Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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Bradford County PA
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Tri County Clippings- Page Three Hundred Thirty Seven

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1883-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Mr. H. T. Scarf
Mr. H. T. Scarf, of Canton, Bradford county, was run over and instantly killed by a freight engine, at the Union depot, Elmira, last Friday evening.  He, in company with a friend, was crossing the track to the Northern Central railroad office.  He was 26 years of age and unmarried.  (Tuesday, January 2, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Myria J. Osborne and son Ollie
Mrs. Myria J. Osborne and her son Ollie, aged 17 years, were found dead in their sleeping apartments at Green Castle, Ind., one morning last week.  It is supposed that the mother poisoned her son and then committed suicide.  She had been despondent for some time.  Mrs. Osborne was in good circumstances.  (Tuesday, January 2, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Stellows
Thomas Stellows, a man about 80 years old who lives a few miles distant from Canton, Bradford county, while at that place a few days ago stepped on the railroad track and was struck and thrown down by a local freight which was doing some switching.  His left arm was run over and so badly injured that amputation was necessary.  He died from his injuries the next day.  (Tuesday, January 2, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Eichholtz
In 1841 John Eichholtz, an eccentric farmer, emigrated from Lancaster county to Ohio.  He died recently, and his property was exposed to sale.  The house in which he had lived for almost half a century has never seen the effects of a paint-brush, and everything around it gives evidence of decay.  Ten thousand bushels of barley were left on the place, and thousands of bushels of corn decayed from age, some of it having arrived at an old enough to vote.  Eighteen car-loads of grain of various kinds, from 10-20 years old, have been shipped, and there still remain about 20 car loads.  The old horse that has done service at the pump for many years sold for $10, and there were old horses that had never had a halter or a piece of harness on their backs.  Every description of agricultural implements was sold, one old vehicle in the shape of a wagon having solid wheels cut from a log.  His father died a miser, leaving John $1, in two silver pieces made the year John was born.  He kept these as pocket pieces until his death.  His estate was over $100,000.  (Tuesday, January 2, 1833, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. E. M. Bixby
Tioga, January 6, 1883.--Mr. E. M. Bixby, editor of the Tioga Express, died last Thursday morning.  The funeral services will be held in the M. E. church next Sunday morning, Rev. Mr. Gamble officiating.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William H. Allen
In Delmar, December 30, 1882, William H. Allen, aged 54(or 64) years and 7 months.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Janie Carlisle
At Arnot, December 9, 1882, Janie, oldest daughter of George and Sarah Carlisle, aged 10 years.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Sarah Carlisle
At Arnot, December 22, 1882, Sarah, daughter of George and Sarah Carlisle, aged 7 years and 9 months.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary J. Hale
In Spring Rock township, Clinton county, Iowa, November 30, 1882, Mrs. Mary J. Hale, wife of James H. Hale and daughter of G. W. and Catherine King, Sr.  The deceased was born in the township of Chatham, Tioga county, Pa., in the year 1847, and went to Iowa with her parents in 1856.  She was married to James H. Hale July 4th, 1868.  She leaves three children, aged respectively 13, 10, and 4 years, and a kind husband and father to mourn her loss, as well as a large circle of friends.  Loved by all who knew her, she was an accomplished, noble-minded woman, and the best graces of womanly character dwelt with her.  Many of her friends will grieve, and many hearts will beat with sympathy for the bereaved husband and dear little children.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Arthur C. Kinch
In Charleston, November 20, 1882, of diphtheria, Arthur C., son of Heth and Ella Kinch, aged 5 years.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Willie D. Kinch
In Charleston, November 24, 1882, of diphtheria, Willie D., son of Heth and Ella Kinch, aged 6 years and 7 months.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Pearson
In Delmar, January 7, 1883, Mr. William Pearson.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Valsing
In Delmar, January 3, 1883, of pneumonia, George Valsing, aged 48 years, 5 months and 7 days.  (Tuesday, January 9, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward V. Armstrong
A lad by the name of Edward V. Armstrong was killed a few days ago in Lock Haven.  He went to the woodpile for kindling, and was shortly after found dead, the wood having fallen on him.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John S. Schrack
While John S. Schrack, a wealthy farmer of Lewisburg, was on a hunting expedition with some friends recently, their wagon was upset on a rough mountain road, and one of the guns discharged its contents into Schrack’s back, causing a wound of which he has since died.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Eliza Manning Hawthorne
Miss Eliza Manning Hawthorne, only sister of Nathaniel Hawthorne, died at Beverly, Mass., a few days ago, aged over 90 years.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Connor
Several days since a daughter of Mr. Perry A. Conner, of Lackawanna township, Mercer county, aged 11 years, was sent by her mother to the house of a near neighbor to borrow a household utensil.  The neighbors were not at home, and all the doors being locked the child raised a window and was partly through the opening when the sash fell, striking her on the back of the neck.  The blow broke her neck, and when the mother, alarmed by her long absence, went to look for the child, she found her lifeless body hanging to the window.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Lynch
John Lynch, son of Michael Lynch, of Andover, NY, a young man of about 17 years of age, while using a towel, one of the long roller kind, slipped on the floor and fell in such a way as to hang himself in the open towel, and was strangled to death.  He was a large, strong fellow.  His little brother, a lad about eight years of age, saw him, but supposed he was only fooling, and did not try to help him until he fell to the floor, and then he was so heavy that he could not lift him.  The boy called one of the neighbors, who went to the house and lifted him out of the towel, but he was dead.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. R. Morley
W. R. Morley, Chief Engineer of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe system, was accidentally shot and killed at Santa Rosalia, 125 miles south of Chihuahua, Mexico, a few days ago.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Robert C. Smedley
Dr. Robert C. Smedley died at his home in West Chester a few days ago.  He was a homoeopathic physician of prominence, and at the time of his death was engaged on a history of the underground railroad system.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lot M. Morrill
Hon. Lot M. Morrill died at Augusta, Me., last week Wednesday morning.  The members of his family and the attending physician were present.  He recognized his family and attempted to bid them farewell, but the words died on his lips.  Lot M. Morrill was born at Belgrade, Me., May 3, 1815, and was educated at Waterville College.  He studied law, and after admission to the bar practiced successfully at Portland.  He was a member of the State Legislature in 1854 and 1856, in the latter year being President of the Senate.  For three years--1858, ‘59 and ‘60--he was Governor of Maine.  He was then elected to the Senate of the United States, to fill the vacancy caused by the election of Hannibal Hamlin to the Vice Presidency, and took his seat January 17, 1861.  He was re-elected in 1863, and was appointed in December, 1869, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of William Pitt Fessenden.  In 1874 he was re-elected as a Republican, his term expiring March 3, 1877.  He was Secretary of the Treasury under President Grant from January, 1876, to March, 1877.  Prior to that he had been tendered the position of Secretary of War on Belknap’s retirement, but preferred then to retain his seat as Senator and chairman of the Committee on Appropriations.  Immediately on receipt of the intelligence of his death at Washington Secretary Folger directed that the flags on the Treasury Department should be displayed at half mast and that the Department should be closed on the day of the funeral.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

V. C. McCollough
At Monroe, La., last Wednesday, L. D. McClain and V. C. McCollough, both prominent citizens, had some difficulty over some pecuniary matters and a personal conflict ensued, in the course of which McClain drew a pistol and shot McCollough above the right eye, causing instant death.  McClain at once surrendered to the police.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William D. Porter
Hon. William D. Porter, one of the most prominent and best-known citizens of South Carolina, died at Charleston a few days ago in his 73rd year.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Matthew Francis Whittier
Matthew Francis Whittier, the only brother of John Greenleaf Whittier, died recently in Boston after a long illness.  He was 70 years old and was formerly an employe in the Boston Custom House.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Morgan
Mr. John Morgan, a former resident of Blossburg, was recently killed by falling slate in the mines at Avery, Iowa.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Armstrong
Mr. Joseph Armstrong, a young man living at Niles Valley, was crushed and killed recently while loading logs on Marsh creek.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Norman D. Murdaugh
Mr. Norman D. Murdaugh, of Daggett’s Mills, was instantly last Wednesday afternoon while engaged in falling a tree near that village.  He was alone at the time, and his body was discovered soon after the accident.  It was evident that the tree in falling had knocked a large limb off another tree which struck Mr. Murdaugh upon the head, crushing it in a terrible manner.  Mr. Murdaugh was engaged in the mercantile business and also conducted a large farm.  He had just completed a fine new store and stocked it with goods at Daggett’s Mills.  He had resided there only about a year, having been engaged in business at Elkland for six years before as senior partner of the firm of Murdaugh & Miner.  The deceased was about 45 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Isaac West
Correspondence of the Agitator.  Pike Mills, January 8, 1883.--A very distressing accident occurred here this morning at 10 o’clock, by which Isaac West, of this place, was killed while at work on C. O. Brown’s lumber job, by a saw-log jumping from the slide.  No one was with him at the moment of the accident.  Mr. Brown left him only about 10 minutes before the accident probably occurred and went down the slide.  Finding the logs running too fast, he returned with the intention of putting in more spikes--a duty that Mr. West was attending to.  In passing up the slide to a point where the spikes were needed, Mr. Brown heard a slight groan and looking in the direction of the sound saw Mr. West lying on his back in the snow at a distance of 20 feet from the slide and probably 10 feet above it.  A small log lay near him, from which he received the fatal blow.  He was struck on the right side of the head and face.  He lived about five minutes after Mr. Brown reached him, but never spoke or appeared conscious.  An axe and lever lay near him, indicating that he was probably standing near the place where struck, and being so far from the slide probably thought himself safe, as no other logs had jumped from the slide on that side or as far up the hill.  Mr. West leaves a wife but no children.  He was very much respected by all here, being an honorable and upright man.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Carrie Merritt
In Nelson, January 7, 1883, of membranous croup, Carrie, only daughter of Hiram and Mary Merritt, aged 4 years, 1 month and 3 days.  (Tuesday, January 16, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James and Henry Leonard
James and Henry Leonard, aged 12 and 14 years, who were asleep in a boiler-house, at Kane City, Venango county, a few nights ago were burned to death in the building, which caught fire.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James T. Humphrey
Mr. James T. Humphrey, father of Dr. William T. Humphrey, died at Osceola on last Wednesday at the age of 86 years.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Stephen Morrell
Mr. Stephen Morrell, one of the pioneers of Jackson township, died on the 13th instant.  He was born in 1796 and came to this county in 1833.  He was a soldier in the war of 1812.  He had been twice married, and was the father of 14 children.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Sullivan
Last Wednesday afternoon, Mr. John Sullivan was killed by falling from the new iron railway bridge at Blackwell’s.  He struck upon his head in the bed of the creek.  He was picked up insensible, and died a few hours after.  We understood he had been at work on the structure for about a week.  The remains were forwarded to Buffalo, Mr. Sullivan’s former home.  It is reported that work has been abandoned on the bridge for the present on account of the extremely cold weather.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. J. Dillistin
Tioga, January 20, 1883.--Mr. J. Dillistin, of this place, died on Monday evening of paralysis of the heart.  He left the Tioga depot about half-past eight, apparently well, but was taken ill on his way home, and died shortly after being taken there.  His funeral was held on Friday afternoon in the Baptist church.  Rev. S. D Merrick preached the funeral sermon.  Prominent railroad officials acted as pall-bearers.  There was a beautiful display of flowers furnished by the Railroad Company which Mr. Dillistin had served so long and faithfully.  In his death Tioga has lost one of her best and most respected citizens.  He has been station agent at Tioga, on the Tioga railroad, for the past 30 years, died last week Monday evening.  He had to his customary duties at the depot and started for home, when he stopped in the hardware store of J. Schieffelin, where he was taken sick.  He was carried home, and died in a very few minutes.  He was unconscious from the beginning of his sickness until he died.  He leaves a wife but no other near relatives in this country.  He was 69 years of age, and was well and favorably known by many people in this county.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Davis
A few days ago Mr. John Davis, of Hillsgrove, Sullivan county, took his axe and gun and went into the woods for the purpose of hunting coons.  He did not return when expected, and his family, becoming alarmed, instituted a search for him, when he was found a short distance from the clearing, dead.  Upon examination it was found that he had been shot in the back of the head.  His axe lay in front of him, his gun behind him.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Clark Mills
Clark Mills, the sculptor, died in Washington on January 12.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. W. Shackleford
Representative J. W. Shackleford, of North Carolina, died in Washington last Thursday morning.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James L. Torrens
James L. Torrens, United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Arkansas, and chairman of the Republican State Central Committee, died at Little Rock on Tuesday night.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. C. Pendleton
General W. C. Pendleton, late Chief of Artillery of the army of Northern Virginia, C. S. A., and rector of Grace Church, Lexington, Va., died suddenly at Lexington last week Monday night.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

D. L. Alford
A young man named D. L. Alford, of Smethport, McKean county, was killed a few days ago while out gathering pine cones.  He fell from a tree, a distance of about 30 feet, fracturing his skull.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jesse E. Davids
At Arnot, January 15, 1883, Jesse E. Davids, aged 2 years, 9 months and 2 days.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ettie L. Davids
At Arnot, January 14, 1883, Ettie L. Davids, aged 4 years, 2 months and 22 days.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Timothy Kennedy
At Arnot, January 3, 1883, Timothy Kennedy, aged 63 years.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Louisa McDowell
In Sylvania, Pa., December 12, 1882, Mrs. Louisa McDowell, aged 78 years.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Mitchell
At Blossburg, January 18, 1883, of dropsy, James Mitchell, aged 19 years, 2 months and 29 days.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Seamons
At Westfield, Pa., November 26, 1882, Charles, son of John and Frances Seamons, aged 11 years, 3 months and 10 days.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Margaret Shaw
In Arnot, January 15, 1883, Margaret Shaw, aged 30 years and 7 days.  (Tuesday, January 23, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Reuben Taylor
Mr. Reuben Taylor of Middlebury township, died of erysipelas last Thursday.  Mr. Taylor was about 60 years of age and was well known throughout the county.  (Tuesday, January 30, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mary Davis
Mary Davis, an old resident of Cherry Flats, was found dead at her home, where she lived alone last Wednesday morning.  She was discovered about 11 o’clock in the forenoon sitting in a rocking chair a table with the breakfast spread upon it in front of her.  It was thought by some that her death was caused by choking as a bread crust was found in her throat.  The lady was about 67 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 30, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Clark
In Bath township, Clinton county, Mich., David Clark, a farmer, was recently shot and killed by his wife.  The murderess committed the act while her husband was administering to the wants of a sick child.  (Tuesday, February 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ed. Flickner
A singular and fatal accident happened a few days ago to Mr. Ed. Flickner, of Oak Hill, Steuben county, NY.  He was doing the chores at the barn when he saw a rat and in trying to kill it, he slipped and fell out of the back door, which is about eight feet from the ground.  In falling he struck on the handle of a pitchfork which had been left in the ground.  The end of the handle entered his body at the rectum, about nine inches, producing injuries from which he died the next morning.  Mr. Flickner was 25 years old and leaves a wife and three children to mourn his sudden death.  (Tuesday, February 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ann Carey
Mrs. Ann Carey, an old resident of Norristown, died recently at an advanced age.  A few days ago before her death she requested an attendant to bring her an old teapot which was concealed in the cellar of her house.  The article of crockery ware was found in the place described by the owner, and being opened proved to contain $500 in gold, which she presented to one of her daughters.  (Tuesday, February 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William E. Dodge
A New York dispatch dated last Friday says:  “William E. Dodge died to day at his residence in Brooklyn.  Mr. Dodge was a member of the old firm of Phelps, Dodge & Co., among the largest importers of and dealers in iron and steel in the country, and was a man of large fortune.  He was a well-known worker in all religious organizations and foremost in all good works.  He was one of the original founders of the Union League Club.  He leaves a large family.  “Mr. Dodge had been ailing for a couple of weeks with gastric fever, though his death was somewhat unexpected.  He was in his 78th year.  He was prominently identified with a number of charitable institutions, and was a member of the Thirty-ninth Congress.”  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hubbard H. Gibson
Mrs. Hubbard H. Gibson, of New York city, nee Happy I. Mathers, formerly of this borough, died last Saturday morning after a lingering illness, at the age of 42 years.  The remains will be brought to this borough today for interment.  The funeral will be held at the residence of Mr. C. C. Mathers on Main street this afternoon at 3 o’clock.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alfred Wivell
Last Wednesday evening Mr. Alfred Wivell died at his home in this borough after a short illness.  Mr. Wivell was a native of London, England.  He came to this country early in life, and has resided in this borough for the past 24 years, following the trade of painter and paper hanger.  He was 48 years of age and was a respected citizen of this community.  The funeral services were held on Friday morning under the direction of Tyoga Lodge of Odd Fellows, of which he was a member.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Farrer
Mr. William Farrer, of Covington, died last week Monday at the age of 94 years.  Mr. Farrer came to this country from England in 1837.  He was one of the first settlers in Blossburg.  There were few houses in that borough when he located there.  He assisted in opening the Blossburg mines, and was among the first miners who worked in those mines--the first in the county.  He also assisted in the experiments in burning coke many years before that industry was begun on a large scale in this region.  He was a man of wonderful constitution and always enjoyed excellent health.  He was noted for his eccentricities through life.  He always preferred to walk rather than ride, and many times since his 90th year he has walked to Liberty, a distance of 15 miles, and it was while walking to that place just before Christmas that he felt the cold so much that he rode a part of the way.  He then took cold, and never recovered from it.  He moved to Covington with his son William in 1865.  Mr. Thomas Farrer, of Antrim, is also his son.  Although a resident of this county for 35 years, he never was naturalized and never voted.  Mr. Farrer ended his days in peace, and leaves to his children and unblemished name.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Nelson Packer
Dr. Nelson Packer, one of the oldest citizens of our borough and a leading physician of this part of the State, died at his residence in this village last Thursday afternoon.  His last illness was a brief one.  The writer of these lines met him at a late hour on Monday evening of last week, and at that time he seemed to be in his usual health; but later that night he had a chill which signalized an acute attack of pneumonia.  His disease rapidly developed alarming symptoms, and several of our local physicians were called in consultation.  But his case was beyond the reach of medical aid, and he himself soon expressed the opinion that the attack would result fatally.  And so it proved.  He lost strength rapidly until he fell peacefully asleep about the middle of Thursday afternoon.  So suddenly has died from amongst us a wise and good physician who, by nearly half a century of efficient ministration to the needs of suffering humanity, had earned a wide reputation for professional skill and learning and had won the confidence and esteem of a multitude of friends. Our late fellow-townsman was a son of Captain James Packer, of Norwich, Chenango county, NY.  Nelson was born in that thriving village on the 8th day of December, 1815.  He was educated at Oxford Academy--an institution of deservedly high reputation--and afterward studied medicine with Dr. Henry Mitchell, of Norwich, a gentleman standing very high in his profession.  The young student also attended the Medical College at Geneva, NY, and having thus completed the preparation for his professional career, he came to Wellsboro in September, 1838, to enter upon the practice of medicine and surgery in a new and wild country, where in many directions it was impossible to travel except on horseback or on foot. When Dr. Packer came to this borough the leading physician in this part of the country was Dr. O. L. Gibson, a man of sterling qualities and having an extended practice.  But the young doctor found plenty to do, and his practice rapidly increased in extent and value.  It soon bade fair, however, to come to a very sudden end, for he had not been here long before he fell sick, his trouble being apparently pulmonary consumption.  He grew gradually weaker, and when a brother came to see him he found the Doctor almost unable to help himself.  Although it was then the middle of a rigorous winter, this faithful brother proposed to take Nelson back with him to the old home in Norwich, where he could have better nursing and receive the constant attention of his nearest relatives and of his old preceptor.  After anxious consultation with Dr. Gibson, who was attending the invalid, it was agreed that this plan should be carried out if possible, although it was considered doubtful whether the sick man would ever reach home alive.  A bed was therefore prepared in a sleigh, and the journey was pursued by easy stages, the brother tenderly caring for him all the way under the advice of the leading physicians of the principal villages through which they passed.  And so the old home was at last reached on Christmas-eve, and the feeble patient was laid on a bed from which he was not to rise until many weary weeks had passed.  The issue of the case was long doubtful; but at length the Doctor’s strength began to increase so that when settled weather came in the spring he was able to ride on horseback.  This daily exercise so improved his health that when June came his former patients and friends at Wellsboro were astonished to see him once more amongst them, and greeted him as one whom they had never expected to see again in this life. From that day until almost the close of his life the Doctor’s health was generally good.  His practice, which he at once resumed, grew from year to year and extended farther and farther through this and the neighboring counties.  He became known as the principal surgeon in this part of the State, and before the war he was called upon to take part in all the critical surgical operations in this region. In 1862, the Southern Rebellion having broken out, he entered the service of the National Government as a surgeon.  He was at first stationed at Chesapeake Hospital, near Fortress Monroe; but when the army was at Harrison Landing he was ordered there, and was soon after prostrated by malarial fever and jaundice.  After great exertion he finally succeeded in reaching home, but he did not recover his wanted health for some months.  In 1864 he was appointed United States Examining Surgeon for this place, and he performed the duties of that office continuously until last November, when he was appointed President of the Medical Board. As a practicing physician Dr. Packer was somewhat remarkable for the promptness and accuracy of his diagnosis.  It would be too much to say of any physician that he never made a mistake, for, unfortunately for the patients, medicine has not become one of the exact sciences, and the most eminent practitioners are sometimes misled, as all the world knows.  But Dr. Packer possessed a practical judgment and sound common sense that, added to his knowledge of books and his extended experience, made him a safe and most valued medical adviser.  His consultations throughout the county have for years been numerous, and his practice has long been a wide and lucrative one.  He was thoroughly devoted to the profession for which he was so eminently fitted.  He discharged its duties faithfully became it was his chosen life-work, not became of the money it brought him; and we venture to say that even in his old age he never failed to respond to any call for his services because the person needing his aid was unable to pay for them.  Like all professional men who really love their work and take pride in it, he was only anxious to render efficient service without regard to its reward.  Personally, Dr. Packer was a most agreeable man.  He was not only the wise medical adviser, but the pleasant friend and companion of his patient.  There are probably few men whom he has brought safely through a dangerous illness who will not recall with pleasure the visits of their doctor when they were slowly crawling back to life and health again.  His hearty sympathy with their sickbed vagaries, his laughing toleration of their peevish criticisms, his genial encouragement and his personal and unaffected pleasure in his patient’s improvement made his visits bright hours in the convalescent’s weary days of weakness. It is undoubtedly true that no man is necessary to the world and that in this hurly-burly that we call life no man can be long missed; but it is certain that no loss that does not invade our home circle can be more keenly felt than the death of a faithful and trusted physician--one to whom we look for help in the most trying hours and to whose care, under Providence, we intrust the lives of those dearest to us.  Such a physician was Dr. Packer, and his loss must be long felt and deeply regretted in many Tioga county homes. The funeral was attended last Sunday afternoon at Dr. Packer’s late residence in this village.  Rev. Dr. Charles Breck, rector of St. Paul’s Church, who conducted the service, spoke in the highest terms of the long and faithful labors of the deceased in his arduous and most useful profession from the early days when this region was a wilderness up to the time of his death.  There was a large attendance at the funeral, including most of the physicians of this part of the county.  Messrs. William Bache, Samuel Dickinson, Chester Robinson, John L. Robinson, A. S. Brewster, B. T. Van Horn, Anton Hardt and A. F. Barnes acted as pall-bearers, and the mortal remains of the good physician were followed to their last resting place in our cemetery by a large concourse of relatives and friends. (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Oscar F. Young
Mr. Oscar F. Young died at Alba, Bradford county, on the 24th ultimo, of dropsy.  He formerly resided in this county, and learned the printer’s trade in Wellsboro before the war.  He was 39 years of age.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Tunis Bush
At Wellsboro, February 5(or 3), 1883, Mr. Tunis Bush, in the 63rd year of his age.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Dorcas Codney
At Blossburg, February 4, 1883, Mrs. Dorcas Codney, aged 78 years, 11 months and 22 days.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Leander Culver
January 12, 1883, Nettie, wife of Leander Culver, aged 23 years.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Neva May Culver
February 8, 1883, Neva May, infant daughter of Leander and Nettie Culver.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Farrer
At Covington, February 5, 1883, Mr. William Farrer, aged 94 years.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Phoebe M. Peters
In Morris Run, January 25, 1883, Phoebe M. Peters, aged 24 years and 9 days.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ezra Potter
In Middlebury, Pa., February 11, 1883, Ezra Potter, aged 82 years.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Leona T. Scott
In Blossburg, February 2, 1883, Leona T., daughter of Mr. Winfield Scott, aged 1 year, 4 months and 18 days.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. E. B. Wakeman
At Catlett, Va., February 5, 1883, of inflammation of the brain, Mrs. E. B. Wakeman, formerly of Wellsboro, aged 71 years.  (Tuesday, February 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sam Wakefield
Sam Wakefield, a Louisiana colored politician, has committed suicide.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Guthrie
James Guthrie, a wealthy planter of Halifax, Va., died on the night of his wedding and by the side of his bride in bed.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George W. Green
Professor George W. Green, of Brown University, a grandson of General Nathaniel Green, of revolutionary fame, is dead.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Owen Hudson
Owen Hudson, a United States whisky gauger, stationed near Waynesburg, fell dead from his horse a few evenings ago.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick Martin
Frederick Martin, formerly Carlyle’s amanuensis, and proprietor of the “Statesman’s Year Book,” died in London a few days ago.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mollie L. Taylor
Mollie L. Taylor, 17 years of age, a servant in the employ of Mrs. Francis P. Smith, of Philadelphia, died a few evenings ago while holding an infant in her arms.  The girl must have been dead several hours before the fact was known.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Gottlieb Schauffler
Dr. William Gottlieb Schauffler, died in New York city recently at the age of 85.  The Doctor was well known as an earnest and successful missionary worker.  He was a noted linguist, speaking 19 languages and being able to preach extemporaneously in six.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Marshall Jewell
Marshall Jewell, who died at Hartford, Conn., on the 10th instant, of acute pneumonia, was born in Winchester, NH, October 20, 1825.  He has lived in Hartford since 1850, where he has been engaged with his brother in the manufacture of leather belting, in which business he was successful in accumulating a handsome fortune.  He was three times elected Governor of the State, was Minister to Russia in 1873-74, and Postmaster General from 1874 to 1876.  At the time of his death he was Chairman of the National Republican Committee.  The funeral services were held last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edwin Dennison Morgan
Ex Governor Edwin Dennison Morgan died at his residence in New York last Thursday morning about 8 o’clock.  At midnight on Tuesday it was apparent that the ex Governor was fast sinking, and his anxious family saw that his death was inevitable.  All during the early hours of the morning he lay peacefully and without suffering any visible pain.  At seven o’clock his condition took a sudden change for the worse, and he lost consciousness, and he remained in that state until he expired. He was born in Berkshire county, Mass., February 8, 1811.  At the age of 17 he entered a grocery store in Hartford, Conn., and at 20 became a partner.  He became a member of the Hartford City Council, and in 1836 removed to New York, and engaged in the grocery business there.  Twenty years later he was one of the foremost merchants of the city. He was elected President of the Board of Assistant Alderman of New York in 1849, and subsequently went to the State Senate from the Sixth district.  In 1855 he declined to return to the Senate, and was appointed Commissioner of Immigration.  In 1858 he was elected Governor.  He next succeeded Hon. Preston King in the United States Senate.  In 1865 he was nominated for Secretary of the Treasury by President Lincoln, but declined, and he also declined the similar appointment tendered by President Arthur.  He married in 1833 Miss Eliza M. Waterman, daughter of a merchant in Hartford, Conn., who survives him.  He leaves an estate valued from $7,000,000 to $12,000,000.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Milton Yarberry
Milton Yarberry, who is said to have killed five men, was executed at Albuquerque, NM., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Hobby Austin
Mr. Hobby Austin, who died at the residence of his daughter, at Morris Run, on February the 8th instant, 1883, at the advanced age of 90 years, was one of the early settlers of Sullivan township.  He went there when the country was a wilderness, and lived over 40 years on one farm.  For 70 years he was a member of the Baptist Church, and his reputation was unspotted from the world.  His remains were laid beside those of his wife in the cemetery at Mainesburg.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. G. M. Vedder
Mr. G. M. Vedder died very suddenly at the house of Wallace Codney, in Blossburg, last Tuesday afternoon.  A dispatch from Blossburg to the Advertiser, last Thursday, says Mr. Vedder was taken with very severe pains in the stomach.  A doctor was called and asked him if he had not been poisoned.  He said no, he had taken nothing.  Mr. Codney says his wife had a bottle of medicine for the toothache and Vedder drank nearly the whole mixture.  If he had told what was wrong his life could probably have been saved.  His family arrived on Wednesday and prepared to take the remains home to Roseville for interment.  He was about 40 years of age, and leaves a wife and two or three children in very poor circumstances.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William H. Bull
Under this head the Elmira Advertiser of last Friday published a special dispatch from Bath, stating that Colonel William H. Bull, the oldest resident of that place and one of the oldest settlers of Steuben county, died at one o’clock last Thursday afternoon, aged nearly 88 years.  He was 87 years, 10 months and 7 days.  He was born in Litchfield, Conn., April 8th, 1795; moved to Painted Post with his parents in 1796; moved to Bath in 1805 and has resided there ever since.  He built the first brick house in Steuben county, which is still standing.  He was County Clerk from 1832 to 1838, and held several town offices.  He has been blind for several years, but was not despondent in the least, and was a very interesting person to narrate the history and incidents of the early settlement of that section of country.  He married Sarah, daughter of the late Colonel John Whiting, of Bath.  They had five children: Mary, who died nearly three years ago; Susan, who died in infancy; Caroline, wife of L. B. Joy, of Bath; Sarah, wife of A. F. Barnes, of Wellsboro, and Augusta, wife of E. L. Church, of Bath, who died nearly two years ago.  Mrs. Bull died a number of years since.  Colonel Bull was one of the founders and a zealous member of St. Thomas’s Protestant Episcopal Church at Bath, and for nearly half a century he was a vestryman and warden of that Church.  He was well known throughout the county of Steuben as a surveyor, and had an extensive an accurate knowledge of the landmarks and old lines of that county.  His funeral was held at St. Thomas’s church Bath, last Saturday afternoon.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Benjamin Schwab
Benjamin Schwab, of Erie, climbed out upon the roof of a two-story house to clean off the snow.  He went over the eaves with the first shovelful, and died from his injuries in an hour.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Waters
An explosion occurred in a blacksmith shop on the Jersey Shore, Pine Creek and Buffalo railroad, a few days ago, by which James Waters, a blacksmith, lost his life.  There was a number of cartridges in the building, and by some means several of them exploded with the above result.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Fanny Corbeaux
Miss Fanny Corbeaux, the artist, is dead, in London.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Richard Wagner
Richard Wagner, the eminent composer of music, died suddenly at Venice last Tuesday afternoon.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Richard Keese
Richard Keese, the last surviving member of the Twentieth Congress, who was elected as a Jackson Democrat in 1827, died a few days ago at Keesville, NY.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Daniel De Vinne
The Rev. Daniel De Vinne, one of the oldest members of the New York East Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, died recently at West Morrisania, in the 90th year of his age.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hamilton Sheppard
A few days ago Hamilton Sheppard, father of City Clerk Sheppard, of Pittsburgh, died.  He was not supposed to have any great amount of money, but after his death $6,000 were found concealed on his person.  Since then $8,000 in gold and $43,000 in bank notes have been found in bureau drawers and other places about the house.  The notes were done up in packages of $500 and $1,000, and had evidently been secreted for some time.  He was not inclined to be miserly, and his family cannot account for the concealment of the money.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Clarence C. Bacon
At Northfield, Wis., February 3, 1883, of consumption, Clarence C., son of Henry and C. Augusta Bacon, aged 20 years and 10 months.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Wesley Nobles
In Delmar, January 14, 1883, Charles Wesley Nobles, youngest son of Daniel and Emma Nobles, aged 2 years and 2 months.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. E. D. Wells
At Lawrenceville, Pa., February 11, 1883, Rev. E. D. Wells, aged 83 years.  (Tuesday, February 20, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Stephen Hempsted
Stephen Hempsted, who was the second Governor of Iowa, is dead.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lyman H. Atwater
Professor Lyman H. Atwater, of Princeton College, died a few days ago.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Dawson
George Dawson, the well-known newspaper editor of Albany, NY, is dead.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

H. B. Quimby
Captain H. B. Quimby, Twenty fifth Infantry, died at Fort Snelling, Minn., last Tuesday, of heart disease.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. H. M. Vaile
Mrs. H. M. Vaile, wife of one of the Star-route defendants, committed suicide in Independence, Missouri, a few days ago.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert A. Packer
Robert A. Packer, of this State, died at his winter residence near Jacksonville, Fla., last Tuesday.  Mr. Packer was the oldest son of the late Judge Asa Packer.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel Gillian
Mr. Daniel Gillian, one of the oldest residents of Farmington, died on the 9th instant, at the age of 80 years.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Fulford
Last Sunday, at Niles Valley, six miles north of this borough, Mr. Charles Fulford was shot and killed by a Sweds named John Hamlin.  We are informed that the details of the tragic affair, as gathered at the inquest yesterday morning, are as follows:  John Hamlin has been at work for Messrs. Bennet & Dimon, at Niles Valley, for some time past--just how long it does not appear.  He seemed to be a man of violent temper, and had made threats against a fellow-workman by the name of Leib, with whom he had had some difficulty.  A short time ago Hamlin purchased a revolver, and since getting it has threatened to shoot Leib.  About a month ago the deceased, Charles Fulford, a resident of Erwin Center, NY, came to work for Bennet & Dimon, and but a few days ago moved his family, consisting of a wife and one little girl about 11 years old, into the house of Harrison Smith, who kept a boarding-house for Bennet & Dimon.  At the time the deceased moved his family into Smith’s house Hamlin was occupying a bedroom on the lower floor of the building.  It being more convenient for Fulford and his family to occupy this lower room than any other in the house, Hamlin was requested to surrender it and occupy another one in another portion of the building, which he did quite reluctantly; and he afterward threatened that he would get even with Fulford.  Last Sunday, the 25th instant, Hamlin, being under the influence of liquor, renewed his threats against Leib, and was seen lurking around the mill late in the afternoon where Leib works.  It is Leib’s duty to look over the mill just before dusk and see that all is safe from fire, etc.  Hamlin failed to find Leib at the mill, and went back to Smith’s house and went into the dining-room and used indecent language to Fulford’s wife, who told him to leave the room.  He then went into an adjoining room, used as a sitting-room for the men, and offered the men liquor which he had--Fulford with the rest.  They all refused to drink, whereupon Hamlin, after drinking out of his bottle, threw it down behind the stove and went out doors and immediately fired his revolver, which he had loaded a short time before going out. As soon as the shot was fired, Fulford stepped to the door and requested Hamlin, who was standing on the door-step, to stop firing, as the report would disturb Mrs. Smith, who was in the house sick.  Fulford no sooner spoke than Hamlin turned around and fired another shot, this time toward where Fulford was standing in the door, the ball striking the casing over Fulford’s head.  Before Fulford had time to defend himself or escape Hamlin fired another shot, the ball taking effect in the right breast of Fulford and passing through the lung and, it is believed, penetrating the heart.  Immediately on being shot Fulford sprang at Hamlin and knocked him down and kicked him violently; but the other men present at once took hold of him and led him into the house, and he died in about five minutes afterward.  Hamlin was immediately arrested and brought to jail. District Attorney Foote, in company with A. S. Brewster, Esq., visited the place of the murder about two o’clock a. m. yesterday, when an inquest was held before a jury composed of J. B. Dimon, John Fletcher, W. B. Sample, C. J. Smith, H. B. Tuttle and Alva Rice.  After hearing the facts in connection with the killing, the jury found that the deceased Charles Fulford, came to his death by a pistol shot at the hand of John Hamlin. The relatives of Fulford living at Erwin Center were telegraphed for, and it is expected that the remains will be taken back to his former home for burial.  He is spoken of as a very quiet, peaceful and industrious man, and it is said that during the short time he worked for Messrs. Bennet & Dimon he made many warm friends.  We learn that since Hamlin was lodged in jail he has threatened to kill himself, and has asked for his revolver for that purpose.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jacob Brebilla
At Morris Run, February 12, 1883, Mr. Jacob Brebilla, aged 80 years and 6 months.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary Grantier
At Sylvester, Pa., February 14, 1883, Mary, daughter of Theodore and Lavancia Grantier, aged 1 year, 1 month and 2 days.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jennettie W. Jones
In Charleston, February 20, 1883, of pneumonia, Jennettie W., wife of Daniel P. Jones, aged 41 years and 17 days.  She was a true, kind and loving wife and mother.  A member of the Welsh Church in Charleston, she was one who trusted in Christ as her Saviour.  The Lord has taken one of his own children home.  It is our loss but her gain.  Charleston, February 26, 1883.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Gladys Monks
In Chatham, February 11, 1883, Gladys, youngest daughter of John and Mary Monks, aged 2 years and 9 months.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Chauncey E. Mulford
At Potter Brook, Pa., February 4, 1883, Chauncey E., son of Mr. B. F. Mulford.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Imogene E. Paris
At Lamb’s Creek, Pa., January 4, 1883, Imogene E., wife of Byron Paris, and daughter of Mrs. W. Bullard, of Wellsboro, aged 20 years and 4 months.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alva B. Paris
At Lamb’s Creek, Pa., February 13, 1883, Alva B., infant son of Byron and Imogene E. Paris, aged 7 weeks.  (Tuesday, February 27, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. S. Crawford
W. S. Crawford, the noted English turf man is dead.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Baron de Javary
Baron de Javary, the Brazilian Minister at Rome, is dead.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ezra Graves
Mr. Ezra Graves, who recently died at his residence near Elkland, February 23, 1883, after a lingering illness, aged 72 years, was keeper of the toll gate near the State line, on the Addison and Elkland plank road, for nearly 20 years.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Morgan
Thomas Morgan, a workman on the Gravity road, near Honesdale, was killed by the giving away of a brake on a car.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Chamberlain and W. Wescott
James Chamberlain and W. Wescott were killed last week Monday by the explosion of a boiler in a saw-mill at Drifton, Pa.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert P. DuBois
Robert P. DuBois, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, in New London, Chester county, for 40 years, died a few days ago.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Orsamus Parrish
In Charleston, March 1, 1883, Mr. Orsamus Parrish, aged 76 years and 17 days.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Maria Sheffer
In Liberty, Pa., February 24, 1883, Maria, wife of Mr. Elias Sheffer, aged 40 years, 3 months and 8 days.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Sykes
In Westfield, February 10, 1883, Mrs. John Sykes, aged 54 years, 9 months and 23 days.  (Tuesday, March 6, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Uriah Moyer
Uriah Moyer, implicated in the murder of John and Gretchen Kintzler, an aged couple, in 1881, was hanged at Middlebury, Pa., on Wednesday morning.  The murder was committed for the purpose of robbery, and Kintzler’s house was burned.  (Tuesday, March 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jim Elliott
At Chicago, a few days ago, Jere Dunn shot and killed Jim Elliott, the pugilist.  Dunn, who is a partner with McKee Rankin in a breeding farm on an island in the Detroit river, has been arrested.  The affray grew out of an old trouble about a sparring match.  (Tuesday, March 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Harry Gilmor
Col. Harry Gilmor, the well-known rebel cavalryman, is dead.  (Tuesday, March 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. R. Green
J. R. Green, author of “A Short History of the English People,” died at Mentone, Wednesday.  (Tuesday, March 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Wilson
William Wilson, while attempting to elope with the daughter of Marshall Parnell, in Union county, Arkansas, was shot dead by the lady’s father and brothers.  (Tuesday, March 13, 1883, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 15 MAR 2008
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice

Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.