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1876 -  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries
 Part One
Part One Part Two Part Three
Rev. Henry Boehm
The Rev. Henry Boehm, better known as Father Boehm, the oldest Methodist preacher in this country, and probably the oldest minister in the world, died on Tuesday at the house of his granddaughter on Staten Island.  This venerable man was born June 8, 1775, in Lancaster county, Pa., where his father, Martin Boehm, was a Mennonite preacher, and afterward prominent in the organization of the Church of the United Brethren.  Henry received a plain German education and a careful religious training, and at an early age became connected with the Methodist Church, then newly organized in this country.  One of the first Methodist meeting houses was built on the Boehm property, and was long the center of a wide religious influence, and it was there, in 1798, that Henry joined the Methodist body.--After the usual probation he was appointed a class-leader at Soudersburg, and subsequently, after attending a Methodist Conference in 1800, became an itinerant preacher.  In 1802 he was appointed to Kent Circuit, and after laboring there with great success was transferred to a new field of action in eastern Pennsylvania.  He preached in German at this time, and was the companion of Bishop Asbury in his tour of the State.--Having now fully acquired the use of the English language, he preached to large audiences at Harrisburg, Reading, Columbia, and other places.  In 1807 he was stationed in Lancaster county, where the Methodist Church first became established through his influence, and while there translated the discipline of the Methodist Church into the German language.  At this period Bishop Asbury again chose this preacher as his traveling companion; and this time their labors extended over the States of Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina, and other points south and west.  In 1809 he made a visit to the Eastern States and New York, and was everywhere the recipient of marks of respect and attention.  In 1812 he was appointed to the charge of the Schuykill district, and he subsequently served as Presiding Elder of the Chesapeake, Delaware, Lancaster, and other districts.--He was a member of the General Conference of 1832 and that of 1844, when the separation took place between the Church North and South.  Since 1844 he has been on the list of supernumeray preachers, but has maintained an active interest in church affairs, and has been a constant attendant of the Conferences, where he was always received with the respect befitting his years and services.  On the 8th of June last his 100th birthday was celebrated at Jersey City by the Newark Conference, of which he was a member.  On this occasion he submitted an outline of his busy life and labors in the Methodist Church, and addresses were made by several prominent clergymen.  The excitement of the occasion prostrated him, and though he rallied, he was again seized with illness on the 12th of the month, while attempting to preach at Richmond.  “Father Boehm,” as he was affectionately called by people of all denominations, was a devoted Christian, and his end was in keeping with the doctrines he taught.--Philadelphia Times.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Augustus Mayhew
Augustus Mayhew, a contributor to the London Punch, is dead.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Creighton
William Creighton, formerly a prominent Baltimore merchant, died in New York last Tuesday.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Timothy Dodd
Timothy Dodd, said to be the oldest merchant of Boston, died on New Year’s Day, aged 95.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ex Senator W. A. Richardson
Ex Senator W. A. Richardson died at his residence in Quincy, IL, last week Monday, of paralysis.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. John H. Clifford
Hon. John H. Clifford, ex Governor of Massachusetts, died last Sunday of dropsy, aged 66 years.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas B. Huston
Thomas B. Huston, one of the proprietors of the Pittsburgh Gazette, died on Tuesday of consumption.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ex Mayor A. C. Wilder
Ex Mayor A. C. Wilder, of Rochester, died in San Francisco a few days since.--He was an ex-Congressman from Kansas.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Peter McNaughton
Peter McNaughton, one of Albany’s oldest physicians, is dead.  He was born in Scotland.  He had a large and lucrative practice.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

E. L. Pierson
E. L. Pierson, a member of the Louisiana Legislature, was shot and instantly killed last week Sunday by Mr. Cosgrove, editor of the New Orleans Vindicator.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas H. Chandler and George F. Northcraft
Thomas H. Chandler, town marshal of Lebanon, Ky., shot and killed George F. Northcraft for resisting arrest, whereupon Chandler’s met a similar fate at the hands of Northcraft’s friends.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William M. Senger
William M. Senger died at Port Jervis, NY, a few days ago, aged 83 years.  Deceased was born in Austria, and was Government Geologist for 38 years.  Some years since the Khedive of Egypt tendered him a salary of $35,000 a year to make that country his home.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lady Louisa Stewart
Lady Louisa Stewart, the last descendant of the royal family of Scotland, has just died at Traquair House, near Peebles, in her 100th year.  She was the daughter of the 7th Earl, and upon the death in 1861, of her brother Charles, the 8th peer, the ancient title of the line became extinct.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. John Hasson
Hon. John Hasson, a soldier of the war of 1812, died in Couter county recently.--The deceased was born in Lancaster county, where he joined a company of 100 raised when the report reached there that the British fleet was approaching Baltimore.  Young Hasson, then only 18 years of age, joined the company, of which the late President James Buchanan was also a private, and marched to the protection of Baltimore.  Mr. Hasson removed to Center county, where he was elected to the Legislature and afterward Associate Judge.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss May Wilson
In Delmar, November 31, 1875, May, youngest daughter of Smith and Priscilla Wilson, aged 5 years and 4(?) months.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lucius Barlow
In Charleston, Pa., December 31, 1875, Mr. Lucius Barlow, aged 84 years, 4 months and 22 days.  Mr. Barlow came to this region from Delaware county, NY, in 1821, and had resided on the farm on which he died ever since that time--a period of 54 years.  He raised a family of 10 children, and during his long life enjoyed the confidence and esteem of all who knew him.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George W. Woodward
George W. Woodward, ex-Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, died while in Europe, in May last.  The public services of Judge Woodward were singularly honorable, and few pages of the history of the State will contain a more interesting recital than those which chronicle the life of this eminent jurist, whom the Commonwealth honored by repeated renewals of her confidence.  Judge Woodward had one of those strong, active, robust minds that wedded to its convictions is never subject to caprice, nor bends to opinion, however fiercely it storms, and his conduct as legislator, judge and man shows his inflexible attachment to principle widely differing at times with his friends and constituents, but with an honest difference that had no selfish or sordid taint.  He has constructed his own most enduring monument in the able and learned decisions he left to the bar, and the current of judicial opinions in Pennsylvania will have a steadier flow because of the direction given it by his master mind.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horace Binney
The length of life accorded to the venerable Horace Binney is seldom allotted to man, and still more rarely is it accompanied to a ripe old age with the vigor and graces of intellect that attended upon this great lawyer to the very close of his long and useful career.  Avoiding public affairs except when duty or patriotism especially evoked his interference, the experience of Mr. Binney illustrated the power and beauty of an unblemished private life, and the independence, and it may almost be said grandeur, and an unbroken, distinguished and honorable career at the bar.  To this venerated jurist, who dedicated all his time and energy with singleness of purpose to the duties of his profession, the Bar of Philadelphia is indebted for an example that helped to give it the character and reputation it maintains, and it was fitting that its most respected leaders show bow with sorrow when in August last they followed to his grave this aged lawyer, whose mind has left its impress for almost a century in every step of the progress of jurisprudence in Pennsylvania.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel E. Dimmick
In October last the mortal remains of the late Attorney-General, Samuel E. Dimmick, were reverently laid in the little cemetery at Honesdale.  Three years ago the character, integrity and recognized legal abilities of this lamented man designated him for the important position he filled with so much dignity and honor, and the full measure of popularity he enjoyed at the time of his death showed how satisfactorily discharged its responsible duties.  Generous, manly and upright in all the relations of life, and administering his high office with a stern and uncompromising fidelity to the interests of the State, the deceased Attorney General tempered his decisions with so much benevolence and courtesy that it is difficult to say whether as man or official he was most beloved.  Of delicate health, and suffering from the affliction that resulted in his death, in response to what he believed a call to duty, Mr. Dimmick died while in attendance upon the Board of Pardons, where his merciful disposition and mature and correct judgment were invaluable helps in dispensing justice.  With the public grief that deplores his loss, I may be permitted to mingle my private sorrow, for while the State mourns for a just and incorruptible officer, the administration has been deprived of a careful and wise counselor, and the Executive of a disinterested and devoted friend.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Prentiss
Mr. Charles Prentiss, an old resident of Canoe Camp, died recently at the age of 63 years.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Deacon D. C. Edgeton [SRGP 14886]
In Sullivan, Pa., December 28, 1875, of pneumonia, Deacon D. C. Edgeton, aged 81 years.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Ames Hill Cemetery]

Mrs. Callahan
Mrs. Callahan, an old lady of Hornellsville, was found dead by the side of her bed on a recent morning.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Seth Clark
Seth Clark, a prominent business man of Buffalo, committed suicide by shooting himself, a few days since.  A Corning paper says he had speculated heavily and lost, so that he became a forger to save himself, operating on a large scale in issuing false certificates of stock in the Akron Cement Company.  He married a sister of the wife of Rev. Amos Hard, of Painted Post.  His wife became insane years ago, and so remains.  He defrauded Rev. Mr. Hard and his two sons, Rev. Manley Hard, of Syracuse, and Rev. Clark P. Hard, formerly of Corning, now a missionary at Madras, India.  The latter loses nearly $2,000.  Rev. Amos Hard loses nearly all of his surplus earnings, and Rev. Manley Hard suffers seriously, the whole loss of the father and sons being about $5,000.  Clark deceived them by representing himself as quite wealthy, and he gave them mortgages on real estate already mortgaged beyond its value, and they trusted his word and therefore made no search in the clerk’s office.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Arthur Antisdel
Last Friday morning Mr. Alfred Smith found the body of a man about 1 ½ miles from Whitneyville on a new road leading to Mansfield.  The corpse was lying close to a log by the side of the road.  It was that of a man apparently about 35 years old and well dressed.  Two bottles were found near it--one empty and the other containing a little whisky.  Justice Benedict, of Charleston, was notified, and held an inquest, the jury finding that the man died from intoxication and exposure.  The body was recognized as that of Mr. Arthur Antisdel, a man who came here on the 26th of November last.  He acted as porter for a short time at the Parkhurst House, and afterwards worked for a brief period at Bunnel’s Hotel, being discharged from both situations because of his dissipated habits.  And it was those habits which brought him to his death.  When he came here he registered himself as from Milwaukee, but we understand he had a wife and child living at Schenevus, Otsego county, NY.  His relatives, on being telegraphed to, sent for his remains, and they were started for Cooperstown last Sunday.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Bennett
Robert Bennett, of Williamsport, died a few days ago.  He was for a time Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue, and for several years Commissioner’s Clerk.  Mr. Bennett was also for a time editor of the Miltonian.  He was 67 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Donahe
Mr. John Donahe, of Bath, died at that place on the 26th ult., at the age of 88 years.  Mr. Donahe settled at Bath in 1814.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hannah Hart
In Charleston, December 9th, 1875, of typhoid fever, Mrs. Hannah, wife of Levi Hart, aged 57 years.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Isaac Wyman
Isaac Wyman, a respectable citizen of Saxton River, Vermont, committed suicide a few days ago by hanging.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Samuel G. Howe
Dr. Samuel G. Howe, a well-known philanthropist and founder of the Institution for the Blind in Boston, died at his residence in South Boston on the 9th, of softening of the brain, aged 74 years.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. J. Henderson
Mr. J. Henderson, an aged resident of Butler county, Pa., lost his wife a few days ago, and unable to bear his grief, he put the muzzle of a loaded gun in his mouth and blew his head nearly off.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. H. A. Douglas
Dr. H. A. Douglas, Bishop of Bombay, died on the 14th of December.  He was a graduate of Baliol College, Oxford, and was ordained in 1845.  He was Dean of Cape Town, South Africa, 16 years, and assisted at the trial of Bishop Colenso.  In 1869 he was consecrated Bishop of Bombay, which position he held until his death.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Admiral Krabbe
Admiral Krabbe, Russian Minister of Marine, is dead, and Vice Admiral Lessowsky has been appointed his successor.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Richardsen
Edward Richardsen, a prominent citizen of Massilon, Ohio, and a member of the city council, was shot and instantly killed by his wife last week Sunday.  She says that her act was in self defense.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ransom Burdick
Mrs. Ransom Burdick, of Norwich township, McKean county, being about to retire, a few nights ago, undertook to put out the kerosene lamp by blowing down the chimney.  The lamp at once exploded, and Mrs. Burdick was so badly burned that she died the next evening.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elizabeth Trombacker
Elizabeth Trombacker has been found dead in some woods near Youngstown, Ohio.  A veil was tied around her throat.  She had evidently been murdered in a manner similar to the Josie Langmaid horror.--Great excitement exists.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. H. Howes
J. H. Howes, late United States Consul at Hakodadi, died in Yokohama recently.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Congressman Starkweather
Congressman Starkweather, of Connecticut, died of pneumonia last Friday morning, in Washington.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Allen F. Webster
In Richmond township, January 22d, 1876, of consumption, Allen F. Webster, aged 35 years, 4 months and 12 days.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horace Peck
In Tioga township, January 24, 1876, Horace Peck, aged 54 years.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lucinda Burdick
On the morning of the 27th ultimo Lucinda Burdick, a young lady living at Almond was found dead in her bed.  She had been slightly deranged for some time past, and it is supposed she died in a fit, as she was subject to them.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Peter Whitaker
Mr. Peter Whitaker departed this life at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. James Cudworth, on the 29th of January.  He lived accordingly to the commands of God, and has gone to reap his reward in the hereafter.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. R. F. Ashley
Mrs. R. F. Ashley died on the 30th of January.  She left an evidence that she was accepted by God.  She left a family and a large circle of friends to mourn her loss.  She rests from her labors and her works do follow her.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hobart Bogardus
Some three weeks ago, Mrs. Hobart Bogardus, of Saugerties, NY, awoke in the night with a severe headache.  Taking a bottle of smelling salts from a stand, she applied it occasionally to her nose, and soon fell asleep, still holding her thumb over its mouth.  In the morning she found that the salts had drawn a blister on her thumb, and in a short time her hand became highly inflamed.  Subsequently gangrene set in, her whole system became poisoned, and on Sunday night she died.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Carrie Cloos
In Chatham Valley, December 18, 1875, of malignant scarlet fever, Carrie, daughter of Nabery(?) and Caroline Cloos, aged 16 years.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Norman Halliday
At 3 o’clock Friday morning, Jan. 28, Norman Halliday, a respectable farmer, near Jamestown, NY, went to his insane father’s room to watch for the balance of the night.  An hour later screams from the old gentleman aroused the family, who found the son dying from a terrible wound in the throat, and the father sitting up looking at the body beside him.  The weapon was a two bladed knife.  The verdict was suicide in a fit of temporary insanity.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Admiral S. H. Stringham
Admiral S. H. Stringham died in Brooklyn last week Monday, aged 78 years.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Christ
John Christ, a Lehigh county farmer, committed suicide on Tuesday by hanging himself in his barn.  Mr. Christ owned a large farm.  No cause is assigned for the deed.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Catherine A. Spencer
In Chatham, Tioga county, Pa., January 29th, 1876, Mrs. Catherine A. Spencer, aged 64 years and 9 months.  Mrs. Spencer moved from the state of New York with her husband and family in the year 1840 to the place where she passed the remainder of her days.  She has been a true and faithful mother.  For many years she had been getting ready for the departure from this world where sorrow reigns to that unfading beauty, and left a bright evidence of her hope in Jesus.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. Luther C. Peck
Hon. Luther C. Peck, formerly a prominent lawyer of Livingston county, NY, died at his residence in Nunda Saturday morning the 12th instant, aged about 80.  (Tuesday, February 22, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Leonard Houtz
Just before dying Leonard Houtz, of Carbon county, informed his children where $1,800 in specie were secreted, and requested an equal division of the money among them.  (Tuesday, February 22, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Canfield
The seven year-old son of H. H. Canfield, of Hornellsville, NY, while playing on the ice, slipped and fell, injuring his head so severely that he died from the effects a few days afterwards.  (Tuesday, February 22, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas McClure
A week ago last Saturday a man named Thomas McClure, residing at Nesquehoning, committed suicide, and in the most deliberate manner.  He took an army rifle, and tying a shoe-string into a loop attached it to the trigger, placing the loop on his big toe, sat down on the floor of his residence, and thus prepared committed the desperate act.  The body presented a sickening sight, being so terribly disfigured as scarcely to be recognizable.  (Tuesday, February 29, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ambrose Francis Didot
Ambrose Francis Didot, an old publisher at Paris, France, died in that city on the 19th instant.  (Tuesday, February 29, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Catlin
In Chatham Hollow, February 13, 1876, Mrs. Elizabeth Catlin, aged 75 years and 12 days.  (Tuesday, February 29, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eddy Sears
In Groton, NY, February 8, 1876, of brain disease, Eddy, son of F. L. and Josephine Ruberolle(?) Sears, aged 1 year and 25 days.  (Tuesday, February 29, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horace Butler
On February 16, 1876, near Hartford, North Carolina, Horace Butler, formerly of Delmar, Tioga county, Pa., aged 60(?) years.  (Tuesday, February 29, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Eliza Butler
In Delmar, February 16, 1876, of paralysis, Mrs. Eliza Butler, aged 65 years.  (Tuesday, February 29, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elwood Simmons
In Delmar, February 25, 1876, Elwood Simmons, aged 12(?) years.  (Tuesday, February 29, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alvin Gaylord
Mr. Alvin Gaylord, one of the oldest citizens of Mansfield, died on Saturday, February 26th, after a lingering illness.  The Advertiser says he came from Vermont at an early age, and has resided at Mansfield for considerably more than half a century.  He was a good citizen, a consistent member of the M. E. Church, and at various times acceptably filled positions of public trust.  His aged companion, to whom he was married 55 years ago, survives him, as do also a number of grown-up sons.  His remains were buried on Monday morning of last week.  Mr. Gaylord had reached his 77th year.  (Tuesday, March 7, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Llewellyn Vough
A fatal accident occurred at the schoolhouse in East Forks, Sullivan county, February 11th.  While several of the scholars were playing baseball the bat slipped out of the hands of one of the players, striking Llewellyn Vough, (sitting some 20 feet distant) on the temple, fracturing his skull.  He expired in about three hours afterward.  The deceased was about 17 years of age.  (Tuesday, March 7, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

White Whitely
White Whitely, a farmer of Sullivan county, was killed by a falling tree, which he had cut down.  Deceased was a peculiar character.  He lived in a large house by himself for 19 years and did his own cooking.  He owned three farms.  He never mixed in society except as a member of a debating club, in the discussions of which he regularly participated.  He was one of the principal debaters, and being absent at a late meeting a search was made for him, and he was found in the woods dead.  (Tuesday, March 7, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Evans
Robert Evans, a miner at the Brookside colliery, Schuylkill county, was instantly killed a few days ago by a premature blast.  (Tuesday, March 7, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Martin
William Martin, a farmer near Myerstown, Lebanon county, was killed by an explosion recently.  A tree which he had felled lodged in the branches of another tree, and being unable to dislodge it he bored a hole in the bottom and filled it with powder.  The powder exploded before he could get out of the way.  (Tuesday, March 7, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Estelle Flower
At Lamb’s Creek, Pa., March 3, 1876, of fever, Mrs. Estelle Flower, aged 25 years.  (Tuesday, March 7, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Louise Revail Colet
Louise Revail Colet, the French authoress, is dead.  (Tuesday, March 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mabel Hall and Edgar M. Moore
Mabel Hall, a ballet girl, was shot in the head on Wednesday in the St. Louis Theatre Comique, by Edgar M. Moore, who then shot himself.  Both will probably die.  The cause was unrequited love.  (Tuesday, March 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

P. S. Schenck
P. S. Schenck, cashier of the Iron Mountain Bank, St. Louis, committed suicide last Wednesday by shooting himself with a pistol.  His wife committed suicide in the same manner a few days ago.  (Tuesday, March 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Sidney Rusling
Rev. Sidney Rusling, of Lawrenceville, died last Tuesday.  Mr. Rusling was a retired Methodist clergyman.  He came there from New Jersey some years since, having charge of a large Church in that State before his health failed.  He died at the age of 75, and was as a shock to corn fully ripe.  His remains were taken to New Jersey for interment.  His loss will be deeply felt by all his friends and especially by the Church of which he was so worthy a member.  (Tuesday, March 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Estella S. Flower
At Lamb’s Creek, March 3, 1876, Mrs. Estella S., wife of Lucius L. Flower and eldest daughter of Samuel and Mary J. Coles, of Elmira, NY, in the 24th year of her age.  (Tuesday, March 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Alma Oldroyd
In Rutland, February 2d, 1876, of typhoid-pneumonia, after a brief illness, Alma, consort of Henry Oldroyd, aged 58 years and 13 days.  (Tuesday, March 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Abram Walker
In Lawrenceville, March 7th, 1876, of pleuro-pneumonia, Mrs. Abram Walker.  (Tuesday, March 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alfred Duckworth
A few days ago Alfred Duckworth, Deputy United States Marshal, went alone to arrest an illicit distiller named Redmond, near the confines of Greenville county, SC, and Henderson county, NC, and while serving his warrant the officer allowed himself to be thrown off his guard, when Redmond shot him with a revolver, killing him instantly.  No attempt has yet been made to arrest the murderer.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

G. B. L. Fellows
G. B. Fellows, Mayor of Ottawa, Ont., died last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ferdinand Freiligrath
Ferdinand Freiligrath, the German poet, died in Carnstadt in Wurtemburg, Saturday.  He was nearly 66 years old.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Marie de Havigny
Marie de Havigny, Countess D’Agoult, the authoress, well known as “Daniel Stern,” died in Paris on the 8th instant.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Fanny Clark
At Woodhull, Steuben county, NY, of consumption, February 24th, 1876, Fanny, wife of E. W. Clark, aged 84 years.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas E. McCarty
In Charleston, Pa., December 11, 1876, Thomas E. McCarty, aged 99 years.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Helen Campbell
In Nelson, February 5th, 1876, of typhoid pneumonia, Mrs. Helen Campbell, widow of Wm. Campbell, deceased, aged 45 years, 6 months and 26 days.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wm. Richmond [SRGP 10026]
In Sullivan township, March 2d, 1876, Wm. Richmond, aged 75 years.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wm. Warner Drake
At Arnot, Pa., March 14th, 1876, of inflammation of the lungs, Wm. Warner Drake, only son of Leon H. and Mary E. Drake, aged 1 year, 7 months and 6 days.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Philetus Hagar [SRGP 05454]
In Sullivan township, March 13th, 1876, Philetus Hagar, aged 50 years.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Darwin Hill [Obit should read "Mrs." Garwood Hill - own name Alpha Palmer - SRGP 09125]
In Sullivan township, March 12th, 1876, Mrs. Darwin Hill, aged 60 years.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [King Hill Cemetery]

Rev. Chas. E. McIlvaine
Rev. Chas. E. McIlvaine, Rector of Christ Church, Towanda, died on Tuesday afternoon, the 22d ult.  He was the only son of the late Bishop McIlvaine, of Ohio.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Abraham C. Beaty
A few days ago Abraham C. Beaty was found dead in a box car, at Meadville, Pa.  A revolver with one chamber empty was found near him.  An inquest was held, the jury coming to the conclusion that he came to his death by his own hand.  The parents of the deceased reside at Painted Post.  Dressed was a miller by trade and formerly worked in Hayt’s mill at Corning, but being out of employment, had announced his intention of going west.  A mystery surrounds the affair which may never be cleared up.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Polly Tubbs
Near Osceola, Pa., January 29, 1876, Mrs. Polly Tubbs, aged 72 years, 3 months and 20 days.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Isaac Thornton
Near Elkland, Pa., January 22, 1876, Mr. Isaac Thornton, aged 79 years, 9 months and 11 days.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alanson Rumsey
In Delmar, March 21, 1876, Alanson Rumsey, aged 66 years, 3 months and 24 days.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John K. Kirkendall
In Lawrence township, March 9, 1876, of typhoid fever, John J. Kirkendall, in the 37th year of his age.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Margaret Stevens
In Arnot, March 24, 1876, Margaret Stevens, aged 35 years, 9 months and 23 days.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Suhr
In Wellsboro, March 20, 1876, of typhoid fever, Mr. John Suhr, in the 53rd year of his age.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Captain William Cook
Captain William Cook, one of the oldest and most honored citizens of Bellfonte, died on the 11th inst.  He was Postmaster of that place for 12 years, and held other positions of trust in which his honesty and fidelity were conspicuous.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Thomas
A little son of Wm. H. Thomas, aged about four years, who resides at Wilkesbarre, while playing by the back porch a few days ago, fell, his chin striking on the crank of a grindstone, dislocating his neck, and causing death in a few minutes.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jonathan Jennings
The Register says that Jonathan Jennings, an old resident of Covington died in that village a few days ago.  The deceased was one of the oldest inhabitants of Covington township, and was much respected by all who knew him.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Calvin Hanmore
Last Wednesday Mr. Calvin Hanmore, a citizen of Tioga borough and some 70 years of age, committed suicide by shooting himself with a pistol.  The reason for the act is unknown, although it is said that he had several times threatened to kill himself.  It seems that a few minutes before noon Mr. Hanmore borrowed a pistol of Mr. Charles Padget, saying that he wished to kill some cats that were destroying eggs.  Having secured the weapon, he went to an upper room in his own house, which is situated in that part of the borough known as “Brooklyn,” and there committed the act that terminated his earthly career.  The report of the shot was first heard by his wife, who ascended the stairs supposing he had fallen.  Upon raising his head the awful truth burst upon her.  As soon as she could recover partially from the shock, she alarmed the neighbors, one of whom immediately summoned a physician.  His assistance and skill were unavailing, however, as the fatal ball had entered the head just above the right ear, causing almost instant death.  The awful intelligence spread like wildfire through the place, and hundreds of excited people soon came to the spot.  A coroner’s inquest was held during the afternoon, and the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the above facts.  The sad affair has cast a gloom over the community, and the grief-stricken family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Kelley
At Lamb’s Creek, Pa., February 23, 1876, Mrs. Julia Brewster Kelley, aged 27 years and 2 days.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Margaret Stevens
At Arnot, Pa., March 24, 1876, Margaret Stevens, aged 36 years.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Eleazer Baldwin
At Mitchell’s Creek, Pa., March 22, 1876, Mr. Eleazer Baldwin, aged 30 years.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Nancy A. Trimmer
At Atchison, Kan., March 24, 1876, Mrs. Nancy A., wife of Joseph A. Trimmer and daughter of A. B. Root, of Wellsboro, Pa., aged 31 years, 5 months and 8 days.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Calvin Phippen
At Lawrenceville, Pa., March 22, 1876, Mr. Calvin Phippen, aged 78 years.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank C. Wortendyke
In South Creek, Bradford county, Pa., March 10, 1876, Frank C., only child of Peter and Susan A. Wortendyke, aged 8 years, 10 months and 20 days.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Alta M. Gerow
In East Charleston, March 4th, 1876, of congestion of the lungs, Alta M., daughter of Green and Emily Gerow, aged 2 years and 12 days.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Hanwell
In Blossburg, Pa., March 25, 1876, Mrs. Mary Hanwell, aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. J. Lloyd Breck, D.D.
Rev. J. Lloyd Breck, D.D., a brother of Rev. Dr. Breck of this village, and a very useful and highly-respected clergyman of the Protestant Episcopal Church, died at Benicia, Cal., on the 30th of last month.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)  We referred last week to the recent death of Rev. Dr. J. Lloyd Breck at Benicia, California.  The following sketch of his life, from the Fairibault Republican of the 6th instant, will be found interesting:  The many friends of Rev. J. Lloyd Breck in this city and State, will be deeply pained to learn of his death, which occurred at the point where his mission work has been conducted, Benicia, Cal., on Thursday last.  Intelligence of this sad event was received in this city on Saturday last by telegraph.  Dr. Breck was one of the earliest and most indefatigable of the pioneer missionaries who laid the foundation of the Episcopal Church work in Wisconsin and Minnesota.  He first came to Wisconsin in the year 1841, being then in deacon’s orders and fresh from the theological seminary.  He, in company with Rev. Drs. Adams and Hobart, founded the theological school, at Nashotah, Wisconsin, where he remained engaged in the school and Missionary work until 1850, when he came to Minnesota.--There were then but three villages in the State, of which St. Paul was one.  In company with Revs. T. Wilcoxson and I. H. Merrick, he established an associate mission at St. Paul, and, making that place a center, supplied mission stations as far as 80 miles in every direction, traveling to them on foot.  They lived in a canvas tent on one of the bluffs which environ the city. In 1852 Rev. Dr. Breck responded to an urgent call for mission work among the Chippewa Indians.  He labored among the people until 1857, when, owing to some government, troubles among the Indians, he was obliged to leave. He came to Faribault in 1858, when it had less than 500 inhabitants.  He entered into the work of building up the church in this city, and of furthering the plans for the establishment of the divinity school and other work, under the auspices of the Seabury Mission. In 1867, the Church work here having mainly passed beyond the missionary stage.  Dr. Breck, though well advanced in years, still burning with his youthful zeal for laying new foundations, resigned his charge here, and with 15 co-laborers, gathered together under his direction, sailed for California.  At Benicia he commenced a work in the interests of the Episcopal Church similar to what had been undertaken at Nashotah and Faribault, and under the influence of his extraordinary zeal and administrative ability a marked success was achieved.  In the summer of 1872 Dr. Breck revisited Faribault, and was greeted by a warm reception from his old friends and parishioners.  Though a devoted churchman, the doctor’s sympathies were bounded by no denominational lines, and it was ever his pleasure to seek out the poor and distressed and minister to their necessities.  There are many in our midst who can testify to his kindness of heart, and true Christian sympathy, and who will cherish the memory of his many noble deeds, his active benevolence, his manly courtesy and zealous devotion to the duties of his high calling, as long as life shall last.  His age was about 56.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male French
A four year old son of Mr. Ira French, of Woodhull, fell into a well on the 31st ult., and was drowned.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Maxey
John Maxey, long a trusted employee of Judge Balcom, at Painted Post, was killed at the railroad crossing near the depot at that place Sunday morning, the 2d inst.  He stepped from the westward bound track to the eastward, to avoid a freight train, and was struck by train 8, and killed instantly.  He was about 55 years of age.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ira D. Fowler
Ira D. Fowler, a saloon keeper at Havana, NY, committed suicide last Thursday by taking a dose of laudanum.  He was about 37 years of age and bore a good character.  His business prospects were good and domestic relations happy.  There seems to have been no motive which could prompt him to the act; but it appears there was a taint of hereditary insanity in the family, as his father and brother disposed of themselves in a similar manner.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Fulton
John Fulton, the coachman of President Andrew Jackson, died recently at Nashville.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel Burton
Last Tuesday night Mr. Daniel Burton, of Mansfield, was run over and killed by the evening express train going south on the Tioga railroad, near Canoe Camp.  The deceased had been to Blossburg, and was returning home in an intoxicated condition.  The remains, which were terribly mutilated, were taken to Mansfield where an inquest was held on Wednesday.  Burton had a wife and two children.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. S. P. Ryon
To the Editor of the Agitator:  Again we are called upon to mourn the loss of another friend and highly respected gentleman.  Mr. S. P. Ryon, although but 32 years old, had earned laurels that will crown his memory in the years to come.  He was a member of the Legislature of this State, and one of the best and most influential men in that body.  He was also a Knight Templar in the Order of Free Masons--an honor which few reach at his early age.  His remains were brought here for burial on Thursday, and the funeral took place on Saturday.  It was attended by a committee of his fellow-legislators, and also by some of his Masonic brethren, who saw the remains of their brother laid in their final resting-place, there to await the summons from the Grand Master on high, to enter into eternal refreshment.  Lawrenceville, April 17, 1876.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Malony, Charles Gamber
A terrible explosion occurred at the boiler shops of Shapley & Wells, Binghamton, at half past seven o’clock, on the evening of the 8th inst.  Charles Carter, foreman of the boiler shop, was testing a 60 horse power locomotive pattern boiler, built for the new Owego steamboat, when it exploded with terrific force.  It was sitting on the sidewalk on Hawley street, in front of the shop where some boys was playing marbles and some other people were passing along.  John Malony, the calker, and Charles Gamber, a boy, were instantly killed.  Fred. Ochsenbein, a jeweler, and Samuel Ingraham, a boy, were seriously injured.  Ochsenbein’s injuries are about the head and may prove fatal.--The Ingraham boy’s eyes were destroyed, but it is thought that he will live.  Several persons were slightly injured.  Large pieces of the boiler flew in all directions.  The firebox flew in the air and came down 200 yards distant, crushing through the roof of the storehouse of Bartlett Brothers, sash and door manufacturers.  The boiler door was carried south about 300 yards.  Fragments are lying all about, and the buildings are blazed in all directions for several hundred yards.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Houser and sister Ann
A dispatch from Athens, Bradford county, gives these horrible details of a robbery and murder, which took place recently in that county:-- “A man named George Houser and his sister Ann, both middle-aged people, had lived for several years together in Tuscarora, their house being removed some distance from any neighbors.  About 10 o’clock on Saturday night, they having retired, they were aroused by a crash in the rear part of the house.  Houser ran from his room to the kitchen, and his sister sprang from her bed and followed him.  They were at once seized by two men.  Houser grappled with his assailant, but being unarmed was soon overpowered, the burglar hammering him almost senseless with a club or some other blunt weapon.  He says that he heard his sister scream twice, when she was silenced, he supposed, by blows from the ruffian who had seized her.  There was no light in the room, but the robbers bound his arms and feet, and in a short time lighted a lamp.  They then tied him to one bed post, and his sister, who was apparently unconscious and was bleeding like himself from a wound in her head, to another.  The men were masked, and their voices strange.  After securing the brother and sister to the bed, they commenced ransacking the house.  Mr. Houser had $300 in a bureau drawer, which the burglars secured, besides some jewelry belonging to his sister, and a gold watch.  After rummaging through the house for half an hour, the robbers put out the light and left without paying any further attention to their victims.  Houser says that when they tied his sister to the bedpost she was groaning faintly, but that she ceased soon afterwards.  He had a hankerchief tied tightly about his mouth, and could make no outcry.  About 9 o’clock Sunday morning a man driving by Houser’s place saw that the back door was open and a heavy piece of timber lay across the sill.  He jumped from his wagon and went into the house, and found the inmates in the situation described above.  Mr. Houser was very faint from loss of blood, and was to all outward appearances dead.  They were speedily unbound and placed in bed, and the gentleman started post haste for aid.  A doctor was summoned, who succeeded in reviving Miss Houser, but she could not be restored to consciousness.  Her head was crushed by the blows she had received, and she lived but a few hours.  Her brother was badly beaten about the head, but his injuries were confined to ugly scalp wounds.  The affair created excitement, and parties started out in search of the murderers, but no trace of them had at last accounts been found.  The boldness of this outrage has no parallel in the records of crime in this State.  The road passing Houser’s house is much traveled, and especially so Saturday nights.”  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Bishop Johns
Bishop Johns, of the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, died recently, aged 80 years.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hon. George Scott
Hon. George Scott, of Catawissa, president of the State Agricultural Society, died at Hazleton on the 10th instant of apoplexy.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Theodore Cuyler
Theodore Cuyler, a prominent member of the Philadelphia bar, and solicitor for the Pennsylvania Railroad for 20 years, died a few days ago.  He was a native of Poughkeepsie.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary A. Kohler
In Charleston, April 9, 1876, Mary A., wife of George Kohler, Sr., in the 63d year of her age.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Catherine Schieffelin
In East Charleston, Pa., April 3, 1876, Catherine, wife of Alpheus Schieffelin, aged 50(or 60) years.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Stephen Taft
In Brookfield, at the house of Ethan Taft, April 10th, 1876, Stephen Taft, aged 79 years.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lillie Dewey
In Tioga, of consumption, April 11, 1876, Lillie, wife of Charles Dewey, aged 22 years.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Julius King
On the Jamieson, in Westfield township, March 28, 1876, Julius King, in the 52d year of his age.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Turney Stewart
Alexander Turney Stewart died at his residence in New York city, last week Monday afternoon, of inflammation of the bowels.  He was born near Belfast, Ireland, October 26, 1802, and was the son of parents in the middle rank of life, who designed to educate him for one of the “honorable and learned professions.”  But he lost his parents while yet a child, and fell under the guardianship of other relatives and friends, by whom he was sent to preparatory schools, and then to Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied and completed his academical education, but did not take a degree.  When he was about 20 years of age he came to this country, settled in New York, and for a while employed himself as a teacher; but in 1823 he embarked in the dry goods business in a small way in that city.  His capital was small, being the proceeds of a limited property in Ireland which he inherited from relatives.  From this small beginning, in 1823, has grown A. T. Stewart and Co.’s enormous business, now so familiarly known throughout the United States, and which is believed to be the largest in the world.  This business, prior to 1848, had expanded to such a degree as to require much greater space for its accommodation than Mr. Stewart could command except by erecting a structure especially adapted to the magnitude and variety of his vast trade.  The marble store, at Broadway and Chambers street, was erected in the above year, and was one of the wonders of that day not only in New York but throughout the country.  Later on, foreseeing the uptown movement of the trade, he prepared for it by buying the block extending from Broadway to Fourth avenue, and from Ninth to Tenth street.  Upon this he erected and completed about the year 1862 the great six-storied iron building which now occupies that site, and within which the immense retail business of A. T. Stewart & Co. is transacted.  It is said that neither London nor Paris, nor any other city, has a retail dry goods establishment that equals this in the dimensions of the structure or in the magnitude of its trade.  There are eight floors--two below and six above ground--each covering an area of two and one-quarter acres, thus making a total of 18 acres devoted to retail dry goods purposes.  It requires 250 horse power to heat the building, run the elevators and work the sewing machines, which are all placed in a row on the 4th floor.  There are about 2000 employees under pay.  The disbursements for running expenses are over a million of dollars per annum.  The wholesale and retail establishments combined have sold as high as $50,000,000 in one year.  At present they probably run in the neighborhood of $33,000,000 per annum. The profits of the enormous business which these great warehouses indicate brought to Mr. Stewart long ago a colossal fortune.  Besides the great capital invested in stock, which he always paid for in cash, making no notes, the surplus is mainly invested in massive blocks of real estate, of which the Metropolitan and St. Nicholas hotels in New York city; the Grand Union Hotel at Saratoga; the estate he was improving at Hempstead, Long Island (known as Garden City); the great mill properties near Fishkill, up the Hudson, and various church buildings and theaters in New York city, are but illustrations.  Mr. Stewart’s latest enterprise, as well as benevolence, was the erection of a building now going on at 22nd street and Fourth avenue, New York city, which is understood to have been designated by him as a home for working girls. Mr. Stewart, we believe, never held any public office except that of an elector on the Presidential ticket for the state of New York, in 1868.  Upon the election of Gen. Grant to the Presidency, he tendered to Mr. Stewart a position in his cabinet as Secretary of the Treasury, and in March, 1869, nominated him to the Senate for that office; but the nomination was subsequently withdrawn because it conflicted with the law which prohibits any importing merchant from holding the office. Mr. Stewart during his life gave considerable sums of money for benevolent and charitable purposes, but they did not become generally known, except upon great public occasions--examples of which were the large sums contributed during the Franco-German war; also the moneys contributed for the relief of the suffers by the Chicago fire, the sufferers by the cotton famine in England, and towards relieving the terrible distress caused by the potato famine in Ireland in 1846, at which time he sent out at his own individual cost a large ship freighted with provisions. The great success of Mr. Stewart’s commercial career, through which he has amassed a fortune estimated from 50 to 100 million of dollars, was the outgrowth of a steadfast adherence to a few practical principles and truths.  He had but one price, which was a uniform price to all; he bought for cash and sold for cash as closely as the ordinary run of trade would permit; he made no debts and consequently could not break; he would permit no employee to represent goods to be other or better than they really were; he believed truth to be as essential an element in selling dry goods as in any other affair in life; he would permit no waste; he was close in all his dealings, but was eminently correct and just in giving every man his due; when depressions in trade came about and prices for goods fell below what he had paid for them, it was one of his principles to immediately realize the situation, and without regard to the amount of loss incurred, to mark down his goods to meet the depression, and finally he was very methodical in the administration of his business, giving his personal attention to all details for many years, to which supervision he brought remarkable executive ability.  As a signal illustration of his belief in the wisdom of accepting the situation when shrinkage of prices comes about in commerce, it is said to have been among his recent observations that he believed it would be a gain to him to get back to a specie basis, even if that operation cost a shrinkage to the nominal extent of a third of his fortune.  Mr. Stewart was, in private life and to those whom he met in the freedom of social intercourse, a cheery, kindly and genial companion; his home was the home of hospitality; he was a good classical scholar and notwithstanding his close application to business, he kept himself read up in the best literature of the day.  He was a large patron and benefactor of art, the collected treasures of which are in his gallery at his New York city residence.  A single one of the pictures in that gallery by Meissonier, “The Charge of the Colrassiers,” cost $60,000 in gold in France, and this with duties and other expenses, brought the aggregate cost up to $75,000.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 09/15/2007
By Joyce M. Tice
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