Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
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Tri County Clippings- Page Three Hundred Seventy Three

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1887-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Mrs. H. Gifford
Mrs. H. Gifford died at Mitchell’s Creek on Christmas day after a long and painful sickness.  Her funeral was attended by a large concourse of friends.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George H. Platt
Last Saturday morning, Mr. George H. Platt, Superintendent of the Clearfield coal mines, died at Peale, Pa., of typhoid pneumonia at the age of 36 years.  Mr. Platt was well known to many of the business men in this county, and his loss will be deeply felt in business circles.  He was a gentleman of pure character, and he had hosts of personal friends.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Eugene Blanchard
Last Thursday, Mr. Eugene Blanchard died at the Coles’ Hotel in this borough after being sick a few days with cerebro spinal meningitis.  The young man was about 18 years of age, and he had been employed as hostler about the livery stables for some months.  He was taken sick on Monday of last week.  The remains were taken to Covington for interment on Friday.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Emma Cole
At Antrim, Pa., December 21, 1886, Emma, daughter of John Cole, aged 16 years.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. George Pursing
At Knoxville, Pa., December 22, 1886, Mrs. George Pursing.  (Tuesday, January 4, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Finkner
A few days ago William Finkner, Esq., of Cowanesque, a man about 78 years of age, went to his barn to look after his stock.  As he did not come in for some time, search was made for him by his wife, and his dead body was found stretched upon the barn floor, where he had evidently fallen when death came without an instant’s warning.  Mr. Finkner settled in Knoxville in 1851; afterwards he resided in Elkland, and in 1861 he moved to Cowanesque.  He was held in high esteem by all who know him.  For 12 years he had held the office of Justice of the Peace.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Oren E. Williams
Last Thursday afternoon, Mr. Oren E. Williams, a well known citizen of this borough, died after a four-weeks’ illness, with brain fever.  The funeral was held on Sunday afternoon at his late residence on Queen street, and it was largely attended by sorrowing friends.  Rev. S. F. Mathews, pastor of the First Baptist Church, assisted by Rev. A. C. Shaw, of the Presbyterian Church, and Rev. S. W. Lloyd, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, conducted the services.  Mr. Williams was born at Groton, Tompkins county, NY, March 18, 1845, and was therefore nearly 42 years of age at the time of his death.  He came to this borough in 1859.  During the war for the Union he enlisted in the army on the last call for troops, he then being about 18 years old, and he served until the close of the war.  He was married on the 7th of February, 1867, to the daughter of James Campbell, of Delmar, who survives him with five children.  Mr. Williams’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Williams, reside in Delmar, and his sister, Mrs. Robert Bodine, lives in this borough.  Mr. Williams engaged in farming in Delmar for some years; but five or six years ago he purchased the Mitchell coal mines, which he has since operated, residing at the same time in this borough.  A good man has been called from earth to join the silent majority.  Mr. Williams died without an enemy.  He was of a genial disposition, straightforward and honest in all his dealings with men, a kind husband and father, always a dutiful son and an affectionate brother.  The death of such a man is a loss to any community.  His aged parents, his own family, and his sister have the deepest sympathy in their sorrow.  Mr. Williams was a member of the First Baptist Church in this borough.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Frances Carpenter
At Academy Corners, Pa., January 1, 1887, of consumption, Miss Frances Carpenter, aged 19 years.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Carrie A. Greenman
At Mansfield, Pa., December 26, 1886, Carrie A., youngest daughter of Mr. John Greenman, aged 19 years.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Edwin Seely
In Jackson, Pa., December 30, 1886, of consumption, Mrs. Edwin Seely.  (Tuesday, January 11, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Isaac Sprague
Isaac Sprague, the “Living Skeleton,” died at Chicago a few days ago.  He was born in Bridgewater, Mass., and was quite healthy until his 12th year, when he caught a cramp while in swimming, fell sick, and lost flesh until he weighed only 46 pounds.  Barnum took him all over the United States, Canada, and England.  He was married and the father of three robust children.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Myers
Information is received of the death at his home on Prairie Greig, Vermillion parish, of Mr. Henry Myers, who was one of the oldest men in the world.  One hundred and twenty-six years ago Mr. Henry Myers was born in Holland, and he came to this country in his young manhood.  The advanced age attained seems almost incredible, but his son-in-law, Mr. Primeau, vouches for its accuracy; as Mr. Myers was in possession of documentary proof of his age, his certificate of baptism showing that he was baptized on the 31st of August, 1769, while another certificate shows that he was admitted to his first communion in 1775.  He died of cancer.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. B. Hazen
General W. B. Hazen, Chief Signal Officer of the Army, died in Washington last Sunday evening.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. J. W. Wilhelm
Mrs. J. W. Wilhelm, formerly of Mansfield, died at Elmira last Thursday.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Chestina Smith
Mrs. Chestina Smith, of Jackson township, died last Sunday at the age of 91 years.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. A. M. Card
Mr. A. M. Card, a well known and esteemed citizen of Sylvania, died on the 11th instant, of pneumonia, after a protracted illness.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David Rexford
Mr. David Rexford, formerly a well known citizen of Westfield, died at Ulysses, Potter county, last Friday, at the age of 87 years.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Peck
Mr. John Peck died at Addison, NY, on the 8th instant, at the age of 52 years.  He resided at Gaines, in this county at one time.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Catherine Knapp
Mrs. Catharine Knapp, of Delmar, aged about 80 years, died a few days ago from the effects of injuries received by the overturning of a kettle of boiling water.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Hiram Meritt
Mr. Hiram Meritt, of Nelson, a prominent and respected citizen, died yesterday morning of pneumonia, at the age of 79 years.  Mr. Meritt was taken sick just a week prior to his death.  He had been a merchant in Nelson for 18 years.  Previous to locating there he kept a store in Farmington for about 17 years.  He had resided in this county for half a century, and he was widely known and greatly esteemed.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Thomas Smith
On the 8th instant Mr. Thomas Smith, a miner at Antrim, was buried under a fall of coal.  When extricated it was found that his jaw was broken and his skull fractured.  The unfortunate man lingered in much suffering until Wednesday, when he died.  The funeral was held last Friday, the remains being interred in St. Peter’s cemetery in this borough.  Mr. Smith left a wife and five small children.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sophia Christman
At Harrison Valley, Pa., January 12, 1887, of cerebro spinal meningitis, Mrs. Sophia Christman, aged 37 years.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Davis
In Charleston, Pa., January 9, 1887, Elizabeth, wife of Thomas D. Davis, aged 75(or 76) years.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Eaton
At Morris Run, Pa., January 1, 1887, Mrs. John Eaton, aged 35 years.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Walker
At Wellsboro, Pa., January 3, 1887, Edward, son of Mary and George Walker, aged 6 months.  (Tuesday, January 18, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Anson M. Card
At Sylvania, Pa., January 11, 1887, of heart disease, Anson M. Card, aged 40 years.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Fields
In Armenia, Pa., January 6, 1887, Elizabeth, daughter of George Fields, aged 54 years.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Maud Lewis
At Blossburg, Pa., January 20, 1887, of membranous croup, Maud, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mart G. Lewis, aged 6 years.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Rexford
In Ulysses, Pa., January 14, 1887, David Rexford, in the 88th year of his age.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Nettie Wheeler
On Bear Creek, near Tioga, Pa., January 6, 1887, Nettie, eldest daughter of William and Layiana(?) Wheeler, aged 15 years.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Curtis Howard
Curtis Howard, a young merchant and prominent citizen of Dowville, Erie county, IL, with typhoid fever and delirious, being left alone for a few minutes on a recent evening, sprang through his bedroom window and ran away with only his night-clothes on.  In the darkness he evaded pursuit, and was found an hour later drowned in French creek, half a mile from home.  He was only 22 years old, and was married last summer.  (Tuesday, January 25, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Emily L. McCullough
Mrs. Emily L. McCullough, widow of the late Rev. Samuel J. McCullough, of Tioga, died at her late residence in the town of Lindsley, Steuben county, NY, January 21, 1887, in the 70th year of her age.  The announcement of the death of Mrs. McCullough will be a shock to many old friends throughout Tioga county, where she lived for more than 50 years.  Born at Tioga Point (now Athens), Pa., April 2d, 1817, she removed with her parents, when a child of four years , to Lawrenceville.  Her maiden name was Emily Lindsley Tharp.  Her father was by profession a surveyor, and during his residence at Tioga Point was associated with his uncle, Dr. Rose, in the management of the great Bingham estate.  Her mother was a daughter of Judge Lindsley, a pioneer and for many years, until his death in 1825, a leading citizen of Steuben county, and one of the Judges who held the first term of court at Bath, in 1796, for the then, lately organized county of Steuben.  Her great grandfather, Colonel Eleazer Lindsley, as officer of the famous “Jersey Blues” in the war of the Revolution, purchased about the year 1788 a tract of land six miles square, now known as the town of Lindsley (incorrectly spelled Lindley), Steuben county, and removed thither in 1789 with a large family.  He was the first representative in the New York Legislature from that part of the county of Ontario which afterwards became Steuben county, and died while in attendance thereon in 1794.  When but eight year old, her mother died, leaving three daughters--the subject of this sketch, an elder sister, the late Mrs. A. B. Lindsley, of Lawrenceville, and a younger sister, Mrs. H. M. Fuller, of Wilkesbarre.  Thereafter, with the exception of five years spent with an aunt at Wilkesbarre, her home was with her grandmother, Mrs. Lindsley, at Lawrenceville.  To this grandmother she gave unbounded love and devotion--such love and devotion as only a motherless girl can give to the kindest of grandmothers.  Mrs. Lindsley could go back in memory to the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, and had come to this region, a bride of 20, in 1780(?), when it was an unbroken wilderness, save here and there a spot which had been cultivated by the Indians.  From her the granddaughter required a large fund of information about the early settlers and customs of the region.  To reminiscent of those early days thus gathered, and which she loved to recount, one could listen with never failing interest.  Her school-days were begun at Lawrenceville, and were continued at Wilkesbarre and at Mrs. Ricord’s seminary at Geneva, NY, and finished in 1841 at the once celebrated Troy Female Seminary, founded by Mrs. Emma Willard.  Her education was thus superior to that of most young ladies of 50 years ago, and it was the more to her credit since it was secured largely by her own exertions in teaching.  On leaving the Troy seminary, she spent some time in Virginia as private instructor in the family of a wealthy planter.  She then returned to Lawrenceville.  She was married October 1, 1844, to the late Rev. Samuel J. McCullough, of Tioga, but then and since 1841 pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Lawrenceville.  In 1848, they moved to Tioga, where Mr. McCullough assumed the duties of pastor of the Presbyterian Church, which had been organized largely through his instrumentality.  Here for almost 20 years they shared the trials and privations of a pastor’s life in a small place at that day.  During the entire ministry of Mr. McCullough, both at Lawrenceville and Tioga, his annual salary actually received, never exceeded $400, while the average was not more than $250.  This always left a deficit to be supplied from some source, for $250, with the most rigid economy, was not sufficient to support the pastor, with a wife and young children, who must needs keep a horse and buggy to attend funerals, etc., even in those days of comparative simplicity of living.  The deficit was made up by the pastor’s noble and self-sacrificing wife, in part with generous contributions from her own slender private means and in part by denying herself many of the comforts and even necessities of life.  She also gave liberally towards the erection of the church edifice which is still used by the Presbyterians of Tioga after nearly 35 years of service.  She loved to give and whatever she gave she gave freely and fully in furtherance of the cause of religion, which was always nearest her heart.  Her piety was of that deep, pervading nature which made it a part of her whole being, but was never ostentatious.  Her Christian life was one that displayed itself in deeds and not words.  Early in life she united with the Presbyterian Church at Lawrenceville.  The quarter of a century during which she resided at Tioga was the most important period of her life.  Here her life-work was mainly wrought out.  Here almost her entire married life was spent.  Here the sons who survive her--Henry M. and Samuel J.--were born and grew up to young manhood; and here, too, December 19, 1867, she saw pass from her side to his eternal abiding-place the husband and companion of 23 years.  In 1873 she removed with her sons to the town of Lindsley, where at the time of her death she had resided nearly 14 years.  Always shy and difficult in society, she had mingled but little in the world of late years, so that those who knew her best are now old or have preceded her to the eternal world.  During the last six years of her life she had been gradually failing in bodily strength.  Her mind, however, was clear to the last.  Though devoted to her family--one of the best mothers that ever lived, the most loving and most self-sacrificing--when the final summons came she was ready to go.  Thus, having almost attained the full measure of three-score years and ten, without prolonged and wasting illness, with her mind at rest in regard to the things of this world and fixed intently upon the things of the next, she died.  Faithfully is it written of such a woman, “Her children arise up and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her.”  (Prov. Xxxi. 28.)  Her funeral was attended at Lawrenceville on Sunday, January 23d, the sermon being preached by Rev. Joel Jewell, and her remains were laid at rest in the old Lidsley burying-ground a mile north of Lawrenceville, where rest also the remains of father and mother, grandparents and great-grandparents, together with a large number of relatives.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William E. Clark
Mr. William E. Clark died at Chemung, NY, a few days ago at the age of 75 years.  He was a former resident of Richmond, in this county, and it is stated that he was the first white child born in that township.  His son, Mr. Henry Clark, resides at Round Top.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hannah VanDeren
Mrs. Hannah VanDeren died at Mansfield a few days ago at the of 83 years.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jacob Van Wort
Last Wednesday morning this community was startled by the intelligence that a woman had shot and killed her husband near Stokesdale Junction, about three miles north of this borough.  Officers at once visited the scene, and the circumstances which led to the tragedy were found to be substantially as follows:  Jacob Van Wort lived on the Marsh Creek road, about five miles from this borough and about two miles west of Stokesdale Junction.  He was not counted as a very reputable citizen, but on the contrary his home was known to be the resort for questionable characters, and there have been dark rumors of lawless deeds committed by him and that he had formerly been in the penitentiary.  It was well known by the neighbors that he was a cruel husband, beating his young wife shamefully at times and keeping up a reign of terror in his home.  Two years ago last Tuesday Van Wort married Esther Brunson, who lived with her grandmother, Mrs. Williams, on Baldwin run.  She was then 14 years of age, and Van Wort was about 40.  She was often accused of unfaithfulness by her husband, and for this and other alleged shortcomings she was frequently tied up and flogged.  Last Wednesday morning Mr. Van Wort came home in a towering rage.  He accused his young wife of having a man in the house on Tuesday night when he was away from home.  This she denied, and called upon her 12 year old cousin, Rose Brundage, who had stayed with her overnight, to prove the truth of her assertion.  But Van Wort dragged the woman upstairs and with a strap he fastened her wrists together and drew her hands over her head to a rafter in the low unfinished attic.  He then flogged her vigorously.  The cousin became frightened by the outcry and fled from the house.  Van Wort soon after discovered this fact, mounted his horse and started in pursuit.  He overtook the girl a short distance down the road and after swearing vengeance upon her if she ever told about the whipping he started back telling her he was going to kill Esther.  Van Wort was leading his horse, and as he reached the watering-trough he met his wife with a bundle under her left arm.  He thundered out, “Where you going?”  She said, “Home; I am tired of your abuse and won’t stand it any longer.”  He pulled a clasp-knife from his pocket and said “Not by a --- sight; I’ll kill you right here.  I’ll cut you in pieces.”  He made an advance toward the frightened woman, when she quickly drew a revolver from her pocket and fired.  The bullet struck Van Wort in the gullet.  He staggered backward, and the woman fell in the snow.  Van Wort recovered his balance and came towards her again, when she arose and fired again, the bullet striking within an inch of the first one.  He fell, and the woman fled down the road, where she met Mr. A. J. Campbell, to whom she told her story.  He advised her to go to her grandmother’s and to give herself up to the officers.  Constable John Roberts, Justice I. M. Bodine and several other citizens visited the place on Wednesday afternoon, and held an examination.  Mrs. Van Wort was arrested and brought to this borough and was committed to jail after a short hearing before Justice Bodine.  It being court week a true bill of indictment for murder was found by the grand jury on Friday, the 28th and the case was brought on trial on Saturday afternoon.  A jury was soon empaneled, as follows:  Morris Butler, farmer, Deerfield; Ambrose Cochran, cabinet-maker, Liberty; Anson H. Furman, Constable, Ward; Franklin C. Ferguson, mason, Covington borough; David S. Jones, farmer, Charleston; Edgar Kinner, farmer, Jackson; Walter Messing, farmer, Jackson; Kingsley C. Palmer, farmer, Middlebury; Allen Strawn, farmer, Chatham; Frank Stevens, clerk, Tioga borough; William L. Seely, farmer, Brookfield; Homer Wilson, farmer, Richmond.  District Attorney Mather opened the case by stating to the jury that the Commonwealth’s testimony was largely made up of the statements of the prisoner at the bar, made by her to several individuals shortly after the shooting; that no witness was present at the shooting and no one heard the shots, and that upon her own version of the transaction the case depended.  The first witness called was Mr. A. J. Campbell who testified as follows:  I live at Marsh Creek.  I knew Jacob Van Wort in his life-time.  Mr. Van Wort lived 3/4 of a mile west, down the creek from my house.  He lived about five miles from Wellsboro and some 2 ½ miles from Stokesdale Junction.  I saw Jacob Van Wort on horseback between 10 and 11 o’clock in the morning go past my house up the road toward Stokesdale.  The horse was on a gallop till he came up in sight of my house, when he slackened his speed and walked past my house till nearly out of sight, when he broke into a trot.  Van Wort returned in about ½ an hour, walking and leading his horse.  I saw him after he was shot, when he was dying.  His head lay up the creek and his body lay at the left of the road as you go down beside a little pole or log.  His head and shoulder were against the pole, and one hand was thrown over it.  His right hand was stretched out in the road, and about 18” from his hand lay a closed pocket-knife, and a few drops of blood were on the upper side of it.  I asked him if he knew he was dying.  He looked at me and grunted but did not articulate.  I saw blood in the road some 7 or 8 feet from where he lay.  I examined his person and found two bullet-holes in his neck.  One was well down in the center of his throat; the other hole was about one inch to the left.  The bullets did not come out at the back of his neck.  He died in about 25 minutes after I saw him.  I left him shortly after I found him to notify the authorities.  When I got back he was dying.  Referring to the time when I saw Van Wort go down past my house leading his horse, I was at that time seated at the window in my house reading a paper.  About five minutes after he had passed my attention was called to his horse, which was returning up the road unattended.  I caught the horse, and some five or six rods behind it, coming towards me, I saw Mrs. Van Wort. I stood and held the horse till she came to me.  I asked her what was the matter.  She was so excited that she could not speak for a minute.  After she recovered herself somewhat she said:  “I want to tell you.  I have shot Jake.  Oh, dear!  I had to do it!”  She said: “I was leaving home.  He whipped me this morning and tried to make me go back, and I told him I would not go.  I would rather die before I would go back to be whipped any more.  He then took out his knife and said, “God --- you, I will kill you right here!  I will cut you up in pieces.”  She said she had the revolver in her pocket and waited till he came pretty near to her and then she shot him and he staggered back, and then he sprang up and came after her again and she shot him again.  She said when she fired the first shot she fell down in the road and before she got up he came at her again.  She asked me what she should do, and I told her to go to Wellsboro and give herself up, and she started towards Stokesdale Junction.  I then put the horse in the barn and went down to the watering trough, some 40 rods below, where I found Van Wort as before described.  On his person was found $10.50. Mr. Campbell on cross-examination by Mr. Elliott, said that he had examined the road to ascertain where Mr. Van Wort went when he passed his house on horseback going towards Stokesdale, and found that he had turned around near the old company’s mill near the fields of the Dickinson farm; that there was no house near by.  Mr. Campbell said he noticed snow upon the clothes and bundle of Mrs. Van Wort.  He said she was greatly excited, and in reply to his question, as to what Mr. Van Wort had been doing to her she said he had been whipping her that morning with the ramrod of a gun; that he took her up stairs and tied her up by the wrists to a collar-beam and drew her hands up over her head; that her wrists were tied up by a leather strap.  She said that was why she was going to her grandmother’s; that she had got together in a bundle a few of her things while Van Wort was gone out of the house up the road on his horse after her little 12 year old cousin.  She said Van Wort told her that some man in the neighborhood had told him that during his absence from home for a few nights a strange man had been seen at his home and that the man had remained with her over night.  She had denied the assertion and called her cousin to witness that there had been no man around, as the little girl had remained with her while her husband was away.  The little girl corroborated the wife; but Van Wort swore that he did not believe her and that he would take her upstairs and whip her till she had acknowledged that a man had been at the house; that he accordingly took her up stairs and whipped her as before described, and that while she was being whipped her cousin left the house to notify her grandmother; that Van Wort noticed that she had left, and for that reason he jumped upon his horse and went after her to bring her back, and that while he was thus gone she had left the house and subsequently met him at the watering-trough.  Mr. Campbell said he should judge that Van Wort was 5 feet 10 inches in height, and weighed 140 pounds, and that he was about 40 years of age, and that Mrs. Van Wort was 16 years of age.  I. M. Bodine, Justice of the Peace, was next sworn.  He testified that he held the post mortem examination on the 26th of January at the Van Wort house.  He said Mrs. Van Wort was sworn and examined before him, and he then detailed her testimony, covering the ground of the first witness.  The Justice said he asked her about Van Wort whipping her, and she told him that he often whipped her, sometimes taking all her clothing off, tying her up by the wrists and whipping her with a leather strap.  She said she had deep cuts and scars on her body where he had cut her.  John Roberts, the Constable of the First ward of Wellsboro, was the next and last witness called.  He detailed his arrest of the prisoner and said he found her and her grandmother on their way to the borough; that he asked the prisoner for her revolver and that she referred him to her grandmother, who gave the revolver over into his possession.  He said the prisoner while in his custody made the remark, “Oh, I wish I had been cut up instead of shooting him.  He gave me the revolver to defend myself; I did not think it would be used to kill him.”  At the close of Mr. Roberts’s testimony the District Attorney said that he was all the evidence the Commonwealth had to offer.  Mr. Elliott then addressed the Court, stating that the Commonwealth had failed to make out any degree of felonious killing, and he therefore moved that the Court take the case from the jury and direct a verdict of not guilty.  Ex-Judge Wilson who was associated with the District Attorney, opposed Mr. Elliott’s motion, stating that in his opinion the case would go to the jury.  Judge Williams then began a recital of the facts as detailed by the Commonwealth’s witnesses, and at the close he said that he could not under the circumstances allow a verdict of guilty to stand should the jury return one, and what is more, he said, I would not.  (At this point the great crowd in the Court-room broke out into cheers.)  He then turned to Gen. Cox, the Clerk, and dictated the following:  “The Court being of the opinion that the evidence was insufficient to convict of any form of homicide, directed the Clerk to enter the verdict of not guilty, and the same was accordingly taken from the box.”  The trial lasted a little over two hours, and the young widow left the Court-house followed by the crowd.  After Mrs. Van Wort had been released an Agitator reporter had a brief conversation with her.  She is small in stature, with a face that is childish in expression at first sight, yet with a somewhat sullen look in the eyes and evidences of a violent temper.  But there was not that hardness in the face that one might expect, considering the life she had led with a brutal husband.  She does not at all resemble the pictures of her published in some of the sensational papers.  She said that when her husband started to come towards her last Wednesday morning, the knife in his hand was open.  She thought of the pistol in her pocket, and she felt that if she didn’t use it he would kill her.  She fired the two shots without dropping the bundle of clothing in her left hand.  She cocked the revolver the second time with her thumb.  Her husband had given her the weapon some time ago, instructing her to use it if molested when he was absent from home.  She had carried it constantly in her dress pocket ever since.  She said she had never fired the pistol but twice before, and then she shot a hedgehog, and missed both shots.  Somebody remarked that “the Lord directed the bullets last Wednesday,” when she looked up quickly and said that she thought “He certainly did.” She stated that Van Wort had whipped her many times before.  Sometimes he had stripped her stark naked, tied her up to the rafters in the low upper story of their house and beaten her with rods.  Once he tied her by the thumbs.  Last Wednesday he used a heavy strap to fasten her wrists together and then he made this fast to a rafter and beat her with the ramrod of a gun.  She said that Van Wort had been in the penitentiary.  She overheard him talking to a man about it one day.  Then she accused him of it, but he denied it.  She said she told him “Take care, don’t you lie to me!”  She heard him say that he worked at making collars in a New York prison.  As she turned to go she said:  “Well, I hope you fellers will never see me here again--in jail again.”  While in jail the woman indulged in considerable talk with the other prisoners in adjacent cells.  She was heard to remark, “I’ve got an awful temper, I have!”  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Enie Anderson
At Arnot, Pa., January 14, 1887, of dropsy, Mr. Enie Anderson, aged 36 years.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Atherton
In Charleston, Pa., January 11, 1887, Mrs. Mary Atherton, aged 58 years, 8 months and 4 days.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. J. H. Martin
At Gaines, Pa., January 24, 1887, of cancer, Mrs. J. H. Martin, aged 51 years and 24 days.  Her sufferings were intense, but she died trusting in the Lord Jesus Christ and rejoicing in the hope of eternal life.  She had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church many years, and her last end was peace.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Christina Smith
In Jackson, Pa., January 16, 1887, Mrs. Christina Smith, aged 91 years.  (Tuesday, February 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. C. E. Brown
Mr. C. E. Brown, of Blossburg, died last week Monday at the age of 31 years.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frank Smith
Mr. Frank Smith, of Niles Valley, died last Saturday morning, February 5, 1887, of consumption, at the age of 22 years.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Nims
Mr. John Nims, of Farmington, aged about 70 years, died very suddenly last week Monday morning.  He had been attending to the wants of his wife, who was ill, and he sat down in a chair and at once fell dead.  Mrs. Nims was the only other person in the house at the time.  Mr. Nims was a well-to-do citizen.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. I. B. Brooks
Mrs. I. B. Brooks, daughter of Mr. Isaac Miller, formerly of Lawrenceville, died at Corry, Pa., last week Sunday.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Stone
We regret to learn of the death of Robert, the seven year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Stone, of Pittsburgh, which occurred last Friday morning.  The child had been ill with laryngitis, but the case was not considered critical until just before the child’s death.  He was a bright and beautiful child, and his death is a crushing blow to his parents.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Pearson
Last Friday Mr. John Pearson, a well-known and respected citizen of Delmar township, died at his home near Stokesdale, at the age of 71 years.  Mr. Pearson had been in poor health for several years, having suffered several strokes of paralysis.  Mr. Pearson was born in Burlington county, NJ.  He came to this county 38 years ago last fall, and he then purchased 834 acres of land known as “the marsh,” three miles north of this borough.  He reclaimed all of this land by drainage and subsequently sold off all but about 250 acres, which he reserved for his own cultivation and which is a most excellent farm.  Mr. Pearson also engaged in lumbering quite extensively in former years.  He was a man of great energy and excellent business qualifications, and he was universally esteemed for his unswerving integrity.  His son, Samuel, and three daughters survive him.  Two sons, George and William died some years ago.  The funeral was held yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Mr. Pearson’s late residence, and it was largely attended.  Rev. A. C. Shaw, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, officiated.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Anna E. Cole
In Delmar, Pa., January 21, 1887, Anna E., wife of George Cole, aged 34 years, 2 months and 6 days.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Emily Dixson
At Almond, NY, January 7, 1887, Emily, daughter of Ira and Sarah E. Dixson and niece of Mrs. A. S. Brewster, aged 26 years.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John G. Holmes
At Knoxville, Pa., February 2, 1887, of typhoid pneumonia, John G. Holmes, aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, February 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Henry Winn
Mrs. Henry Winn died near Bloomington, IL, after fasting for 47 days.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward L. Youmans
Prof. Edward L. Youmans, the distinguished writer and lecturer on scientific subjects, died a few days ago, in his 66th year.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Abbey Kelly Foster
Mrs. Abbey Kelly Foster, a noted anti-slavery and woman’s rights lecturer, died at Worcester, Mass., a few days ago, aged 76 years.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Edwards
John Edwards, the leading Welsh bard of America, died at Rome, NY, a few days ago, aged 81.  He was President of the first Welsh literary society organized in New York city.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick Amerling
Frederick Amerling, the painter, who died recently, bequeathed to the city of Vienna his collection of art antiquities, valued at $75,000, on the condition that it be kept intact for public inspection.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John L.(or H.) Talcott
Hon. John L.(or H.) Talcott, ex-Judge of the Supreme Court of New York, died at his residence in Buffalo recently, aged 74 years.  He ranked for many years as one of the most eminent lawyers of the State.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry B. Stanton
Henry B. Stanton, the distinguished journalist and lawyer, died a few days ago, of pneumonia, at New York city.  He was the husband of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the noted advocate of the right of woman suffrage.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Henry
There died a few days ago, in the City Hospital at Vicksburg, Miss., a very remarkable negro, John Henry, who had invented a piece of agricultural machinery which is said to display evidence of great inventive talent.  Henry was a pure-blood negro.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Clarissa D. Raymond
Mrs. Clarissa D. Raymond, who died in Wilton, Conn., a few days ago, aged 104 years, 8 months and 24 days, left a daughter aged 81, a grandson aged 60, a great-grandson aged 31, and two other great-grandchildren, aged 6 and 8 years respectively.  Mrs. Raymond was the oldest woman in the State.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Simon Harris
Simon Harris died in Putnam county, Ind., a few days ago, aged 109 years.  He was born in Orange county, North Carolina, on January 1, 1778.  He cast his first vote for Jefferson for President in 1801 and voted at every Presidential election since.  He was a veteran of the war of 1812.  His memory remained good.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Bloom
Mr. John Bloom died at his home near Mansfield a few days ago, of typhoid fever.  His aged was 50 years.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Kiley
At Covington, Pa., February 9, 1887, Mrs. John Kiley, aged 57 years, 8 months and 23 days.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Isaac Spencer
At Jackson Summit, Pa., January 29, 1886, Mr. Isaac Spencer.  (Tuesday, February 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Catherine McMahon
Last Tuesday Miss Catherine McMahon, a young Irish girl of 22 years, who was employed as a domestic in the family of William D. Knox, at Academy Corners, committed suicide by taking a dose of “Rough on Rats.”  The Courier says that she had been residing in the family of Mr. Charles Toles, at Wellsboro, and went to Academy Corners about Christmas.  Her parents still live in Ireland, and she has three brothers and a sister at Blossburg.  Coroner W. R. Francis held an inquest on Wednesday, and the jury rendered a verdict that the deceased came to her death by taking poison with suicidal intent.  Her relatives took charge of the remains.  (Tuesday, March 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Elmer E. Elliott
Mr. Elmer E. Elliott, of Mansfield, who died in that village a few days ago, was 23 years of age.  His death was the result of injuries to the spine sustained a year or more ago.  He was a member of the firm of T. D. & E. E. Elliott, grocery men in Mansfield.  Mr. Elliott was a very promising young man, and he was widely known and universally respected.  (Tuesday, March 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Davison
Dr. James Davison, who for 26 years was a practicing physician at Canton, Bradford county, died in that village on the 15th ultimo, in the 58th year of his age.  He was a native of Yorkshire, England.  When 21 he came to this country and he worked at the printing trade in this borough and later at Troy.  The confinement impaired his health, and he began the study of medicine in Cincinnati in 1853.  In 1856 he was graduated, and at once began the practice his profession at Blossburg.  After three years he located at Canton where he enjoyed a large practice.  He was universally held in high esteem for his many many virtues and his pure christian life.  (Tuesday, March 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Huce
In Delmar, Pa., February 23, 1887, Sarah, wife of Jacob Huce, aged 76 years, 7 months and 21 days.  (Tuesday, March 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane Riley
In Sullivan, Pa., January 27, 1887, Mrs. Jane Riley, late of Austinville, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, March 1, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Benjamin F. Taylor
Benjamin F. Taylor, poet- and author, died at Cleveland a few days ago after a brief illness from peritonitis.  He was born in Lowville, NY, in 1822.  (Tuesday, March 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Harry Davis
Harry Davis, aged 22, of Shaffersville, Huntingdon county, had never tasted liquor until a recent Monday.  His mother was buried on Sunday.  To drown his grief he began drinking heavily.  On Tuesday he died in a drunken stupor.  (Tuesday, March 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Addison Watrous
Mr. Addison Watrous, one of the most prominent merchants of Waverly, NY, committed suicide a few days ago by deliberately shooting himself through the heart after he had gone up stairs over his store.  He was a man of good character, happy in his domestic relations, prosperous in his business, and he had no serious trouble, and left no line or letter of farewell.  He was 74 years of age.  He had been troubled for a few days with neuralgia.  (Tuesday, March 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Amanda V. Gray
At Gray’s Valley, Pa., February 8, 1887, Mrs. Amanda V. Gray, aged 63 years.  Mrs. Gray had been a constant sufferer for many months, and this experience had the effect to round out a noble Christian life.  She was one of the standard bearers in the East Sullivan Baptist Church for more than 40 years, always ready to help in all Christian work.  She was widely known as a kind-hearted neighbor and a true friend.  She was a wise mother, and was loved most by those who knew her best.  She left a husband and four children to mourn her loss.  (Tuesday, March 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Juliet Harris
In Westfield, Pa., February 22, 1887, Juliet, wife of S. W. Harris, aged 33 years, 5 months and 2 days.  (Tuesday, March 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Newell
In Covington, Pa., February 13, 1887, Mrs. Mary Newell, in her 85th year.  (Tuesday, March 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James Sampson
A correspondent of the Advertiser says that last Tuesday James Hughes and James Sampson, of Covington township, visited Blossburg and imbibed too freely of intoxicants.  About 10 o’clock in the evening they started off together in a cutter for home, about 10 miles distant from Blossburg.  When about two miles from Blossburg the two were thrown from the cutter, and Sampson struck on his head and fractured his skull.  Hughes was too drunk to tell much about how the accident happened.  Sampson was first taken to the dwelling of George Clemons, near where the accident occurred, and then to the residence of Dr. John Kiley, of Covington, where was held a consultation by Drs. Kiley and Hazlett, of Covington, and Crandall, of Blossburg.  All efforts to restore the injured man to consciousness proved of no avail, and about 7 o’clock the next morning he died.  On Thursday Justice of the Peace L. B. Smith, of Covington, held an inquest over the remains, and the verdict of the jury was that Sampson came to his death from injuries received by falling from a cutter while intoxicated, in the manner stated above.  (Tuesday, March 8, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles J. Peterson
Charles J. Peterson, of Peterson’s Ladies National Magazine died in Philadelphia a few days ago.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Herr Kirchenpatier
Herr Kirchenpatier, Burgomaster at Hamburg, and well known as a naturalist and geographer, is dead.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jared Phelps
Our old pioneer settlers have been passing away very rapidly within the past month, of Liberty.  On the 22d of February Mr. Jared Phelps died; aged 76 years, 4 months and 21 days.  Mr. Phelps was born in Smithfield, Bradford county, and came to Liberty township over 50 years ago.  He was a consistent and devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for over 30 years, and had been a leading Republican in our township ever since the organization of the party.  Our community will feel the loss of such a useful man.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jacob Schartel
On February 28th, Mr. Jacob Schartel, after a short illness, died at the age of 57 years, 8 months and 2 days.  Mr. Schartel was born in Schuylkill county in 1830, and came to Liberty with his family in the year 1866.  He was a good citizen, a kind husband and father, and his loss will be felt in our community.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Hughes
Also on February 28th, Mrs. Sarah Hughes, widow of the late Joseph Hughes, of Liberty, died at her daughter’s residence in Blossburg, aged over 80 years.  Mrs. Hughes and her husband were natives of England and came to Liberty over 40 years ago.  Mrs. Hughes had been one of the most industrious, honest and hardworking women to be found in our township.  She leaves several married sons and daughters to mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent mother.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Anna Landon
On the 8th of this month, Mrs. Anna Landon, widow of the late William Landon, of Liberty, died after a brief illness.  She was 64 years, 8 months and 10 days old.  Mrs. Landon was a sister of William and Thomas Farrer, and was a native of England.  She became the wife of William Landon over 40 years ago.  She leaves behind a number of sons and daughters.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frank Brown
Frank Brown, a young man of Thurston, Steuben county, was accidentally shot and killed near Cameron a few days ago by the accidental discharge of a comrade’s gun while both men were hunting.  The right side of Brown’s face was almost blown off.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Hazlett
Mrs. John Hazlett, formerly of this borough, died near Lawrenceville a few days ago.  The funeral was held at the Baptist church in Middlebury, and the remains were interred in Chatham.  She was a most estimable woman.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Harris
Westfield, March 11, 1887.--On the 25th of February Mrs. S. W. Harris died very suddenly.  The day before her death she attended to her household duties and was apparently in good health, with the prospect of a long and useful life before her.  Her maiden name was Julia Markham.  She was born on the 23d day of September, 1853, and was consequently in her 34th year.  She was married to Mr. Harris in 1870, and she leaves with her sorrowing husband three little girls.  She was a dutiful daughter, a devoted wife and a fond mother, and her memory will remain bright in the hearts of those to whom her short life brought so much of comfort and love.  The funerals of both the deceased were held at their late residence on the Jemison, and they were largely attended by sorrowing friends and neighbors.  Rev. J. E. Hays, of Knoxville, conducted the services, and the mortal remains of the departed were laid at rest in the Champlin cemetery. (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Wilbur Harris
Mr. Wilbur Harris, who was nearly blind and who had been in poor health for several years, gradually failed after the death of his daughter-in-law, until last Wednesday, the 9th instant, when he fell asleep in death.  During his sickness it seemed to be a source of comfort to him to know that the end was near.  Mr. Harris was born in the town of Greenfield, Saratoga county, NY, on the 6th of December, 1806.  In 1831 he was married to Miss Lydia Ann Doty, of Leroy, NY, who survives him with three of their children.  Mr. Harris was one of the pioneers of this section of the county.  He came to this place in 1842 and in 1843 he settled on the farm where he died, remaining a farmer all his life.  He was a member of the Christian Church, of which in his younger days he was a local preacher of some note.  He won the respect of all who knew him, and was a conscientious, upright man who always tried to do his duty as it was made known to him.  His aged companion and his children have the deepest sympathy in their sorrow.  The funerals of both the deceased were held at their late residence on the Jemison, and they were largely attended by sorrowing friends and neighbors.  Rev. J. E. Hays, of Knoxville, conducted the services, and the mortal remains of the departed were laid at rest in the Champlin cemetery.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Arthur J. Weller
In Charleston, Pa., February 27, 1887, of heart disease, Arthur J., son of Frank and Alice Weller, aged 1 year and 8 months.  (Tuesday, March 15, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane Washington Thornton Beck
Mrs. Jane Washington Thornton Beck, wife of Senator Beck, of Kentucky, died at her residence in Washington a few days ago.  She was a graduate of George Washington.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Randall
Mr. Charles Randall, a prominent citizen of Union township, died a few days ago.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jonathan Beecraft
In Deerfield, Pa., March 10, 1887, Jonathan Beecraft, aged 90 years.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Phebe Dennis
In Harrison, Pa., February 8, 1887, of cancer of the stomach, Mrs. Phebe Dennis, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Edna Dunsmore
At Blossburg, Pa., March 15, 1887, Edna, daughter of Mr. W. J. Dunsmore, aged 2 years.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jefferson Heath
At Wellsboro, Pa., March 3, 1887, of consumption, Mrs. Jefferson Heath.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ann Landon
In Liberty, Pa., March 8, 1887, Ann, relict of William Landon, aged 64 years, 8 months and 8 days.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane Leonard
At Blossburg, Pa., March 13, 1887, Jane, wife of Thomas Leonard, aged 51 years.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Maria Miller
Near Millerton, March 5, 1887, Maria, widow of Charles Miller, deceased, aged 58 years.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Nancy Reynolds
At Daggett’s Mills, March 8, 1887, of pneumonia, Nancy, wife of Samuel Reynolds, aged 58 years.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sally Ruggles
In Sullivan, Pa., March 11, 1887, of paralysis, Sally, widow of the late Orrin Ruggles, aged 82 years.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Tillinghast
At Millerton, Pa., March 7, 1887, the infant daughter of Mr. William Tillinghast.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Francis Louis Eugene Viel
At Blossburg, Pa., March 10, 1887, Francis Louis Eugene Viel, aged 70 years and 20 days.  (Tuesday, March 22, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Prudence Hawks
In Harrison township, Pa., March 19, 1887, Prudence, wife of Alonzo Hawks, in the 61st year of her age.  (Tuesday, March 29, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. S. M. Kyes
At Tioga, Pa., on Thursday, March 17, 1887, Mrs. S. M. Kyes, in her 68th year of her age.  Mrs. Kyes died after a lingering illness which she bore with Christian fortitude, fully trusting in the merits of Christ Jesus.  She was born in Barrington, Yates county, NY, April 30, 1819, and was the loving daughter of Norman and Elizabeth Wells.  She was married to William B. Kyes, August 14, 1841, and with him she spent 46 years faithfully discharging her duty as a devoted wife and mother.  She leaves a husband and five children to mourn her loss--Mrs. G. W. Hazelett, of Tioga; Mrs. William Hazelett, of Chicago; Mrs. S. C. Kyes, of Chico, Cal.; Mrs. Anna Lownsberry, of Tioga, and Mrs. B. S. Baldwin, of Washington, D.C.  She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Daggett’s Mills many years before moving to Tioga.  Soon after this she, with her sister, Mrs. Lewis Daggett, and four daughters, united with the Presbyterian Church, of which she remained a faithful member until she was translated to the Church triumphant.  Her last words were very comforting to those who were permitted to stand by her coach of pain.  She wanted her companion to sing for her, generally of his own selection, and this would seem to soothe her into perfect tranquility, although passing through very severe pain of body.  Her dying words to her husband and children were, Live so that when your earthly work is finished, we may be united again in the world beyond.  (Tuesday, March 29, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Newton
At Sabinsville, Pa., March 17, 1887, an infant son of Mr. E. T. Newton, aged 5 months, 2 weeks and 3 days.  (Tuesday, March 29, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Dale
Last Thursday Mrs. Elizabeth Dale died of pneumonia, at the home of her son-in-law, William B. Stowell, in Delmar, at the age of 79 years.  The funeral was held last Saturday, and it was largely attended.  (Tuesday, March 29, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Delos Forest
Last week Sunday, Delos Forest, a lad of 15 years, died suddenly at the Soldiers’ Orphan School at Mansfield, of neuralgia of the heart.  The lad’s home was in Smithfield, Bradford county.  This is the first death that has occurred in the school since November, 1881.  (Tuesday, March 29, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James McConnell
Mr. James McConnell, an old and esteemed resident of Sullivan township, died suddenly last week Monday night.  (Tuesday, March 29, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary Elizabeth Truman
Mary Elizabeth Truman, daughter of Mr. Lucius Truman, of this borough, died at Trout Run, Lycoming county, on the 19th instant, at the age of 38 years.  She was well-known and highly esteemed by many friends in this borough, where she formerly resided.  She had been afflicted with consumption for eight or ten years, and she bore her suffering with fortitude and died in the triumph of faith.  For several years past she resided with her sister, Mrs. James Van Valkenburg, at Trout Run.  The funeral was held at Owego, NY, her early home, last Tuesday, and the remains were deposited in the receiving vault of Evergreen cemetery.  Messrs. Albert A. Truman, of this borough, and Irving L. Truman, of Trout Run, accompanied their sister’s remains to Owego.  (Tuesday, March 29, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Saxe
John Saxe, the humorous poet, died at Albany last Thursday.  (Tuesday, April 5, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Manning
The death of Mrs. Mary Manning, of Wakefield, Mass., at the age of 105 is recorded.  (Tuesday, April 5, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Paul Tulane
Paul Tulane, the philanthropist and founder of Tulane University, New Orleans, is dead.  (Tuesday, April 5, 1887, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Tri-Counties Page 16128

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 25 JUNE 2008
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice

Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.