but at the time of his decease a citizen of Kansas.  The course taken by Mr. G. since his removal to Kansas, has made him a host of friends wherever his letters are read, and we deeply regret his untimely death.  His lonely wife, far from friends, with all her earthly hopes blighted, we would be glad to speak kind words to her, if in our power.  Let us bear in mind that there are sorrowing ones around us where we can befriend if so disposed.--Coudersport Journal.  (Thursday, June 21, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Burdick Hill
Sudden death.--We learn that Mr. Burdick Hill, an old and highly respectable resident of Chatham in this county, dropped down dead in the hay field on Monday, 6th inst.  He had been in poor health for a number of years, but a few hours previous to his death remarked to his family that he had not felt so much like work for years.  He repaired to the harvest field, and having mowed a few rods, put down his scythe and commenced raking grain.  In a few moments thereafter he was seen to fall, and life was extinct when help arrived.  A post-mortem examination disclosed an enlargement of the heart on one side, and a reduction of the muscular tissue to the thinness of brown paper.  The heart had burst in this place and suffered the blood to escape into the cavity.  (Thursday, August 16, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Kelsey
In Middlebury, on the 23d inst., Julia A., wife of Morris Kelsey, aged 19 years, 1 months and 9 days.  (Thursday, August 30, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henderson Niles
In Delmar, September 2d, Henderson W., son of Erastus and Lucy D. Niles, aged three months and 11 days.  (Thursday, September 6, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Goodenow
In Covington, on the 20th ult., Mr. George Goodenow, aged 65 years, 2 months and 22 days.  He was a soldier of 1812.  (Thursday, September 6, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Archibald Baxter
A father killed by his son.  Yesterday, Archibald Baxter, who kept the Melodeon Exchange on Walnut street, was killed suddenly.  The deceased opened the window to admit air when his son John closed it.  This was repeated three times, and a quarrel and high words ensued.  In order to close the window, John clinched his father, and in the struggle the old man was thrown down, and his head coming in contact with a stove he was killed instantly.  John, the son, was arrested in the Hammond street Station House.  He is a young man about 25 years of age and unmarried.  The deceased was over 60 years old.  He was a widower, and leaves three children, all of whom however grown.  (Thursday, November 29, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Harker
We notice the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Harker announced in the Huntington papers.  She died in the prison at that place, where she had been confined under sentence of death since the fall of ‘ 53.  We do not think that the annals of crime in Pennsylvania furnish such another case as was hers.  At the advanced age of 65 years she committed a double murder--her husband and sister being the victims--in order to become the wife of her sister’s husband.  She poisoned her husband some time in 1852, and, although there were lively suspicious of the true cause of his death he was buried without a post mortem examination, and the suspicion gradually faded away.  A year afterwards, however, her sister--with whom the murderess then lived--was seized with violent illness, exhibiting marted symptoms of poison, but she recovered.  Soon after she was seized with the same terrible symptoms, and died in great agony.  Still no suspicion rested upon Mrs. Harker.  The deed was too foul--the purpose to horrid, to justify the belief that she was guilty; and but for her subsequent unfeeling conduct, she would doubtless have gone down to the grave with the secret of her crime between herself and her God. Little by little facts were devolved until the public mind settled down on the conviction that she was the murderer of her sister.  The body of the victim was taken from the grave, a post mortem examination made, the stomach taken to Philadelphia and examined by a chemist, who found in it enough of arsenic to kill three persons.  The body of her husband was also taken up, and although time and the worms had made sad havoc with it, the fatal drug that laid her sister low, was also found in his stomach.  She was arrested and tried in Huntington in 1853, and the jury after two hours deliberation, rendered a verdict of murder in the first degree.  She was sentenced to death and remanded to prison; but Gov. Bigler humanly determined that she should not be executed.  Her sex and her extreme age plead for her, and she was allowed to drag out a life of remorse and suspense until called by Providence to her final account.  Two weeks ago a stern summons came, and Elizabeth Harker, silvered by the frost of age, and charged with guilt such as has rarely stained the frame of mortals, passed to that tribunal where judgement is at once infallible and eternal.--Chambersburg Whig.  (Thursday, November 29, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Susan G. Thompson
In Wellsboro’, at the residence of her parents, Wm. And Jane Thompson, Susan G., aged two years, one month and 28 days.  (Thursday, November 29, 1855, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)


1855 - Tioga Eagle

Mr. Laban L. Rockwell
On Sunday morning, the 24th ult., Mr. Laban L. Rockwell, of Rutland, Tioga county, in the 56th year of his age.  He left a wife and 10 children and numerous relatives to mourn his loss.  His death was peaceful and triumphant.
His mind was tranquil and serene,
No terror in his looks were seen,
A Saviour’s smile spelled the gloom,
And soothed his passage to the tomb
Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.  M. R.  (Thursday, January 4, 1855, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Fanny Cone
In Wellsboro’, on the 23d ult., Fanny, daughter of A. P. and Anna Cone, in the 4th year of her age.  (Thursday, March 3, 1855, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Israel Merrick
In Delmar, on the 5th inst., Mr. Israel Merrick, on the 65th year of his age.  (Thursday, March 15, 1855, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Caroline Knox
In Knoxville, on the 20th ult., Mrs. Caroline Knox, wife of the late Archibald Knox, Esq., aged 59 years.  She was an early settler, consequence a long resident of Knoxville and for many years a devout follower of the Saviour.  (Thursday, May 10, 1855, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lord Raglan
The late British Commander.  Lord Raglan, whose death in the Grimea was announced in the foreign news received by the Arago, was perhaps the most distinguished General in the English service.  He was in the 68th year of his age.  He was known as Lord Fitzroy James Henry Somerset, till 1852, when he was created Baron Raglan.  He was the 8th son of the 5th Duke of Beaufort, born in 1788, and entered the British Army in 1804 as Cornet in a Dragoon Regiment.  In consequence of his high birth he was rapidly promoted, and in eight years had passed through the various ranks up to that of Colonel, which appointment was given him in 1842.  He early joined the staff of the Duke of Wellington, to whom he became Secretary, and accomplished him in all his important engagements.  Immediately after the peace of 1814, he became Secretary to the British Embassy at Paris, but shortly after returned, and married Lady Emily Pole, niece of Wellington.  He was with the latter some months afterwards at the battle of Waterloo, where he lost his right arm.  He was made Major-General in 1825, Lieutenant-General in 1838, and Field-Marshal in 1854.  He was highly respected and honored wherever he was known, and it is intimated that his death was hastened by anxiety of mind, in consequence of the want of being properly sustained by his government in the Crimea, and the manner in which his want of success was condemned by the English Parliament and press.  (Thursday, May 31, 1855, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary M. Webb
In Wautoma, Waushara county, Wisconsin, on the 26th of October, 1855, of typhoid fever, Mrs. Mary M. Webb, aged 23 years and two months, wife of Wm. C. Webb, Esq., of Wautoma, and daughter of Josiah Witter, of Dakota.
“He died!--She died!--has been pronounced of
All the by-past human race; and soon these
Words will be our sad memorial, We must die!”

“She died!--the young, the loved, the beautiful,
Ah, she had been the happy, careless girl,
The caressed sister, the idolized daughter,
The worshipped bride, with her wealth
Of treasured hopes, and pictures of high joys
Along a sunny future.”

Yes, she died!  And in her death, society has lost one of its brightest members, a parent’s household is filled with grief, and the husband’s home made desolate.  But she has gone the way of all our race, from Adam downward to the present day--out down in the very prime of life, and at a time when she might well have look forward to many years of usefulness and happiness. Scarce seven months ago, Mrs. Webb left her parents’ home, a happy bride, to assume the duties and responsibilities, not of a wife merely, but of a mother to three young children, who are now bereft of a mother’s kindness, and a mother’s love.  So soon perish all human hopes--so soon are blasted, our fondest expectations! The deceased was formerly of Brookfield, Madison county, New York, where she left a large circle of friends and relations, and whence she came to this State several years since.  During her residence in Wisconsin, she won the confidence and esteem of all who knew her, and her decease is deeply lamented by her entire acquaintances.  She made no profession of religion, but her whole life bore testimony that she possessed in an eminent degree, all those qualities which distinguish the true christian.  Mild, gentle, firm--benevolent, humane and just, she never made an enemy, and never lost a friend.

“But Mary died.  I saw her in her shroud,
With death’s seal set upon her.  The fixed eyes
Gleamed darkly from beneath the heavy fringe
Of the half open and disinterred lids
The lips were livid, and the placid smile,
Left by the happy spirit as it passed,
Like radiance left by the time departing sun
Upon the Western clouds, was fading out
From the unseemly company of death.
Wautoma, Oct. 30. Q. E. D.  (Thursday, December 20, 1855, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elizabeth Oldroyd [SRGP 27053]
In Rutland Dec. 1, Elizabeth Oldroyd, aged 16 years.  Sister E. had been a member of Roseville Lodge No. 26, of I. O. of G. T., for the space of 2 ½.  She was punctual in attendance when circumstances would admit until she was attacked with a disease which terminated in her death.  She bore her sufferings without a murmur four short weeks and then bid adieu would of sorrow, leaving many friends to mourn her early departure.  She was beloved by all who knew her, and will be remembered as one taken from earth in the bloom and beauty of youth. The Lodge met and the following resolutions were adopted:  Resolved that we deeply sympathize with the family in their afflictions.  Resolved that a copy of the above be sent to each of the county papers for publication.  By order of the Lodge.  Elmer Backer, W. S.  (Thursday, December 27, 1855, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)


1856 - Tioga Eagle
Solomon Daniels
In Tioga Village, on the 6th inst., Solomon Daniels, aged 58 years.  (Thursday, March 13, 1856, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Asahel W. Kingsbury
In Covington Township, on the 20th ultimate, Asahel W. Kingsbury, aged 34 years.  (Thursday, March 6, 1856, Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)


1856 - Wellsboro Agitator
Mr. Laban L. Rockwell [SRGP 06167]
On Sunday morning, 24th ult., Mr. Laban L. Rockwell, of Rutland, in the 56th year of his age.  He left a wife and 10 children and numerous relatives to mourn his loss.  His death was peaceful and triumphant.  The following lines express his state of mind: His mind was tranquil and serene, No terror in this looks was seen, A Savior’s smile dispelled the gloom, And soothed his passage to the tomb.  (Thursday, January 4, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wesley Gibson
On the 28th ult., Wesley H., son of John and Laura E. Gibson, aged 15 years and 10 days.  (Thursday, January 4, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Maria Burns
A girl burned to death by fluid and a terrible murder at White Haven.  Two weeks ago, yesterday, a girl by the name of Maria Burns, was burned to death by the explosion of a fluid lamp.  The accident occurred at Browns’ steam mill three miles this side White Haven.  When the lamp exploded the fluid flew all over her and in an instant she was wrapped in flames.--She ran out doors and those near by rolled her in the snow; but before the fire was extinguished, she was roasted from her neck down.  Her funeral took place on Friday following.  At the time of the funeral, some Irishmen were employed on the dam at White Haven, in cutting ice for filling an ice house.  They left their work to attend the funeral, and three Germans were employed in their place during their absence.--On their return Friday evening they went down to the ice and abused the Germans for taking their places, but nothing serious occurred at the time; all went home.  Next night (Saturday) as these three Germans were going quietly home, his same Irish party rushed out upon them with three axes, dealing blows indiscriminately upon the three with the blades of the  axes.  One of the Germans, Henry Guisse, received a cut on the top of the head.  The sharp part of the axe cut through the skull and into the brain.  The blow would have cleft his skull open had not the handle of the axe struck the back part of the head.  The other two Germans, Lewis Kespole and John Meyer were badly but not dangerously cut.  (Thursday, January 31, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elizabeth Cobb
In Wellsboro’, on the 31st ult., Elizabeth, wife of M. H. Cobb, aged 21 years.  (Thursday, February 7, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James S. Bryden
At his home in Delmar, on Monday the 16th inst., Mr. James S. Bryden, aged 37 years.  (Thursday, March 20, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James P. Williams
A horrid death.--James P. Williams, of New Brunswick, in this State, was found dead in the cars on the train which left Philadelphia for Pittsburgh, on Wednesday night.  When about two hours from Philadelphia, his head was observed hanging out of the window, and blood running from it.  It is supposed that it came in contact with a water tank, or cars standing on the other track.  The wife and child of the deceased were sleeping on the same seat with him at the time of the accident.--Newark Advertiser.  (Thursday, May 8, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth McEwen
At the residence of E. P. Deane, Delmar, 9th inst., Mrs. Elizabeth McEwen, aged 63.  (Thursday, May 22, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Caleb Newell
At his residence in Covington township, on the 2nd of June, Mr. Caleb Newell, aged 46 years.  (Thursday, June 19, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Irena A. Benour
In Gaines, 17th June, Mrs. Irena A. Benour, aged 29 years.  (Thursday, June 26, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Caleb Newell
In Covington, 2d June, Mr. Caleb Newell, aged 46 years.  (Thursday, June 26, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George W. Morton
In Iowa City, 4th June, of typhus fever Mr. George W. Morton, formerly of Charleston, aged 29.  He leaves a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.  ‘So early fade earth’s fairest flow’rs.’  (Thursday, June 26, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane Farnsworth
In Nauvoo, 26th ultimo, Jane, wife of C. L. Farnsworth, Esq., in the 44th year of her age.  (Thursday, July 3, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane Hart
In Charleston, 10th ult., Jane, wife of Mr. Jeremiah Hart, aged 36 years.  The deceased was a member of the Baptist persuasion, and bore the suffering of a lingering illness with exemplary patience and resignation.  A devoted wife and mother, her loss will be deeply felt by the husband and little ones she has left behind.  (Thursday, August 14, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Wright
Dreadful accident.  A sad accident happened on the New York & Erie R. R., on Saturday evening last, at Scio, by which Henry Wright, aged 17, son of Col. J. N. Wright of Covington, lost his life.  Mr. Wright was fireman on a freight train, and his brother, Clark Wright was engineer of the same train.  It seems that Henry was standing on the bunting beam of the engine, oiling the cylinders, while his brother was running the train on to a turnout for the purpose of stopping over the Sabbath.  By some motion of the engine, Henry lost his balance and fell upon the track in front of the engine.  His brother Clark seeing him jump, reversed the engine and tried to stop the train, but he was knocked down by the cow-catcher and was run over by the engine tender, and seven freight cars before the train stopped so that he could be picked up.  His body was terribly mangled.  His brother George and Clark Wright and brother-in-law, John L. Lee, passed through this place with the body on Monday evening, taking him to Covington, where he was buried on Tuesday.  Mansfield Express.  (Thursday, August 28, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Louis J. Cummings
In Winterset, Iowa, on Friday, the 1st day of August, Louis J. Cummings, late of Wellsboro’, Pa., aged 22 years.  (Thursday, September 4, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Ellen Northup
In Brookfield, Tioga Co., Pa., on the 8th of August, ult., Mrs. Mary Ellen, wife of Dr. Geo. W. Northup, in the 29th year of her age.  Mrs. Northup came to this place with her husband, six years ago.  Mingling as much as her attention to her family would allow, in the scenes of affliction to which the profession of her husband called her, she soon became favorably known as a sympathizing, christian friend in time of need.  In everything good she had a willing heart and ready hand.  In early life she had become a member of the Presbyterian church, and among the last public acts of her life, was her uniting with her husband and two other persons to form the First Presbyterian Church of Brookfield, a few months previous to her death.  Her friends were numerous as her acquaintances, and though comparatively a recent citizen among us, she was followed to the grave by a large number of sincere mourners.  Of her husband it may be truly said, “Tis the survivor dies.”  The youngest of the three small children left behind, was about a week old, and none of them old enough to know the loss they have sustained.  Her bodily suffering was great for a few days previous to her departure, but her mind, so far as she was conscious of her situation, seemed to be calmly, peacefully reposing that our Saviour whom she loved and believed.  The valley seemed deep and dark down which she was called so quickly to descend, and the summons shocking which called a young wife and mother so suddenly away from her little family.  But she was without that faith.  (Thursday, September 11, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Oliver P. Hymes
In Middlebury, on the 4th inst., Oliver P. Hymes, aged 36 years.  (Thursday, September 25, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Chauncey Ingham
In Middlebury, Oct. 23, Chauncey Ingham, aged 73 years.  (Thursday, November 6, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia A. Cassoday
In Hopkinton, RI, on the 19th of October, 1856, of disease of the lungs, Mrs. Julia A. Cassoday, aged 22 years.  The deceased was the daughter of Widow Lucy Maxson, of Hopkinton.  She embraced religion at an early period in life, and has ever been a devoted Christian.  Whether engaged in laboring at home, or in study in the Academy, she has always made the Bible her daily companion.  It seemed that her great object in life was to become wiser and better.  Industry, perseverance, modesty, and an earnest purpose in life, had endeared her to the hearts of all who had formed her acquaintance.  She graduated at Alfred Seminary, with the honors of her class, and the esteem of her classmates.  Two mor the ago she was married, and looked upon the life before her with bright prospects and cheering hopes, but disease soon fixed its grasp upon the young wife, and she called her companion to watch over the few remaining days of her life.  She became conscious that her time was short two days before her death, and freely talked about her prospects in another world.  She would have been “glad to live” for the sake of the friends who loved her, but she was “willing to die” for the sake of Christ.  In her own expressive language she knew she loved God.  At 3 o’clock in the afternoon she had her head upon the pillow, and quietly breathed her last.  She leaves a young husband and a large circle of friends, who will often mourn as they think of Julia.  (Thursday, November 6, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Frances E. Lathrop
On the 9th inst., at Elkland, where she was spending a few days with her relatives, of Congestion of the Brain, Mrs. Frances E. Lathrop, wife of Austin Lathrop, Esq., of Lawrenceville, Tioga Co., Pa., aged 37 years.  (Thursday, November 20, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Anna Bache
In Wellsboro, on the 1st inst., Mrs. Anna Bache, aged 73 years.  The deceased has been long known in this community, and the tidings of her death will cause sadness by many a fireside.  Some are still living who with her endured the hardships of a pioneer life.  All the associations of past years endear her memory to such.  Others have not known her for so long a period, but they also have loved her for that motherly wisdom and kindness which so distinguished her.  She was reliable as a friend, sympathizing as a neighbor, faithful as a wife, affectionate as a mother and humble as a Christian.  What more can be said in her praise?  “Her children arise up and call her blessed.”  And we doubt not that ere this it has been said to her-- “Well done, good and faithful servant!” We may indeed regret for ourselves, that such an one has died from the earth which so much needs the presence of the prudent, the meek and the good.  But we cannot sorrow for her.  She felt that her work was done and she longed, as she expressed it, to go home.  There was no murmuring about pain, no dissatisfaction with her earthly lot; but as an aged pilgrim, she felt the need of rest and refuge in Heaven.  The future was not a blank to her, but was bright with the presence of her Lord and Saviour. “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, even so saith the Spirit, for they rest from their labors.”  (Thursday, December 4, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Anna E. Nibbell
In Wilkesbarre, on the 19th ult., Anna E., wife of Edward S. Nibbell, Esq., senior Editor of the Luzerne Union.  A shadow has fallen across our friend’s threshold early in life’s morning--when hearts and hopes are warm.  He has tasted life’s sweetest and its bitterest draught mingled in the same brimming cup.  But the future is not so dark and unlovely as it must for a season appear to him.  Life and its purposes are before him, and hope, on rainbow wings will return to beckon him onward and upward.  And as the philosophy of life unfolds itself, the soul that has wrestled with bereavement, tried, purified and accepted, shall at last sit down with those who hear the footfalls of the angels.  (Thursday, December 4, 1856, The Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site 28 FEB 2007
By Joyce M. Tice
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