Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
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Tri County Clippings- Page Three Hundred Eighty

These obituaries are extracted from various newspaper that are available to us. They are arranged by newspaper and date. If you do not have the time to enjoy the luxury of sifting through our clippings they will be included in the Search Engine which you can reach from the "Front Door" of the Tri-County Genealogy & History sites by Joyce M. Tice. All Newspaper clipping in this section of the site are in the Clippings partition of the Partioned search engine that you can find at the bottom of the Current What's New page.

1888-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries
Mrs. Hannah Sharkey
Mrs. Hannah Sharkey died a few days ago, at Youngstown, Ohio, aged 111 years.  She was a native of Ireland.  (Tuesday, November 20, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Ribble
George Ribble, of Wilawana, Bradford county, was killed a few days ago.  He was in company with his uncle, who was carrying a gun.  The latter stumbled and the gun was discharged, the charge passing through the boy’s back and killing him instantly.  The lad was 14 years old.  (Tuesday, November 20, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James B. Hayes
A sad suicide occurred at the Dickinson House, Corning, on the morning of the 8th instant.  James B. Hayes, a commercial traveler for a Rochester wholesale grocery firm, went to bed after wrapping a towel saturated with chloroform about his face.  When found in the afternoon he had been dead some time.  Although worth about $30,000, and receiving a handsome salary, he was detected the day previous to his death stealing money from the till of Wood’s grocery at Bath, and gave Mr. Wood a check for $1,000 to settle the matter.  Hayes was a fine-looking man about 50 years of age, and an active Church and Sunday-school worker.  He leaves a wife and one daughter.  (Tuesday, November 20, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Holister Baker
In Westfield, Pa., November 10, 1888, Mrs. Holister Baker, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, November 20, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Rachel Partridge
In Charleston, Pa., November 7, 1888, Mrs. Rachel Partridge, relict of the late Chester Partridge, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, November 20, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. D. McCarty
Mrs. D. McCarty, of Blossburg, died last week Sunday after a long illness, at the age of 74 years.  She had resided in that borough for upwards of 25 years.  The remains were taken to Addison, NY, for interment.  (Tuesday, November 27, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David Dunbar
Mr. David Dunbar, of Corning, died of heart disease a few days ago.  He was formerly a resident of Elkland.  (Tuesday, November 27, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hannah Ames
Last Tuesday night Mrs. Hannah Ames, of Millerton, died at the age of 82 years.  She retired in her usual health, and about 10 o’clock asked for assistance in turning over in bed.  She expired almost at that instant.  She had resided in Jackson township since 1838.  (Tuesday, November 27, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Kennedy
Mr. John Kennedy was the conductor on coal train No. 75 on the Fall Brook railway.  Last Saturday night, as his train was coming south, he was engaged in sup-intending some switching at the Lawrenceville station, when he fell into a shallow pit between the rails and before he could get up the cars were upon him, and his left leg was horribly crushed near the thigh.  The unfortunate man was taken into the depot, and a physician was summoned, who amputated the limb, but the poor fellow died about half an hour later.  Mr. Kennedy was about 25 years of age, and he was unmarried.  (Tuesday, November 27, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Judge
The Advertiser says that Mr. William Judge, of Mansfield, dropped dead last week Monday afternoon while he was engaged in gathering vegetables in his garden.  On Saturday night he had a similar attack and remained unconscious for a long time, but finally recovered, complaining of pain in his right side.  He was up and about all day Sunday, although still suffering.  Monday morning he arose as usual, and in the afternoon he went into the garden and began pulling turnips.  He had been thus employed about 15 minutes when his wife noticed him lying at full length in the garden with his face downward.  Aid was at once summoned and he was carried into the house, but death appeared to have been instantaneous.  He was examined by his physician on the morning of his death, but no signs on heart trouble could be detected.  The supposition is that he fell in a fit not necessary fatal, but by striking on his face in the soft ground died from suffocation.  Not more than three minutes elapsed between his fall and his discovery by Mrs. Judge.  He was in his 59th year, and he was a most excellent citizen.  His wife and seven children survive him.  One of his daughters, Miss Rose H. Judge, is a teacher in the public schools in this borough.  (Tuesday, November 27, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Mead
At Wellsboro, Pa., November 18, 1888, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. Mead, aged 9 days.  (Tuesday, November 27, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Thomas Keefe
Mrs. Thomas Keefe, of Blossburg, died last Tuesday at the age of 79 years.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Susan Randall
Mrs. Susan Randall, of Blossburg, died a few days ago after a lingering illness, at the age of 55 years.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Harrison Howe
The Canton Sentinel states that Mr. Harrison Howe, of Union, while out hunting near Marsh Hill, accidentally shot himself.  Thirteen buckshot entered the groin and passed up through his body.  After receiving the fatal would he fired off his gun until all his ammunition was exhausted, in the hope of attracting attention, then walked a mile before he was found.  He died on Tuesday night.  He leaves a young wife to mourn his sad death.  This young man’s father came to his death by accidentally shooting himself many years ago.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

F. H. Vandegrift
At Columbus, Georgia, on the 22d ultimo, Prof. F. H. Vandegrift, an aeronaut, met a tragic death by drowning in the Chattahoochee river.  He was to make a parachute jump from his monster hot-air balloon, but after ascending from the Exposition park the balloon burst.  Vandegrift succeeded in cutting loose the parachute, and he would have made a successful decent but for the fact he fell into the river and became entangled in the netting and was drowned.  The young man was a cousin of Mr. James Vandegrift, of Stony Fork.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Weaver
Last Wednesday afternoon about 1 o’clock Mr. William Weaver, a brakeman on the Arnot branch of the Tioga railroad, was assisting in making up the train at the Blossburg yard, when he met his death by being crushed between the engine and coal-car.  He was attempting to couple a locomotive to a coal-dump with a crooked link, the bumpers of the engine being much higher than those of the car.  The link broke, and before Weaver could escape he was caught between the water-tank of the locomotive and the frame-work of the car.  He was almost instantly killed.  Mr. Weaver was about 24 years of age, and he was unmarried.  He was a young man known for his industry and correct habits.  He lived with his widowed mother in Blossburg, and was her chief support.  The funeral was held at St. Andrew’s church on Friday morning.  This makes the third fatal accident that has occurred on the railroad near Blossburg within six months, and Mr. Weaver was the third member of his family to meet an accidental death.  It is said that his father was killed by the cars about 15 years ago, and his brother met his death under the car-wheels near the coal-schutes at Arnot about seven years ago.  The Coroner’s jury, after considering the case, made up a verdict censuring the Railroad Company for neglect, as follows:  We have come to the conclusion that William Weaver met his death accidentally by the breaking of a coupling-link while coupling the engine to the cars.  And we further think said accident could have been avoided if there had been bumpers on the tender of engine 640.  We further think that the Railroad Company is to blame for compelling its employees to couple cars of different sizes when bumpers are not of the same height, and which give no protection to brakemen in making couplings.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Benjamin W. Bower
In Woodhull, NY, November 26, 1888, Benjamin W. Bower, after an illness of one year, aged 66 years, 7 months and 3 days.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth McCarthy
At Blossburg, Pa., November ?, 1888, Mrs. Elizabeth McCarthy, aged 74 years.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia M. Shaw
At Wellsboro, Pa., November 15, 1888, of consumption, Mrs. Julia M. Shaw, aged 40 years, 6 months and 14 days.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah A. Buckley
Sarah A., wife of Charles A. Buckley, died on the 20th (or 29) of October, of spinal meningitis, at their home in Delmar, at the age of 38 years.  She was sick for five months and bore her sufferings patiently.  When convinced she would not recover, she disposed of her effects and gave full directions for her funeral services.  A bright little girl, 11 years old, and a loving husband, remain to mourn their great loss.  Mrs. Buckley was a devoted mother and a kind neighbor, and she was loved and respected by all who knew her.  She leaves an aged father, and mother and an only sister, Mrs. Thomas Horton; but it is well with her, for she has gone to meet her brother in heaven.  (Tuesday, December 4, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frank A. Wheeler
Mr. Frank A. Wheeler, an esteemed citizen of Tioga, died very suddenly last Thursday afternoon of neuralgia of the brain.  He leaves a wife and three young children.  He had been employed by Mr. E. A. Smead for many years.  (Tuesday, December 11, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Middaugh
Mr. George Middaugh, of Lawrence, died on the 1st instant at the age of 80 years.  He had resided in that township all his life and for more than 50 years had occupied the homestead where he died.  He was an upright citizen and an honest man.  (Tuesday, December 11, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Amos Ives
At Wellsboro, Pa., December 4, 1888, Mr. Amos Ives, aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, December 11, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Margaret Keefe
At Blossburg, Pa., November 28, 1888, Mrs. Margaret Keefe, aged 79 years.  (Tuesday, December 11, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. S. Randall
At Blossburg, Pa., November 28, 1888, Mrs. S. Randall, aged 55 years.  (Tuesday, December 11, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Ruth Gitchell
Miss Ruth Gitchell, of Mainesburg, died of pneumonia on the 6th instant.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry T. Wilcox
Dr. Henry T. Wilcox, formerly of Mansfield, died at Youngstown, Ohio, on the 26th ultimo, of a throat disease.  He was among the first to enter the Soldiers’ Orphan School, and he was graduated from the Normal School in 1876.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Amos Mansfield
Rev. Amos Mansfield, of Rutland, died on the 7th instant, and the funeral was held at the Roseville Methodist church last week Sunday.  It is said that he was the oldest Methodist minister in northern Pennsylvania.  An article in the Mansfield Advertiser says Mr. Mansfield was born at Dumerton, Windom county, Vt., March 2, 1800.  He was converted at the age of 12, and at 16 he entered upon the work of a circuit alder in his native State.  In 1823 he moved to Syracuse, and two years later to Chenango county, NY, where, in 1825, he became the husband of Miss Eliza Thompson, of DeWitt, Onondaga county.  Here he remained and preached the gospel for 10 years and then moved to this county.  Arriving here he settled upon a farm on Rutland hill, near the present village of Roseville.  Soon after coming to this county his mother, father and one sister died of small-pox, and their remains were buried on what is now known as the Harris Soper homestead.  His first sermon here was preached in a barn on Burton hill, some two years prior to the erection of the first meeting-house in the township.  He preached also at Canton, Monroeton and Towanda.  The Methodist Church at Towanda was founded by him during a season of great religious excitement.  His next charge included Lower and Upper Ulster, Springfield, Smithfield, Troy, and Armenia.  On this charge he received an annual salary of $400.  His average salary for many years was only $150.  Most of this time he lived upon and worked his farm on Rutland hill, thereby, with the aid of his slender salary, providing support for himself and family.  He also at one time preached on the circuit known as Mansfield and Covington.  Some time after the death of his first wife, who is remembered as a very estimable woman, he was united in marriage to Miss Hettie DeWitt, daughter of Rev. John DeWitt, then a prominent Methodist exhorter of Roseville.  Father Mansfield enjoyed the reputation for many years of being one of the most successful exhorters in the country.  He was not an educated man, but possessed to a high degree the qualifications of a successful orator.  Few itinerant preachers had a wider acquaintance than did this sturdy son of the long ago.  His preaching for several years had been confined to now and then a funeral sermon or occasional discourse from the platform of neighboring school-houses.  He gave the land upon which the Mansfield church, on Rutland hill, now stands and himself took an active part in its construction.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.) [Wood Cemetery]

Mr. John Fisher
Last Wednesday forenoon Mr. John Fisher, an old and respected citizen of Arnot, was crushed under a fall of coal in the lower drift and instantly killed.  He had been making an undercut, and in order to do this it was necessary to work while lying upon his side.  It is thought that the overhanging coal was not sufficiently propped.  Several hundred pounds of coal fell upon him, crushing his skull and breaking his neck.  Mr. Fisher was about 50 years of age, and he had been a miner at Arnot for 23 years.  It is stated that he helped in building the railroad from Blossburg to Arnot.  His wife and one daughter survive him.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Clara M. Argetsinger
At Elmira, NY, Mrs. Clara M. Argetsinger, formerly of Rutland, Pa., aged 52 years.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hannah Doane
At Knoxville, Pa., December 9, 1888, after an illness of about three years, Hannah, wife of John Doane, aged 63 years.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Ann Drew
At Keeneyville, Pa., December 8, 1888, Mrs. Julia Ann Drew, relict of the late John Drew, aged 76 years, 10 months and 8 days.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. W. L. Tuttle
At Canoe Camp, Pa., September 18, 1888, Mrs. W. L. Tuttle.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Morris
The township of Liberty and the county of Tioga have suffered the loss of one of their most honored and useful citizens by the recent death of Rev. Joseph Morris.  Mr. Morris was born in the year 1816, west of this city, in the community known as Long Reach.  From here he emigrated in 1823 to Liberty, Tioga county.  He received the usual public school education of that early day and subsequently became a teacher.  He found his home in a wild, uncultivated region, and with the people of his time suffered those inconveniences and privations so incident to a new and sparsely settled country.  At that period Williamsport, then a mere hamlet, was the nearest trade center and the people brought their meager products here to exchange for the usual necessities.  This was before the days of railroads and indeed of the old-fashioned stages, and travel to this point could only be accomplished on horseback or by foot and staff.  Mr. Morris became a Christian when quite young and united with the Church known as “Christian,” then the influential communion of that section of Tioga county.  Having been approved by his gifts worthy of the office, he was ordained about the year 1855 to the ministry, under the direction of Rev. Mr. Kelly.  He at once entered upon his sacred functions and continued to serve with great fidelity until his lamented death.  Not unlike many ministers of that day, he derived his support mainly from his farm, and many of his most effective sermons were prepared while following the plow.  After a day of labor it was not unusual for him to walk many miles to meet his appointments as minister.  He had been known to walk from 10-20 miles after a week of toil in order to preach to his scattered flock.  And it may be said with perfect truthfulness that the sermons of this good man, prepared under the most unfavorable circumstances, were marvels of spiritual power, and many saved men and women will rise up in the last day to call this man blessed.  His sermons may not have been models of literary beauty, but they were such as could only be produced by a man endowed by the Spirit of God and a fame with a desire to do good.  Mr. Morris was possessed with such a warm, sympathetic spirit and was so well known and revered that he was summoned to sick-beds and funerals all over the country.  It would be difficult to estimate the time and strength this man of God expended during his long, useful life, as he went in obedience to every call, at all hours, in all seasons, and often when wearied with his bodily toil.  His position in the cause of temperance was most pronounced and emphatic, and that, too, when it cost much to be known as an anti-liquor man.  His voice was raised in most earnest remonstrance as he depicted the sorrow and crime resulting from the traffic in ardent spirits.  He was a diligent student of the Bible and was characterized by his facility in the quotation of passages from every part of the Book.  His mind was in truth a storehouse of Biblical knowledge.  Some of those might passages uttered by his ringing voice will confront some of his hearers in the great hereafter.  In the death of Mr. Morris the community loses one or the best and truest of men, and his family a loving, generous Christian husband and father.  His resignation under the most trying ordeals was a marked characteristic of his spirit.  No matter how severe the affliction of how great the adversity of which he shared so largely, no word of reproach passed his lips.  He has gone to the good man’s reward and his works do follow him.  (Tuesday, December 18, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Havens
James Havens, a Lehigh Valley switchman at Sayre, Pa., met with a horrible death a few days ago.  He was in the act of picking up a coupling-pin which he had dropped, when the cars came together and crushed his head between the bumpers.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Andrew J. Rockwell
A terrible death occurred at a tannery in Elmira, NY, a few days ago.  Andrew J. Rockwell, a carpenter, while making repairs had his clothing caught by a shaft making 100 revolutions a minute.  He was whirled around for some time, and then hurled against the side of the building.  His lifeless body contained hardly one unbroken bone.  He was about 48 years of age.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Michael Kane
Last week Monday morning Mr. Michael Kane, of Hornellsville, a brakeman on the Erie railway, fell from his train at Corning, and the long line of freight cars ground his body into a shapeless mass.  The entire top of his head was crushed, the clothing was stripped from his body, both legs were severed in two or three places, while one arm hung by the shreds.  Three trains had passed over him before the accident was discovered.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Danner
David Danner, a prominent citizen of Allentown, died a few days ago.  A week before his death he dropped a large butcher-knife out of his hand.  The point struck his shoe, went through the leather and stuck in his foot at the base of his big toe.  A sharp pain instantly shot through Danner’s body and seemed to concentrate at the back of his neck.  The next day the back of his neck began to swell and turn purple.  The swelling continued until Danner died, after suffering intense agony.  He was 50 years old.  The physicians are puzzled over the strange case.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Booth
Mr. William Booth, an old resident of Arnot, died last Tuesday.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John McLowery
John McLowery, a young man who was employed at Weston’s saw-mill near Olean, NY, met a horrible and sudden death a few days ago.  He was running a belt on a revolving wheel, and was caught by the belt and carried over the wheel and shaft.  His body was whirled about at every revolution of the shaft until it was torn in two at the waist, each part being thrown many feet away.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles G. Dahlgren
General Charles G. Dahlgren died in Brooklyn last Tuesday.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

R. B. Ayres
Major-General R. B. Ayres, who recently died at Fort Hamilton, NY, at the age of 62, was graduated from West Point in 1847.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Settle
Judge Thomas Settle, a prominent Republican politician in North Carolina, died at Greensboro, NC, a few days ago, 50 years of age.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George W. Seward
George W. Seward, who died a few days ago at the old Seward home in Florida, Orange county, NY, was a brother of the late William H. Seward and the last survivor of the family.  He was 80 years old.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James N. Matthews
James N. Matthews, editor and proprietor of the Buffalo Express, died last Thursday after an illness of four months with Bright’s disease.  He was born in England, November 21, 1828, and came to this country when 18 years old and at once entered upon his career as a newspaper man at Buffalo.  He was an able man and a vigorous and independent writer.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Daniel Bacon
Dr. Daniel Bacon died at his residence on Main street in this borough last Wednesday morning a few minutes before 4 o’clock.  It is understood that he had been feeling unwell for some time before he was prostrated, but he continued the active work of his profession up to within a week of his death.  On Wednesday, the 12th instant, he made some professional calls; but during the day he was forced to give up his work, and his disease, which was diagnosed as cerebral meningitis, rapidly ran its fatal course to the morning of the 19th, when the flickering spark of life went out.  Doctor Bacon was in the prime of life, having been born on the 21st day of May, 1836, in Delmar township.  He was the son of Oliver and Catharine Bacon, and his aged mother still lives to mourn his untimely death.  He grew up on the family homestead in Delmar; but on reaching man’s estate he determined to become a physician and surgeon, and began reading medicine in the office of Dr. W. W. Webb, in this borough.  He afterward went to Buffalo to complete his course of study, and received his diploma from the University of Buffalo on the 22d of February, 1860.  Before he had fairly entered upon the practice of his chosen profession the Rebellion broke out, and in the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Company L of the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry.  He was soon promoted to the post of Hospital Steward and served in that capacity until June 1st, 1862, when he was promoted to Second Lieutenant.  At the expiration of his three years term of service--his discharge was dated October 11, 1864--he began the practice of medicine at Tioga.  Afterward he practiced for a time at Blossburg and Osceola and then came to this borough where he remained for the rest of his days engaged in the exacting duties of his profession.  On the organization of the Twelfth Regiment of the National Guard he was appointed Assistant Surgeon with the rank of First Lieutenant, his commission dating from October 13(or 18), 1874.  For meritorious service he was promoted to Surgeon with the rank of Major on April 18, 1877.  He served continuously on the medical staff, excepting in 1882, up to June 17, 1887, when he finally resigned.  He was an active and well-known member of the Grand Army of the Republic and was efficient in promoting the interests of the organization.  Doctor Bacon stood among the leading physicians in this region, and his reputation as a skillful and successful surgeon extended beyond the boundaries of the county.  The death of such a man in the very prime and vigor of active professional life is nothing less than a public loss and one that will be keenly felt.  Personally, Doctor Bacon was a genial, generous, good-hearted man--a lover of fun and a believer in the healing virtue of cheerful spirits and a hearty laugh, and a special friend and jovial companion of little children.  He sometimes indulged in a brusque, abrupt manner of speech that led those who knew him superficially to think him lacking in sympathy; but no person who had ever seen him at the bedside of a suffering patient could long hold that opinion of him.  Those who knew him best liked him most and trusted him implicitly.  He was an able, cautious physician, a skillful surgeon, an honest man and a good citizen--one whose untimely loss will long be regretted.  His funeral was held at 1 o’clock Friday afternoon at his late residence, and it was largely attended, the George Cook Post being represented by 40 members.  The Protestant Episcopal service was read by Rev. Mr. Ware and Rev. Dr. Shaw, and four brothers of the deceased acted as pallbearers,--Simeon and Oliver Bacon, of Delmar, Pharez Bacon, of Williamsport, and Seth Bacon, of this borough.  In addition to these, two other brothers and three sisters are still living, and the deceased also leaves a widow to mourn the loss of a cherishing husband.  (Tuesday, December 25, 1888, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Tri-Counties Page 16135
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 25 JUNE 2008
By Joyce M. Tice
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Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.