Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
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1890 Obituaries are continued on pages 412 413 414 415


1890-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Mr. Griffith Jenkins
Mr. Griffith Jenkins, a well-known miner and a resident of Blossburg for 30 years, died on the 30th ultimo, at the age of 74 years.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1890 The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Carrie Littley
Mrs. Joseph Littley, formerly Miss Carrie Sprague, died at Montoursville, Lycoming county, on the 21st of December, at the age of nearly 25 years.  She leaves a husband and two young children.  She was sick for many months and was a great sufferer.  She formerly resided in this county.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John H. Way
John H. Way, chief clerk in the General Superintendent’s office of the Fall Brook Coal Company, died last Saturday afternoon at his home in Corning, NY, of acute bronchitis following a protracted attack of rheumatism.  John Way was known to a great many people in this county as a popular and a genial conductor running between Blossburg and Corning for a long series of years.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Michael Ely
Mr. Michael Ely, a prominent citizen of Covington, died last Wednesday, of consumption.  He was 60 years of age.  He was born in Vermont.  In 1867 he came to this county and became a member of the firm of Hirsch, Ely & Co., of the Blossburg glass-factory, and in 1881 he moved to Covington.  His wife and 10 children survive him.  The funeral was held on Friday at the Blossburg Roman Catholic church under the auspices of the C. T. A. Society, the Presidents of the various local organizations acting as pall-bearers.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frank L. Boehm
Last Tuesday evening Mr. Frank L. Boehm, a car-inspector for the Fall Brook Coal Company, was instantly killed in the yard at Corning. Nobody saw the accident, but when the body was found the head was lying inside the rail and the trunk outside, it evidently having been dragged a few feet.  It is supposed that he was killed at about half past eight o’clock, as at about that time a switch engine pushed a few cars in upon the track where the body was found, and those cars undoubtedly came in contact with the train already there, pushing the latter onward a few feet.  From the position of the body it is thought Mr. Boehm was probably lying on his back, tightening some loosened bolt or other part of the car, when, without warning, the cars moved, the wheels caught his head and his death was instant.  The features were scarcely distinguishable, one leg was broken and the fractured bones protruding through the cloth.  His lantern was crushed, and his repair tools were found with the lantern a short distance back.  Boehm formerly lived at Blossburg, and he was employed on the Tioga railroad for 25 years.  He was 56 years of age, and he leaves a wife and several children.  The remains were interred at Blossburg.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

U. Grant Milliken and Daniel P. Howard
Last Sunday morning the wrecking crew, consisting of about 60 workmen, and about 40 men and boys attracted by curiosity, boarded a train at this station and went to Niles Valley, where the workman spent the day in getting back on the track the jumbo engine upset in the wreck of last Thursday.  The work was completed about 4 o’clock, and the workmen were all quite happy to think that the job had been accomplished so speedily.  Returning to this place, the train consisted of a platform car, upon which was a derrick and tackle-blocks, and two tool-cars in which the men and boys were riding.  It was a quarter to six o’clock when the train was moving over the iron bridge just below this station.  The engine and tender passed over safely, and then there was a terrific crash as the iron-bridge gave way and let the cars down a distance of about 15 feet.  The rear car hung by its trucks above the abutments of the bridge, and the forward end was pitched down against the other cars, smashing the roofs where they came together.  The occupants of the last car were thrown forward in a heap and many of them were badly bruised.  Upon the forward platform of this car were standing U. Grant Milliken, Daniel P. Howard and Conrad Dittenhofer, and they were crushed between the two cars and by the bridge irons which fell upon them.  Milliken and Howard were instantly killed and Dittenhofer was so badly injured that he is not expected to recover.  It was a moment of dreadful suspense when the bruised and bleeding occupants of the cars scrambled out into the darkness with the knowledge that some of their comrades were killed and perhaps many other fatally hurt.  It was not long before many citizens answered the call of the locomotive whistle and lent assistance in getting out those imprisoned under the irons and timbers.  A heavy timber was lifted off little Willie Brew, the dispatch messenger, and the poor lad was carried home.  It was thought for hours that he could not live, but yesterday the doctors predicted that he will recover.  His injury is internal, a timber striking him across the back.  Conrad Dittenhofer was taken from between the cars and from under some bridge irons and carried upon a stretcher to Fretz’s hotel near the depot.  His right arm was terribly bruised, the bones of his right leg were crushed just above the ankle, his skull was fractured near the left eye and two long gashes were cut upon the top of his head.  Dr. Morgan L. Bacon, the Company’s surgeon, assisted by Dr. C. W. Webb, amputated the arm at the shoulder, and it will undoubtedly be necessary to amputate the poor fellow’s leg also if he recovers from the shock of the first operation.  The dead bodies of U. Grant Milliken and Daniel P. Howard were taken out by chopping away the ends of the cars, and they were carried to Van Horn & Chandler’s undertaking-rooms, where they were prepared for burial.  Mr. Milliken was one of the railroad workmen.  He was 23 years of age, and he leaves a young wife, the daughter of Policeman James Hazlett.  When his body was taken from the wreck it was found that his neck was broken, the right arm and foot crushed and the body terribly bruised.  Daniel P. Howard was also found with his neck broken and skull crushed.  He was an industrious man and esteemed for his integrity.  His age was 24.  He leaves a wife and three children. The complete list of the killed and injured are as follows:  Daniel P. Howard, instantly killed.  U. Grant Milliken, instantly killed.  Conrad Dittenhofer, probably fatally injured.  William Brew, dispatch-boy, series spinal injury.  Richard Childs, conductor, bruised upon side and wrist.  Zura Baker, track supervisor, side injuries.  William Francis, injury to chest and arm.  John Roberts, ribs broken.  Luther Schaffer, head cut.  Mell Hill, gash on head.  Jerry O’Shea, badly bruised.  John Short, bad scalp wound.  Milton Fretz, bad gash between the eyes.  William Green, head and wrist cut.  Frank Strait, hand cut.  Charles O’Conner, foot hurt.  Edward Ellsworth, head cut.  Oscar Caldwell, of Blossburg, knee and back injured.  Fay Holman, hand bruised.  O. Warriner, right leg injured.  The general opinion on the night of the accident seemed to be that the derrick on the flat-car caught upon the bridge and caused the disaster by jerking out a supporting rod in the truss, thus causing the structure to fall under the weight of the cars.  Yesterday Dr. A. Niles, of Keeneyville, Coroner, called the following jury to inquire into the cause of the death of U. Grant Milliken and Daniel P. Howard:  A. S. Brewster, Foreman, E. A. Smead of Tioga, George D. Keeney of Keeneyville, Jared Davis of Keeneyville, F. W. Graves of Wellsboro and E. J. Purple of Wellsboro.  The jury viewed the bodies and then adjoined to Monday, the 20th instant, to hear the evidence in the case.  The railroad men went to work upon the wreck Sunday night, and a trestle is now being built.  It is expected that trains will be running up to the station to-day.  Engineer Shaffer, of the ill-fated train, with great presence of mind jumped from his engine immediately after the accident and dashed through the creek and back down the track with his lantern to stop Engineer Barber(?), whose engine was following the first train.  Quite likely his thoughtfulness averted a second direful disaster.  Drs. Morgan L. Bacon, Hugh L. Davis, Clarence Webb and D. G. Drake were kept busy for some hours after the accident in attending the injured.  The funeral of Mr. Milliken is to be held at the home of James Hazlett this afternoon at 1 o’clock.  Mr. Howard’s funeral is to be held at the First Baptist church at 1:30 o’clock p. m. to-day.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Roxanna Brewster
Mrs. Roxanna Brewster died very unexpectedly at the residence of her son, Mr. C. E. Brewster, on Tioga street, last Sunday at 9 o’clock in the morning.  She was 89 years old, but very smart and vigorous for so old a person.  She got up Sunday morning and dressed herself and seemed to feel as well as usual; but suddenly she had a difficulty in breathing, and her death followed in a few minutes.  Mrs. Brewster’s maiden name was Sprague.  She was born in Massachusetts, and was the 5th wife of the late Jonah Brewster, who died in March, 1858.  She was a woman of unusual intelligence and retained her mental faculties to the last.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Doren J. Kniffin
Mrs. Doren J. Kniffin, a former resident of Blossburg, died recently in Elmira.  She was a daughter of Mr. Ira B. Guernsey, who was for years a conductor on the Erie road.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Capps
At Wellsboro, Pa., January 13, 1890, Mrs. Elizabeth Capps, aged 62 years.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Darrah Kelley
Congressman Kelley passed quietly away at 6:20 o’clock last Thursday evening at his hotel in Washington, in the presence of his wife and children.  His death was painless, Dr. Stanton says, as were his last two days, for during the 48 hours he had been in the state of unconsciousness varied only by delirium.  He literally died of heart failure.  There were no dying words to record.  All day Wednesday and Thursday his family watched carefully for some sign of consciousness, but in vain.  Even when he was conscious he had difficulty in speaking, owing to his cancer and catarrh.  His last words were really those he addressed to his wife and daughter when they went down 10 days before his death to take him home, and he told them.  “No, no; I want to stay here and die in the harness.“  He said to them again and again that he longed for the meeting of Congress after the holiday recess, so that he might take his place in the House.  He wanted to die there, and he fought against his increasing weakness chiefly that he might live to do it.  Judge Kelley had an exalted idea of the office of Representative in Congress.  He regarded it as a place of the highest dignity, and he could not have died more content in the Presidency.  During all the past year as his strength gradually failed he kept his thought of dying in the harness constantly in mind.  He hoped at first last winter that he might die as chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means, but by the time he got to Washington this winter he found himself so weak that he knew that it would be impossible.  Last winter Judge Kelley was able to take some part in the affairs of the House and to look after the interests of his constituents, but this winter he has not even attempted this.  He had just, as he said himself, been trying to keep his shattered hulk afloat.  His cancerous and his catarrhal trouble, especially since the catarrh extended to his stomach, taken with the gradual disappearance of his teeth, made it difficult for him to take solid food.  For months he had lived practically on liquid foods and stimulants, especially champagne, of which he was very fond.  Latterly he had been kept alive by stimulants alone.  Naturally enough, he got very thin as well as very weak, so that the undertaker remarked upon his emaciation.  But for a man of 76 he looked surprisingly young as he sat around the hotel before he got so weak that he had to go to bed.  It was the erectness of his spare figure, the grace of his gait and the dark color of his hair and beard, flecked though they were with gray, which relieved his wrinkled, weather-worn face and made him seem contemporary with men who were in the cradle when he first appeared in public life.  He was very proud of his youthful appearance, and always counted himself in as one of “the boys.”  Until this winter he was fond of dining out and of good entertainments of all sorts, the theater included.  William Darrah Kelley was born in Philadelphia, says the Record, in 1814--April 12th.  His grandfather, John, was a Revolutionary officer, of Salem county, NJ.  His father was David Kelley, who was in business as a jeweler and watchmaker at No. 227 North Second street.  His birth occurred during the war of 1812, when business of all kinds was depressed.  When peace was declared the financial embarrassments still continued, and almost every family was thereby affected, some being utterly wrecked in fortune.  This was the fate reserved for the Kelley family, and, to add to their distress, death removed the husband and father, leaving the widow without any estate and with four little children to provide for.  Until he was 11 years old William attended school, and then made a start in the battle of life--first as an errand boy in a bookstore, and then as copy-reader in the Inquirer’s office.  Finally concluding to learn a trade, he was apprenticed in the jewelry manufactory of Richards & Dubosq., with whom he remained until 1834.  Besides sticking close to his bench in working hours, and in the evening indulging a keen appetite for books, he sought recreation in Colonel James Page’s State Fencibles.  When he had completed his apprenticeship he found employment at his trade in Boston.  His stay there had a marked effect upon the broader career which ability, industry and perseverance were to open to him.  He achieved at that time considerable fame as an eloquent lecturer and debater, and was advised to seek a scholarship in Harvard.  A better suggestion came from the late Colonel James Page, long known as one of the most active of Philadelphians.  “Why don’t you study law?”  “Why don’t I go to Congress, sir?” replied Kelley, the one thing seeming to him as practicable as the other.  “Perhaps you may some day, but first come and read law with me.”  On March 9, 1839, Colonel Page registered William D. Kelley, who had now returned to Philadelphia, as a student at law in his office, and on April 17, 1841, on Colonel Page’s motion, the jeweler became a full-fledged limb of the law.  He was admitted to practice in 1841; in 1845 was appointed Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for the State, and in 1846 was commissioned by Governor Shunk one of the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas.  Here his course was put to a severe test in the celebrated contested election case for District Attorney, Reed vs. Knease(?), where the Democratic party lost their case.  Judge Kelley was known to be largely responsible for this fact, and he was ostracized by those with whom he had formerly sympathized.  In 1851 the Judges were made elective, and running on an independent ticket he was elected and commissioned for 10 years.  About the time of the Missouri Compromise he was outspoken in his opposition to slavery, and in 1856 the Republican Convention of the 4th Congressional district nominated him for Congress.  He accepted and was defeated.  He was a delegate to the Chicago Convention of 1860, and when Lincoln was chosen to be President Kelley was elected to represent the 4th district in the 37th Congress, and served continuously up to the time of his death, being known as the “The Father of the House.”  It is not necessary to follow the details of Judge Kelley’s Congressional career.  He took rank beside the most able and earnest defenders of the Union, favored the most vigorous conduct of the war, favored emancipation and manhood suffrage, and so early in 1862 advocated the arming of the negro; took an advanced position on the question of reconstruction; advocated the Morrill tariff of 1861, and was always one of the most advanced protectionists.  In 1869 he was made a member of the Committee on Ways and Means, and remained in continuous service on that committee until December last, when, in consequence of his feeble health, he requested Speaker Reed to give him a committee assignment which would involve less labor.  In compliance with that request he was made Chairman of the Committee on Manufactures.  By 1878 he had risen to second place on the Ways and Means Committee, and when Mr. Henry L. Dawes was transferred to the Senate in 1875 he became the senior Republican member.  In 1879, under Democratic rule in the House, the late President Garfield was placed ahead of him on the committee; but, when the Republicans returned to power in the House in 1881, he was made Chairman and leader of the Republican majority.  Judge Kelley’s health had been failing for nearly 10 years part, and frequently during that period he had been compelled to take long rests from active Congressional labor.  As long ago as 1883 he was obliged to make a trip to Europe on account of his health.  For many years past Judge Kelley had made his home in an attractive house in West Philadelphia.  There is nothing pretentious about the residence, but its halls are broad and its ceilings high, and ample grounds surround it.  Some years ago he was regarded as a poor man financially, but the appreciation of his West Philadelphia property ultimately placed him in comfortable circumstances.  A family of children had grown up around Judge Kelley.  His eldest son, William D. Kelley, Jr., is extensively engaged in business in Birmingham, Ala., and another son, Bertram, is now a student at the University of Pennsylvania.  His three daughters are married, one of them having become the wife of Russian gentleman while she was pursuing her medical studies in Europe.  William D. Kelley died in this city last evening, in his 76th year.  He had served 14 consecutive terms in the House and had just entered upon his 15th term, and his continuous service of 29 years exceeds that of any other member of either House, with the single exception of Senator Morrill, who began his service in the 34th Congress.  The House adjourned to day in recognition of the sad event, and the funeral services will be held at the capitol tomorrow, after which the remains will be taken to Philadelphia for burial.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Robert Browning
The funeral of Robert Browning took place at Westminster Abbey a few days ago.  The body was placed in a polished pine coffin, on which was a small brass plate bearing the dates of the birth and death of the poet.  Wreaths from Lord Tennyson and Miss Browning were placed on the top of the coffin.  The grave is in front of Abraham Cowley’s monument, within the angle marked by Longfellow’s bust.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. General Longstreet
The wife of Gen. Longstreet died at her home in Gainesville, Ga., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Rodgers
Mrs. Rodgers, wife of Rear Admiral C. R. P. Rodgers, died recently after a long illness.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alva Stewart
Alva Stewart, Judge of the 9th Judicial Court of Wisconsin, died of pneumonia at Portage, Wis., a few days ago, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mellville G. Blaine
Prof. Mellville G. Blaine, principal teacher at the Chemwa Indian training school near Salem, Or., and a brother of Secretary James G. Blaine, died a few days ago after a brief illness, at the age of 63.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. Oswell Livingstone
Dr. W. Oswell Livingstone, the last surviving son of David Livingstone, the famous African explorer, died at St. Albans, Eng., the other day, aged 39.  He was born in Africa and failing health compelled him to give up his practice as a doctor some nine years ago.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Levi F. Bowen
Levi F. Bowen died at Lockport, NY, the other day, after a short illness, aged 81 years.  He was a Provost-Marshall of the district during the war and a Judge of Niagara county in 1878.  He was also at one time a Justice of the Supreme Court of the 8th Judicial district.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Mollenhauer
Henry Mollenhauer, the well-known composer, leader and pianist, died recently at his residence in Brooklyn, NY, of heart disease.  He was born in Erfurt, Germany, in 1825, played before the Duchess of Welmar when seven years old, attained great celebrity in all Europe and came to this country in 1856.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frederick Vinton
Rev. Frederick Vinton, librarian of the College of New Jersey, died recently from a complication of diseases at his residence at Princeton, NJ.  He had been ill for some time.  Mr. Vinton was born in Boston, October 9, 1817.  For eight years he was Assistant Librarian of Congress, which position he resigned in 1873 to assume the one which he held at the time of his death.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Carter
Robert Carter, the senior partner of Robert Carter & Bros., publishers of New York city, for over 50 years, died recently in his 82d year.  He was of Scotch nativity, and was born in Earlston, a village about six miles from Abbotsford, in 1807.  He was a man of earnest and thorough nature, with a bent toward religion that colored the business of the publishing house which he established in this country.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Hamilton
Alexander Hamilton, a grandson of the great statesman of that name, died at Irvington-on-the-Hudson a few days ago, in his 79th year.  He was a native of New York city.  After a partial course at West Point, he studied law, and in 1848 was appointed Secretary of the United States Legation at Madrid.  Upon his return to New York two years later he entered upon a very successful career at the bar and retired in 1879.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Robert Tyler
Mrs. Robert Tyler died in Montgomery, Ala., a few days ago, in the 74th year of her age.  Mrs. Tyler was a daughter of the tragedian Thomas Cooper and Mary Fairlie, a celebrated belle of New York.  In 1840 she married Robert Tyler, eldest son of President Tyler, and upon the special request of the President and of his wife, who was an invalid, she presided as “lady of the White House” during the first three years of President Tyler’s Administration.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Adelbert Hill
Adelbert Hill, aged 23, was so badly hurt by falling under the wheels of a Northern Central freight train at Columbia X Roads last Tuesday that he died the following afternoon at the hospital in Elmira, where he had been taken for treatment.  One of his legs was cut completely off and the other badly mangled by the wheels.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Radford
Rear Admiral William Radford, United States Navy, retired, died at Washington a few days ago.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Starr Dana
Commander William Starr Dana, of the United States Navy, died in Paris the other day of pneumonia.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Prof. Wilhelm C. H. Muller and Prof. Nasse
Two German scholars of note died recently,--Prof. Wilhelm C. H. Muller, the philologist, and Prof. Nasse, the political economist.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lord Napier of Magdala
Lord Napier of Magdala, Abyssinia, who has just died at the age of 80, began his service in the British Army as a member of the Bengal Engineers in 1872.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George I. Woods
Ex Governor George I. Woods died at Portland, Ore., recently.  He was elected Governor of Oregon in 1869, and in 1871 was appointed Governor of Utah by President Grant.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Norwood Browne
Norwood Browne, one of the oldest editors in the State, died the other day at his home in Delhi, NY, aged 77 years.  He had been editor of the Delaware Gazette for 50 years.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles A. Clark
Prof. Charles A. Clark, principal of the Albion Academy, died at Milton, Wis., last week of what is believed to have been hydrophobia.  He was bitten by a cat last March, but no serious results were feared at the time.  Recently, however, unmistakable signs of hydrophobia appeared, and his death was a very painful one.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Elliot Bowen
John Elliot Bowen, son of Henry C. Bowen of the Independent, and one of the editors of that paper, who died of typhoid fever a few days ago at the house of a friend on Columbia Heights, Brooklyn, was to have been married very soon.  This is a melancholy close of a life that promised much.  He was but just past 30.  He was graduated at Yale in 1881 and spent some years abroad.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Harrison
Alexander Harrison, an American artist of extraordinary talent, long resident in Europe, has died by his own hand, having shot himself at Dover, England, for causes unknown to his friends.  Harrison was born in Philadelphia 37 years ago, and went to Paris before he was 30 years old, entering there the school of fine arts, and studying under Gerome, whom, however, he never imitated.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Fitzgeorge
Mrs. Fitzgeorge, whose death is announced from London, was one of the most respectable members of the royal family of England, although her name never appeared in any official list.  The Duke of Cambridge married her at Dublin 45 years ago, when he was a young officer of 25 and she was the beautiful Irish actress and dancer, Miss Farebrother.  The Queen never would acknowledge the marriage of her cousin, but the Duke was faithful to his Irish wife and she to him.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Walker Blaine
Walker Blaine, Examiner of Claims of the State Department, and oldest son of James G. Blaine, Secretary of State, died at the family residence in the old Seward mansion facing Lafayette park at Washington at 8:20 last Wednesday evening, of acute pneumonia superinduced by an attack of the grip.  He had been ill only a few days, and his death was a sudden and severe shock to an unusually large circle of friends, who were not aware that he was dangerously sick till Wednesday morning, while the family, who were all greatly devoted to him, are prostrated with grief.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horatio Allen
Horatio Allen, the civil engineer who died at Montrose, NJ, a few days ago, claimed the honor of running the first locomotive engine in this country.  When he heard of Stephenson’s success in England, he sailed for Liverpool with an order to buy three locomotives and a quantity of rails.  In August, 1826, he ran an engine out of Honesdale, Pa., on the Delaware and Hudson road, no one being found who was willing to accompany him upon the trip.  Mr. Allen was a Columbia College graduate, and became an engineer of marked ability.  He had been assistant engineer of the Croton aqueduct, a New York City Water Commissioner, president of the Erie Railroad, and consulting engineer of the Brooklyn bridge.  Many of his inventions, including a four wheel truck, are now used upon all railroads.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elbridge Gerry Lapham
Elbridge Gerry Lapham, ex-Senator from the State of New York, died a few days ago at his home in Canandaigua lake, aged 75 years.  He succeeded Roscoe Conkling in the Senate in 1881, when Messrs. Conkling and Platt resigned, and served until March, 1885.  Mr. Lapham was an upright man, an able lawyer and a faithful public officer.  He was born in Farmington, NY, October 18, 1814, a farmer’s boy, who attended the academy at Canandaigua in the same class with Stephen A. Douglas.  He first became a civil engineer and was employed on the line of the Michigan Southern railroad; then he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1844, and settled in practice at Canandaigua.  He gained a good business and local influence, and was sent to the 44th Congress, being three times re-elected.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James B. Dewey [SRGP 05858]
Mr. James B. Dewey, one of Sullivan’s pioneers, died last week, of pneumonia, at the age of 86 years.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Stephen Costley
Mr. Stephen Costley died at his home in Elkland last week Sunday night of heart disease.  He was 37 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Lizzie Whitney
Miss Lizzie Whitney, of Scranton, a student at the Mansfield Normal school, died last week Sunday evening of laryngitis following an attack of the grip.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Daskam
Mr. William Daskam, who was injured on the 10th instant, by being struck by a locomotive at Susquehanna, died from his injuries last Wednesday, January 14, 1890, of Wellsboro, Pa., aged 27 years and 8 months.  His father, mother and sister were at his bedside.  The remains were brought home on Thursday and the funeral was held at the family residence on Saturday afternoon, Rev. Dr. A. C. Shaw conducting the service.  William Daskam was nearly 28 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Ruth Morehouse
Miss Ruth Morehouse, a well-known and highly respected colored resident of this borough, died yesterday afternoon just before 3 o’clock, of pneumonia.  She had been a domestic in the John Dickinson family for a great many years, and she was beloved by many people who had learned to know her excellent qualities of mind and heart.  She was born in Colesville, Broome county, NY, August 12, 1820.  She was taken sick last Saturday.  The funeral was held at the Methodist church tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William F. Goodman
On the 11th instant Dr. William F. Goodman, a colored physician who was well known in this county, died at the Arnot Ogden hospital in Elmira.  He was 70 years of age, and he was highly respected.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Maggie Graves [Margaret Doud SRGP 06781]
Maggie, wife of Harry T. Graves, of the Milleton Advocate, died last Wednesday morning in her 46th year.  She had been an invalid for a long time with consumption.  The funeral was largely attended at the Millerton church last Friday afternoon.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Ingerick [SRGP 74379]
Rev. Jacob Ingerick died at the home of his son, Mr. Elmer Ingerick, at East Charleston, last Wednesday, in his 86th year.  He had been sick only about a week.  Jacob Ingerick was born in New York city, September 28, 1804.  He was married at Neversink, NY, in 1825, at the age of 21.  His wife died about 13 years ago.  Of their four children, two sons are now living--Mr. Elmer Ingerick, of East Charleston, and Mr. Wesley Ingerick, now residing at Little Marsh, both being respected citizens.  Mr. Ingerick came into this vicinity 51 years ago and settled on a farm just north of this borough, where he lived and toiled for several years.  His person and life had become widely known through this section.  He began preaching when about 36 years of age, and continued till his feebleness prevented.  He began his ministerial work as a local preacher in the Methodist Church and afterward became associated with the Freewill Baptist Church, and still later he joined the regular Baptist Church.  He held several pastorates and did much supply work as calls came to him, always retaining his home on the farm, from which he derived almost his entire support.  He cheerfully gave his time and strength to the Churches he served.  For many miles about here he has done much efficient work in preaching the word.  He was an industrious student, though he had enjoyed no academical training.  Possessed of a strong memory and an earnest, persistent thirst for truth, he came into possession of a wide range of facts and a clear view of the saving power of the gospel, and he delighted to converse on these themes.  During his last hours his gaze was foreward and not backward.  At one time he remarked, “I would like to go to sleep and not awake here again.”  When asked if he desired some food, he said, “I am feasting on Christ.”  His familiar form so frequently seen on our streets will be missed.  “He rests from his labors.”  His funeral was held at the Methodist church at East Charleston, and it was largely attended.  The sermon was preached by Rev. H. J. Owen.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. George Wilson
Lamb’s Creek, Jan. 17, 1890.--Mrs. George Wilson died very suddenly at the residence of Mrs. Daniel Clark a few days ago.  Mrs. Wilson had started from her home about a mile from Clark’s to go to her farm up Mann creek.  She stopped at Mrs. Clark’s to rest.  She sat down in a chair and died in a few minutes.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Graves
At Tioga, Pa., January 9, 1890, of heart disease, Mrs. Sarah Graves, aged 49 years.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Gorley and three children
John Gorley and three children perished by fire one night last week at St. John.  N. F. Gorley died in the flames while making a third attempt to rescue his children from a burning house.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Andrew Twaddle
Andrew Twaddle, who died recently at Morristown, Ohio, aged 74, was the last of a famous family of nine children, all born without the optic nerve, therefore stone blind.  The State deeded them a section of land for a farm.  They could go anywhere alone, did all the farm work, cut timber, built fences, ran a grist mill, drove horses, told the color of horses with denomination and genuineness of paper money by touch.  They were useful and wealthy.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ex-Senator Riddleberger
Ex-Senator Riddleberger died at Winchester, Va., early last Friday morning.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rev. Father Sestine
Rev. Father Sestine, considered the most accomplished astronomer in the United States, is dead.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ansele Kinne
Professor Ansele Kinne, of Syracuse, NY, prominent in State educational circles, died of heart failure last week.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Wheeler
George Wheeler, the well known yacht builder and designer, died at his home in Riverdale, Mass., last week, aged 43.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John McSweeney
John McSweeney, the most prominent criminal lawyer in Ohio, died at his home at Wooster, Ohio, last Tuesday night from acute pneumonia.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Harry Plunkett Grattan
The last of the original contributors to Punch, which was started 49 years ago, died lately in the person of Mr. Harry Plunkett Grattan, who was in his 82d year.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Nicholas Longworth
The death of Judge Nicholas Longworth, of Cincinnati, a few days ago, is severely felt in that city.  Judge Longworth, who was in the prime of life, was distinguished not only as a jurist but as an author, mechanic, philosopher and chemist.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Adam Forepaugh, Sr.
Adam Forepaugh, Sr., died at his home in Philadelphia, last Wednesday night, a victim to pneumonia super induced by the prevailing epidemic.  Next to Mr. Barnum, Mr. Forepaugh was probably the most widely-known showman in this country.  He was 68 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Albert Paul Smith
Albert Paul Smith, manager of the Chicago Clearing House, fell dead in a street car last Wednesday evening while on his way home from his office.  Mr. Smith had been at the clearing house during the day, and apparently in good health.  Heart disease was the cause of death.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Peter Henderson
Peter Henderson, the florist and seedsman, died at his home in Jersey City a few days ago, of pneumonia.  The disease developed from the grip.  He was 66 years old and almost up to the day of his death he was in robust health.  He leaves a wife, two sons, who were his partners in business, and one daughter.  He was born in Scotland, in 1823.  At the age of 16 he was apprenticed to a gardener.  He became a careful student of botany and developed into a scientific as well as a practical horticulturalist.  He had written many books on horticulture.  His first was “Gardening for Profit.”  It was published in 1866, and more than 125,000 copies have been sold.  In 1868 he published “Practical Floriculture,” and in 1875 “Gardening for Pleasure.”  His last book, “Handbook of Plants,” was printed in 1881.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frances Bowen
Francis Bowen, one of the oldest and ablest professors of Harvard College, died at his home in Cambridge last Tuesday morning.  He was born in Charlestown, Mass., September 8, 1811.  His ancestors were New England farmers.  Without means, but possessing indomitable energy, he set about the task of securing a liberal education.  He became a great educator in the broadest sense of the word.  In 1854 he published his most useful and valuable work.  “The Principles of Political Economy Applied to the Conditions and Institutions of the American People.”  He was a strong protectionist, and the principles of protection were ably set forth in this work, which has been a college text book for many years in institutions where foreign notions have not supplanted American ideas.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Covell
Robert Covell, of Elmira, in years past a well-known business man, died Tuesday night, aged 75 years.  At one time he was worth considerable money, but adversity overtook him and he died a poor man.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Jackson
Henry Jackson, the colored prisoner, who was about to be removed to the Eastern penitentiary at Philadelphia, to serve a sentence of three years and three months, cut his throat  last Thursday morning and died a short time after his condition was discovered.  He leaves a wife and two children at Williamsport.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. S. Steck
W. S. Steck, of Mill Hall, Pa., who was a guest in the family of John Shultz, at Jersey Shore, was found dead in bed last Thursday morning.  Mr. Steck was in apparent good health the evening before, and made no complaint of feeling unwell upon retiring.  In the morning he did not answer the call to get up, and when Mr. Shultz went to his room he was found dead.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male McConnell [SRGP 641718]
The 10 year old son of Mr. Alonzo McConnell, who lives on the flats beyond the cemetery, died of diphtheria last Tuesday.  Another child in the family is sick, but is reported to be out of danger.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Harriet Rouse
Mrs. Harriet Rouse, of Cherry Flats, died last Friday at the age of 76 years.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Thomas Shaw [SRGP 05772 Wellsboro Cemetery]
Mr. Thomas Shaw died at his home near the old Dickinson mill last Friday morning of paralysis.  He had been gradually failing for many months, and for a long time he had been almost helpless.  He was about 65 years of age.  The funeral was held on Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. H. A. Sherman [Elizabeth James SRGP 08533 Watson Cemetery]
Mrs. H. A. Shearman, of Rutland, died last week Sunday of pneumonia following the grip.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. H. H. DeMille
Rev. J. H. H. DeMille, formerly rector of the Episcopal Church at Tioga, died recently at Waverly, NY.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lamont Leach
Mr. Lamont Leach, an old and esteemed citizen of Westfield, died last Sunday night of typhoid pneumonia, following an attack of grip.  He was 76 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Fischler, Sr.
Last Wednesday afternoon Mr. John Fischler, Sr., a well-known resident of this village, died of congestion of the lungs.  He was in his 67th year.  He had been in poor health for several weeks, but his condition was not considered critical until a few days before his death.  Mr. Fischler was born in Germany.  He came here in the fall of 1856, worked at his trade as a shoemaker for a number of years, and then he opened a shoe-shop.  Some years afterward he started a shoe-store which he successfully conducted until a few years ago, when he closed out the business.  He was a man of integrity and was a good citizen.  He was fond of music, and devoted much of his leisure to the cultivation of this talent in himself and family.  Years ago he organized an excellent orchestra composed almost entirely of members of his own family, but he retired in a few years and the organization was continued for a long time by his five sons.  He leaves a wife and eight children.  The funeral was held at St. Peter’s church last Friday morning, and it was largely attended.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sally Kelts [Sally Putnam SRGP 88281]
Mrs. Sally Kelts died at Covington yesterday noon.  She was the oldest resident of Covington, being in her 96th year.  She was a native of New Hampshire, was a daughter of Elijah Putnam and a sister of Gen. Thomas Putnam, both well known citizens of Covington up to the time of their death.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William C. Trim
Last Wednesday afternoon Mr. William C. Trim died at his home near Westfield from injuries received by the kick of a horse on the previous Saturday.  Mr. Trim was in the field with his team, and he stooped to hitch the tug, when his horse kicked him, striking him on the head just above the left temple.  The skull was crushed, and Mr. Trim remained unconscious till death came to his relief.  The funeral was held on Friday, and the remains were taken to Elkland, Mr. Trim’s former home, for burial.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Parkhurst
Mr. John Parkhurst, an old resident and one of the most prominent business men of Elkland, died quite suddenly at his home on Main street last week Monday morning.  He had been in poor health for the past two years, says the Journal, and of late had been quite feeble, but had not been confined to his bed.  He arose as usual Monday morning and sat with his family at the breakfast table.  After finishing the meal he sat and conversed with his family a short time and then retired to his room, upon entering which he fell to the floor and expired almost immediately.  The cause of his death was heart failure, super induced by Bright’s disease, to which he had been subject for several years.  Mr. Parkhurst was born at Richmond, NH, February 13, 1823.  He came to Tioga county in 1844, locating at Lawrenceville, where he engaged in the mercantile business.  In 1848 he went to Elkland and formed a co-partnership with the late Joel, Parkhurst, which continued until 1854, when the latter retired from the firm and the late J. G. Parkhurst was admitted.  This partnership continued until 1804, when it was discontinued and Mr. Parkhurst engaged in wool buying in Tioga.  Bradford, Potter, and Steuben counties until 1867.  In that year he, with the late Joel Parkhurst, under the firm name of J. & J. Parkhurst, bankers, established the business, which has been so successfully carried on since, and is now recognized as one of the strongest private banks in the State.  In 1869 Mr. C. L. Pattison was admitted to the firm, and the firm name became J. Parkhurst & Co., with copartners as above.  About a year ago he retired from active business, his oldest son, Mr. L. K. Parkhurst, taking his place in the bank.  Mr. Parkhurst was one of the three sole survivors who aided in making Elkland a borough in 1849 and 1850, and he had lived to see it grow from a small hamlet to the most thriving business town in the  Cowanesque valley.  Probably ne man had a wider acquaintance or more friends in this and adjoining counties.  He was also one of the charter members of the Odd Fellows’ Lodge in that place.  Mr. Parkhurst married in 1852, and leaves a widow and three children to mourn his loss--Mr. L. K. Parkhurst, Mrs. W. E. Williams, of Montrose, Pa., and Mr. J. W. Parkhurst, of Reed City, Mich.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Delos Ely
In Charleston, Pa., January 19, 1890, Mr. Delos Ely, aged about 50 years.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Augustus Gray
In Ward, Pa., January 2, 1890, of consumption, Mr. Augustus Gray, aged 40 years.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary A. Satterlee
Mrs. Mary A. Satterlee died on the 18th instant in the 72nd year of her age.  The funeral was held on Monday at the late residence of the deceased.  Rev. Stephen Tobey officiating.  Mrs. Satterlee was a noble christian woman, a fond mother and a faithful friend.  She leaves four adult Children and a large circle of friends to mourn her loss.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Andrew Teachman
Osceola, Jan. 24, 1890.--Mr. Andrew Teachman, formerly of this place, died a few days ago at his home near Ulysses.  His remains passed through here last Monday for burial in the Lime Kiln cemetery in Farmington township.  (Tuesday, January 28, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Adell
Jacob Adell, of Fairmount, Ind., roasted himself alive last Wednesday to expiate his sins and propitiate the favor of the Almighty.  Adell, until recently, was a Quaker.  A month ago he became a follower of Frank Norton, who teaches the severest self-sacrifice as the only way to Heaven.  Adell was evidently insane.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

T. J. McGibben
Hon. T. J. McGibben, president of the Latonia Jockey Club and the best known horseman in Kentucky, is dead.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Addison M. Sawyer
Addison M. Sawyer, the millionaire of Athol, Mass., inventor of the “Sawyer gun,” which was used during the war of the Rebellion is dead.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mason Brown
Colonel Mason Brown, one of the most prominent lawyers in Kentucky and a man of National reputation, died last Wednesday of pneumonia.  He was a leading Republican and a brother of the late B. Gratz Brown.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Potter
One of the largest men in southern Pennsylvania, George Potter, the Collector of borough taxes at Waynesboro, died the other day.  He weighed 430 pounds.  For over a year he had slept in a chair, fearing that if he should ever lie down he would never be able to keep alive.  His coffin measured 74 1/4” long, 33 ½” wide and 27 ½” in depth.  It took eight men to carry him.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Chester Edward Lester
Charles Edward Lester died in Detroit, Mich., last Wednesday, aged 80.  Mr. Lester was prominently identified with the abolition movement.  While in England as a delegate from this country to the Exeter Hall Convention, Mr. Lester gathered data for a work which he afterwards published, called “The Glory and Shame of England.”  He was Consul-General to Italy under President Pierce.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Withey Gull
Sir William Withey Gull, the distinguished English physician and author, is dead.  He was born December 31, 1816.  He received the degree of M. D., at the University of London in 1846.  From 1847-1849 he was professor of physiology in the Royal Institute, and was a lecturer at Guy’s hospital for many years.  He was a voluminous writer upon medical subjects and became celebrated as a successful practitioner.  He attended the Prince of Wales during his long and severe illness from typhoid fever, and was knighted for the service then rendered.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Westenhoffer
A frightful accident occurred at the stone quarries at Chickies, Lancaster county, last Wednesday morning.  A charge of dynamite failed to explode, and when William Westenhoffer, the foreman, went to investigate the charge, it exploded as he was working at it, tearing off his head and mangling his body in a frightful manner.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. W. H. McHenry and Alex. Carman
Last Tuesday morning a terrible nitro-glycerin explosion occurred near Mt. Alton, McKean county, killing two men--W. H. McHenry and Alex. Carman, of Bradford, both well-known “oil-well shooters.”  They were going to Alton to shoot a well, and while unloading their wagons the terrible explosion occurred.--no one knows how.  The Era says pieces of human flesh and shreds of clothing were to be seen on the ground and clinging to the limbs of trees in all directions.  A round hole torn in the earth, 16 feet in diameter and three feet deep, showed where the explosion had occurred.  Twenty feet from the hole stood two trembling, bleeding horses.  They had in their fright started to run, but a beech stump was in their way, and the axle coming in contact with it held them in check.  Two cans of glycerin stood on the ground between the wagon and the hole.  They were intact, and why they were not blown up with the others is one of those mysteries that cannot be explained.  The force of the explosion broke into pieces and removed bodily the large tree alongside of which the cans were placed by the ill-fated shooters.  Why McHenry’s horses were not killed is another question not easily answered.  McHenry was aged, about 45 years and leaves a wife and children.  Carman was aged about 55 years and leaves a wife.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Kentch
The 9 month old son of Mr. James Kentch, on Conway street, died last Sunday afternoon of diphtheria.  Another child in the family is quite sick with the same disease.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Emma Beals
The body of Miss Emma Beals was found in the small lake near Canton yesterday afternoon.  She had been missing since Saturday afternoon, but it was supposed that she had gone to see some friends who live near.  It is thought that she drowned herself, as she had threatened to do so.  She was 21 years old.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Edna Williams
Last Tuesday evening Edna, the 5 year old daughter of Mrs. Orrin E. Williams died of diphtheria.  The child had been sick for several days and was believed to be improving until a few hours before her death, when she became suddenly worse.  She was an unusually bright child.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Levi Bewley
Mrs. Levi Bewley died last Saturday evening at Elmira.  She went to the city from this place in the morning and was apparently in her usual health, but was taken with a hemorrhage towards evening.  She formerly lived in Elmira, but she came here to reside several years ago.  Her husband is a wagon-maker.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary A. Lamkin
Mary A., wife of Rev. Harvey Lamkin, of Covington, died last Tuesday of pneumonia.  She was nearly 81 years of age.  The funeral was held on Thursday, Rev. E. J. Heermans, of Elmira, NY, conducting the service.  Mrs. Lamkin was a woman deeply loved for her beautiful traits of character.  She leaves three sons and one daughter.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Sarah Scott
Miss Sarah Scott died at the home of her nephew, Mr. John P. Scott, in Charleston, on the 25th ultimo, of dropsy.  She was in her 82nd year.  She resided in Herkimer county, NY, where she was born, until five years ago, when she came to this county.  She was the last of a family of seven children, all of whom lived to a ripe old age.  Miss Scott was a great sufferer for many months before her death. (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Davis
Mrs. Mary Davis, widow of John J. Davis, died at Blossburg on the 25th ultimo after suffering from an attack of the grip.  She was 62 years of age.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Delia May Ames
In Minnesota, January 18, 1890, Delia May Ames, aged 26 years, 8 months and 18 days.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Brown
In Middlebury, Pa., January 27, 1890, Mrs. John Brown, aged 62 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Linus A. Califf
At Lawrenceville, Pa., January 20, 1890, Linus A. Califf, aged 72 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James B. Dewey
At Mainesburg, Pa., January 14, 1890, James B. Dewey, aged 85 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Dingman
At Knoxville, Pa., January 26, 1890, Mrs. Elizabeth Dingman, aged 61 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Lamkin
At Covington, Pa., January 28, 1890, Mary, wife of Rev. Harvey Lamkin, aged 80(or 89)  years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Asenath Longwell [Asenath Lawrence SRGP 52607]
In Rutland, Pa., January 29, 1890, of paralysis, Asenath, wife of Samuel Longwell, aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alden Murdock
In Brookfield, Pa., January 27, 1890, Alden, infant son of Mr. Alden Murdock.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Parmenter
In Wells, Pa., January 15, 1890, of pneumonia, Mrs. Sarah Parmenter, aged 53 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Rice
At Trout Run, Pa., January 28, 1890, of heart disease, Henry Rice, aged 67 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Edwin Satterlee
In West Jackson, Pa., January 18, 1890, Mrs. Edwin Satterlee, aged 67 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Tears
At Canton, Pa., January 27, 1890, of pneumonia, John Tears, aged 77 years.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 16 JAN 2009
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.