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1889-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries



Female Graves
At Mansfield, Pa., September 23, 1889, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred. L. Graves.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Willard Howland
At Knoxville, Pa., September 18, 1889, Mr. Willard Howland, aged 84 years.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John M. Bosard
We, the committee appointed by Nelson Lodge, No. 434, I. O. O. F., of Nelson, Pa., to draft suitable resolutions on the death of our late Brother, Past Grand John M. Bosard, respectively submit the following:  Whereas, It has seemed good to Almighty God to remove from our midst, while yet in the prime of life, our worthy and esteemed Brother John M. Bosard, thus reminding us of the uncertainty of this life; and Whereas, The relations held by the deceased with the members of this Lodge render it proper that we should place on record our appreciation of his services as a brother and his merits as a man; therefore, be it Resolved, That we deplore the loss of Brother Bosard, and with deep feeling of regret, softened only by the confident hope that his spirit is with those who have fought the good fight are now enjoying happiness in a better world.  Resolved, That we, as members of the Nelson Lodge, extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family of the deceased and commend them for consolation to Him who orders all things for the best, and that we will ever hold in remembrance our departed brother and will honor his name as a faithful member of our Lodge, and that these resolutions be place upon the minutes, a copy sent to the family, with whom we mourn their loss, also that they be published in the Wellsboro Agitator.  C. F. Merritt, J. F. Baxter, W. E. Cady, Committee on Resolutions.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Wilkie Collins
Wilkie Collins, the great English novelist, who had been seriously ill for some time, died last week Monday.  William Wilkie Collins, to give him his full name, was born in London in January, 1824, his father being William Collins, R. A., a well-known painter of rustic scenes, and his mother a sister of Mrs. Carpenter, who is said to have been one of the best of the female portrait-painters of her time.  He was educated at a private school, and after spending two years with his parents in Italy was placed with a firm in the tea trade, to remain four years and learn the business.  He abandoned commerce after a time, however, and turned to law.  He was a student at Lincoln’s Inn when his father died, and his first contribution to literature was then made, being a biography of his father in two volumes, with selections from his journals and correspondence.  This was published in 1848, and from that time Mr. Collins made literature his profession.  His first novel was printed in 1850, and was called “Antonina, or the Fall of Rome: a Romance of the Fifty Century.”  “Rambles Beyond Railways, or Notes in Cornwall Taken Afoot,” published in 1851, wandered from the track of romance, in which his successes were destined to be so phenomenal, but in 1852 he was back in fiction with “Basil, a Story of Modern Life,” and “Mr. Wray’s Cash Box, or the Mask and the Mystery: a Christmas Sketch.”  “Hide and Seek” was presented in 1854, and at about the same time he became a contributor to Household Words, in which “After Dark” and one of his most successful works,  “The Dead Secret,” were originally published.  Several of his novels, including “The Woman in White” and “No Name,” were published originally in All the Year Round “Armadale” and many of his subsequent stories were printed in American magazines before appearing in book form and he is said to have received enormous prices for some of these.  “The Moonstone,”  “Man and Wife,”  “The New Magdalen,” and “The Law and the Lady” are other works of his that have had wide circulation.  His principal books have passed through many editions both in England and in the United States, and have also been translated into French, Italian, German, Dutch, Danish, and Russian.  The works of very few modern writers have had a greater circulation or acquired more general popularity than those of Mr. Collins.  Mr. Collins also made occasional incursions into the field of dramatic writing, but never with marked success.  His plays, “The Light-house” and “The Frozen Deep,” were produced by amateurs, Charles Dickens being in the cast of the latter and appearing in a private performance before the Queen as well as in the public performances for charity.  A dramatic version of “The Moonstone,” written by Mr. Collins himself, was produced at the Olympic Theater in 1877, and in 1883 his play, “Rank and Riches,” brought out at the Adelphi Theater, was a complete failure.  For several years Wilkie Collins had been a great sufferer from acute attacks of gout and rheumatism.  He was compelled to use a can most of the time, and his bent shoulders gave him the appearance of being shorter in stature than he really was.  When these attacks came on he had to stop work and shut himself up in his room, seeing no one but his faithful attendant.  He was a thorough economist of time, rigidly systematic in his hours of work and of exercise.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

D. H. Hill
Ex Confederate General D. H. Hill is dead.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Benjamin R. Nichols
Professor Benjamin R. Nichols, of Ann Arbor, Mich., was killed last Thursday while trying to stop his runaway horse.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eliza Cook
Eliza Cook, the poetess, died last Wednesday at Wimbledon, England, where she has been a resident for many years.  She was born in 1818.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Beale
Ex-Surgeon-General Joseph Beale, with relative rank of Commodore, United States Navy, died last week Monday at his residence in Philadelphia.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

The Duke of Combra
The Duke of Combra, brother of the King of Portugal, is dead.  He was 42 years old.  He was a General of Division and Inspector-General of Cavalry.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Chancellor Hartson
Chancellor Hartson, one of California’s prominent pioneers, died suddenly of heart disease at Napa, last Thursday, aged 64.  He was a native of New York and went to California in 1849.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Lewis
Judge Edward Lewis, late Presiding Justice of the St. Louis Court of Appeals, died suddenly at his residence a week ago last Saturday from the bursting of a blood vessel in his head.  Judge Lewis was born in Washington, D. C., February 22, 1820, and was a blood relative of George Washington.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel L. Caldwell
Rev. Dr. Samuel L. Caldwell died at Providence, R. I., last Thursday, aged 79.  He had been formerly pastor of Baptist Churches in Maine and Providence.  He then accepted the chair of church history at Newton Theological Seminary and held that till 1878, when he was elected to the presidency of Vassar College.  He resigned the latter position in 1885 and removed to Providence.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Abram A. Kimball
Bishop Abram A. Kimball, of Salt Lake City, died last Wednesday at Kanosh, Utah.  He was prominent in the Mormon Church and had a number of wives.  He was sent to the penitentiary last November to serve six months, but was pardoned by President Cleveland in December because he was a consumptive.  His father, Heber C. Kimball, had 15 wives and used to refer to them as “heroes.”  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George H. Cook
Dr. George H. Cook, the New Jersey State Geologist, and vice-president of Rutgers College, who died at New Brunswick last week Sunday, was graduated from the Troy, NY, Polytechnic Institute in 1839, and rose to be senior professor of that school.  He was made principal of the Albany Academy in 1850, professor of chemistry and natural philosophy at Rutgers College in 1852, and a year later he was chosen Assistant Geologist of New Jersey.  It was in fact mainly due to his efforts that the office was re-organized and restored to its former usefulness.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Absalom Hadden
Mr. Absalom Hadden, a prominent lawyer, of Corning, NY, was found hanging by the neck last Saturday morning in a boat house on Lake Keuka.  Life was not extinct when he was cut down, but he died Sunday evening.  Judgments had recently been filed against him for upwards of $10,000, and others were to follow.  These facts, together with his poor health, probably prompted the act of self-destruction.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

B. Gage Berry
Hon. B. Gage Berry, editor of the Chenango Telegraph, died at his home in Norwich, NY, last Wednesday evening after an illness of several months.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Davis Sturgis
Gen. Samuel Davis Sturgis, of the United States Army, died at his home in St. Paul, Minn., a week ago last Saturday, being 62 years old.  He was one of the most distinguished officers of the regular army, having rendered valuable services in the Mexican war and in the war for the Union.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John T. Nixon
Judge John T. Nixon, of the United States District Court of New Jersey, died a few days ago at the age of 69.  He was a native of New Jersey and a graduate of Princeton College.  Up to 1870, when President Grant elevated him to the bench, he took an active part in politics, having figured in the New Jersey Legislature and in Congress.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert von Heimholtz
Great regret has been caused in scientific circles of Berlin by the death of Robert von Heimholtz, who promised to share the renown of his illustrious father.  His life was almost a martyrdom.  He was afflicted from his birth with curvature of the spine.  Despite his defects, he studied at the Universities of Berlin and Heidelberg, evincing great intellectual power.  His associations with Bunsen and Kirchoff, the discoverers of spectrum analysis, were most intimate.  In 1885 he was graduated from Berlin with the degree of Ph. D.  He published at once a series of articles upon steam expansion, which aroused the admiration of the scientific world.  His tastes led him to mathematical physics.  He also made original and valuable contributions on the nature and composition of the fog.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mattie M. Hart
Miss Mattie M. Hart, who died at Hornellsville, NY, September 28th, of consumption, was a daughter of Charles M. and Sarah C. Hart, formerly of Charleston.  She was 20 years of age and of a lovely Christian character, and she had always been actively interested in Church work.  Miss Hart was a granddaughter of Mr. Nathan Austin, of Charleston, and a niece of Mr. Job Hart, of this village.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Thomas Trimble
Mrs. Thomas Trimble, of Blossburg, who was injured in the Tioga railway wreck three weeks ago, died yesterday from the affects of her injuries.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Allen
Mrs. Judson W. Allen died at Coudersport on the 28th ultimo, of consumption.  Her maiden name was Mary Bowen.  She was about 53 years of age.  The funeral was held at the home of her mother in Deerfield last week Sunday, Rev. Mr. Bush, of Coudersport, officiating.  Mrs. Allen was a teacher in the Mansfield Classical Seminary in 1859 and 1860.  She was an intelligent and estimable woman.  She was a sister of B. F. and George C. Bowen, of this borough.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Brown
Mr. Henry Brown, an old and respected citizen of Covington, died last Thursday morning.  He was almost 80 years of age.  Mr. Brown was a man of pure character, and he had a large circle of friends.  He was a brother of Mr. C. M. Brown, of Cherry Flats.  The funeral was held on Saturday.  It is said that Mr. Brown had always enjoyed remarkably good health, never having called a physician until two weeks before his death.  He had been a leading member of the Covington Odd Fellows’ Lodge for more than 20 years.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Hilboldt
In Delmar, Pa., September 17, 1889, Mr. Henry Hilboldt, aged 86 years.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Bertha A. Rhodes
In Tioga, Pa., September 14, 1889, Bertha A., daughter of Charles and Eva Rhodes, aged 5 years and 9 months.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sherman Patterson
Whereas, It has pleased the Supreme Ruler to take from our midst Brother Sherman Patterson; it is therefore Resolved, That by his death we lose a valued and trusty member and the Order at large a true and zealous Odd Fellow; his family a faithful and loving husband and father and society a fair minded, Christian gentleman.  Resolved, That we, his brothers of Tioga River Lodge, No. 797, cause these resolutions to be spread upon the minutes of our Lodge; that they be published in the proper newspapers, and that a copy be presented to his afflicted wife--all as an endearing mark of our affection and esteem for him.  J. H. Putnam, S. M. Geer, E. C. Fish, Committee.  (Tuesday, October 8, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Feeks
A telegraph lineman named John Feeks met a horrible death on Chambers street, New York city, last Friday afternoon from contact with an electric-light wire.  He presented a terrible sight, as he died on the net-work of wires in mid-air, while the deadly fluid actually made his body sizzle and the blood poured out on the sidewalk and over the clothing of the horrified-spectators.  The accident, occurring in one of the busiest parts of the city, was witnessed by a large number of people.  The man’s body lay limp and motionless over the mass of wires attached to the cross-trees of the pole.  The firemen brought out a ladder and one went up with a pair of shears to cut the wires.  The man was found to be dead.  He probably touched the electric-light wire by accident.  The body lay where it was until firemen went to the factory and had the current turned off.  The victim’s face was turned towards the sidewalk, and in 15 minutes the wires had burned off half the face.  The left arm was also seen to be burning, and every few seconds the blue flames spurted out from the various parts of the body.  Hundreds of people stood shivering as they looked at the awful sight.  No one dared to go near.  Even the firemen’s faces blanched with horror.  The body of the lineman could not be taken down from the wires for half an hour.  Deputy Coroner Jenkins, who has witnessed some horrible sights during his official career, said this spectacle was the most ghastly he had ever seen.  He was present while efforts were being made to get the body down and afterwards viewed it.  A wire, he said, had cut through the lineman’s cheek and had burned clear into the cheek bone.  A burn in the throat had severed the windpipe and many muscles and veins.  If the mangled remained suspended in the air much longer the head would have been completely severed from the body.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

A. P. Brush
Rev. A. P. Brush, rector of St. Thomas’s Church at Bath, NY, died last Tuesday morning, aged 58 years.  He had been sick for some time.  His remains were taken to Muncy, Lycoming county for burial.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Daily and three sons
At Davis Switch, a small village 13 miles from Bradford, McKean county, last Thursday night, the dwelling of Patrick Daily was burned and his wife and three sons, aged 13, 11 and 9 respectively, were roasted in the flames.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jules Dupre
Jules Dupre, the great French landscape painter, is dead at the age of 77.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Lyon Smith
John Lyon Smith, the last of the 21 original trustees of Wesleyan University, died at Middletown, Conn., a few days ago, aged 93 years.  He was born in Edinburgh.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles S. Bishop
Charles S. Bishop, a member of Sothern’s “Lord Chumley” company, died in his dressing room while preparing for the last act of the play, in New York, last Tuesday night.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Enrique Devilla
Enrique Devilla, Colombian Consul, who arrived at New Orleans from Guatemala, by the steamer City of Dallas, October 1st, died at his residence there on the 3d, of yellow fever.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Christopher Robinson
Christopher Robinson, for many years prominent in public office and as a lawyer, died at Woonsocket, R. I., the other day, of heart-failure, in his 74th year.  He was Attorney-General of Rhode Island in 1854-55, Representative in Congress in 1858, 61 and Minister to Peru in 1861-64.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ruth M. Wells
Mrs. Ruth M. Wells died at Fort Wayne, Ind., a few days ago, aged 82.  She bequeathed her property, consisting of half a block in the heart of the city, worth $25,000, to the city, provided an asylum for the blind is maintained thereon.  Her mother was for years afflicted with blindness.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John A. Martin
Ex-Gov. John A. Martin, of Kansas, who died a few days ago, was a Pennsylvania boy, born in 1839, emigrated to Kansas in 1847, became a free-soil editor, later on, prominent in the organization of the Republican party in that State.  He was an earnest soldier, and commanded a brigade at Chicamanga and Chattanooga.  Since the war, he has edited the Atchison Champion.  He was a United States Centennial Commissioner, Vice-President of the Board of Managers of the National Soldiers’ Home, a Department Commander of the Grand Army, and twice Governor of Kansas, his second term expiring in 1888.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Hubbard Vail
Thomas Hubbard Vail, Bishop of Kansas and one of the oldest members, both in years and service, of the house of Bishops now in session at New York, died at Bryn Mawr, Pa., within a fortnight of completing his 77th year.  Bishop Vail was born in Richmond, Va., of parents from New England, and his mother brought him home with her to Connecticut after his father’s death.  He was graduated at Trinity College, Hartford, in 1831, and four years later from the General Theological Seminary at New York; was ordained deacon by Bishop Brownell at Canaan, Ct., and priest by Bishop Griswold in Boston, and became assistant minister at St. Paul’s in that city.  In 1863 he became rector of Trinity Church, Muscatine, Pa., and was in December, 1864, consecrated in that church the first Bishop of Kansas.  Bishop Vail was an accomplished and agreeable man besides being an excellent manager; he wrote verse and published 50 years ago in Boston, anonymously, “Hannah; a Sacred Drama,” and about the same time edited the religious verse of Rev. A. F. Lyte.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Isaac Losey
Mrs. Isaac Losey, of Lawrenceville died last week Monday, October 7, 1889, of cancer, at the age of 56 years.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John W. Fitch
Mr. John W. Fitch, a prominent resident of Knoxville, died recently at the age of 67.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick E. Smith
Last Tuesday afternoon Frederick E. Smith, a prominent citizen of this county, died at his home in Tioga borough of angina pectoris after an illness of only a few days.  His death was quite unexpected, as it was thought that he was improving until within a few hours of his dissolution.  He had partaken of some nourishment and expressed the belief that he was better, when suddenly his heart ceased to beat and Mr. Smith’s life went out like the blowing out of a candle.  Frederick E. Smith was born at Amherst, Massachusetts, in 1822.  He was graduated from Union College in 1844.  He was subsequently principal of the academy at Wolcott, NY, one year and of the academy at Clyde, NY, one year.  He commenced reading law with Chauncey F. Clark, at Wolcott, NY, completed his studies with the late John W. Guernsey, of Tioga, was admitted to the bar of this county in 1849, to the Supreme Court of the State in 1852 and to the United States courts in 1865.  In 1849 he formed a co-partnership with the late Charles H. Seymour, of Tioga, for the practice of the law, and that partnership continued until 1853.  In June 1853, he married Miss Stella F. Bigelow, daughter of Levi Bigelow.  In 1856 he was one of the Presidential Electors nominated on the Fremont ticket.  In 1867 he was appointed United States Register in Bankruptcy, which office he held until the law expired.  In June, 1879, he became a partner with Horace and S. W. Pomeroy in the banking business at Blossburg, retaining his residence at Tioga.  He also held the office of United States Commissioner.  Mr. Smith was a man of excellent literary as well as legal attainments, and he was prominent in business and social circles, not only in this, but in adjoining counties.  He leaves a wife and three sons, namely, A. Lee Smith, cashier of the bank at Blossburg, Fred. B. Smith, Esq., of Tioga, and W. Clive Smith, now in college.  On Wednesday there was a meeting of the members of the bar at Judge Mitchell’s office to take action upon the death of Mr. Smith.  Eulogistic remarks were made by Hon. Henry Sherwood, and then Judge Mitchell appointed a committee of five to report resolutions and make arrangements for attending the funeral in a body.  The funeral was held at Mr. Smith’s late residence in Tioga on Saturday afternoon.  Rev. Percy J. Robottom, of Towanda, read the Episcopal burial service and made appropriate remarks.  There was a profusion of floral offerings.  The music was unusually fine.  The pall-bearers were Messrs. Hiram Pickering, William L. Lamb, W. T. Rhodes, H. C. Wheeler, E. M. Field, Charles Ferris, J. P. Wilcox and James Dewey, all of Tioga.  The honorary bearers included his personal friends and older acquaintances, Messrs. C. B. Farr, Philo Tuller, John J. Davis, E. M. Smith, Robert Bishop, T. L. Baldwin, Dr. R. B. Smith, W. T. Urell, R. P. H. McAllister and F. H. Adams, all of Tioga.  Yesterday an impressive memorial service was held at the Court-house, which was largely attended by members of the bar and others interested.  The following memorial was read by Jefferson Harrison, Esq., and ordered inserted in the minutes:  To The Honorable Court of Common Pleas of the County of Tioga:  Your committee, appointed at the last session of the court to report an expression of the regard which the members of the Bar entertain for one lately removed from them, respectfully offer the following:  The Bar of Tioga county, having met to express publicly their regard for the late Frederick E. Smith, who has been one of their number for the past 40 years, and their deep sorrow and unfeigned regret for his unlooked-for death, do declare and record this their testimony to his memory:  That by his death at a ripe age he has ended an honest and successful professional life; the Bar has lost a member to whom its juniors have long been accustomed to look for an example of industry and success, one who in his professional engagements was ever generous, courteous and kindly disposed to each and all.  That the community at large have lost a citizen who in his profession, in his private and public life had gained, preserved and justly merited their unreserved confidence.  That our sincere and heartfelt sympathy is hereby extended to his family for their great sorrow and bereavement, to be expressed by a true copy hereof conveyed to them.  Henry Sherwood, S. F. Wilson, Jerome B. Niles, Wellsboro, October 14, 1889.  Interesting and heartfelt remarks upon the life and character of Mr. Smith and expressing the high regard in which he was held by all members of the bar were made by Major Merrick, David Cameron, S. F. Wilson, M. F. Elliott, J. B. Niles, Henry Sherwood and Judge Mitchell.  Several of the gentlemen present were evidently affected by the addresses, and as a whole the memorial service was very impressive.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Caroline Dickinson
Mrs. Caroline Dickinson, widow of the late Samuel Dickinson, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. D. Willis, on West avenue in this borough, early last Wednesday morning.  Mrs. Dickinson was 82 years of age.  She seemed to suffer from no organic disease, but her death was due to the natural failure of the vital forces.  Mrs. Dickinson’s maiden name was Caroline Blakesly(?).  She was born at Colesville, Broome county, NY, in 1807.  She married Mr. Dickinson at Harpersville, NY, January 15, 1832, and the same year they moved to this borough.  Mrs. Dickinson was a woman possessed of many admirable traits of character.  Her intelligence and interest in current events, her genial temperament and her well-grounded Christian principles and benevolence of heart made a life-long friend of every person who was fortunate enough to enjoy her acquaintance.  She was one of the number who signed the petition for the organization of St. Paul’s Church in this borough, and from its organization she remained a faithful member of the Church.  She leaves five children--Mrs. Caroline D. Willis and Miss Mary Dickinson, of this borough, S. N. Dickinson, of Chippewa Falls, Wis., Decatur Dickinson, of Neillsville, Wis., and D. B. R. Dickinson, of Sparta, Wis.  The funeral was held last Friday afternoon and it was largely attended.  Rev. A. W. Snyder, the rector of St. Paul’s Church, read the burial service and made brief remarks on the admirable Christian character of the deceased.  Mrs. Dickinson’s three sons and Messrs. J. M. Robinson, W. H. Whiting and E. C. Dickinson, relatives of the family, acted as bearers.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. R. Queal
In Rutland, Pa., September 23, 1889, Mr. R. Queal, aged 89 years.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Phoebe M. Smith
At Nelson, Pa., October 3, 1889, Phoebe M., wife of Henry Smith, in the 74th year of her age.  (Tuesday, October 15, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Maggie Heggins
At Gaines, Pa., September 21, 1889, of consumption, Maggie, wife of Luther Heggins, aged 24 years.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Myron Hodge
 At Landrus, Pa., October 8, 1889, Mrs. Myron Hodge, aged 25 years.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Frederick Hartranft
Ex Governor John Frederick Hartranft died at his home at Norristown, Pa., last Thursday noon.  The cause of his death was a diseased condition of the kidneys, from which he had suffered for several months.  General Hartranft had a very distinguished-career as a soldier and a civilian.  He was born in New Hanover, Pa., December 16, 1830, and was, therefore nearly 59 years of age at the time of his death.  He was graduated from Union College, when he was a member of the Sigma Phi fraternity, in 1853.  He afterwards studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1859.  At the beginning of the civil war, he raised and was made Colonel of the Fourth Pennsylvania Regiment of three months men.  The term of his regiment expiring just before the battle of Bull Run, he served in that engagement as a volunteer on General Franklin’s staff.  He then organized the 51st Pennsylvania Volunteers, became its Colonel, July 27, 1861, and was with General Burnside in his expedition to North Carolina, in March, 1862.  He was in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Campbell’s Station, and was very efficient in the defense of Knoxville.  He was with the Ninth corps, in the siege of-Vicksburg, and with General Sherman in the advance on Jackson.  Afterwards returning to the army of the Potomac he commanded a brigade in the battle of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, was commissioned a Brigadier-General, May 12, 1864, and was in all the movements before Petersburg.  He was assigned to the command of a division in August, 1864, and was brevetted a Major-General for his services in recapturing Fort Steadman, March 25, 1865.  This ended his long and honorable military career and he returned to his native State to receive the civic preferment there awaiting him.  He was, as a Republican, elected Auditor-General of Pennsylvania in October, 1865, and re-elected in 1868.  He was twice elected Governor, serving from 1872 until1878. During his term the militia system of the States was entirely re-organized, and he is credited with suggesting the plan of municipal reform which is now in operation in Philadelphia.  After retiring from the Governorship he made Philadelphia his home for several years, and in June, 1879, he was appointed Postmaster.  He became Collector of the Port in 1880, serving through the Arthur Administration.  More recently he had resided in Norristown, and had been, since 1869, Major-General of the National Guard of the State.  He was a gallant soldier and a faithful civic official.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Chapin
George Chapin, a railroad employee, died while telling a funny story in a restaurant at Oakland, Cala., last Thursday.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Prescott Jones
Dr. James Prescott Jones, the eminent English scientist, is dead.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sir Daniel Gooch
A London dispatch says Sir Daniel Gooch, the well-known engineer, is dead.  He was born in 1815.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

E. D. Culver
Ex-Judge E. D. Culver, of Greenwich, NY, is dead, aged 86.  He served two terms in Congress and during Lincoln’s first Administration was Minister to Venezuela.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas B. Van Buren
Gen. Thomas B. Van Buren, who was Consul-General to Japan between 1874 and 1885, died at San Francisco the other day.  He was a brother-in-law of William Walter Phelps.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Newton W. Nutting
Hon. Newton W. Nutting, who resigned his seat in Congress from the 27th district of New York a few days ago, died in Oswego last Tuesday.  His disease was cancer in the right jaw.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Asa P. Blunt
General Asa P. Blunt died at Manchester, NH, a few days ago, aged 62 years.  He was born in Danville, Vt., served through the Rebellion as Adjutant of the Third Vermont Volunteers, and had been almost continuously in the United States military service since.  He received his commission as Major-General the Saturday before his death.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Waterman
William Waterman, aged 114 years, died in Grand Rapids, Mich., last Thursday.  He was married twice.  His first wife lived to be 75.  He married his second wife when in his 100th year.  She died a few years ago.  He always used tobacco, but was temperate in his habits.  While he used liquor to some extent it was never to excess.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Luis I., King of Portugal
Luis I., King of Portugal, who has been ill for some time, died last Saturday morning.  He was born in 1838 and succeeded to the throne in November, 1861, on the death of his elder brother, King Pedro V., without issue.  Two years later he married the second daughter of King Victor Emmanuel, of Italy, by whom he had two sons.  The elder of these, the Duke of Braganza, succeeds to the throne as Carlos I.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Newton Sheldon
Rev. Dr. David Newton Sheldon, ex-president of Colby University at Waterville, Me., died at his home in that town a few days ago.  He was born at Suffield, Ct., June 26, 1807, was graduated at Williams College in 1830, and later at Newton Theological Seminary.  For four years he was stationed at Paris as a Baptist missionary, and after a pastorate of two years at Halifax, N. S., and another of one year at Waterville, he was chosen to the presidency of Colby, then known as Waterville College.  He continued as pastor and president for 11 years, and then accepted a call to the Baptist Church at Bath, Me.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward A. Perry
Edward A. Perry, whose term of four years as Governor of Florida expired not long ago, died at Kerrville, Texas, last week from paralysis, after an illness of about a week.  He was born in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, March 15, 1833 entered Yale in the class of 1854, but left the year before graduation, and went to Alabama.  He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1857, and settled in practice at Pensacola, Fla.  He entered the Confederate service as Captain at the breaking out of the war and came out as Brigadier-General.  At the close of the war he resumed practice in Pensacola.  He was elected Governor in 1885.  (Tuesday, October 22, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John G. K. Truair
John G. K. Truair, for 30 years publisher of the Syracuse Journal, died last Wednesday, aged 72 years.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jeremiah McGuire
Jeremiah McGuire, ex Speaker of the New York Assembly, died at Elmira last Friday.  He had been in poor health for a long time.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph S. Bonney
Joseph S. Bonney, aged 62 years, a well-known inventor, of Lawrence, Mass., shot himself through the heart last Friday.  He had been despondent of late.  He was a prominent Mason and Odd Fellow.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lyman Davis
Lyman Davis, aged 114, and probably the oldest man in the State, died at Salisbury, NY, last week.  He was a farmer and had lived in Salisbury for nearly a century.  He remembered well events of 100 years ago.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Creerar
John Creerar, senior member of the great railroad supply firm of Greerar, Adams & Co., died in Chicago a few days ago at the age of 65 years.  Mr. Creerar was a bachelor, and leaves no heirs except two maiden cousins, who live in New York.  His estate is valued at $3,000,000.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

A. J. Barrett
Rev. Dr. A. J. Barrett, pastor of the Lake Avenue Baptist Church at Rochester, NY, dropped dead while on the way to his church last week Sunday night.  He was one of the most prominent Baptists in the city, and had officiated there over 12 years.  A widow and two children survive him.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William M. Dickson
Judge William M. Dickson, who was killed in the inclined-plane accident at Cincinnati, was early associated with the anti-slavery movement and assisted in the organization of the Republican party.  He was a close friend of Salmon P. Chase, in whose law office he studied at one time, and was well known to President Lincoln, Secretary Stanton and the representative men of that time.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

B. T. Babbitt
B. T. Babbitt, the famous soap-manufacturer, died last week Sunday at his residence in New York city, aged over 80 years.  The cause of his death was really old age.  Mr. Babbitt was born in Westmoreland, Oneida county, NY, and received a meager education.  Over half a century ago he went to New York with practically no capital but a pair of willing hands and an extraordinary capacity for business.  He soon began the manufacture of the soaps which have made his name familiar throughout the world.  He invented the substitute for baking-soda known as saleratus, which the house manufactures in vast quantities.  The house has branches in every important city in the United States.  Mr. Babbitt’s life was devoted solely to his family and business.  He leaves a wife and two daughters, one of whom is the wife of Dr. Frederick E. Hyde.  His fortune is estimated at several millions.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Joanna Hyde
Mrs. Joanna Hyde died at Blossburg a few days ago at the age of 76 years.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Sweazey
Mr. Joseph Sweazey, of Westfield, Pa., died after a short illness, October 17, 1889, at the age of 77 years.  During his 25 years’ residence in this county he had always been respected by his neighbors for his sterling integrity.  Joseph Sweazey was born in the State of New Jersey, October 12, 1812.  When nine years of age his parents moved to Groton, Tompkins county, NY.  Fifty years have passed since he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet French, of Genoa, Cayuga county, NY, who still survives him.  Nearly 25 years ago he settled with his family in Westfield, where he has since resided.  He leaves three children who will deeply mourn his loss, and grandchildren who will never forget one who was taken so great an interest in their welfare.  He was remarkably honest and upright in his dealings with his fellow-men, believing every promise, whether made by himself of others, should be literally fulfilled.  He was an affectionate husband, a kind and loving father and a true, sympathetic friend to those who ever befriended him.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. F. M. Alvord, of Friendship, NY, who expressed many true, comforting words to the friends, and who seemed to have a heart that could well sympathize with those so greatly bereaved.  L. H. K.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ira H. Ayers
Last week Monday afternoon the dead body of Mr. Ira H. Ayers was found by the side of a fence a short distance from his barn in Wells, Bradford county, near the line of this county.  He had been missing since the Saturday previous, and his brother-in-law, Mr. John Lain, was out searching for him, when he was horrified to find the body.  It is said that a neighbor, Mr. James Sturdevant, accompanied Mr. Ayers home on Saturday evening, parting with him at the door.  It seems that instead of entering the house he wandered to the field and laid down.  The night was quite cold.  Mr. Ayers was a prosperous farmer and he was well known in this county, where he owned considerable property.  He recently purchased the store of Mr. David B. Lain, at Daggett’s Mills.  The funeral was held last Tuesday.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Darling
In Wellsboro, Pa., October 27, 1889, of cholera infantum, the adopted son of Arthur and Marie Darling, aged two weeks.  (Tuesday, October 29, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. R. Porter Putnam
Mr. R. Porter Putnam, who died at Portersville, California, on the 21st ultimo, was formerly a resident of Covington, being a son of General Thomas Putnam.  He was 52 years of age.  (Tuesday, November 5, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William English
Tioga, November 2, 1889.--Mr. William English died a few days ago at his residence on Crooked Creek.  His funeral occurred on Tuesday.  Mr. English served in the Mexican war.  (Tuesday, November 5, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jesse Bowell
Hon. Jesse Bowell, whose skull was crushed by a boulder thrown by Captain Decatur Abrams, at Belle Vernon, Pa., last week Monday, died Thursday morning.  Captain Abrams, who is a well-known steamboat man, is in jail at Uniontown and will be held for murder.  (Tuesday, November 5, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Edward Calhoun
James Edward Calhoun, of Abbeville, S. C., cousin and brother-in-law of John C. Calhoun, died recently, aged 93(or 98) years.  Mr. Calhoun entered the United States navy in 1816 and resigned in 1833, being the wealthiest officer in the service.  At his death he was the largest land-owner in South Carolina, with a homestead of 25,000 acres of rich savannah land, and 165,000 acres of mountain land in Pickens and Oconee counties.  For the last 50 years he had led the life of a hermit, devoting himself exclusively to the increase of his estate.  (Tuesday, November 5, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James C. Sylvis
James C. Sylvis, a prominent labor advocate, died the other day at Bloomsburg, Pa., aged 57 years.  He wrote the “Life of William H. Sylvis,” his brother and president of the National Labor Union.  The deceased was one of the committee that procured the adoption of the labor plank in the Democratic platform in 1868.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Robert Walker
Mr. Robert Walker, who was seriously injured in the Arnot mines a year ago last July, died last week Monday.  He had been a great sufferer from the injury of the spine.  The funeral last Wednesday was attended by the Knights of Pythias in a body.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Darius B. Ford
Mr. Darius B. Ford, who died at Lower Stony Fork last Thursday, had lived at that place for the past 35 years.  He was a man of sterling integrity and of great decision of character, and he was highly respected by a large circle of acquaintances.  His funeral was held on Sunday, and it was largely attended.  Rev. James A. Boyce conducted the service.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John J. Davis
Mr. John J. Davis, an esteemed citizen of Blossburg, died last week Sunday at the age of 50 years.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Lain
Last Sunday morning Mr. Charles Lain, of Chatham, committed suicide by hanging himself in his barn.  He got up and built the fire in the house as usual and then went to the barn to do the chores.  He did not return in a reasonable time, and a member of the family went out to call him to breakfast and found his dead body suspended by a halter strap.  Mr. Lain was a well-to-farmer, and he resided near Little Marsh.  It is said that he was moved to take his own life by melancholy caused by domestic troubles.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frank Kohler
Mansfield, November 8, 1889.--Mr. Frank Kohler, who was hurt in the Tioga Junction wreck last September, died at his home in this borough yesterday afternoon.  Mr. Kohler got better at the start and was about in a few days; but he was taken worse by erysipelas supervening, from which he was gaining rapidly, when blood-poisoning set in.  He lingered for a while, growing better and then worse, until yesterday afternoon, when the end came to relieve his sufferings.  Mr. Kohler was a man well respected by all who knew him and was a kind husband and father.  He was in the hardware business in this place for about 10 or 12 years, when he sold out to John Farrer and afterwards bought the grocery stock of J. F. Brooks, which he held until his death.  Mr. Kohler leaves a wife and two children and a number of brothers and sisters and a host of friends to mourn his loss.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Arad Smith
Mr. Arad Smith died at the home of his son, Charles Smith, in this borough, last Monday morning about 10 o’clock.  Mr. Smith was in his 90th year.  His wife died about eight years ago.  He leaves three children.  The funeral was held at the Elk Run church, and the burial was at that place.  Mr. Smith leaves a host of friends to mourn his loss.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick Daniels
In Deerfield, Pa., October 31, 1889, Frederick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Daniels, aged 22 years.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Darius B. Ford
At Stony Fork, Pa., November 7, 1889, Mr. Darius B. Ford, aged about 70 years.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Wilhelmina Kleinhans
At the home of O. A. Smith, in Gaines, Pa., November 8, 1889, after a long and severe illness, Mrs. Wilhelmina Kleinhans, in the 75th year.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Darius Ford
Mr. Darius Ford died last Thursday night about 8 o’clock.  Mr. Ford had been an excellent neighbor and a man respected by all, and he will be missed very much in this community.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Stephen Olmstead
At Olmsville, Pa., November 5, 1889, of pneumonia, Mr. Stephen Olmstead, aged 71 years.  (Tuesday, November 12, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Goldsmith
There died the other day at Howells, NY, Mrs. Sarah Goldsmith, aged 100 years, 1 month and 7 days.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Isaac E. Taylor
Dr. Isaac E. Taylor, the originator and founder of Bellevue Hospital College, died suddenly a few days ago.  He was 77 years old.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

M. A. Kellogg
Professor M. A. Kellogg, founder and president of College Temple, at Newman, Ga., died a few days ago.  He was one of oldest and best educators in the South.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward S. Ebbert
Few people ever heard of Edward S. Ebbert, aged 89, who died in West Virginia the other day, yet, in 1819, he built the first human habitation on the site of Chicago.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Wambold
David Wambold, one of the most noted men ever engaged in negro minstrelsy, died at New York a few days ago of a combined attack of Bright’s disease and rheumatism.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Princess Marie
Princess Marie, wife of Prince Alexander of Battenberg, died a few days ago at Gratz in child birth.  Prior to her marriage Princess Marie was the well-known opera-singer, Mile. Losinger.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Scientist Joule
Scientist Joule, who died recently in England, was almost unknown to the general public, yet his achievements gave him rank with Newton and Darwin.  He discovered the law of conservation of energy and the mechanics equivalent of heat.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lord Falmouth
Lord Falmouth, who died the other day, was one of the many racing lords of England and of the few who never indulged in betting.  In his long career on the turf he won the Derby twice, the St. Leger three times, the Oaks four times and a long list of smaller racing prizes.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Adair
The death is announced of Robert Adair, one of the oldest newspaper men in England, at the age of 87 years.  He was the oldest stamp-distributor in the Kingdom, having been appointed 60 years ago by the poet Wordsworth, who was then at the head of that department for that country.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Lawrence Manning
Ex Governor John Lawrence Manning, of South Carolina, at one time one of the wealthiest planters in the South, died in Kershaw county the other day, aged 75.  He was a son of Governor Richard Manning and a grandson of Lawrence Manning, a distinguished officer of Lee’s army of the Revolution.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert H. Shankland
Col. Robert H. Shankland, editor of the Cattaraugus Union, who died a few days ago at Ellicottville, NY, began his journalistic labors in 1835, when he was 24 years old.  He worked at the case beside Horace Greeley, and they were firm friends till death separated them, though Shankland was a stanch Democrat all his life.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Libertus VanBokkelen
Rev. Dr. Libertus VanBokkelen, a well-known retired clergyman of the Protestant Episcopal Church and former rector of Trinity Church in Buffalo, was found dead in his bed a few days ago at his residence in that city.  Heart failure is supposed to have been the cause of his death.  He was 74 years of age and was a native of New York city.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Millard Powers Fillmore
Millard Powers Fillmore, son of the late Millard Fillmore, 13th President of the United States, died of apoplexy last Friday night at a Buffalo hotel.  His exact age is not known, but it was something over 60 years.  He had no near relatives, and only a few sorrowing friends were with him in his last moments.  He was educated as a lawyer, but had retired from practice.  He was not married.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alfred Rhett
Colonel Alfred Rhett, son of ex-United States and Confederate Senator R. Barnwell Rhett, died at Charleston, SC., last Tuesday, aged 60.  He was a Colonel in the Confederate army and commanded Fort Sumter when it was attacked by the Monitor fleet.  He was a well-known duelist.  The most noted affair in which he was engaged was a fatal duel in 1863 with Colonel Ransom Calhoun.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Edgar Benson
Mr. Edgar Benson died at his home near Mansfield on the 9th instant after a short sickness.  He was in his 45th year.  The funeral was held last Tuesday at Roseville, Mr. Benson’s former home.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David Caldwell, Sr.
Mr. David Caldwell, Sr., who died on the 6th at Salem, Ohio, of pneumonia, at the age of 85 years, was once a well-known citizen of this county.  In the winter of 1835, says the Covington Intelligencer, when the snow was deep and nothing but an unbroken path ran up Pine Creek,  he started and walked from Jersey Shore to Wellsboro in one day,  a distance of 65 miles, and returned the next day.  Wellsboro was then in its infancy and it being the county seat he believed its future prospects for a thriving  town were good, and concluded to locate there.  He soon established his cabinet business, which proved successful and encouraging.  The following year he engaged in the mercantile business in company with John F. Donaldson.  About this time the Western fever broke out, and Mr. Caldwell sold his property in Wellsboro, and in the spring 1840 he started with his own conveyance and went to Battle Creek, Mich.  He soon returned to this county, and was in the grocery business at Covington for a number of years.  Through heavy losses on account of indorsing a friend’s note he became financially embarrassed and moved to Williamsport, thence to Michigan,  back again to Elmira, and for several years his home has been in Corning.  A few days before his death he went to visit his daughter at Salem.  The funeral was held at Covington on the  9th instant.  (Tuesday, November 19, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Theodore Palmer
Mrs. Theodore Palmer, of Brookfield, died of heart disease last week Sunday.  (Tuesday, November 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Timothy W. Whiting
Mr. Timothy W. Whiting died here last Saturday morning, of paralysis, at the age of 82 years.  He was formerly a resident of Bath, NY, and yesterday his remains were taken to that place for burial.  (Tuesday, November 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. V. D. McAllaster
Mrs. V. D. McAllaster, of Tioga, died at the home of her father, Rev. Mr. Howland, at Hinsdale, NY, last Thursday, of consumption.  She was about 30 years of age.  The funeral was held at Tioga on Sunday.  (Tuesday, November 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. P. W. Bradley
Mrs. P. W. Bradley, of Marsh Creek, died suddenly last week Sunday morning.  She retired at 12 o’clock in her usual health.  In a few minutes she complained of feeling badly, and her husband got up and built a fire, after which she got up; but she soon laid down again and died within a few minutes.  (Tuesday, November 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George A. Douglas
Last Thursday afternoon about 2 o’clock Mr. George A. Douglas started from Tiadaghton to go down Pine creek in a boat, to carry some supplies to a gang of workmen who were working further down the creek, under the superintendence of Mr. Ed. Baker, in repairing the damages on the railroad.  As he started out he said to an acquaintance, “If we can’t run on the railroad, we can go by water!”  Some fears were expressed for his safety, but Douglas claimed to be accustomed to handling a boat.  It was noticed, however, that when he got into the boat he seated himself with his back to the bow, evidently intending to pilot the craft with the oars.  Pine creek was very high, and the current was running swift; therefore boating must have been extremely dangerous even for one accustomed to the course of the tortuous stream.  At about half-past 11 on Friday morning Douglas’s boat was found at Slate Run.  Mr. Baker, with his men, went in search of Douglas, and his dead body was found on the bank of the creek on Mr. Hillborn’s place, near Cedar Run.  It was lying with the feet on the bank and the head in the water.  His watch was found stopped at 12:27.  Mrs. Hillborn says that she heard cries about noon on Friday.  She went to the barn, where the men were threshing, and learned that the cries did not come from that quarter.  It is supposed that the voice she heard was that of Douglas, who, benumbed by the cold water, was trying to get ashore.  The body of Douglas was brought to this borough on Friday evening, and his father, Mr. George Douglas, of Charleston, and his wife at Covington were notified.  They came here on Saturday, and the remains were taken on the afternoon train to Savona, NY, for burial.  George A. Douglas was about 40 years of age.  His home was at Covington.  He leaves a wife and one child.  He was an industrious man and an excellent citizen.  (Tuesday, November 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Tri-Counties Page 16142
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 27 JUNE 2008
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.