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1875 -  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries
Part One
Part One Part Two Part Three

Gerrit Smith
The distinguished philanthropist whose name heads this article died in New York city, from a sudden stroke of paralysis, last week Monday afternoon.  In his death the country loses an illustrious and patriot citizen and the world an ardent and powerful friend of suffering humanity.  Mr. Smith belonged to a class of men not numerous in this country or in any other.--He was born to great wealth, received a thorough education, and possessed all the native qualities and cultivated graces which make men popular in social, business, and political circles, and so tend to render them natural conservatives.  But great as was his stake in social order, he could not remain silent in the presence of what he believed to be a wrong or an evil inflicted on his fellow men, and so at a very early period in his career he became an agitator for the abolition of slavery and afterward a warm enemy of the liquor traffic.  He was a man of brilliant intellect, of persuasive eloquence, and of fine presence-qualities which would have justified him in aspiring to political positions of the first rank; but he became an Abolitionist at a time when that hated name was a bar to all political preferment and almost to all social toleration.  In short, he was one of those rare men of perfect moral integrity who are ready to follow the lead of conscience not only at the risk of life but--a much harder thing to do--at the risk of incurring the contempt of their fellow men. Mr. Smith was a man of great business capacity and shrewdness, and yet he used his wealth in a manner that most men of business would regard as Quixotic and ruinous.  He believed in the brotherhood of man, and so he divided freely among his brethren of both races vast tracts of land--too often to see his bountiful gifts wasted and frittered away.  But no ingratitude or improvidence on the part of those he aided could close his ear to the cry of human distress, and to the day of his death he remained the sure earthly refuge of his most needy fellow men. It is hard to estimate Mr. Smith’s influence on public affairs, because that influence was exerted indirectly.  Except as a member of Congress for part of one term, he never held a public office; and office-holdings was little to his taste.  But he did have much to do in shaping the politics of his country, for he did much to create that public opinion which finally obliged the shrewdest politicians to oppose the extension of human slavery, and so led to its overthrow.  He was not of that school of Abolitionists who held that the Constitution was “a covenant with hell,” for he believed that freedom was national and slavery sectional, as Sumner afterward contended; but he had as strong a conviction of the moral wrong of slavery and of the laws which upheld it as Garrison or Phillips, and his advocacy of the cause of abolition was probably quite as effective as that of any of the original Abolitionists.  His hatred of tyranny was not limited by any geographical lines.  He had a fervent appeal and an open purse for the oppressed people of any quarter of the globe.  His catholic sympathy had been recently shown in the case of the heroic struggle for Independence in Cuba.  It is refreshing, amidst the modern tyranny of public opinion, to contemplate a character like that of Gerrit Smith.  He was a man who was unconventional, thoroughly conscientious, pitilessly logical and independent in forming his own opinions and acting upon them.  There are few such men in any land, but if there were many more the world would be the better for it; but after all it is not the politician--the President or King--who leads the nations, but the independent thinker, who has the courage of his own opinions. The body of Gerrit Smith was taken from the residence of Gen. Cochrane to the Grand Central depot late Wednesday afternoon and put aboard the train to be sent to the late home of the deceased at Peterboro for interment.  It is reported that Gerrit Smith leaves an estate worth between $700-800,000, consisting principally of property in Oswego city, which will probably be divided between his two children--Mrs. Miller and Green Smith.  Gerrit Smith‘s first wife was a daughter of Rev. Dr. Bachus, one of the early Presidents of Hamilton College.  His second wife was a Baltimore lady, a daughter of Colonel Fitzhugh, of Maryland, a prominent slaveholder, who afterward liberated his slaves.  These were taken to Peterboro, Gerrit Smith‘s ancestral residence, and furnished with homes in that neighborhood.  The funeral of the late Gerrit Smith took place from his residence at Peterboro, Madison county, at 1 o‘clock p. m. on Thursday.  The services were simple but impressive.  There was a very large attendance. (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wm. H. Reinhart
The funeral of the late Wm. H. Reinhart, sculptor, who died in Italy, took place in Baltimore on Saturday.  He was a native of Maryland.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thos. G. Turner
Thos. G. Turner, President of the Equitable Insurance Company, and who was Governor of Rhode Island, in ‘59 and ‘60, died at Providence last Sunday, aged 64.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Richard Barnum, wife, and two children
Richard Barnum, his wife, and two children were burned to death at Shannon, Mississippi, on Saturday week.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Montanye
James Montanye, of Hurley, Ulster county, NY, shot himself through the heart Tuesday morning.  Dissipation led him to the act.  He left a family.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Murphy
John Murphy, who was executed at Carson, Nevada, on Tuesday, for the murder of J. R. McCollum, was a native of Scotland, and at one time traveled with J. C. Heenan, giving sparring exhibitions.  On the scaffold he made some remarks professing his belief in spiritualism, and at the same time uttering horrible blasphemies.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Goodman
John Goodman was executed at Ottawa, Ohio, on Wednesday, for the murder of the Haywood family last April.  The prisoner confessed the crime while on the scaffold.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Alvah Crocker
Hon. Alvah Crocker, Representative in Congress from the 10th District of Massachusetts, died at his residence at Fitchburg, Mass., on the 26th ultimo.  He left Washington on Monday previous to spend the holidays at home, and caught a severe cold, which on Friday assumed the serious form of congestion of the lungs, and terminated fatally.  His age was 73.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph B. Varnum
Joseph B. Varnum, a prominent New York lawyer, died last Thursday.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Thomas, Jr.
William Thomas, Jr., was killed in Philadelphia on Wednesday afternoon in a saloon fight.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Delos G. Beecher
At Hazleton, Luzerne county, Pa., Dec. 24, 1874, Mr. Delos G. Beecher, aged 53.  The deceased was a native of Wellsboro.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Anna Horton
In Delmar, Dec. 28, 1874, Anna Horton, wife of Thomas Horton, in the 86th year of her age.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Maria Kimball
On the 24th day of December, 1874, Maria, wife of Norvah R.(or E.) Kimball, of consumption, aged 84(?) years, 1 month and 18 days.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Adaline Cady
In Middlebury, Dec. 26th (or 28th), 1874, Mrs. Adaline Cady, in the 60th year of her age.  The subject of this notice has long lived, and was well known as an intelligent and virtuous member of society in Middlebury township.  In her death, her relatives and friends sustain a loss irreparable in time; but our loss is her gain.  (Tuesday, January 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Ada Bell Niles
In Lakeview, Mich., December 31, 1874, of congestion of the spine, Ada Bell, daughter of Chas. P. and Elizabeth A. Niles, formerly of Tioga county, Pa., aged 8 months and 23(or 28) days.  (Tuesday, January 12, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hannah M. Price
In Newaygo county, Mich., December 22, 1874, Hannah M., wife of James Price, formerly of Covington, Pa., aged 27 years.  (Tuesday, January 12, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank Bryant [SRGP 05462]
In Sullivan, January 3d, 1875, of typhoid fever, Frank, youngest son of William Bryant, aged 17 years.  (Tuesday, January 12, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Wood Cemetery]

Miss H. T. Fry
Miss H. T. Fry, a music teacher, was found dead in her room at a hotel in Williamsport a few days ago.  An inquest was held, and the jury brought in a verdict that her death was caused by an epileptic convulsion, produced by the excessive use of stomach bitters.  (Tuesday, January 19, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Bigelow
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Bigelow died at Genesee Falls, NY, a few days since.  They were each over 80 years of age, had lived together as husband and wife for over 60 years, raising a family of 16 children.  Both died on the same day, only a few hours apart, of natural causes, and they were buried in one grave.  (Tuesday, January 19, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Wickham R. Crocker
Hon. Wickham R. Crocker died at his residence in Cameron, Steuben county, on the 6th instant, at the age of 65 years.  Mr. Crocker was born in England, and had been a resident of Cameron about 30 years, during which time he was a practicing physician.  He was a member of the Assembly from Steuben county in 1859 and ‘60.  (Tuesday, January 19, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John H. Hendershot
John H. Hendershot, living three miles from Port Jervis, in Pike county, was accidentally shot and killed a few nights ago, by his son, in front of the Delaware House, in Port Jervis.  They were returning in the night stage from Milford, from a day’s hunt.  As Mr. Hendershot was getting out of the stage his son’s gun was discharged in some way.  The whole charge entered the lower part of his back, carrying away a portion of his spine, and lodged in the groin.  He lived but a short time.  (Tuesday, January 19, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Gaylord, Esq.
Henry Gaylord, Esq., died at Wyalusing, Bradford county, January 1, 1875, aged 68 years, 8 months and 16 days.  The death of Esquire Gaylord severs one of the Maks that bind the present to the generations of the past.  Connected both by birth and by marriage with the oldest families of Wyalusing, his decease deserves more than a passing notice, on account of the high place he held in the esteem of his fellow citizens, gained by sterling worth as well as by his family connections.  (Tuesday, January 19, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George De Pui
Mr. George De Pui, formerly of Tioga, died recently in Illinois.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. R. J. Inscho
Mr. R. J. Inscho, a respected citizen of Tioga, died of pneumonia last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, January 26, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary E. Bacon
In Salem, Richardson county, Nebraska, Dec. 18, 1874, Mary E., daughter of Elmer and Sarah Bacon, aged 22 years and 4 months.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Margaret Landon
In Liberty, Pa., Jan. 15, 1875, Mrs. Margaret Landon, aged 80 years, 9 months and 3 days.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Artley
In Liberty, Pa., Jan. 16, 1875, Mrs. Artley, aged 78 years.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Capt. Thomas C. Harris
Capt. Thomas C. Harris, United States navy, died Sunday morning at the Naval Asylum in Philadelphia, after a brief illness.  Capt. Harris was born in Pennsylvania in 1823.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

E. B. Cook
E. B. Cook, of the Waterbury, Conn., American, the oldest editor in the State died Sunday week, aged 82.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Charles Kingsley
A dispatch from London says that Rev. Charles Kingsley is dead.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick Heidenblut
Frederick Heidenblut was hanged on Wednesday in Philadelphia for the murder of Godfrey Kuhule(?) in December, 1873.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Sprague
Charles Sprague, the banker poet of Boston, is dead, aged 84 years.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Emerson
Last Friday forenoon Mrs. John Emerson, of Bradford, NH, was found about 10 o’clock, sitting in the kitchen of her house, with her head literally blown from her body.  Her husband was at the barn.  He heard the report of a gun, and entering the house, found his wife as above stated, with her knitting work in her hands.  A double-barreled shotgun, discharged, was on the floor.  Mrs. Emerson had been married but a few months, was 20 years old, and not known to have an enemy.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William H. Aspinwall
William H. Aspinwall is dead.  His name is chiefly associated with the organization of the Isthmus route to California, out of which grew the Pacific Mail Steamship Company.  (Tuesday, January 26, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Kingsley
The time was when news of the death of Charles Kingsley would have brought with it no less consternation than sorrow to all who labor for the welfare of the human race; for every such worker would have felt that a great warrior had fallen in the very beginning of the battle.  Now--since so much has been accomplished that he lived to accomplish, and, in the progress of constitutional government, the repeal of bad laws, and the wide dissemination of liberal and humane thoughts and ideas, the safety of his cause and theirs seems assured--this news will be heard with a deep sadness and solemnity indeed, but with a sorrow unmixed with alarm.  He has fallen; but not before his victory was won.  The champion of the oppressed poor man-sinks into the grave; but the poor, throughout the English-speaking world, are better in condition and happier in mind because Charles Kingsley has lived; and the high purpose of social amelioration which he refreshed and stimulated, by so many agencies, in the best heart and intellect of his age--giving it a fresh impetus and a renewed vigor--survives to lift them higher yet, and constantly to teach and keep in view the brotherhood of man. The story of his life is of course the story of his works and their influence--and that is written on the experience of his generation.  The most than can here be given, in brief commemoration of him, is the meager narrative of incidents and record of impressions.  Mr. Kingsley was born at Holne, in Devonshire, England, June 17, 1819.  His father was then vicar of Holne, but afterward became rector of St. Luke’s, Chelsea.  The family of Kinglsey is an ancient one in Cheshire.  There was a Col. Kingley, who served under Cromwell, and a Gen. Kingsley who led a brigade at the battle of Minden.  One ancestor emigrated to America and established a branch which still exists in this country.  The traits of force, martial valor, and public spirit which are said to have distinguished the family in former times are strikingly obvious in the works of Charles Kingsley, as they were in his character and in the conduct of his life.  The childhood of this celebrated man was passed in Holne vicarage, and amid surroundings of such natural beauty and historic associations as have won for Devonshire the name of the garden of England.  These environments of natural loveliness and legendary lore had their strong and healthful influence on the development of his imagination and his robust and manly frame.  From the age of 14 till the age of 20 he was under the tuition and care of the Rev. Derwent Coleridge, at Ottley, St. John.  Then he went to King’s College, London, and then, in his 22d year, to Magdalen College, Cambridge, from which institution he was graduated with high honors as a classical scholar and a mathematician.  In 1844, having chosen the profession of the Church, he was settled over the parish of Eversley, in Hampshire, and there were passed many years of his useful and brilliant life.  In 1844, also, he was married--his wife being the daughter of Pascoe Grenfell, long a member of Parliament for Truro and Great Marlowe.  His life at Eversley must have been very happy--for, though he worked hard for the parish and was assiduous in preaching, he followed with the freshness and ardor of a boy those field sports of which he was passionately fond, and which kept him in health and hope and cheer.  As a clergyman he was staunchly devoted to the Established Church, yet liberal in theology.  As a preacher he was simple, sincere, strong, effective, and, --by reason of his manliness, his sympathy with the poor, his knowledge of the wants and feelings of the humblest rustic, --very dear to the people among whom he lived and labored.  He arose in the Church to be Canon of Westminster, and he became one of the private chaplains to the Queen.  Another office of honor that he occupied with credit and beneficence was that of Professor of Modern History at Cambridge University. The writings of Mr. Kingsley are voluminous and diversified, showing prodigious industry as well as a vital and versatile mind.  His first work, “Village Sermons,” appeared in 1844.  It is simple, earnest, and meant for simple readers; it urges the spirit of Christianity as the guide and helper in everyday life, and as the first and most essential force in righting social wrongs.  His next work was “The Saint’s Tragedy,” published in 1848, with a preface by the Rev. F. D. Maurice.  This relates to the history of Elizabeth of Hungary, and depicts the human heart in revolt against asceticism.--Deep belief in the nobleness possible to human nature, and blended therewith a determined opposition to the fetters--of whatever sort--by which it is constrained and fretted, breathe through all his writings; but their earliest emphatic enunciation was made in his third work, “Alton Locke,” put forth in 1850.  This has been called a “Chartist novel.”  It espouses the cause of the poor, and it eloquently urges that every human being should be permitted to make the best of himself that he can according to the law of duty and conscience.  A keen and pitying sense of the miserable state of the poor of London, working upon a nature full of tenderness and of poetic aspiration and hopefulness, pervades this book and gives it an astonishing vitality.  Its originality and power seized the public attention, in its day, with a very strong grasp, and Charles Kingsley became at once a name and a power in the world of thought and among the practical workers for Christian civilization.  His subsequent publications were:  “The Message of the Church to Laboring Men,” 1851; “Yeast,” 1851; “The Application of Associative Principles and Methods to Agriculture,” 1851; Sermons on National Subjects,” 1852; “Phaetheon, or Loose Thoughts for Loose Thinkers,” 1852; “Hypatia, or New Foes with an Old Face,” 1853; “Alexandria and Her Schools,” 1854; “Westward Ho,” 1855; “Sermons for the Times,” 1855; “Glaucus, or the Warders of the Shore,” 1856; “The Heroes, or Greek Fairy Tales,” 1856; “Two Years Ago,” 1857; “Andromeda and Other Poems,” 1858; “Sir Walter Raleigh and His Times,” 1859; “Good News of God,” 1859; Lectures and Essays; “Hereward, the Last of the English;” “Town Geology,” and “At Last.”  One of his most notable minor works was a sermon on “Muscular Christianity,” which he preached in St. Mary’s, the church of the University of Cambridge. Dying at the age of 55, Mr. Kingsley passes away in the meridian of his powers.  He had lived a wholesome life; he was a well-knitted, tough, elastic man; he had the capacities within him of much additional work.  Yet it cannot be said that he has left his work unfinished.  The word that it was in him to speak--for the emancipation of mankind from error and wickedness, from the tyranny of caste, the wrongs of class legislation, the burdens of poverty, of wretchedness, and vice--was fully spoken.  He never lost an occasion--with voice or pen, in sermon, novel, or poem--to plead with man for the rights of humanity.  His vindication of health, as an element in the salvation of the world, had likewise been made complete.  There were his doctrines; there were his examples.  To literature he might have contributed more; but it is quite unlikely that he would have wrought in a new vein or risen to a loftier eminence.--Virtue, manliness, the spirit of adventure, the work of self-reliant character, and the necessity and beauty of religious faith are urged and celebrated in all his fictions.  The lesson had been wholly taught.  And Charles Kingsley, distinguished on two continents as novelist, poet, and moral and social philosopher and teacher, had lived to see not a few ideas crystallized into practical fact which were though to be visionary 25 years ago.  If it was his appointed vocation to foster the intelligent and virtuous aspirations of mankind toward equality before human laws and of obedience to laws divine--and thus toward national and healthful happiness--he certainly accomplished it to the utmost limit of his power.  In later years he had desisted from strife and controversy, finding the social world calmer, and yielding more to the poet than to the reformer in his restless spirit.  His visit to this country was a happy episode in his autumnal experience.  He made many friends here, and he left a gracious and fragment memory when he sailed away.  He will be honored, in the long future, as a man of true and pure genius, whose moral nature allied that genius to patient work for the practical good of his fellow creatures.  He will be mourned in the present as the magical romancer who called up Hypatia the beautiful, and the tender poet who sang of “The Sands o’ Dee.”--NY Tribune.  (Tuesday, February 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edgar Sickles
On the evening of the 21st ultimo a brutal murder was committed near Towanda, an old man named Edgar Sickles being killed by two brothers named Powers.  The murderers were intoxicated, and got into a quarrel with Sickles about two pounds of sugar, ending the affair by splitting his head open with a hatchet and stabbing him several times.  Both the murderers are safely locked up at Towanda.  (Tuesday, February 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Avery
A very unusual event took place in Chatham township last Wednesday morning.  Mr. and Mrs. Charles Avery had settled in that township a long time ago, and had won the respect and love of all who knew them.  They had lived together many peaceful years, raising a useful family of children, and sharing the joys, the cares and the sorrows common to all humanity.  For sometime past Mrs. Avery had been suffering from that dread scourge of high latitude--consumption.  At last, as it became more and more evident that for her the closing scene was at hand, her life’s companion also sickened of an acute disease--inflammation of the lungs.  Last Wednesday morning the end came.  Mrs. Avery breathed her last at 1 o’clock, and her husband, having learned of her death, rapidly sank until, at 3 o’clock, he followed her to the “undiscovered country.”  We have heard of the irony of fate; but this event seems to have illustrated the very paths of life.  People often express the desire to die together, and certain it is that many a faithful couple will wish their last end may be like this; but it is very seldom that such a wish is gratified.  Man and wife may totter down the hill of life hand in hand, but it is not often that they are laid “together at the foot” so literally as were this aged couple.  The funeral services were held Friday morning, and then the mortal remains of the good old husband and wife were followed to their last resting place by the relatives, friends and neighbors, and placed in one grave, for “in death they were not divided.”  (Tuesday, February 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Kydd
In Blossburg, Jan. 25, 1875, Mrs. Kydd, aged about 18 years.  (Tuesday, February 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Daniel Williams
In Blossburg, Jan. 26, 1875, Mrs. Daniel Williams, aged 79 years.  (Tuesday, February 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William A. Buckingham
William A. Buckingham, Senator of the United States and ex-Governor of Connecticut, died at his home in Norwich, Thursday at midnight.  (Tuesday, February 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Betsy Williams
Betsy Williams, one of the last of Pennsylvania’s slaves, died in Lewisburg recently, at the advanced age of 75.  She was purchased by Wm. Davis, of Limestoneville, Montour county, when only 8 years old.  At the age of 18 she became free.  Her skill as a cook was unsurpassed and she wielded her authority with regal sway in the kitchen.  Her fame spread throughout the neighboring country.  Many are the recollections possessed by as many persons of the royal way in which she browned a turkey.  Her doughnuts were unsurpassed.  She was a good friend, or a good enemy.  She was perfectly identified with the interests of the family with whom she lived.  Her master’s friends were her friends; his enemies her enemies; his joys, her joys; his sorrows her sorrows.  As age crept upon her, her manners became remarkably kind and winning.  The smallest child did not hesitate to climb into her friendly lap, and even the brute creation such as dogs and cats, were attracted toward her and always found her ready to befriend in all emergencies.--The old homestead at last was broken up, and old “Aunty,” found a home with one of the daughters of her old master, Mrs. Dr. Marr, of Lewisburg.  (Tuesday, February 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Emma Maria Smith
In Wellsboro, February 6th, 1875, of puerperal fever, Mrs. Emma Maria, wife of Alvarius Smith, in the 22d year of her age.  (Tuesday, February 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alfred Conkling
While a number of boys were coasting at Middletown, NY, Tuesday night, an accident occurred by which Alfred Conkling was instantly killed, his neck being broken.  A number of older boys who were on the sled with him were wounded.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rear Admiral Charles S. Bell
Rear Admiral Charles S. Bell, USN, died of pneumonia Friday morning at his residence in New Brunswick, NJ, aged 77 years.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. E. Smith
W. E. Smith, an old resident and successful merchant of Addison, NY, died in that village on Tuesday.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Flora F. Lake
At Antrim, Pa., February 15th, of inflammation of the bowels, after an illness of a few days, Flora F., daughter of James and Julia Lake, aged 18 years and 9 months.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sally Ann Dibble
In Delmar, February 6th, 1875, Mrs. Sally Ann Dibble, aged 68 years, 9 months and 10 days.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary G. Dodge
In New Albany, Ind., Feb. 3, 1875, of pneumonia, Mrs. Mary G. Dodge, of Sullivan, Tioga county, Pa., aged 58 years.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Allie E. Johnson
Allie E., daughter of Newton and Elizabeth Johnson, of consumption, in Wellsboro, January 21st, aged 22 years.  Miss Johnson was an estimable young lady, beloved by those who knew her.  For six years, she had been an invalid; but heroically clung to the idea of her recovery, expecting to enter into the active work of life as a laborer in God‘s vineyard.  This thought she abandoned a few days before her death, when she came to know that the sphere of her activities would be Heaven instead of Earth.  Enjoying great mental tranquility and spiritual joy, she patiently awaited the summons that would release her from her bondage and introduce her into the “Paradise of God.”  No one could see her without perceiving how great to her was the gain of godliness, as it enabled her to say, “To me, to live is Christ, and to die is gain.”   Her funeral services were attended in the Methodist church, of which she had been an honored and consistent member.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Leroy Abell
The Blossburg Register says Mr. Leroy Abell, of Westfield, accidentally shot himself dead a few days ago.  His barn was infested with rats, and he kept his gun loaded and standing in a convenient place for the purpose of shooting them.  He went into the barn, and seeing a rat he reached for the gun.  While looking for the rat he drew the gun towards him, the lock struck against some pieces of lumber, and it was discharged, the contents taking effect in his heart, causing instant death.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Job Head
Mr. Job Head, an old citizen of Clymer township, died last week Monday.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. W. Wiggins
W. W. Wiggins, of Hornellsville, an inmate of the Willard Asylum, died recently at that institution.  He had been insane some 10 or 12 years, and at times believed himself to be President of the Erie railway, and a clergyman.  Previous to his insanity he was a man of position and influence, and very much respected by the community in which he resided.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Samuel Hooper
Hon. Samuel Hooper, Representative in Congress from Massachusetts, died at Washington last Saturday evening.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John McCormick
John McCormick, one of the wealthiest citizens of Mount Vernon, Ohio, was murdered in his store a few nights ago, for money.  A heavy reward is offered for the murders.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elmer Doud [SRGP 09836]
In Sullivan, Pa., Jan. 29th, Elmer, son of Lafayette and Clara Doud, aged 8 years.  (Tuesday, February 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Mainesburg Cemetery]

W. B.(or R.) Smith
W. B.(or R.) Smith, an old resident and successful merchant of Addison, NY, died in that village on Tuesday.  (Tuesday, February 23, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Michael Reilly
Michael Reilly, an Erie Railroad trackman, 50 years of age, got one of his feet fast in a railroad track at Otisville, Wednesday morning last, and was instantly killed by a passing train.  (Tuesday, March 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Stevens
Mr. Henry Stevens, a prominent citizen of Middlebury, died last Sunday, aged about 54.  The funeral is to be attended to-day.  (Tuesday, March 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Harriet Humphrey
At her residence in Woodhull, NY, February 18th, 1875, of typhoid-pneumonia, Harriet, wife of James V. Humphrey and mother of Dr. William T. Humphrey, of Osceola, Pa., one of our present legislative Representatives.  Deceased was born in the town of Bainbridge, Chenango county, NY, in the year 1804, and consequently was at the time of her death in her 71st year.  She moved with her husband into the town of Woodhull 17 years ago, where they have resided ever since.  Her sickness was short--only 10 days.  Three of her sons and an only daughter were with her when she closed her eyes in the sleep that knows no waking.  The funeral procession was a large one although the day proved to be very stormy.  (Tuesday, March 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Daniel Smith
At Liberty, Pa., Feb. 20, 1875, Daniel Smith, aged 45 years.  (Tuesday, March 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Christina Schaumbacher
At Liberty, Pa., Feb. 23, 1875, Mrs. Christina Schaumbacher, aged 94 years.  Mrs. Schaumbacher was Judge C. F. Veil’s mother-in-law.  She was the mother of seven children, 45 grandchildren, 101 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild.  She has lived the life of a Christian, and has gone to give an account of her stewardship.  (Tuesday, March 2, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sir Charles Lyell
Sir Charles Lyell, the great geologist, died a few days ago at the age of 78 years.  He had been for many years at the head of his department of natural science, and everywhere his writings are considered as the highest authority.  (Tuesday, March 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gen. Lorenzo Thomas
Gen. Lorenzo Thomas, late Adjutant General of the army, died at Washington last Wednesday, in the 72d year.  (Tuesday, March 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Lizzy Ames [SRGP 09011 Elizabeth Borden Ames]
Miss Lizzy Ames, daughter of Mr. Thomas W. Ames, of Sullivan, aged 34, died in Philadelphia, where she was attending medical lectures, on Sunday evening, February 28th.  She was one of the graduates of the first class of the State Normal School at Mansfield in 1866.  Miss Ames was a warm friend and consistent every-day Christian, beloved by all who knew her, and she has gone to enjoy the company of the blessed forever.  She died of heart disease.--Her funeral was attended at the M. E. church to-day, Prof. Fradenburgh preaching the funeral sermon to a crowded house.  Prof. Allen also made a few appropriate remarks.  (Tuesday, March 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Mainesburg Cemetery]

E. S. Barnard
E. S. Barnard, of the Cuba, NY, Patriot, died on Sunday morning of last week.  (Tuesday, March 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William D. Burdick
William D. Burdick, one of the oldest residents of Hornellsville, died recently at the age of 73 years.  (Tuesday, March 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Capt. Henry S. Dow
Capt. Henry S. Dow, editor of the Lumberman’s Gazette, Bay City, Michigan, died from an overdose of morphine, taken while he was ill and probably intentionally.  He was a captain of a N. H. Regiment in the war.  He then came to Addison, NY, and for six months was one of the publishers of the Advertiser, and from thence went to Oil City and published a daily newspaper.  (Tuesday, March 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Morgan
At his residence, at Round Top, Pa., February 10, 1875, Samuel Morgan, aged 72 years, 10 months, and 26 days.  (Tuesday, March 9, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Fulkerson
The Register says a man named Charles Fulkerson was found dead at Nauvoo, in this county, on the 16rh inst.  He had been gone from his house about 15 minutes, accompanied by a small boy, his grandson.  The boy came back to the house and told his grandmother that he had fainted.  She sent for a neighbor, who rubbed him with camphor, but failed to restore him to consciousness.  A physician was summoned, but found the man dead.  It was thought he died of heart disease.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Capt. J. J. Shepard
Capt. J. J. Shepard, an officer in the 107th N. Y. Vols., in the late war, died in Corning a few days ago.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Olive Dunsmore
At West Covington, February 27th, 1875, Olive, wife of William Dunsmore, aged 33 years.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Diantha Marvin
At West Covington, March 6th, 1875, Diantha, wife of A. G. Marvin, aged 42 years.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Forbes Cooley
In Delmar, March 13, 1875, Mr. Forbes Cooley, aged 53 years.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Annie Morris
On the 11th inst., Annie, only daughter of William E. and Mary N. Morris.  Interment at Laurel Hill, Philadelphia, March 15th, 1875.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

RICH -  Mrs. Rosilla Welch [SRGP 03466]
In Sullivan March 11th, Rosilla, wife of James Welch, aged 54(?) years.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [State Road Cemetery]

Mr. David Palmer [SRGP 07736]
In Sullivan, March 15th, Mr. David Palmer, aged 86 years.  Palmer was one of the oldest settlers of Sullivan.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [King Hill Cemetery]

HAYDEN - Mrs. Phebe Doud [SRGP 07253]
In Sullivan, March 17th, Phebe, wife of Munson Doud, aged 89 years.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [State Road Cemetery]

Elisha Kingbury
Elisha Kingbury, probably the most prominent architect and builder in Elmira died at his rooms in the Rathbun House last Thursday morning soon after five o’clock.--His sickness has been of comparatively brief duration, the disease prostrating him being a brain fever.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Edwards
Mr. George Edwards died at Bath a few days since, after a long illness.  Mr. Edwards was born in Elmira--then Newtown--in 1815.  His father, the late Hon. George C. Edwards, then a practicing lawyer, removed to Bath in November, 1821, and there reside till his death in 1837.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. P. H. Crofut
In Elk township, March 13, 1875, Mr. P. H. Crofut, aged 77 years.  He died in great peace.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Welsh and John Owen
A tragedy occurred at Mount Pleasant mine, Scranton, last Tuesday, by which two boys, named Henry Welsh and John Owen were crushed to death in a coal screen.  Both were employed in the screen room with about 60 other cracker boys, separating slate from the coal.  Welsh was in the act of stepping across the screen when his foot was caught in the ponderous machine which was revolving slowly.  His cries brought to his aid his companion Owen, a boys some 15 years of age, who bravely and in the face of a fearful fate sought to extricate him.  In the effort his arm was caught in the screen, and before the machinery could be brought to a stand--still both boys were crushed into a shapeless mass, their heads and arms severed from their bodies, and altogether presenting a shocking spectacle.  (Tuesday, March 16, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Laurie
James Laurie, of Hartford, the eminent civil engineer, died suddenly last Tuesday, aged 70 years.  (Tuesday, March 23, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Monyhan
Last Wednesday night, in Brooklyn, John Riley shot John Monyhan, killing him almost instantly.  Deceased, who was married to Riley’s sister, was drinking all day, and it is alleged made repeated assaults on Riley.  (Tuesday, March 23, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Chloe Bockus
In Charleston, March 4th, 1875, Chloe, daughter of Philander and Eliza Bockus, aged 2 years, 6 months and 22 days.  (Tuesday, March 23, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

[Own Surname not known] Mrs. Jane Connelly [SRGP 13262]
In Sullivan, March 26th,(or 25th), 1875, Jane, wife of William Connelly, aged about 25(?) years.  (Tuesday, March 23, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [State Road Cemetery]

John Martin
John Martin, a member of Parliament for Meath, Ireland, died last week, aged 63(or 68) years.  (Tuesday, April 6, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Francis Condle
Dr. Francis Condle, author of several medical works, died in Philadelphia, Wednesday, aged 80.  (Tuesday, April 6, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. Simmons
J. Simmons, a well known auctioneer of Albany, fell dead in his office Thursday morning.  (Tuesday, April 6, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rodman Robinson
A slide on the Northern Central Railroad at Narrows, near Clark’s Ferry, Dauphin county, Pa., Saturday morning, threw a freight train off the track.  Rodman Robinson, a brakeman, was killed.  (Tuesday, April 6, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John J. Monks
The house of John J. Monks, at Boardville, NJ, was burned Thursday night.  Two children were saved by being thrown from a window.  Two others perished in the flames, and Monks was so burned that he has since died.  (Tuesday, April 6, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Minnie E. Packard
At East Charleston, Pa., October 3d, 1875, Minnie E., daughter of Erskine and Jane Packard, aged 2 years, 2 months and 8 days.  (Tuesday, April 6, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry H. Packard
At East Charleston, Pa., March 23d, 1875, Henry H., son of Erskine and Jane Packard, aged 7 months and 15 days.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Morris R.(or B.) Dawson
In Charleston, March 1st, 1875, Mr. Morris S. Dawson, aged 73 years.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Cordelia W. Dawson
In Charleston, March 20th, 1875, Mrs. Cordelia W. Dawson, aged 38 years.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Caroline Lathrop
In Lawrence township, Pa., Caroline, wife of Austin Lathrop, Esq., aged 51 (or 54) years.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jeremiah McDonald
At the County ---, in Charleston township, March 30th, 1875, Jeremiah McDonald, of Clymer township, aged about 51(or 61) years.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Amanda Giles
Amanda Giles, otherwise known as “Suckerhill Mandy,” was found drowned just below the State dam at Corning last Wednesday.  She was probably one more victim of a depraved appetite for alcohol.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charlie Stevens Lloyd
At Niles Valley, on the 29th ult., Charlie Stevens, only child of George and Anna A. Lloyd, aged 1 year and 3 months.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Patrick O’Shea
Patrick O’Shea, a wife-murderer, was hanged at St. Louis last Friday.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ex Judge James J. Roosevelt
Ex Judge James J. Roosevelt, formerly of the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals of New York, died in New York city last week Monday night.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Carney & wife
John Carney cut his wife’s throat with a razor and then his own, in a drunken fit, last Tuesday.  Both are expected to die.--This happened in St. Louis.  (Tuesday, April 13, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Fred Brandenburg
Fred Brandenburg, of Philadelphia, aged 18, died of starvation in San Francisco last Tuesday.  (Tuesday, April 20, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry W. Dutton
Henry W. Dutton, senior proprietor of the Boston Evening Transcript, died last Thursday, aged 79 years.  (Tuesday, April 20, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Stephen Potter
Mr. Stephen Potter, an old settler at the mouth of Potter Brook, died on the 9th instant at the age of 86 years.  (Tuesday, April 20, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Wesley Shaffer
A few days ago Mr. Wesley Shaffer, a highly respected and well-to-do citizen of Driftwood, Cameron county, committed suicide.  He shot himself with a rifle, completely tearing away the upper portion of the skull.  For three months or more Mr. Shaffer has been laboring under a fit of temporary insanity, brought about by financial embarrassments.  On the morning of the catastrophe Mrs. Shaffer and son were about to enjoy a horse-back ride into the country.--The children had followed them to the stable.  As they were upon the point of starting, the report of a rifle alarmed them.  Returning to the house, a scene of blood and death confronted them.  The husband and father had shot himself as described, and was then in an insensible condition.  He lived about an hour after inflicting the fatal wound.  The deceased was about 60 years of age, and was a brother of the Rev. G. W. Shaffer, who was last fall the temperance candidate for the Legislature from Cameron county.  (Tuesday, April 27, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Harper
John Harper, senior member of the firm of Harper Brothers, publishers, New York, died last Thursday night, aged 79 years.  (Tuesday, April 27, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. J. E. White
To the Editor of the Agitator:  It is with sadness of heart that I inform your numerous readers of the death of the late Mrs. J. E. White, which occurred upon the 18th instant at 4 p.m., at her late residence in Knoxville.  By this event the community has lost one of its best and most respected citizens.  She was always foremost in administering to the wants of the sick, and was always ready to sacrifice almost life itself for her friends.  She recently lost a sister, the wife of Mr. Austin Lathrop, of Lawrenceville, whose funeral occurred upon the 4th instant, and now she has quickly followed her to the final rest.  Her funeral took place on Wednesday, at the Union church in Knoxville.  The sermon was preached by the Rev. Mr. Murdock, of Troupsburg Center, assisted by the Rev. Messrs Kenney and Wicks, of Knoxville, and the Rev. M. Burnell, of Woodhull.  The text may be found in Revelations, 14:13.  In his discourse the preacher said the deceased was ready and willing to go from this to the joys of the upper and better world, where all sorrows cease and all tears shall be wiped away. The relatives of the deceased have the heartfelt sympathy of their numerous friends in this section of country in this their loss of a wife and mother.  Mrs. White was taken sick while sitting up with the wife of Mr. D. Coats, of this place, and went home from the house of sickness to her own never to leave it again alive.  Her loss will be severely felt in this place and the surrounding country.  Business is quiet here, but with a better tendency than since last winter.  May it still grow brighter and brighter is the wish of all the country.  T. D. Mede.  Knoxville, April 23, 1875.  (Tuesday, April 27, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Ella Hart
At the home of her father in Thomasville, NC, on the morning of the 20th inst., after a lingering and painful illness.  Ella, second daughter of Jeremiah Hart, formerly of Charleston, in the 26th year of her age.  (Tuesday, April 27, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Mathers
In Liberty, Pa., April 9, 1875, John, son of Edward Mathers, aged 1 year, 9 months and 5 days.  (Tuesday, April 27, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Emberger
In Cherry Flats, April 1, 1875, infant son of Martin and Clary Emberger, aged 11 days.  (Tuesday, April 27, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Willie Van Deusen
Willie Van Deusen, of Farmington, died March 31st, 1875, aged nearly six years.  This dear little boy was bright and smart beyond most children of his age.  His favorite hymn was that one with the refrain “Jesus loves me.”  Its truth has been proved, for He who was the Babe of Bethlehem has taken their lamb to His bosom, and agonized parents derive comfort from the knowledge that he is now.  Osceola, April 19, 1875.  (Tuesday, April 27, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Oliver Charlick
Oliver Charlick died Friday morning in New York.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Bowring Stephens
Edward Bowring Stephens, the English sculptor, is dead.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Albert Zachariae
Henry Albert Zachariae, the eminent German jurist, is dead.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Winwood Reade
Winwood Reade, an English writer of books of travel, is dead.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Officer Reibsonner
Officer Reibsonner, who was shot by the Connells, died Friday morning.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. F. B. Conway
Mrs. F. B. Conway, of the Brooklyn Theater, died in New York last Wednesday night.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederic De Waldreck
Frederic De Waldreck, the famous French traveler and artist, is dead.  He was in his 111th year.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Widow Catharine Boom
To the Editor of the Agitator:  Widow Catharine Boom closed her earthly pilgrimage, at the residence of her youngest son, in Chatham, April 18th, in the 77th year of her age.  This noble woman was among the grand relicts of a former age.  She and her husband were among the first settlers of this town.--Side by side with her husband, with the axe, she helped to fell the forest, and labored with him in the logging, fallow and field.  As a mother she was faithful and fond; as a neighbor trustful and true.  Oft at midnight she could be seen with lighted torch threading the lone paths of the woods to minister to the sick, and carrying means to relieve their wants.  Did death enter the rude dwelling, she was there to perform the last sad act of kindness, and to console the bereaved.  The principles of the Christian religion guided and sustained her in all her acts, trials and afflictions.  In the faith and glorious hopes of that religion she calmly sleeps.  A. E.  Chatham, April 26, 1875.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. F. Lewis
J. F. Lewis, one of Emporium’s oldest and most respected citizens died a few days ago.  (Tuesday, May 4, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mina Adell Lockwood
In St. Petersburgh, Clarion county, Pa., April 7th, 1875, Mina Adell, daughter of Andrew and Olive Lockwood, aged 1 year and 9 months.  Little Mina was very dear to her parents and sisters.  And in this their first bereavement, it was difficult to yield so sweet a treasure back to the giver.  In their sorrow they seek comfort in Him who said, “Suffer little child to come into me,” expecting to meet the loved one in Heaven.  (Tuesday, May 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charley Lefler
April 21st, 1875, in Jackson, Charley, the only child of M. J. and Ellie Lefler, and grand child of Rev. Mr. Rockwell, aged 1 year, 1 month and 10 days.  (Tuesday, May 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles H. Simmons
Mr. Charles H. Simmons died at his residence in Wellsville on Thursday morning, the 22d ultimo.  He had been a long and patient sufferer from a fever-sore, and an operation had been performed the day before his death by his physicians, with the intention of trying to save the affected limb.--Chloroform was administered, and the operation lasted about 1 ½ hours, but it was too much for his nervous system, and 17 hours after taking the chloroform he was dead.  In his death Wellsville loses a man remarkable for his business talent and energy, and the man who contributed more to its growth as a commercial town than any other six men within its limits.  He had within the past year extended his business by establishing branches in Florida, and his calculations were oftentimes such as to astonish his friends and neighbors.  (Tuesday, May 5, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wesley Van Duzen
A shocking tragedy occurred in the town of Copake, NY, last Tuesday morning.  Wesley Van Duzen, a wealthy and respected farmer, in a fit of insanity shot his mother, an aged lady through the head and breast, killing her instantly, and then shot himself through the heart.  (Tuesday, May 11, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Sheridan
John Sheridan, father of Lieut. General Sheridan, died at his residence at Somerset, Ohio, on Thursday.  (Tuesday, May 11, 1875, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 29 JUL 2007
Revised 12 SEP 2007
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
 Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us