Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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1889-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Male Smith
In Delmar, Pa., May 28, 1889, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Smith.  (Tuesday, June 11, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Father Damen
Rev. Father Damen, the well-known and venerable Roman Catholic priest of Chicago, ied at Creighton College last Friday.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James McAden
Rev. James McAden, the oldest Methodist minister in the South, died recently in Brunswick county, Virginia, in his 95th year.  He had been in the ministry for 75 years.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Bryce Williams
Bryce Williams, one of the few survivors of Waterloo, died recently at Perth.  He piped to the 79th Highlanders and also took part in the entry of the victorious British army into Paris.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Leonora Bolles
Miss Leonora Bolles, who died recently at New York, left $30,000 to the Homeopathic State Asylum at Middletown.  A library building to be called the Bolles Memorial will be erected with the money.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Jennings
Edward Jennings, a veteran of the English army and a participant in the siege of Lucknow, died recently in North Shields, Eng., aged 74.  He bore upon his breast the coveted emblem of the Victoria Cross, yet for several years he maintained himself by sweeping the streets.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Semple
William Semple, the millionaire dry-goods merchant of Allegheny City, and prominently identified with various railroad interests, died last Friday, after a long illness, the result of a general breaking down of his system.  The deceased was about 60 years old and was a self-made man.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank Reeves Heath
Lieutenant Frank Reeves Heath, United States Navy, died at Marc Island Naval Hospital last Wednesday after a six days’ illness.  He was one of the survivors of the wrecked man-of-war Vandalia and came to San Francisco on the steamer Rockton a few weeks ago.  He had been suffering for weeks with a disease contracted at Apia, and a week before his death was taken down with pneumonia.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Johnson
Charles Johnson, employed in the mines at Two Harbors, Minn., was killed Tuesday night.  A dump car at the top of the shaft broke from its fastenings and dashed toward the shaft.  Johnson, in an effort to save his friends at the bottom of the pit, threw himself against the car, but was thrown over the edge of the platform and fell 150 feet down the shaft.  Death was instantaneous.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Leonard H. Swett
Chicago loses a familiar figure in the death of Leonard H. Swett, the eminent lawyer and friend of Abraham Lincoln, who died of Bright’s disease, a few days ago.  He was born in Maine, served in the Mexican war, and began to practice law at Bloomington, IL, where he formed a lasting friendship with David Davis.  He removed to Chicago in 1865, and there kept at the front of the bar.  Mr. Swett nominated Mr. Lincoln for the Presidency, and preformed a like service for Judge Gresham in the last National Republican Convention.  But this speech was not a success, and seemed like an echo from the old days.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Francis Alexandre
The success in life of the late Francis Alexandre, of New York, is an example of what diligence and talent could do for a man early in the century.--and doubtless there are young men not so far from doing the same thing now.  Mr. Alexandre was a native of the Isle of Jersey, and of a wealthy family; but he went to sea at 13 years of age, giving all his spare time to reading and attending night schools when in port; at 21 he had became a competent Captain, and was doing so well that he renounced his inheritance in favor of his sisters.  He settled in New York when 28, and established a commission house on South street, where he paid but $25 annual rent; soon he started a line of sailing vessels to Honduras, and another to Vera Cruz; in 1876 he put on steamers to Havana and Vera Cruz, and for 17 years carried the mails between New York and Mexico.  Mr. Alexandre retired from business a year ago at the age of 80.  His wife, who was French, died a few years ago, and three sons survive to continue their father’s honorable name.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Timothy Sullivan
Mr. Timothy Sullivan, of Covington, died very suddenly last Friday morning.  He was a man of 45 years, and he had been long employed as a gatherer in the glass-factory at that place.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Thomas Roberts
Mr. Thomas Roberts, whose mother lives near Mansfield, was drowned at Proctor, Lycoming county, by the flood of June 1st by being swept off a bridge while he was assisting in saving some plank.  A large party of men searched for his body several days, but it was not found until last Tuesday.  It had been carried down the stream about three miles.  The remains were so badly decomposed that it was necessary to inter them in the nearest cemetery.  Roberts was an unmarried man about 35 years of age.  He left Mansfield about a year ago.  His mother, Mrs. George Crippen, lives on Elk run.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Bailey
Last Tuesday morning Mrs. L. L. Bailey died at her home on Walnut street in this borough after a painful sickness of about 10 days.  She was 37 years of age.  Mrs. Bailey, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Catherine Hill, was a daughter of the late Rev. Henry Hill, of Lindley, NY.  She was born at Geneseo, NY, January 6, 1852.  She was graduated at the State Normal School at Mansfield in both the classical and musical courses.  She was married at Lindley in 1872 and spent the first few years of her married life in Antrim, and then Mr. and Mrs. Bailey moved to this borough.  Mrs. Bailey was an excellent Christian woman, and by her life she exemplified the religion which she professed.  She was a devoted wife and mother, and by her many beautiful traits of character she endeared herself to a large circle of friends.  Mrs. Bailey left a family of six young children, the youngest being about one year old.  The funeral was held at Mr. Bailey’s residence on Thursday morning and was attended by a large number of sympathizing friends.  Rev. S. F. Mathews, assisted by Rev. Dr. Shaw, conducted the service.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Frank Cady
Mrs. Frank Cady, of Corning, a 16 year old wife, took a dose of opium last Friday morning because she had quarreled with her husband over a trivial matter.  She died a few hours later.  (Tuesday, June 18, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Landis
Farmer John Landis, of Frandonia(?) township, Montgomery county, hanged himself to an apple tree a few days ago because his son would not heed the parent’s objections to the erection of an addition to the barn.  (Tuesday, June 25, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Bates
Mr. William Bates, a jovial, prosperous and intelligent farmer at East Canton, Bradford county, committed suicide on the 15th instant by taking three ounces of laudanum.  He appeared to be happy in the possession of plenty of this world’s goods, and his family relations were most pleasant.  He was 70 years of age.  The rash act is said to have been caused by melancholy.  (Tuesday, June 25, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles S. Collins
Charles S. Collins, associate editor of the Troy, (NY) Times for a number of years, died suddenly last Wednesday.  He was taken ill while working at his desk.  (Tuesday, June 25, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

A. C. Myers
General A. C. Myers, late Quartermaster-General of the Confederate Army, died ay Washington last Thursday.  He was graduated at West Point in 1833 and served in the Seminole and Mexican wars.  He married the daughter of General David E. Twiggs, commander of one of the two divisions of the army in the Mexican war.  (Tuesday, June 25, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John L. Lawes
Mr. John L. Lawes, of Elmira, NY, who died last week Monday, was one of the heaviest men in the country.  He weighed 640 pounds.  Naturally, his death will leave a large gap in the community.  Lawes was 40 years of age.  It is only within the past three years that he acquired his mountain of flesh.  He used to be a blacksmith, and was a slight, delicate thing of 200 or 300 pounds.  Then he began to gain from five to ten pounds every week until he had progressed to a dime-museum magnitude.  His appetite increased with his avoirdupois.  Two or three pounds of beefsteak was but the merest “snack” for him.  Towards the end of his life he spent most of his time eating.  He got so fat that of late he could neither lie down nor walk, and he required constant attendance.  Under the circumstances it would seem as if death must have been a relief.  Still, the huge man was of the happiest disposition in the world.  He positively enjoyed showing his immense proportions to admiring beholders.  (Tuesday, June 25, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Sunderlin
Mr. Joseph Sunderlin, of Tioga, died last Wednesday morning at the age of 64 years.  The funeral was held on Friday.  (Tuesday, June 25, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. James H. Gulick
Mrs. James H. Gulick, formerly a resident of Blossburg, died at Washington, D. C., on the 4th instant, at an advanced age.  (Tuesday, June 25, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Wright Skinner
Mr. Wright Skinner died at his home in Sabinsville last week Sunday in the 71st year of his age.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alexander Harris
Mr. Alexander Harris, an old and respected citizen of Jackson township, died at the residence of his son, near Job’s Corners, last week Monday.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Francis Rand
Rev. Francis Rand, who will be remembered by many of our readers as pastor of the Nelson and Farmington Presbyterian Churches from 1855 to 1865, died at Boston, Mass., last Friday.  The remains are to be brought to Farmington, and the funeral will be held in the church there tomorrow at 10 o’clock a. m.  Mr. Rand was a son-in-law of the late John C. Robb and a brother-in-law of Mr. James L. Robb.  Mrs. Rand died several years ago, leaving four children.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. J. B. Denmark
Mr. J. B. Denmark, who was quite recently a resident of this borough, died very suddenly at Elmira, where he was residing, last week Monday.  It is stated that he was working at his trade--he was a carpenter--in a barn near his house, when he complained of feeling sick and went to bed at once.  In a few minutes afterwards he was dead.  Mr. Denmark came here from Blossburg a few years ago, and from here went to Big Flats, NY, and afterwards to Elmira, where he had been living for some months.  He was about 65 years of age and was a member of the George Cook Post of the G. A. R.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucy Ware Hayes
Mrs. Hayes, the wife of ex-President Hayes, was stricken with apoplexy on the 21st of June at her home in Fremont, Ohio, and died last Tuesday morning at 6:30 o’clock.  At 8 o’clock Monday night she became much worse and gradually sank until the hour of her death.  At the bedside were the members of the family, with a few relatives and the physicians.  Lucy Ware Webb was the daughter of Dr. James Webb and Maria Cook Webb.  Dr. Webb was an extremely popular man and a successful practicing physician in Chillocothe, Ohio.  He died of cholera at Lexington, Ky., in 1833, while engaged in preparations for sending to Liberia the slaves set free by his father and himself.  The grandfather of Mrs. Webb was Lieutenant-Colonel Cook, who in 1777 was serving in a regiment commanded by Col. Andrew Ward in the army of the Revolution.  Mrs. Hayes was, therefore, like her husband, descended from a Revolutionary family.  She was born August 28, 1831, and her marriage to Mr. Hayes took place December 30, 1852, in Cincinnati.  The fruit of the marriage was eight children, three of whom had died before Mrs. Hayes went to Washington as the wife of the President.  On the breaking out of the Rebellion her husband and both of her brothers immediately entered the army, and from that time until the close of the war her home was a refuge for wounded, sick and furloughed soldiers going to or returning from the front.  She spent two winters in camp with her husband in Virginia, and after the battle at South Mountain, where he was badly wounded, she hastened east and joined him at Middleton, Md., and later spent much time in the hospital near Frederick City.  After the close of the war she accompanied her husband to Washington while he was a member of Congress.  She was one of the originators of the Ohio Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphans Home, and was on its Board of Directors prior to its adoption by the State.  While her husband was Governor of Ohio she took an active interest in all the charitable institutions of the State.  She was, on entering the White House in 1877, a woman of rare matronly beauty and an almost ideal American mother.  While thoroughly domestic, she possessed the rare faculty of adapting herself to a high social station without losing sight of the duties she owed to her family, and managed to discharge both duties without making the domestic side conspicuous to the public.  She was perfectly artless and sincere.  The people who met her immediately admired her, and the White House contains a good portrait of her that is a testimony for all the time of the strength of the admiration that she evoked while she occupied the conspicuous and trying position of mistress of the White House.  Well educated an well read, she was an excellent talker on a great many subjects, and as an entertainer she was graceful and charming.  She was on medium height, with a well-developed figure, dark hair worn low over the temples and in heavy braids coiled at the back, brown eyes, regular features, good color and a peculiarly sweet mouth and chin.  When Mrs. Hayes entered the White House it was to discover that her husband was not a popular man.  His unpopularity increased instead of diminishing.  Mrs. Hayes was as fully aware of the hostility and prejudice that existed as any one could be, and she employed all the tact and skill at her command to overcome it.  To her efforts may be attributed whatever degree of success rewarded the attempt to reconcile the country to the Executive.  In some respects, however, Mrs. Hayes was not successful.  She was a religious woman, and it was to her an irreligious thing to tempt people with wine.  Her earnestness in her temperance views led her to banish wine from the White House table.  Soon after the Administration came in, it was expected that the President would give the usual dinner to the diplomatic corps.  To give that dinner without wine would, in the estimation of Secretary of State Evarts, whose advice was asked, be extremely awkward.  The President favored the proposition of his wife to give the dinner without wine.  The Secretary of State contended for the old custom.  Mrs. Hayes overcame the difficulty in her own way.  Instead of having a dinner for 30 or 40 members of the diplomatic body, she invited several hundred persons to meet the representatives of foreign counties.  To seat so many at table was out of the question, so a fine entertainment, much more expensive than a dinner for 40, was provided, but without any wine.  The White House was filled above and below, but the reception was not all miscellaneous.  The impropriety of serving wine to such an assemblage was regarded by Mrs. Hayes as a sufficient excuse for its absence.  This first wineless diplomatic dinner served as the pattern for all the diplomatic dinners during President’s Hayes’s term.  It is said that there was no saving of expense effected by the change of style.  Each of the receptions cost about $3,000, which was more than the most generous dinner with wines could possibly have cost the President.  Mrs. Hayes did not attempt to enforce her temperance views or practices upon those about her.  The old employees of the White House, who were there when Mrs. Hayes was its mistress, speak of her with a sincerity of admiration that speaks volumes of praise of her kindness and consideration.  They tell of the delightful Thanksgiving-day dinners that were a regular occasion all through the term of Mr. Hayes, when the President and Mrs. Hayes sat down with their children and with the private secretary, the assistant secretary and the Executive clerks to enjoy a repast that was as simple and homelike as it is possible to make any meal in so official a place as the White House.  Mrs. Hayes had changed but little since she left the White House.  She still preserved her healthful color.  Although somewhat stouter, she was a good citizen, her eyes were bright and clear, and she was altogether a picture of health.  She had not visited Washington since she left there in 1881.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Carlotta Patti
Carlotta Patti, the well-known singer and sister of Adeline Patti, died in Paris last Friday.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Maria Mitchell
Maria Mitchell, the noted astronomer, died in Lynn, Mass., last Friday, aged 70 years.  She was a Vassar professor for 22 years.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George A. Smith
Rev. George A. Smith, one of the oldest ministers of the Episcopal Church of Virginia, and at one time editor of the Southern Churchman, died in Alexandria last Friday, aged 86 years.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William H. Hunt
Chief Engineer William H. Hunt, of the Navy (retired), died in Washington last Tuesday, aged 57.  He entered the Navy in 1853 as Third Assistant Engineer and was promoted through the various grades to the rank of Chief Engineer, which last promotion he received in 1863.  (Tuesday, July 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gabriel Beck
Gabriel Beck, who was recovering from a protracted spree, drank sal soda and carbolic acid at Reading, Berks county, a few days ago, and the next day died.  (Tuesday, July 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horatio McKelvy
Horatio McKelvy, aged 15 years, died at Franklin, Pa., on the 1st instant from the effects of a peculiar accident.  He had been suffering with toothache, and a dentist put creosote into the cavity of the tooth to kill the pain.  During Saturday night the boy swallowed the creosote and was taken violently ill soon after and died.  The physician attending him says he died from blood-poisoning caused by the creosote.  (Tuesday, July 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Joel Palmer
Mrs. Joel Palmer died at her home last Wednesday evening.  The funeral was held on Friday at 11 o’clock, Rev. A. G. Cole, officiating.  One by one the ripe sheaves are being gathered by the Reaper, and before we realize it the early pioneers of our county will all have died.  Mrs. Palmer was a model wife and mother, and will be sadly missed by the entire community.  (Tuesday, July 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Boyle
The boiler in the factory of the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, at Wilkesbarre, exploded last week Monday.  The roof of the building was blown completely off and some of the walls were demolished.  The fireman, John Boyle, aged 27, was the only person in the boiler-room at the time.  He was blown through the roof, and his bleeding remains were found in an adjoining field.  (Tuesday, July 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Parker
Alexander Parker, aged 19, a Yale College student, was killed at South Amboy, NJ, last Thursday night.  He was riding on top of a freight train with a companion and was struck by a wagon bridge that crosses the tracks.  He was a son of Courtland Parker, the well-known New Jersey prohibitionist.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Stockton Howell
Mrs. Mary Stockton Howell, wife of Rear Admiral J. C. Howell, of the United States Navy, died last Thursday, at Geneva, Switzerland.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Maurice B. Flynn
Maurice B. Flynn, at one time a prominent New York city politician, died at Long Branch last Tuesday night from cancer of the stomach.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William M. Lyon
William M. Lyon, the oldest iron manufacturer in the country and one of Pittsburgh’s most prominent business men, died recently at apoplexy, aged 78.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. C. F. Temple
Mrs. C. F. Temple, wife of Admiral Temple, U. S. N., died at Washington a few days ago.  She was a daughter of Gen. Totten, U. S. A.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Abram Wakeman
Abram Wakeman, Postmaster of New York in Lincoln’s first Administration and one of the founders of the Republican party, died a few days ago at the age of 65.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel L. M. Barlow
Samuel L. M. Barlow, the well-known New York lawyer, died at Glen Cove last Tuesday, of apoplexy.  Mr. Barlow is said to have been the greatest railroad lawyer in the country.  He was born in Granville, Mass., in 1829.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edmund Rice
Edmund Rice, Representative in Congress from the Fourth Minnesota district, who died last Thursday, had a long, a busy and a prosperous life.  Born in Vermont, 70 years ago, he went to Michigan when 19 years old, studied law, and became Master in Chancery and Clerk of the Supreme Court.  He served in the Mexican war, and in 1849 settled in St. Paul, where he practiced law and engaged in various railway enterprises.  He was elected to the 50th Congress and re-elected to the 51st as a Democrat.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Gardiner Tyler
Mrs. Julia Gardiner Tyler, who was the second wife of President Tyler, died at a hotel in Richmond, Vt., last Wednesday from a congestive chill.  She was born on Gardiner’s Island, near New York, in 1820 and was married to President Tyler in New York city, June 26, 1844.  For the succeeding eight months of his term she presided over the White House with tact, grace and dignity.  After the 4th of March she resided in Virginia until after the Rebellion, her husband having died about the beginning of the strife, and then went to reside at her mother’s residence on Carlton Hill, Staten Island.  After several years’ residence there she moved to Richmond, Va.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Morse
Mr. George Morse, was instantly killed a few days ago by a falling tree in the lumber camp near Hazeltine’s mills on the West branch.  He was 24 years of age.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles M. Beck
Charles M. Beck, a boy living with his mother at Elmira, NY, died last Thursday of lockjaw resulting from an injury to his thumb by fire-works on the 4th.  He was 14 years of age.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lyman R. Williams
Lyman R. Williams, once Superintendent of Schools in Steuben county, NY, recently committed suicide at Angola, Indiana, by hanging.  He was a graduate of Ann Arbor.  Grief over the death of a member of his family and poor health are supposed to be the causes of his self-destruction.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Child Bossinger
A child of Henry Bossinger, of Granville Run, Mifflintown, while running about with bare feet a few days ago, was bitten by a copperhead snake.  A chicken was cut open and applied to the wound, and it drew out so much of the poison that a cat which ate it while another was being applied fell dead.  The child cannot live.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Bower
The Williamsport Republican says that a most distressing accident happened in Nippenose valley last week Monday, resulting in the instant death of a 3 year old girl, daughter of Samuel Bower, living in Limestone township.  It seems that a scythe had been laid down in the yard near the house while the workmen were at dinner.  A 9 year old boy picked up the scythe and commenced swinging it about in imitation of the men-folks, when his little sister approached him from the rear.  The blade struck her in the neck with full force, almost severing the neck, cutting the jugular vein.  There was a cry of distress, the parents were on the scene as quickly as possible, but the little girl was dead in less than a minute’s time.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. S. H. Kuhn
Mrs. S. H. Kuhn, formerly a resident of Lawrenceville, died at Harrison Valley last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John P. Johnson
Last Tuesday evening Mr. John P. Johnson, a young Swede, of Landrus, went in bathing at the mill-dam in company with three other men.  Johnson couldn’t swim, and he was either attacked with cramp or got beyond his depth and strangled.  He called for help, and his companions ran for assistance instead of trying to lend aid themselves.  When they got back Johnson was dead.  He was 23 years of age and was an excellent young man.  His brother, who resides at Landrus, was his only relative in this country.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Robinson
Last Friday morning Mr. Thomas Bolton, boss of section No. 7, just north of Stokesdale Junction, found the dead body of Mr. Henry Robinson lying beside the track about 1 ½ miles north of the railway station.  It is supposed that Robinson was struck and killed by train 90 going north about midnight on Thursday.  He had been to this borough and had started to walk the track to his home at Niles Valley.  He was about 22 years of age.  The following is the report of the Coroner’s inquest which was held on Friday:  Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, as:  An inquisition held at the home of Thomas Bolton, in the township of Middlebury, county of Tioga, State of Pennsylvania, on the 12th day of July, A. D., 1889, before me, George D. Keeney, Justice of the Peace, “acting Coroner,” upon the oaths of Dr. A. Niles, Fred. Potter, Thomas Bolton, James Rasey, S. B. Hackett, Jr., and John Hackett, good and lawful citizens of the county aforesaid, being duly sworn to inquire how, where and when Henry Robinson came to his death, do say upon their oaths, after examining the body and surrounding conditions, that he purchased a ticket at Niles Valley for Wellsboro the evening before he was found by the section men while going to their work in the morning, near the residence of John Hackett, between Niles Valley and Stokesdale Junction.  On removing the body to his boarding-house, at Thomas Bolton’s, and examining the contents of his pockets, was found a package of goods and a spool of thread, evidently purchased at Long’s store at Wellsboro, as indicated by the wrapping-paper upon it; also $1.52 in money and a bottle half-filled with whisky.  Knowing that at times the said Henry Robinson was intemperate, and that, in our opinion, he was returning from Wellsboro somewhat under the influence of liquor, between the hours of 12 and 4 a. m., and that he came to his death by being struck by a south-bound train on the line of the Fall Brook Coal Company’s railroad, and crushing his temple, which resulted in his immediate death, and that no blame is attached to the Fall Brook railroad or anyone else.  In witness whereof, we, the Justice of the Peace and jury aforesaid, do, to this examination, affix their hands and seal at Niles Valley, Pa., on this, the 12th day of July, A. D. 1889.  George D. Keeney, J. P., Dr. A. Niles, Thomas Bolton, James Rasey, S. B. Hackett, Jr., John Hackett.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles H. Williams
Yesterday morning Mr. Charles H. Williams, of this borough, died after having been sick a long time with paralysis.  He suffered the first stroke nearly two years ago, and he had been steadily declining ever since.  Several weeks ago he was again prostrated and he and his friends could see that his end was rapidly drawing near.  He died in the full faith of a blessed immortality.  Mr. Williams was born at Troy, Bradford county, on the 18th of April, 1816, being a son of Chester and Polly Williams.  He received a common-school education, and when he became of age he went West.  He used to tell about running a threshing-machine at Chicago, IL, when the place was nothing but a small hamlet.  In 1843 Mr. Williams was married to Sarah Garrison at Groton, NY, and two children, a son and a daughter, grew up to bless their union.  Their son Oren was suddenly stricken down in the prime of a useful life about two years ago.  Their daughter, Mrs. Robert Bodine, is a resident of this borough.  Mr. Williams came to this borough in 1859, having purchased the foundry in company with Mr. Robert Young.  Two or three years later the firm was dissolved and Mr. Young retired.  His place was soon filled by Mr. Isaac Sears, and Sears & Williams conducted the business for about eight years, when Mr. Williams sold out to his partner, in 1869, and moved to Oil City, Pa.  In 1876 he returned here, but in 1879 he went to Amsterdam, NY, where he engaged in milling till 1883, when he again returned to this region and purchased a small farm south of the borough.  Here he resided until stricken by disease about two years ago, when he moved into the village.  With true philosophy and Christian courage he awaited the coming of the Angel of Death, and he remarked that he felt no fear, but rather was anxious to hear the final summons.  Mr. Williams was an excellent man.  For years he had been an active Christian, and he was an active member of the First Baptist Church.  His true manhood and genial nature won him many life-long friends.  He always took a deep interest in public affairs, and his convictions were generally sound upon political questions.  The funeral is to be held at the First Baptist Church tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock.  Mr. Williams named the text for his funeral sermon, selected the hymns he desired sung and arranged for every detail of his funeral some weeks ago.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Potter
Mr. William Potter, a well-known jeweler at Elkland, died very suddenly last week Monday morning of apoplexy.  He was a bachelor and slept at his store and took his meals at the Case House.  He did not come there to breakfast on Monday, and a boy was sent to call him.  Finding his store closed it was thought that something must be wrong, and a ladder was procured to reach his bed-room window.  Mr. Potter was found lying upon the floor in front of his bed cold in death.  The Coroner was summoned and an inquest was held, the finding being that Mr. Potter died of apoplexy.  He was 62 years of age, and he had always resided in the Cowanesque valley, having been born at Potter Brook.  He had been in the jewelry business for many years and had held the office of Justice of the Peace for five years.  He was a general favorite in the community.  The funeral was held at Potter Brook and was largely attended.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dryden A. Pope
Rev. Dryden A. Pope, who died at his home in Chatham on Saturday, the 6th instant, was a man of sterling worth and usefulness.  He had been in poor health for a year or more, and fully understood that the end of this life was near, but he was not confined to his bed, and was outdoors looking after his affairs only the night before he died.  The immediate cause of death seemed to be of an apoplectic nature.  Dryden A. Pope was a native of Connecticut, where he was born in April, 1816.  When he was five years of age his parents moved to Binghamton, NY, where the boy grew to man’s estate.  He attended the common schools of that day, and by working and teaching managed to secure a fair education.  He learned the trade of a carpenter and millwright, and did much work in building bridges for the New York and Erie Railway when that road was constructed through southern New York.  Mr. Pope was converted quite early in life and entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  In 1856 he moved to Chatham in this county, where he purchased 178 acres of wild land which he afterward cleared and brought into a good state of cultivation.  On this farm he remained all the rest of his life.  After coming to Chatham he joined the Free Will Baptist Church and became and remained a diligent preacher of that denomination until a few years ago, when failing health compelled him to retire from the active ministry.  While residing at Binghamton, Mr. Pope wedded Miss Lucy A. Roberts, who survives him.  The couple were blessed with six children, of whom five are still living.  Mr. Pope was a man of much more than ordinary intelligence, of decided convictions and of great moral courage.  In life his labors and example were helpful and inspiring to his fellow-men, and now that he is gone to his reward his memory among those who knew him will long “Smell sweet and blossom in the dust.”  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary B. Beers
At Antrim, Pa., July 8, 1889, Mrs. Mary B. Beers, aged 87 years and 10 days.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sebrina George
In Brookfield, Pa., June 26, 1889, Sebrina, wife of Mr. William B. George, aged 60 years.  (Tuesday, July 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Floyd Torrance
The sad intelligence was received here last Friday of the death of Mr. Floyd Torrance, of Avon, NY, who was known to many people in this borough as the son-in-law of Rev. J. F. Calkins, having married his youngest daughter Stella.  Mr. and Mrs. Torrance were visiting Mrs. George D. Meigs, in this borough, about three weeks ago.  Mrs. Torrance remained here until about 10 days ago, when she returned home.  A day or two after her return Mr. Torrance was unloading hay in his farm barn with a patient hay-work. While the horses were pulling, some part of the harness broke and the whiffle-trees flew back and struck Mr. Torrance in the abdomen, inflicting internal injuries.  He died last Thursday evening from the effects of the accident.  Mr. Torrance was about 40 years of age, and he was one of the leading citizens and most prosperous farmers in that region.  Mrs. G. D. Meigs left this borough last Friday morning to attend the funeral.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ransler Toles
Last Sunday afternoon Mr. Ransler Toles, of Little Marsh, died very suddenly at Addison, NY, where he had been staying for several weeks for medical treatment.  Mr. Toles had suffered with an obstinate ulcer upon his hand for two or three years, and he went to Addison to have it treated.  Although 79 years of age he was a bright and active man, and on Sunday morning he was apparently in his usual health.  At about 4 o’clock in the afternoon he suddenly expired of heart disease.  Mr. Toles was born in 1810 in Schoharie county, NY.  He came to this county in early life and settled in Chatham, purchasing his farm of the Bingham Estate and hewing his home out of the primeval forest.  His aged wife and four children survive him, namely, Mrs. Jerome B. Niles, Mrs. John S. Mourey, Charles W. Toles and Edwin W. Toles.  One son, T. Alfred Toles, died in the army during the war.  The funeral is to be held at Little Marsh this afternoon, and the remains will be interred in the cemetery in this borough.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Asa G. Churchill
The Huntsville, Ont., Forrester gives the following sketch of a once marked character in this borough, Mr. Asa G. Churchill, whose “flash poetry” gave him quite a local reputation in 1852 or thereabouts.  After putting in the time of this earth for about 94 years and when the time arrives to take up his abode in another world, to be run over by a railway locomotive, is pretty hard lines, you will say.  Such apparently is the fate of Asa Gildersleeve Churchill, the Muskoka poet.  Word was received here this week that Mr. Churchill was killed on the New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio railway on Monday last, the 8th instant.  Over 30 years ago he left the town of Wellsboro, Tioga county, Pa., and came to Canada, intending at the time to return home in a month or two.  He left behind a good farm and several sons and daughters.  The point of interest was Niagara Falls, and after giving that wonderful fall a poetic touch, he was induce to invade a little further into Canadian territory.  He wandered around for some two or three years and finally struck Collingwood, where he fell in love with a widow and married her--his first wife having died a short time before he left the States.  He went from Collingwood to Parry Sound, where he located a farm, and until his second wife died he made that his home.  This land, of which he holds a clear deed, is now, we understood, inside the corporation of the town of Parry Sound.  Twelve years ago, he came to Huntsville and since that time he has spent his time in this part of the district.  Some six or seven years ago he again fell in love with a little German widow, named Albert, living about three miles from Huntsville, with whom he lived until two years ago, when she died, she being his third wife.  He made his living by writing poetical effusions of small towns and villages, lumber-camps, saw-mills, etc.  Although over 90 years of age, he did all his traveling on foot.  He would sooner walk than ride any time.  There is not a hole and corner in these large districts that has not been visited by the “old Poet Churchill” as he was called.  He was a great man; his great age and his wonderful powers for reciting business poetry, was the astonishment of everybody, and farmers would keep him over night and send him away happy next morning for the amusement they could get out of the old man.  Since that day he left the States, he had never received any word from his children, nor had ever written home, but he has talked several times during the past two years of paying his old home a visit.  About six weeks ago he made up his mind to go to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and pay his children a visit, if they were alive, and see what had become of the old homestead, and foot it all the way, if he could not get a free ride.  Think of it, reader, a man supposed to be about 94 years of age,--he told the writer three years ago he was over 90 years of age--with locks whiter than the driven snow, starting out to walk all the way to Wellsboro, in the State of Pennsylvania.  That he would have accomplished the wonderful feat no one who knows him doubts, had he not been run down by a lightning-express train while counting the ties on a railway, almost in sight of his destination.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Asahel N. Cole
A news dispatch says that Mr. Asahel N. Cole died at his home at Wellsville, NY, last week Sunday night after a lingering illness, which threatened several times to terminate fatally before the end came.  He was known far and wide as an editor and politician.  He was born on October 15, 1821, in the town of Freedom, Cattaraugua county.  His father, Daniel Cole, was a descendant from the family settling Cole’s hill, in Plymouth, Mass., and his mother, whose maiden name was Joanna Williams, was a lineal descendant of Roger Williams of Rhode Island.  When Asa was 4 ½ years old his father and mother died.  Thus thrown upon his own resources, he early commenced the battle of life.  In 1848, when he was 27 years of age, he was better known by and more closely linked with Joshua R. Giddings, Gerrit Smith, James S. Wadsworth, William H. Seward, Charles Sumner, Salmon P. Chase, John P. Hale, John Van Buren, and others of like political affinities than any man of his age in America.  In 1852, assisted by Gen. James S. Wadsworth, Mr. Cole established the Genesee Valley Free Press as a Republican paper at his home in Allegany county.  In the columns of this, the pioneer Republican newspaper of the country, appeared the first call for a Convention to organize the Republican party.  This Convention met in Friendship, NY, in May, 1854, and dates the birth of the Republican party, though the town of Angelica succeeded in 1884 in establishing her birthright by showing that the first Convention called for the nomination of candidates convened at that place about the middle of October, 1854.  The celebration of the birth of the party occurred at Angelica just before the fall election in 1884.  Mr. Cole presided, having been for years acknowledged and recognized as the father of the Republican party.  About four years ago his neighbors were astonished by the growth of fruits and vegetables of marvelous size, beauty, profusion and perfection on his grounds.  He was understood at first to be making experiments in under-drainage, and his nearest neighbors and most intimate friends had no intelligent conception of the theory under which he was proceeding--that of subsurface, subterranean, or underground irrigation, better known as “the new agriculture.”  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. Hage Winfield
J. Hage Winfield, son of the Methodist Episcopal Bishop of California, was mortally shot at Benicia, Cal., a few days ago, by J. E. Crooks in a quarrel over a newspaper article.  Winfield struck Crooks in the face, when the latter drew a revolver and put a bullet into Winfield’s abdomen.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Weddington
William Weddington, a colored man, was hanged at Charleston, SC., a few days ago for the murder of Policeman John Pierce, of Monroe.  Pierce’s 8 year old son witnessed the hanging.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Benjamin Owen
Professor Benjamin Owen, the music composer, died at Ishpeming, Mich., last Wednesday, of apoplexy.  He was a native of Sweden and came to America with Ole Bull.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Isabella Dallas-Glyn
Mrs. Isabella Dallas-Glyn, who had a notable career on the English stage 30-40 years ago, has recently died in England after an illness of two years, at the age of 66.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles W. Sanders
Charles W. Sanders, one of the pioneers of the public school system in this country, and author of a well known series of school books, died at New York a few days ago, aged 84 years.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. H. Putnam
W. H. Putnam, great-grandson and a lineal descendant of General Israel Putnam, died at Brooklyn last Wednesday, aged 75.  At the recent dedication of General Putnam’s monument deceased was the most prominent figure.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

I. N. Waterbury
I. N. Waterbury died recently in Glenbrook, Conn., the town of his birth, in the 73d year of his age.  With the death of Mr. Waterbury there has died the last of the number who made American ships famous all over the world.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James J. Corcoran
Very Rev. James J. Corcoran, S. T. D., aged 70 years, died at St. Charles Barromeo Seminary, Overbrook, Pa., last Tuesday.  Deceased was one of the most learned men in the Roman Catholic Church in this country.  He was a prolific writer.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. L. Martin
Dr. J. L. Martin died at Baltimore, Md., the other day, aged 69.  He was one of the leading homeopaths of the country.  He was practicing in Boston during the cholera epidemic which raged there in 1849, and he then gained the gratitude of hundreds by his heroic conduct.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William N. Taft
William N. Taft died at Maysville, Sumter county, SC, a few days ago.  He was for the last quarter of a century one of the most prominent figures in Republican political circles in South Carolina.  He went to Charleston with the 3d Rhode Island Artillery when 15 years of age.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary A. Brigham
Miss Mary A. Brigham, the new president of Mount Holyoke College, was killed in the recent railway accident near New Haven.  She was for several years at the head of Ingham Seminary at Leroy, NY, and afterward attracted attention by her management of a seminary in Brooklyn.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William B. Carroll
William B. Carroll, who was probably the oldest circus performer in the country, died last week Sunday at his home in West Chester village, NY, at the age of 74 years.  His life was eventful.  He was born in Knoxville, Tenn., in 1815, and when 12 years old ran away from his father’s farm and joined a small circus company.  In those days it was obligatory upon any one entertaining the profession to begin at the bottom and serve a regular apprenticeship.  Young Carroll began his work by talking care of horses.  He afterward became one of the finest riders in the business.  He became, too, a wonderful leaper and a clever acrobat.  In 1844 he created a sensation by appearing in a circus arena riding upon a horse’s bare back, and at the same time carrying a boy on his head.  It was the first time the feat had been performed and it was made Carroll the most famous circus man in the country.  He was in active service as a rider and leaper as late as 1876,when he was with the VanAmberg show.  At that time he was 61 years old.  His last service was with the Forepaugh show as ring-master in 1878.  On the 74th birthday last March while instructing some performers the old man mounted a bare-backed horse and performed a number of difficult tricks, to the intense astonishment of all beholders.  (Tuesday, July 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Johnston
Prof. Alexander Johnston, of Princeton College, a master of the political history of this country, and in that line an unrivaled authority, has died at the early age of 40, and the loss to the ranks of American teachers and writers is one that will not speedily be made good.  He was born in Brooklyn, NY, April 29th, 1849.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Father Curley
Father Curley, Director of Georgetown University, died at Washington last Wednesday, aged 93.  He was the oldest priest in the United States, and, so far as known, in the world.  His death was due to his falling downstairs some time ago.  He made a number of valuable contributions to science.  He was best known as an astronomer.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick Gardiner
Rev. Dr. Frederick Gardiner, for 17 years Professor of Literature and New Testament Interpretation at Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Ct., died a few days ago after a short illness, aged 67 years.  He was a man of ripe scholarship, his lines of study not being limited to the specialties which he taught.  For many years he studied chemistry, and furnished a laboratory near his study, where he could find relief from the contemplation of Greek roots and theology.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Nelson C. Dewey
The first Governor of Wisconsin, Nelson C. Dewey, died at Cassville, in that State, last week Sunday, in destitution and comparative seclusion.  He emigrated from New York in 1836 and reached Wisconsin just as the lead-mining boom had broken out in the southwestern part of the Territory.  The practice of law made him wealthy, and, plunging into politics, he was elected Governor when the State came into the Union, and was re-elected.  His marriage with the daughter of Chief-Justice Dunn, of Wisconsin Territory, at this time aided his prospects, but he very shortly faded from view, and the turn of the tide from Democracy to Republicanism, he being a Jacksonian Democrat, left him stranded.  He sunk his wealth in attempting to found a city where Cassville is located.  His palatial home was burned, his wife left him, his mother-in-law drowned herself on hearing that some of her money had been lost, and his death now follows in destitution.  He was 75 years old.  The Governor of Wisconsin appointed a committee of ex-Governors and prominent citizens to attend his funeral.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. G. M. Butler
Mrs. G. M. Butler, of Covington township, died last Thursday morning after a long sickness.  She was 58 years of age, and she was widely known and loved.  The funeral was held at the Disciple church on Friday afternoon, and the remains were interred at the Gray cemetery.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mollie E. Bailey
Mrs. A. Ward Bailey, whose maiden name was Mollie E. Urell, died at her home near Mansfield on the 18th instant, at the age of 23 years.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George J. Burt
Mr. George J. Burt, of Elmira, died last Friday at the age of 37 years.  His widow will be remembered as Miss Anna Veazie, formerly a resident of this borough.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Warren Fausey
Warren Fausey, aged 24 years, living in DuBoistown, opposite Williamsport, died in the hospital a few days ago, the result of bleeding at the nose, which began three days before.  His little son, who was occupying the bed with him, accidentally threw his hand over in his sleep, striking the father on the nose and starting the bleeding which produced fatal results.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Michael Merchel
While Michael Merchel, a prominent coal operator of Minversville, Pa., was cleaning a gun last Thursday, it was accidentally discharged, killing him.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Catharine Cruttenden
At Arnot, Pa., July 17, 1889, Mrs. Catharine Cruttenden, aged 73 years, 4 months and 22 days.  (Tuesday, July 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Hull
Charles Hull, editor of the Bolivar county, (Miss.) Democrat, was killed by L. A. Weissinger, a lawyer, last Friday.  Hull was prominently connected.  Weissinger is editor of the Review.  The men has assailed each other editorially.  While Hull was returning from his dinner he was shot by Weissinger with a gun.  Weissinger was jailed.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horatio Bonar
Rev. Horatio Bonar died at Edinburgh, Scotland, last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Evaristo Carazo
Evaristo Carazo, President of Nicaragua, died last Thursday.  Dr. Sacasa has succeeded to the Presidency, in conformity with the constitution.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Noe Eliza Lofton-Phillips
Noe Eliza Lofton-Phillips, wife of W. W. Pugh, Jr., is dead at New Orleans.  Mrs. Pugh was well known in literary circles.  She contributed to the literature of the South, many sketches under the nom de plume of “Adria.”  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Kendrick
Prof. John Kendrick, of Marietta College, died at Marietta, Ohio, last week, aged 86.  He was a classmate of Salmon P. Chase at Dartmouth, and went West to take a professorship in Kenyon College.  Stanley Matthews, ex-President Hayes and other eminent men recited to him there.  In 1839 he went to Marietta College and held an active professorship till 1873.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charlemagne Tower
A dispatch from Waterville, NY, announces the death at his summer residence there, of Charlemagne Tower, of Philadelphia.  His age was 81.  Mr. Tower was born in Oneida county, NY, and graduated at Harvard University in 1830.  He studied law in New York city, where he practiced his profession for some time.  The greatest undertaking, perhaps, of his long business career was his development of the iron resources of Minnesota, now well known to the world as the Vermillion Range, about 15 years ago.  In 1887 Mr. Tower disposed of his interests in the range to a syndicate and received in return certified checks on banks and financial institutions to the amount of over $6,000,000.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Sullivan
John Sullivan, aged about 20 years, a resident of Ralston, met a horrible death on a recent evening.  He was standing on a side track while a train was passing, and did not notice an approaching train on the siding.  He was crushed under the wheels and his head severed from the body.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Waldo Avery
Mr. Waldo Avery, of Mansfield, died last week Sunday at the age of 30 years.  He had suffered long with epilepsy.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James Campbell
Mr. James Campbell, of Tioga, died last Tuesday after a long illness.  The Etz Post, G. A. R., conducted the funeral on Thursday.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Harriet Amanda Sherwood
Mrs. Morgan Sherwood, an aged resident of this borough, died at the family residence on King street last Wednesday morning about 11 o’clock.  She had been in failing health for a year or more, and for the past two months she had been very sick indeed, her malady affecting both mind and body.  Death was to her a release from hopeless suffering.  Mrs. Sherwood, whose maiden name was Harriet Amanda Brewster, was born in Bridgewater, Susquehanna county, 72 years ago.  In 1837 she was married to Mr. Morgan Sherwood, who was then a shoe-dealer in this borough.  After living here about 20 years, Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood went West, living in succession in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Missouri.  They moved back to this borough 17 or 18 years ago to pass the evening of their days here.  Mrs. Sherwood was well known and highly respected in this borough, being a woman of marked intelligence and force of character.  She was a faithful member of St. Paul’s Church, and her funeral was held at the parish church last Saturday morning at 10 o’clock, the rector, Rev. A. W. Snyder, reading the service.  The pallbearers included several of the oldest gentlemen of the borough--William Bache, John N. Bache, John L. Robinson, Henry Sherwood, Charles G. Osgood and Thomas Allen.  Mrs. Sherwood was the sister of A. S. Brewster, Esq., of this borough, and of Mr. George A. Brewster, of Charleston township.  She leaves two children--Charles C. Sherwood, of Columbia, Mo., and Miss Mary Sherwood, of this borough, to console their aged and sorely-bereaved father.  (Tuesday, August 6, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elva Royce Hill
Mrs. Elva Royce Hill died at Howard City, Michigan, on the 5th instant.  Mrs. Hill was the youngest daughter of Mr. Calvin Royce, formerly of Stony Fork, who moved to Michigan about 20 years ago, when Elva was a little child.  She married Mr. Frank J. Hill recently in Michigan.  (Tuesday, August 13, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucinda Tuttle Jewett
Mrs. Lucinda Tuttle Jewett, widow of Benjamin Jewett, died at Custer City, Pa., recently.  She was a native of Westfield.  (Tuesday, August 13, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sophia Price
Mrs. Sophia Price died at her home near Knoxville on the 3d instant at the age of 66 years.  About 1850 she with her husband, Prof. S. B. Price, established a school at Academy Corners, and for many years she was preceptress of the institution, which was justly celebrated in this region for nearly a quarter of a century.  (Tuesday, August 13, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Tri-Counties Page 16140

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 27 JUNE 2008
By Joyce M. Tice
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Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.