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1876 -  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries
 Part Three
Part One Part Two Part Three
Wm. P. Kitchen
Wm. P. Kitchen, president of the New York Bank, died suddenly Thursday morning, of paralysis of the lungs.  (Tuesday, September 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Corzette
A deplorable accident happened at Millerton, Pa., on the 13th instant.  Charles Corzette, a resident of that place, was drawing a load of wood into his lane, and had stopped for a moment to have the bars let down.  He started up when this was done and as he did so, heard his little son, an only child, about three years of age, cry out in agony.  He had gone only about six feet.  The boy had run out, seeing his father stop, and had commenced to climb upon the wheel.  He had fallen, as the wagon had gone on, and the wheel passed over his head, crushing it fearfully, and instantly killing him.  The father jumped off the load, and picked his son up dead.  The sad accident falls with increased weight upon the father and mother, as they have but recently lost two older children.  It is an affliction in which they are entitled to the sympathy of all.  (Tuesday, September 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eugene H. Robinson
The citizens of our village were shocked yesterday morning by the announcement that Eugene H. Robinson, cashier of the First National Bank, had just died from the effects of a fall on the previous evening.  But a few hours before he had been seen among us in his usual health and spirits, happy in an assured social and business position and beaming with youthful hopes and expectations, and now he last wrapped in death’s “cold obstruction,” nevermore to be known in the ranks of mortal men.  Never was death more unexpected or tragical--never the frailty of our mortal tenure more startlingly exemplified.  The circumstances attending this terrible casualty were as follows:  Last Sunday evening Mr. Robinson called at the residence of Mrs. Robert G. White, on Main street in this village.  After the early evening had passed in pleasant social intercourse, Mr. James White and Mr. Robinson passed out a back door on to a porch situated at the side of the kitchen portion of the house for the purpose of getting a drink of fresh water at the well.  The pump is at the edge and near the front end of this platform, being but three of four feet from the main building.--Just by the edge of the platform and immediately behind the main portion of the house is an outside cellar stairway closed at the top by the usual sloping doors.  When opened one of these doors folds back against the edge of the porch or platform.  The cellar stairs are of wood, the pavement at the bottom being of brick and about eight feet below the porch floor. As the two gentlemen, about half past eight, passed from the lighted rooms of the house to this back porch they must have been unable for a moment to distinguish any object by the eye, for the night was a dark one at best.  Mr. White, however, was well acquainted with the locality, and at once took hold of the pump handle to draw the water.  Meanwhile Mr. Robinson stepped to the edge of the platform between the pump and the house.  The cellar doors were both open, and as Mr. Robinson walked forward in the dark he struck the edge of one of them with his leg and was pitched forward head first into the cellar-way.  Mr. White heard him fall, and instantly ran down the steps and helped his friend up again.  Mr. Robinson walked into the house and into the front room without help, and seemed to be not very severely hurt so far as could be judged from his outward appearance.  His right ear was cut and bleeding, and there was a slight abrasion of the forehead, but no further injury was visible.  He was inclined to pass the accident as a slight mishap, and said he must get his hat and go home as his coat was so badly soiled.  Mrs. White, however, insisted on his laying down on the couch, and at once sent her son for Dr. Packer and Mr. Jesse Robinson, both of whom soon arrived.  Before they came, however, the injured man began to complain of pain in his right temple, calling upon Mrs. White to press hard on that spot.  At this time he knew the ladies present, calling them by name, and recalled the fact that his brother Jesse was intending to leave town early the next morning for Philadelphia.  On reaching the house the doctor sewed up the torn ear, and every possible attention was paid to the patient.  Mr. Robinson soon fell asleep, and from that time it is probable that he was not conscious.  He roused once during the night and vomited; and once he grew cold, but the circulation was speedily restored by the application of bottles of warm water, and after that he breathed easier.  Dr. Packer remained with him all night, watching him closely, and believing his symptoms to be favorable.  Soon after he had left the house in the morning, however, Mrs. White saw that Mr. Robinson was dying.  He sank rapidly, and peacefully breathed his last about 8 o’clock. Mr. Robinson’s family were most of them absent at the time of his death, his father, mother and sister and Mr. Chester Robinson and wife being all out of town.  The parents of the deceased returned on the morning train yesterday, coming back to a home most terribly and suddenly desolated.  The remains were removed from Mrs. White’s to the family homestead before the arrival of the sorely stricken parents.  It is not necessary to say that the afflicted household have the sincere sympathy of our whole community Eugene Hamilton Robinson, who has been thus suddenly removed from the scenes of life in the strength of early manhood, was born in this village on the 21st of April, 1846.  As a child, as a youth, as a man, his life has been known to all our citizens, and he has enjoyed the respect and esteem of all.  Ever since he reached man’s estate he has been engaged in the bank of which his father is president, having for several years past been cashier of that institution.  In that position he has ever discharged his very responsible duties faithfully, promptly and accurately, showing himself an able and trustworthy business man.  In social life he was genial and companionable, being a favorite among his intimates.  His fate will be long regretted by the business community; he will be long missed and mourned in the circle of his acquaintances; but most bitter, sharp and lasting will be the grief excited in that more limited group where he was known as a loving son and brother.  (Tuesday, September 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Patrick Francis Kilmarry
At Arnot, Pa., August 13, 1876, Patrick Francis Kilmarry, aged one year and four days.  (Tuesday, September 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary M. Root
In Wellsboro, September 18, 1876, Mrs. Mary M., wife of Joseph A. Root, and daughter of Thomas H. and Helen V. Sloan, aged 32 years, 3 months and 10 days.  (Tuesday, September 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Emma Josephine Bailey
At Elkland, September 15, 1876, Emma Josephine, wife of J. W. Bailey, and daughter of Apollos Pitts, of Richmond, Pa., aged 29 years and 6 months.  (Tuesday, September 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel M. Dann
In Mansfield, September 18, 1876, of consumption, Samuel M., adopted son of Wm. M. and J. A. Dann, aged 5 years.  (Tuesday, September 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Payne
A rock weighing seven tons fell upon James Payne, at the Blue Stone quarries, near the Chain bridge, on the Potomac, last Wednesday, killing him instantly.  (Tuesday, October 3, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Thomas Laycock
Dr. Thomas Laycock, the eminent medical writer and physician to the Queen of England, is dead.  (Tuesday, October 3, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gen. Braxton D. Bragg
Gen. Braxton D. Bragg died suddenly at Galveston, Texas, on Wednesday, in the 62nd year of his age.  (Tuesday, October 3, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eugene H. Robinson (Con’t)
The funeral services over the remains of the late Eugene H. Robinson, whose sudden death we announced last week, were held at St. Paul’s church last Friday afternoon.  The building was filled in every part, one gallery being crowded by the members of the Fire Department of the village, and a large part of the body of the house being reserved for members of the Masonic fraternity.  Mr. Robinson was a member of Eureka Hook and Ladder Company, and was Worshipful Master of Ossea Lodge of Masons, and also member of the Chapter and Commandery; and a 32? member of Corning Consistory.  The chancel of the church contained several appropriate Christian and Masonic symbols beautifully wrought in flowers, and the rail was heavily draped with the funeral colors--black and white.  The procession formed at the residence of John L. Robinson and moved to the church, where the metallic casket inclosing the remains was placed in front of the chancel during the services. The exercises opened with a funeral anthem by the choir, after which Rev. Dr. Breck read the solemn and impressive burial service of the Protestant Episcopal Church.  The 35th hymn-- “Abide with me; fast falls the eventide”--was then sung, and Dr. Breck proceeded to address the large congregation in a few most feeling remarks.  He began by speaking of the sudden and unexpected summons to stand in the presence of death.  All hearts had been moved and all minds shocked by the sudden calling away of one so well known among the most useful members of society--of one who was, though so young, so prominent in business circles.  It was as though a strong right arm had been suddenly cut off. Twenty-eight years ago, he said, a precious child stood at that chance-rail and was received at his hands into Christ’s flock.  Twenty-eight years!  and yet it is but a little time.  How soon are we called away from the scenes of life, and called to enter upon the scenes of eternity!  The deceased had mingled in all the various affairs of life; he was in a certain sense a leader in business; had linked himself with an ancient and honorable secret organization, and was a member of that company of young men who have banded themselves together for our protection; and he had dropped away from these associations with great suddenness.  It becomes us, then, to turn and ask ourselves whether we realize the shortness and uncertainty of human life--whether this event will make the impression it ought to make on our own minds. It is always sad to see the young thus taken away.  Those of us who have passed the middle period of life know that our time must soon come.  We have passed through the various relations and experiences of life; and we are always filled with sympathy for the young, who are looking forward to the enjoyment of the pleasures of which we have tasted; and it always especially afflicting to see the young thus cut off.  We would plead with the young to lay this event to heart.  If we would say with the Psalmist, “Lord, let me known my end, and the number of my days; that I may be certified how long I have to live,” let us remember that our Heavenly Father has most wisely concealed these things from us.  We stand here to-day as living men--as dying creatures.  Let us then look unto God for grace; let us consecrate ourselves to Him and to His service.  Let the truths of His Gospel direct our lives.  And let us be mindful of the words of the Redeemer:  “I am the resurrection and the life,” and let us remember that He has brought immortality to light.  Trust not to men who may deny the resurrection; but believe as true the glad tidings of Christ to poor, dying creatures.  Let us examine our hearts, and see that we build not up any hope of eternal life on our own deserts, but on the sacrifice of Christ. The speaker urged his hearers to give their hearts and lives to the Redeemer.  Be not slothful in business; be active, diligent, enterprising; be fervent in spirit, serving the Lord.  Then when the end comes and the day of resurrection comes--the day the apostles continually love to dwell upon--all the things of his world will be but as dust and ashes compared with the glorified body.  Let us try to realize, not only the scenes of life, but let all the glorious truths of the gospel come in to cheer our hearts and strengthen our souls.  Then as the end comes to each one of us we shall look through death to a glorified life beyond the grave. At the conclusion of Dr. Breck’s remarks, of which we have given but a brief abstract, the 507th hymn was sung, beginning “Nearer, my God, to thee.”  The services at the church concluded with a prayer for those in affliction and collects appropriate to the occasion. The long procession then re-formed and passed to the cemetery, where Dr. Breck read the usual service at the grave, and was followed by the Masonic service, Rev. Mr. Reynolds, Rev. Dr. Buck and Robert C. Simpson, Esq., taking part in it.  (Tuesday, October 3, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Andross
In Brockport, NY, September 7, 1876, Mary, wife of John P. Andross, formerly of Tioga, aged about 80 years.  (Tuesday, October 3, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Loren M. Ashley [SRGP 13209}
In Richmond, September 13, 1876, Loren M., son of Orange and Elizabeth Ashley, aged 4 years, 7 months and 25 days.  (Tuesday, October 3, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Mainesburg Cemetery]

Lora D. Ashley [SRGP 13208]
In Richmond, September 18, 1876, Lora D., daughter of Orange and Elizabeth Ashley, aged 2 years and 4 months.  (Tuesday, October 3, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Mainesburg Cemetery]

James Lick
James Lick died in San Francisco, Sunday morning, the 1st instant.  (Tuesday, October 10, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Warren
Joseph Warren, editor of the Buffalo Courier died suddenly Saturday evening, the 31st ult.  (Tuesday, October 10, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas N. Hickox
Suddenly, at the residence of his son-in-law, Rev. J. S. Palmer, Mansfield, October 2, 1876, Thomas N. Hickox, in the 81st year of age.  (Tuesday, October 10, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. W. R. Coles
In this village, October 4, 1876, the wife of Mr. W. R. Coles, aged about 37 years.  (Tuesday, October 10, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Silas Smith [SRGP 01856]
In Sullivan, October 6th, 1876, after a short illness, Silas Smith, aged about 50(or 60) years.  (Tuesday, October 17, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Whittaker-Jaquish Cemetery]

Hon. F. O. J. Smith
Hon. F. O. J. Smith died at his residence in Deering, Me., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, October 24, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Francis P. Blair
Francis P. Blair, the venerable journalist and politician, died on Wednesday, at his residence, Silver Springs, Md., aged 87 years.  (Tuesday, October 24, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Major W. W. Lander
Major W. W. Lander, formerly private secretary to Senator Chas. Sumner, but for the past two years a well-known politician of Colorado, died suddenly in Denver, recently.  (Tuesday, October 24, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mabel Matilda Locher
In Mansfield, October 15, 1876, Mabel Matilda, daughter of Louis M. and Ella C. Locher.  (Tuesday, October 31, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Susanna Welch CUDWORTH, Susannah [SRGP 03464] -
In Sullivan, October 6, 1876, Mrs. Susanna Welch, aged about 50 years.  (Tuesday, October 31, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Delos Field
At Cherry Flats, Pa., October 25, 1876, Delos Field, aged 38 years, 8 months and 18(or 13) days.  He died trusting in God--a sinner saved by grace.  (Tuesday, November 7, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gen. Giles A. Smith
Gen. Giles A. Smith, a distinguished soldier of the late war and more recently Second Assistant Postmaster General, died at Bloomington, Illinois, a few days ago.  He served with distinction at the captures of Forts Henry and Donalson, and at Corinth, Shiloh, and on other fields under Sheridan, and was wounded three times.  (Tuesday, November 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John McMahon
John McMahon was killed recently near Bloody Run, in Venango county, by the accidental discharge of his pistol.  This makes the 5th person who has been shot in that locality.  Six years ago David Wingard was killed not far from the scene of the late accident; three years after Jacob Wingard and Lew. Wallace, a colored man, gave up the ghost; last year, the 18th of September, John Wingard was added to the list of victims, while McMahon ended the sad catalogue of casualties for the present.  The place is appropriately named.  (Tuesday, November 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Alice Gray [Sarah Alice MILLER - SRGP 07443]
In Sullivan, November 11, 1876, of typhoid pneumonia, Alice, wife of Wilton Gray, aged about 21 years.  (Tuesday, November 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [State Road Cemetery]

Mrs. Barbara Griffin
At her home in Delmar, Pa., Saturday morning, November 4, 1876, of strangulated hernia, Mrs. Barbara Griffin, relict of the late William Francis, in the 57th year of her age.  (Tuesday, November 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Nancy C. Peake
In Charleston, Pa., September 22, 1876, Nancy C. Peake, aged 55 years, 8 months and 6 days.  (Tuesday, November 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Flora B. Packard
In Covington, November 6, 1876, Flora B., daughter of J. H. and Lucinda R. Packard, aged 2 weeks and 4 days.  (Tuesday, November 14, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Pharez Houghton
In Delmar, November 2, 1876, of paralysis, Mr. Pharez Houghton, aged 69 years and 6 months.  (Tuesday, November 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Cynthia Kimball
In Wellsboro, November 13, 1876, at the residence of N. R. Kimball, Cynthia, relict of Daniel Kimball, deceased, aged 68 years and 7 months.  (Tuesday, November 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Judge Walter H. Lowrie
Judge Walter H. Lowrie, at one time Chief Justice of Pennsylvania, died at his home in Meadville last Tuesday, in the 77th year of his age.  (Tuesday, November 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Francis Grappote
Francis Grappote, convicted of murder in the second degree, in Watertown, NY, hanged himself in his cell a few nights ago.  The prisoner was worth $20,000.  (Tuesday, November 21, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles London
The Blossburg Register says that a terrible and fatal accident occurred at Arnot on Saturday, the 18th instant, in the steam saw mill in that place.  A man named Charles London, aged about 36 years, was working as tail sawyer, and in taking a heavy plank from the saw was overbalanced, and in falling struck the saw, cutting off one of his arms and throwing him up nearly to the roof of the mill.  Coming back he struck on the saw again, cutting off one of his legs and mangling him otherwise frightfully.  He lived about 15 minutes after being hurt, and spoke some.  We understand the saw had to be thrown out of gear before he could be rescued.  Deceased was known as a very quiet steady man, and had worked in Arnot some years.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ira Bulkley
Mr. Ira Bulkley, one of the first settlers on the Cowanesque, died a week ago last Sunday at his residence near Osceola.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Leslie Vargason
A few days ago a young man named Leslie Vargason, living with Dan Hoover, in Wysauking, Bradford county, was shot and killed by the accidental discharge of his gun, which he had left lying on a bed.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Calvin Cowley
Calvin Cowley, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of Addison, died last week Monday afternoon.  He was about 76 years of age.  He had been a resident of the place for many years, and was an honest, upright citizen, with a large circle of friends.  For many years he had been a faithful member of the Presbyterian Church.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Dent
Thomas Dent, son of the sheriff of Richland county, SC, was shot and fatally wounded by State Senator John Cochrane, of Anderson county, Wednesday night, the difficulty growing out of a political discussion.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Rebecca Austin
In Mainsburg, November 15, 1876, Rebecca, wife of L. R. Austin.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ollie A. Borden
In Wellsboro, November 9, 1876, of dropsy of the heart, Ollie A., wife of I. P. Borden and daughter of John Gibson, Esq., in the 31st year of her age.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Franciscus B. Merz
In Arnot, November 21, 1876, Franciscus M. Merz, aged 2 years, 11 months, and 26 days.  (Tuesday, November 28, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank Wilber Derby
In Wellsboro, November 28, 1876, of diphtheria, Frank Wilber, son of George O. and S. P. Derby, aged 4 years, 9 months and 11 days.  (Tuesday, December 5, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry E. Beard
In Middlebury, October 17, 1876, of heart disease, Henry E., son of E. G. and M. A. Beard, aged 17 years and 16 days.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hattie Turner
In Mansfield, November 17, 1876, Hattie Turner, aged 16 years.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Levi Starkey
In Richmond, November 22, 1876, Levi Starkey, aged 87 years.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Hartman
In Mansfield, November 24, 1876, Mary, wife of A. L. Hartman, aged 29 years, 7 months and 2 days.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hattie Day
In Richmond, November 18, 1876, Hattie, wife of Charles Day.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Delia Handy
In Lawrenceville, November 27, 1876, Delia, eldest daughter of Francis Handy, aged 18 years.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Willie Kerwin
In Arnot, November 27, 1876, Willie, son of Hugh Kerwin, aged 1 year and 1 month.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Schafer
In Wellsboro, December 5, 1876, Mr. Charles Schafer, aged 44 years.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Breck
Last Friday a dispatch was received in this village from Rev. Dr. Breck, who has been for a few weeks past at Wilmington, Del., announcing that his son and only child, Samuel, died that morning in the city named, and that the funeral would take place to day.  The young man went to Philadelphia before the close of the Centennial Exhibition, and shortly after proceeded to Wilmington, whither his parents also went, to attend the wedding of a friend.  While there Samuel was prostrated by an attack of typhoid fever, and his father and mother were detained at his bedside some time after they had expected to return.  The crisis of his disease seemed to have passed, however, and last week his friends here were cheered by letters saying that he was in a fair way to recover, and they were therefore all the more shocked by the telegram announcing his death. Samuel was, we understand, in his 21st year, and was born at Wilmington, where his father was at the time settled as a rector.  The youth was principally educated at Racine, Wis., and afterwards pursued his studies at Anandale on the Hudson river.--He had not yet entered upon the active business of life.  He was a young man of most bright, frank, open and genial nature--one who attracted the esteem and confidence and affectionate regard of all with whom he came in contact.  His character and his daily life were alike pure and blameless, and while he was loved and admired in his domestic and social relations, his life was rapidly developing into a noble, true and useful manhood.  By his death his friends have lost a most faithful and sympathetic companion, the country an unspotted and most promising citizen, and the Church militant a most dutiful and cherishing son.  But no words can tell the loss of those who, stricken again and again, have now been called upon to surrender their last child to the all-devouring grave.  Only silence and tears can indicate the heartfelt sympathy of the many friends who mourn with them in this day of their crowning bereavement.  (Tuesday, December 12, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William C. Dietrich
William C. Dietrich, cashier of the Kutstown Savings Bank committed suicide a few days ago.  The bank closed its doors the day previous on account of its inability to meet its liabilities, and this fact, it is alleged, so troubled the young cashier that he went to the banking house the next day and ended his misery by taking his own life.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Dunn
John Dunn, of Bradford county, while hunting a few days ago, on Frenchtown Mountain, slipped over a precipice.  His first descent was a perpendicular one of 25 feet, and sliding a few feet he went down another of 30 feet, and then sliding and tumbling onward he came finally to the cut made by the canal excavation, and went down 60 feet to the bed of the old canal.  From the point where he started to where he finally landed the distance by measure is over 300 feet.  He died from the injuries received.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Reese
A correspondent writes us that a few days ago a little child of Mr. Josiah Reese, Jr., of Catlin Hollow, was left alone in the house a short time by his mother.  On Mrs. Reese’s return the child was unable to unfasten the door to let her in, and on finally effecting an entrance by another door she found the child’s clothes burned off and the little sufferer so injured that he died in a few days.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Burt Scudder
Mr. Burt Scudder, a young man of Fall Brook, committed suicide, a few days ago by taking laudanum.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Morris Middaugh
Mr. Morris Middaugh, of Morris Run, was so severely crushed by a log recently that he died.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Horace S. Cook
Mr. Horace S. Cook, of this village, well known throughout the county as the janitor as the janitor at the Court House, died at his residence last Thursday morning.  His disease was pneumonia, and his illness was a brief one.  We understand Mr. Cook had lived in Wellsboro something near 40 years, coming here from Massachusetts in his early manhood.  He was a painter by trade, and had during his residence here held several minor offices.  He was a man of intelligence and one who will be missed in his sphere of labor.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dennis Kelley
A week ago last Friday morning a terrible accident occurred in the cutting rooms of the Corning Glass Works.  Dennis Kelley, a young man 23 years old, while working at the cutting lathe, attempted to shift the belt upon the cone pulleys which regulated the speed of the machine, when the sleeve of his blouse caught upon the shaft, and he was instantly drawn from the floor and thrown against the timbers above.  The machinery was stopped as soon as possible, and the poor man dropped to the floor terribly injured.  His thighs were both broken, and his right arm was torn from the body and was still clinging to the shaft where the belt had entangled it.  The man was conscious, and talked intelligently during the day.  At 8 o’clock in the evening he died.  He was a young man of unblemished character.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Harriet Robbins
In Gaines, November 25, 1876, of measles, Mrs. Harriet Robbins, wife of C. M. Robbins, in the 39th year of her age.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Starkey
In Richmond township, November 22, 1876, Mr. Joseph Starkey, aged 87 years.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Yost
John Yost, a workman at Gauster’s brewery, Lebanon, Pa., was dreadfully scalded through falling into a vat of boiling beer.  He died soon after, suffering intense agony.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Isabelle Walker
In Covington township, December 23, 1876, Isabelle, relict of the late Lewis Walker, in the 72nd year of her age.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hopkins Crosby
In Richmond, December 23, 1876, Hopkins Crosby, aged 71 years.  (Tuesday, December 19, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gen. W. F. Bartlett
Gen. W. F. Bartlett died at Pittsfield, Mass., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, December 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Cardinal Constantine Patrizi
Cardinal Constantine Patrizi, Dean of the Sacred College, at Rome is dead.  (Tuesday, December 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Hoover
Ex Naval Contractor Henry Hoover, master ship-joiner at the Washington Navy Yard, died in that city recently of paralysis.  He was a native of Philadelphia.  (Tuesday, December 26, 1876, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 09/15/2007
By Joyce M. Tice
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