Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
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Tri County Clippings- Page Four Hundred Fourteen

These obituaries are extracted from various newspaper that are available to us. They are arranged by newspaper and date. If you do not have the time to enjoy the luxury of sifting through our clippings they will be included in the Search Engine which you can reach from the "Front Door" of the Tri-County Genealogy & History sites by Joyce M. Tice. All Newspaper clipping in this section of the site are in the Clippings partition of the Partioned search engine that you can find at the bottom of the Current What's New page.
1890 Obituaries are continued on pages 412 413 414 415


1890-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

M. Catacazy
M. Catacazy, formerly Minister of Russia at Washington, who made himself so obnoxious to the Government that he had to be recalled, died of paralysis of St. Germain, France, a few days ago.  He was dismissed from the diplomatic service of Russia and became a journalist at Paris.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

C. F. Clarkson
C. F. Clarkson, the venerable father of First Assistant Postmaster General Clarkson, died at his Des Moines home a few days ago.  He was born in Maine in 1840(or 1810), and migrated to Iowa in 1855, where he had since been prominent as a journalist, the Iowa State Register, the leading Republican newspaper of the section, being his creation.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Carlyle
James Carlyle, whose death in London in announced, was the opposite of his celebrated brother, Thomas, in the amiableness of his character and disposition to see the bright side of life.  But like Thomas he had his peculiar habits, one of which--that of watching mice in a room--made him the highest authority in all England on small wild wood and house vermin.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Amasa J. Parker
Judge Amasa J. Parker died at Albany, NY, last Tuesday, after a brief illness, aged 83.  He was made Supreme Court Judge in 1844.  He was a member of Assembly in 1834 and Congressman from Delaware and Broome in the 25th Congress.  He was a Democrat in politics.  He was a member of the Court of Appeals in 1855.  In 1856 he was a candidate for Governor, but was defeated.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George W. Nesmith
The recent death of Judge George W. Nesmith at Franklin Falls, NH, in his 90th year, removes another of the personal friends of Daniel Webster, and doubtless the only survivor of the coterie who knew the “great expounder” in his early days.  Judge Nesmith had been a prominent figure in the affairs of the Granite State for more than half a century, and was an active and interested man to the last, especially devoted to the welfare of Dartmouth College of which he was a trustee, and of the State Agricultural College of which he was president.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Nasmyth
James Nasmyth, the great Scotch engineer and inventor of the steam hammer, is dead at the age of 82.  He was born in Edinburgh in 1808 and was the son of a noted painter.  The steam hammer and the steam pile-driver, which was a modification of it, made Nasmyth’s fortune.  He was sent for to supply machine tools for the dockyards and arsenals of France, Spain, Italy and Russia, and every finished contract brought him new customers, so that he was able to retire at 48 with a reputation as an innovator in mechanics which has not been equaled in Great Britain except by Watt.  His devices number more than 40, and nearly all of them are important and have become part of the commonplace of mechanical engineering.  In 1856 he retired from business with an ample fortune, and he employed his active leisure in cultivating flowers and astronomy, and “whistling for amusement.”  His astronomical ability brought him in contact with the great astronomers of his day.  He published a book on the moon, and in 1883 his autobiography appeared edited by Samuel Smiles, of “Self-Help” fame.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Asenath L. Swope [Asenasth Spencer SRGP 05779 Wellsboro Cemetery]
Mrs. Asenath L. Swope, wife of Abiathar Swope, died yesterday morning, at the home of her son-in-law W. R. Trull, on Morris lane.  She was 58 years of age.  She was born in Sullivan township, and was a daughter of the late Lyman Spencer.  She had long been a consistent member of the First Baptist Church.  Mrs. Swope had been sick for about nine months, being first prostrated by a nervous disease.  Last winter she had the grip, and she had been rapidly failing since that attack.  The funeral is to be held at Mr. Trull’s residence tomorrow at 10 a. m.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

A. J. Cole
Dr. A. J. Cole, formerly of Mansfield, died very suddenly at his home at Burdett, Kansas, a few days ago.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ashton Carpenter
Last Wednesday afternoon Ashton Carpenter, a boy of 14 years, living with Mr. Ralph Carpenter, four miles west of the village of Woodhull, NY, hung himself with a rope in Mr. Carpenter’s barn.  The act was deliberate, as the lad took off his coat and hat and climbed up a ladder to fasten the rope to a beam.  He had been dead some time when the body was found.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gillette Bryant
At Crooked Creek, Pa., May 9, 1890, Gillette, son of Frank and Helen Bryant, aged 4 months and 13 days.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Chaplain
At Westfield, Pa., May 4, 1890, of pneumonia, Mr. William Chaplain, aged 67 years.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary E. Hall
At Nelson, Pa., May 2, 1890, Miss Mary E. Hall, aged 17 years, 11(?) months and 6 days.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Oliver Murdock
At Potter Brook, Pa., May 8, 1890, of pneumonia, Mr. Oliver Murdock, aged 55 years.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Thomas Murray
At Fall Brook, Pa., April 25, 1890, Mrs. Thomas Murray, aged 36 years.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Sheffer
At Liberty, Pa., April 27, 1890, Charles Sheffer, aged 30 years.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Reuben Stewart
At Jackson Summit, Pa., April 28, 1890, Reuben Stewart, aged 80 years.  (Tuesday, May 20, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Hughes
Last week Monday night Mr. John Hughes, an aged and respected citizen of Blossburg arose in his sleep and walked out of the second story window of his dwelling house.  He fell a distance of 12 feet and although no bones were broken the shock was so great that he died from the injury on Thursday morning.  Mr. Hughes had been sick a long time from the effects of the grip and he had been blind since 1852 from an accident in the mines.  He was upwards of 80 years of age.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lucius Truman
Lucius Truman, a well known citizen of this borough, died at his home on Charleston street last Friday afternoon.  He had for a long time been in failing health, but his strong vitality enabled him again and again to rally from the painful and prostrating attacks of incurable disease.  Three or four weeks ago he was confined to the house by distressing symptoms that soon led his friends to see that the end was near.  But although he suffered greatly and fully recognized the gravity of his situation, he maintained a cheerful spirit so long as consciousness lasted, and finally passed peacefully away to that rest which must have been for him a blessed release from long continued and hopeless suffering.  Early in the present century Mr. Asa Truman was a prominent businessman of Owego, the county town of Tioga county, New York.  He was engaged in business as a country merchant and lumberman, selling general merchandise to his neighbors and manufacturing lumber which he rafted down the Susquehanna river on the spring freshes.  It was on the 18th of April, 1818, that the home of this busy man of affairs was gladdened by the birth of a son whom his parents named Lucius and who grew to a vigorous manhood in his native village.  Winding up his school days with his graduation from the Owego Academy, the young man went to work with his father and remained so employed until after his marriage.  That event took place in 1840, when young Truman was 22 years old, his bride being Miss Mary P. Leach, a young lady of Owego.  Shortly after his marriage the young husband went into business on his own account, entering into partnership with Mr. William A. Stone, of Owego.  The partners engaged in the general lumbering business.  Truman attending to the outdoor work of the firm.  The first partnership did not last a great while, however, and after its dissolution Mr. Truman came to this region and formed a business connection with Mr. John R. Bowen who was also from Owego.  The firm engaged extensively in lumbering on Pine Creek and its tributaries, and they prospered until 1857, when the partners made heavy purchases of lands in Minnesota and Wisconsin.  These investments were made at an unfavorable time, and the financial panic which almost immediately followed involved the firm in losses which made it necessary to wind up the partnership affairs.  Mr. Truman then moved to Philadelphia where he remained until the breaking out of the Rebellion, when he came back here and helped to raise and organize a company of Union volunteers.  On the 15th of May, 1861, he was mustered into the service as First Lieutenant of Company E of the First Rifles--the old Bucktails--and he was mustered out as Quartermaster of the same regiment on the 28th of July, 1865, having served with conspicuous fidelity and ability for four years.  After the war he again formed a partnership with Mr. Bowen in the lumber business.  The firm was prosperous until it met with a heavy loss by the burning of the sash and blind factory at the foot of Main street in June, 1878.  The partnership continued, however, until Mr. Truman was appointed Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue in 1883.  He faithfully discharged the duties of this responsible post until the election of a Democratic President resulted in the appointment of a successor holding that political faith.  Of late years Mr. Truman has held several borough offices which were mainly valuable as public testimonials of the good will and confidence of his neighbor.  He was elected County Auditor in 1887, and for three or four years past he has been Crier of the Courts.  Mr. Truman’s first wife died in 1864, leaving six children, five of whom are still living.  In 1873 he married Miss Mary D. Doumaux, of Charlestown township, who survives him, together with two young daughters.  Personally Mr. Truman was most companionable--a man of decided convictions and fixed principles and at the same time of broad views and genial humor.  He was a faithful soldier, a diligent public officer, a vigorous, enterprising business man, a good citizen and a kind neighbor, and he has left many friends who will long regret his loss.  The funeral was held at the family residence on Charlestown street yesterday afternoon at two o’clock.  It was attended by a large delegation of the George Cook Post of the G. A. R. in uniform and by many of Mr. Truman’s friends and neighbors.  The services were conducted by Rev. O. S. Chamberlayne, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Myrtle D. Beach
At Little Marsh, Pa., May 13, 1890, Myrtle D., daughter of S. P. and Beulah Beach, aged 5 years and 8 months.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Allen
At Millerton, Pa., May 12, 1890, Jacob Allen, aged 16 years.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dennis Perry
In Tioga, Pa., May 25, 1890, Dennis Perry, aged 63 years.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

G. H. Paul
G. H. Paul, long known as one of the ablest Democratic leaders in Wisconsin, died at Kansas City the other day.  He was born in Vermont in 1826.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

F. G. Mead
F. G. Mead, of the American Bank Note Company, died at Plainfield, NJ, a few nights ago.  He was a brother of Larkin Meade, the sculptor, and brother-in-law of W. D. Howelle.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wirt Dexter
Wirt Dexter, the brilliant Chicago lawyer, died very suddenly the other evening.  He was sick only a couple of hours, from what was probably a very acute congestive chill, with preliminary symptoms of pneumonia.  He was the leader of the bar in that city.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Marcus Reinhold
Bishop Marcus Reinhold, who was a leader among the Pennsylvania Germans 50 years ago in trying to repeal the law that introduced the present common-school system into this State, died a few days ago, aged 9-.  He was one of the oldest Menonites in the State, which sect formerly did not believe in giving their children “worldly” education.  Reinhold had been a Bishop of the denomination 70 years.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Drummond
Judge Thomas Drummond, who died a few days ago at Wheaton, IL, began his illustrious judicious career in 1850, when President Taylor appointed him District Judge for the district of Illinois.  The appointment was unsolicited on the part of Judge Drummond, but was urged by the entire bar of the circuit in which he had been practicing.  In 1869 President Grant appointed him Judge of the Seventh circuit, consisting of the States of Illinois, Wisconsin and Indiana.  He resigned this position in 1885, Judge Gresham succeeding him.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Julius White
Gen. Julius White, a soldier of the war for the Union and by Gen. Grant’s appointment United States Minister to the Argentine Republic, died at his home at South Evanston, near Chicago, a few days ago.  He was in his 74th year.  Born in Cazenovia, NY, he went to Chicago in 1836, and there he lived in 1864 when President Lincoln appointed him Collector of the Port.  He resigned, however, to take command of the 37th regiment, the Fremont rifles, took part in Fremont’s expedition to southwest Missouri and was wounded at Pea Ridge in June, 1862.  He was commander of the Illinois department of the Loys Legion.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

G. C. Grose
Capt. G. C. Grose, who died on Staten Island a few days ago, was one of the eminent ship-builders of the country.  He was for many years the leading ship builder at Bath, Maine, where he was the founder of the leading ship-building firm of New England and the greatest wooden ship-building concern in the world.  He was born in 1822, received an academic education and after teaching school a few years adopted the for a profession.  He soon rose from steward on a coasting schooner to captain of a ship in the China trade.  In 1869 he retired from the sea, having sailed as captain 10 years, settled in Bath, and soon after engaged in ship-building.  He was the father of the idea of building iron ships there, and was the creator of the magnificent marine engine works of the New England Co, established as the first step toward an iron ship-building plant, which have turned out some of the finest marine engines of the compound and triple-expansion type on this side of the Atlantic.  He was twice a member of the Maine Legislature, was always a Republican, and was one of the most honored citizens of the State.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Herr Nessler
Herr Nessler, the German composer, is dead.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

M. Bombonnel
M. Bombonnel, the famous painter, was killed at Dijon last week.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Dr. Dinder
Dr. Diner, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Posen, died a few days ago.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Nagel
Rev. Jacob Nagel, known as the oldest Roman Catholic priest in America, died at Buffalo a few days ago, aged 86 years and 5 months.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Fletcher Harper
Fletcher Harper of the great publishing house of Harper & Brothers, died at his home in New York a few days ago.  He was the son of the first Fletcher Harper, the youngest brother of the original firm, which was founded in 1816.  The elder Fletcher died only so lately as 1877, being 71 years old, and his son, born in 1828 was in his 62d year when he died.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Silva Porto
Silva Porto, whose death by suicide is reported by way of Lisbon, by virtue of 50 years of experience, was the oldest of contemporaneous African explorers, and certainly the greatest of those classed as Portuguese.  As a traveler in Central Africa he preceded David Livingstone, his first great journey from the west coast to Lake Nyanza taking place in 1853.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John White
Mr. John White, the senior partner of the well known and extensive lumber firm of White, Lentz & White, Williamsport, died last Tuesday at the age of 73 years.  He was long identified with the business interests of Williamsport.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Hector L. Miller
Mr. Hector L. Miller, a well-known citizen of Elmira, died last Wednesday evening at the age of 66 years.  The cause of his death was paralysis.  He was a native of Millerton and one of its largest property owners, the place being named in honor of his family.  He was a man of strict integrity and of great moral worth.  The remains were brought to Millerton for interment last Sunday.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Hanley
The Lawrenceville Herald says that Mr. John Hanley, an old and respected citizen of Lindley, was instantly killed a few days ago while returning home from Lawrenceville.  As he was driving through the village of Lindley in company with his wife, his carriage wheels dropped into a deep rut and Mr. Hanley was pitched out and struck on his head, killing him instantly.  It was found that his neck was broken by the fall.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Krause
Mrs. John Krause, of Liberty, died a few days ago at the age of 93 years.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Abel Humphrey [SRGP 13085]
Dr. Abel Humphrey, formerly of Tioga died at Center Hill, Florida, on the 1st instant.  He suffered from an attack of the grip, which developed into dropsy and terminated fatally in disease of the heart.  We believe Dr. Humphrey was born 75 years ago last January in Chenango county, NY.  He came to Tioga in 1840 and taught school there.  He then studied medicine and for many years practiced his profession very successfully in that part of the county.  He was a strong abolitionist, was active in organizating the Republican party and was zealous and efficient in advocating his principles of the stump.  At one time he was Associated Judge of the county, and during the war and afterward he held the office of Special Mail Agent under the Post-office Department.  He was an unsuccessful candidate for Congress against Hon. G. A. Grew in 1862.  He went to Florida about 10 years ago, and practiced medicine there until his death.  Dr. Humphrey was a man of more than ordinary ability, well informed, quick witted, impulsive and very decided in the support of his own convictions.  He was warm hearted, and his sympathetic nature greatly endeared him to many friends who will regret to learn of his death.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Manley
At Roaring Branch, Pa., May 30, 1890, Mr. George Manley, aged 73 years.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Campbell
Last Tuesday morning Mr. Robert Campbell, a well known citizen of Delmar, started from his home to go over to the place of his son Edwin, about 1 ½ miles distant across lots.  Nothing further was seen of him until about 4 o’clock in the afternoon, when one of his grandsons found him lying helpless in a meadow on Mr. Harry Wheeler’s farm, about 80 rods from Mr. Edwin Campbell’s house.  He was carried to the house and a physician was called, who pronounced it an attack of paralysis.  Mr. Campbell lingered until about 2 o’clock Wednesday morning when he passed peacefully away.  He was in his 82nd year.  The funeral was held at Mr. Edwin Campbell’s on Friday afternoon, Rev. Dr. A. C. Shaw conducting the services.  Mr. Campbell came to Delmar in March, 1837, and bought of James Alger 200 acres of land and went to work industriously to improve and clear up his new farm and bring it under cultivation.  In a few years he purchased 51 acres adjoining his place and continued clearing and improving his farm until it was classed among the best in Delmar.  He always kept a strict account of his expenses and income and at the end of the year he could tell what was his gain or loss.  He took a lively interest in agriculture and was one of the first to organize the Tioga County Agricultural Society being one of the Executive Committee for the fair held in the county and President of the Society the second year.  He was always interested in the advancement of the cause of education, and he taught school winters after he came to Delmar.  He was connected with the Delmar schools for 43 years serving a long time as a Director and he did business for the township with the same care and fidelity which marked his career as a successful farmer.  He always strove to he just in his dealings with his fellow men.  He was a member of the Presbyterian Church of Wellsboro.  He was a kind husband and father and always by word and example strove to lead his family and friends to place their trust in the Christian faith.  Since the death of his wife in January, 1885, he had been failing in health, and often said he was waiting for his Master to call him home, saying that he was lonely and wished to meet his companion on the other shore.  (Tuesday, June 17, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. S. N. Coe
Mr. S. N. Coe, an undertaker at Canton, died last Wednesday morning of blood poisoning, which was caused by a small cut upon one of his fingers made while he was caring for a dead body a few weeks ago.  (Tuesday, June 17, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Aaron VanDyke
Mr. Aaron VanDyke, of Nelson, was found dead in his bed at the house of Mr. Richard Schoonover, at Austinburgh, last Wednesday morning.  Mr. VanDyke was visiting at Austinburgh, and he was in his usual health when he retired on Tuesday night.  Coroner Niles held an inquest on Wednesday, and the jury rendered a verdict that VanDyke came to his death by organic heart-disease from which he had suffered for several years.  Mr. VanDyke was 59 years of age.  He leaves a wife and four children.  The funeral was held last Friday forenoon.  (Tuesday, June 16, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Stewart
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Stewart, of Delmar, are sadly bereaved over the death of their eight year old son and only child, who died of diphtheria last Friday morning.  The funeral was held on Saturday.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Hathaway
Mr. and Mrs. George M. Hathaway are bereaved by the death of their bright little daughter.  The child died of diphtheria last Wednesday.  The funeral was private and was held the same evening.  We are glad to learn that an older child is recovering from the disease.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Samuel Ludlum
On the 9th instant Mrs. Samuel Ludlum, who lives on the Bowen farm in Deerfield, was taken to Philadelphia to undergo an operation for the removal of a tumor.  The operation was performed on the following Wednesday, but Mrs. Ludlum did not rally from the ordeal and died on Saturday.  Her remains were brought home and the funeral was held on Tuesday.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Seymour G. Rhinevault [SRGP 51549]
Seymour G. Rhinevault, a well-known citizen of Mansfield, died last Tuesday of paralysis, in his 75th year.  On the 8th of April he was suddenly prostrated in his office, but he was so far recovered as to be out again; but on the 22d of may he suffered a second stroke and gradually wasted away.  In early life Mr. Rhinevault learned the trade of a blacksmith.  In 1855 he joined the East Genesee Conference and until after the war broke out he was faithful minister in the Methodist Church.  He raised a company of volunteers at Woodhull, NY, and went out as its Captain in the 86th N. Y. Vols.  He rose to the rank of Major.  After leaving the army he resumed his labors as a minister.  About five years ago he gave up preaching and located at Mansfield, and for three years he had served as a Justice of the Peace.  He was a kindly man and excellent citizen who lived his religion every day.  The funeral was held at the Mansfield Methodist church last Friday afternoon.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Augustin S. Torpy
Mr. Augustin S. Torpy, who died of Bright’s disease at his home in Delmar last week, was a well known lumberman.  He was a good citizen and was prompt and honorable in his business operations.  He was a faithful Union soldier, and his funeral was attended on Thursday by a large delegation from the George Cook Post and by other soldiers.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. O. C. Hills, of this borough.  Mr. Torpy was in his 56th year.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Nathan Austin
Last Thursday morning Mr. Nathan Austin, of Charleston, died at his home near the railroad crossing on the State road.  He had been complaining of what he called neuralgia for two months or more, and for two or three weeks prior to his death he was unable to attend to his business affairs, although he was about most of the time.  Last week Monday he was taken worse, and it was then apparent that he had been suffering from an abscess in the head.  He rapidly sank until death came to end his suffering.  Mr. Austin was the son of Caleb and Clarissa Austin.  He was born on the present Poor house farm, February 6, 1820.  He was a practical and successful farmer, and he took a deep interest in the Grange movement and lent the cause his intelligence in recent years.  Mr. Austin was a man of pure character, and he was highly esteemed by all who knew him on account of his geniality and strict integrity.  The funeral was held Saturday afternoon, and it was largely attended.  Rev. Mr. Chamberlayne conducted the service, and six of Mr. Austin’s brethren in the Grange bore his remains to the grave.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Fray
At East Point, Pa., June 5, 1890, of cancer, Mrs. Elizabeth Fray, aged 80 years, 8 months and 25 days.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Leonard Rose
At Blossburg, Pa., June 6, 1890, Mrs. Leonard Rose.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John M. Croft
Keeneyville, June 21, 1890.--Mr. John M. Croft, who died at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. A. J. Smith, on the 13th instant, was born at Locke, Cayuga county, NY, December 25th, 1807.  In 1838 he married Miss Roselia Lent, of Bradford county, and two years later he moved to Chatham, where he resided until the death of his wife, about three years ago.  After that time his home was with Mr. Smith at this place.  Mr. and Mrs. Croft were among the early settlers in this part of the county.  They were blessed with a large family, their living children being Samuel M, now in Michigan, Clayton, of Nebraska, Lavern and Wayne M. Croft, of this place, Helen, wife of A. J. Smith, and Olive, wife of John E. West.  Mr. Croft was a life-long Republican, having taken the Agitator ever since it was started.  He allowed school-teaching a short time after locating in Chatham, but farming was his main pursuit through life.  The funeral services were held at the church here last Sunday at 10 o’clock a. m.  Rev. A. G. Cole, of Little Marsh, was the officiating clergyman.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Croft
At Keeneyville, Pa., June 20, 1890, Mr. John Croft, aged 82 years.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Lula Stewart
In Delmar, Pa., June 20, 1890, of diphtheria, Lula, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Stewart, aged nearly 8 years.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Benjamin Williams
At Blossburg, Pa., June 16, 1890, of inflammation of the lungs, Benjamin Williams, aged 14 years.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Chester Stewart
Mr. Chester Stewart, a prominent resident of Jackson, died a few days ago after an illness of only a few days.  He was 70 years of age and was a veteran soldier.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Emily Button
At Little Marsh, Pa., June 20, 1890, Mrs. Emily Button, aged 58(or 53) years.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Miller
The two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Miller, who reside on State street, died in convulsions last Saturday after suffering for 20 hours with bowel trouble.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Urban G. Fisher
Mr. Urban G. Fisher, a well-known resident of this borough died yesterday afternoon at his home on East avenue.  Several years ago Mr. Fisher was leading a heifer, when the animal jerked him suddenly and he fell, hurting his head severely.  He never fully recovered from this injury, and for the last few months he had been rapidly failing in health and mental vigor, and for 10 days he had been confined to the house.  Mr. Fisher was 58 years of age.  He had been a drug clerk in this borough for 35 years.  He was a kind-hearted, genial citizen, unobtrusive in manner but faithful in the discharge of all the duties of life.  He was a bachelor, having loved for many years with his four sisters, who, with a brother, survive him.  The funeral is to be held tomorrow afternoon at 5 o’clock at Mr. Fisher’s late residence on East avenue.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. William B. Sturdevant
Mrs. William B. Sturdevant, a well-known and highly esteemed woman, died at Job’s Corners on the 3d instant.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. W. M. Woodside
Mr. W. M. Woodside, a champion bicycle rider who resided at Blossburg for a time, died recently at Rio Janeiro, Brazil, of yellow fever.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Frank Johnston
Mrs. Frank Johnston, of Charleston, died at the home of her father, Mr. George D. Brooks, last Sunday night after a long sickness.  She was 22 years of age.  She was an exemplary young woman.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. W. T. Compton
Mr. W. T. Compton, who died suddenly last week Sunday evening at Crooked Creek, was 61 years of age.  He was a well-known millwright and formerly resided at Corning, NY.  The remains were interred at Post Creek, NY.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Amy Jones
Last Sunday night Miss Amy Jones, daughter of David J. Jones, of East Charleston, died of typhoid fever.  She had been in feeble health for some time.  Miss Jones was 20 years of age and she was a bright and intelligent young woman whose death will be sincerely mourned by a large circle of friends.  The funeral is to be held tomorrow morning.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Enos Slosson
Mr. Enos Slosson, who died at his home in Chicago on the morning of the 5th instant, was a man whom the older residents of the Cowanesque valley will remember as a leading citizen of that region a generation ago.  For the last 30 years he had been a prominent real estate dealer in Chicago.  He was born in Tioga county, NY, 73 years ago.  His father was a Colonel in the war of 1812 and his grandfather was a Captain in the Revolutionary army, serving directly under General Washington.  The subject of this notice came to the Cowanesque valley when a young man and engaged in business at Osceola, which place he was largely instrumental in founding and building up.  He was at one time a partner of the late Joel Parkhurst in the mercantile business, and he was appointed Postmaster at Osceola, under President Taylor.  His strong antislavery sentiments prompted him to join the Free soil party, and the first gathering of that party was organized by him and held at Osceola.  Mr. Slosson afterward moved to what was then the Territory of Minnesota, and he was influential in securing its admission as a State.  He became a “charter member” of the Republican party on its organization and he remained true to his early political faith all the days of his life.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Clinton B. Fisk
General Clinton B. Fisk died at his residence in New York city last Wednesday.  The funeral services were held on Friday, and the body was taken to his old home, Coldwater, Mich., for burial.  Clinton B. Fisk was born at York, Livingston county, NY, December 8, 1828, and was a representative of the New England Fisk’s, from whom have been bred men of renown.  He was a child when his father removed to Michigan.  In his youth he began a course of education preparatory to entering college, but was prevented from completing it by bad health.  He then opened a store, and was successively merchant, miller and banker before leaving Michigan to make his residence in St. Louis.  This was in 1859.  The war was still young when Mr. Fisk became Colonel of the 33rd Missouri Infantry, in the forces of the Union.  Made a Brigadier-General in 1862, he was promoted to Brevet Major-General of Volunteers in 1865.  After the war he was Assistant Commissioner under General Howard in the management of the Freedmen’s Bureau in Kentucky and Tennessee.  He married Miss Jeannette C. Crippen, of Coldwater, Mich., and had three children, two sons and a daughter.  Mrs. Fisk was among the early Florence Nightingales in the War of the Union.  Associated with Mrs. Jessie Benton Fremond, she was concerned, at St. Louis, in the first society for the relief of the soldiers.  She was in the field with her husband two years in charge of hospitals.  General Fisk was one of the leading laymen, in the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He was President of the Board of Trustees of Fisk University, for colored students, at Nashville, trustee of Dickinson College, Pennsylvania of Drew Theological Seminary, and Pennington Seminary, New Jersey, and of Albion College, Michigan.  His useful services to religious organizations included the duties of trustee of the American Missionary Association, and those of membership in the Book Committee of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  His secular activities were principally in railroading and insurance interests.  He was a friendly and genial man, of portly presence, and excelled in public addresses.  He was the Prohibition candidate for Governor of New Jersey in 1886 and the same party’s candidate for President at the last National election.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Nannie Lebsinger
Nannie Lebsinger and Stella Cole, two notorious women of Knoxville, Tenn., fought a duel with knives last week and the former was killed.  The other was arrested.  The quarrel occurred over a man named Matt Bradley.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Harry S. Hull
Harry S. Hull, editor of the Steuben Courier, of Bath, NY, died from apoplexy at Rochester, NY, last Wednesday morning.  He went to Rochester on Monday afternoon, and that evening underwent an operation to remove false tissues in the nose.  He felt usually well afterwards and retired at his regular hour.  He expected to return to Bath on Tuesday morning, but on account of the extreme heat and a severe headache was advised by his physician to remain until evening, and be kept his bed.  About 11 o’clock, as his attendant was placing hot applications upon his head to relieve the headache, he was suddenly attacked with apoplexy, and he became insensible and never became conscious again.  Dr. Roe at once summoned two other physicians and until 3 o’clock in the afternoon they had strong hopes of his recovery, when their patient became much worse.  Dr. Roe at once telegraphed his family, and his wife and Miss Carrie Hull went to Rochester on the evening train and were with him when he died at 1 o’clock Wednesday morning.  Mr. Hull was in his 38th year and was born and educated in Bath.  He early showed adaptation for newspaper work, and at the age of 21 became a partner with his father in the publication of the Courier under the firm name of H. H. Hull & Son.  Upon the death of his father in 1876, he assumed the entire control of the Courier, and had since been its editor and publisher.  He had been a prominent figure in the conventions of the New York State Press Association for several years, and at the time of his death was Vice President of the Association.  For several years he had been the teacher of the Bible class in the Presbyterian Church, with a membership of 160.  To this he had devoted a large part of his leisure time, and it is believed by many of his friends that his work in its behalf had overtaxed his strength and contributed materially to the cause of his death.  He leaves a widow and four young children---three sons and a daughter.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

A. W. Acheson
A. W. Acheson, Judge of the Beaver-Washington district, and member of the Washington county bar for 57 years, is dead.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Clark
William Clark, of Denver, Col., formerly a State Senator from the Wayne-Cayuga district of New York, died recently at the age of 80(or 89) years.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edwin Chadwick
Edwin Chadwick, the venerable English social economist, to whom is due morn than to any other man the reform of the charities and the advance in sanitation in Great Britain, is dead at the age of 89.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George A. Parkhurst
George A. Parkhurst, the actor, died suddenly at his home in New York the other afternoon.  He was 50 years old.  Mr. Parkhurst was the last living member of the company that played in the National theater, Washington, on the night of the assassination of President Lincoln.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Melvin
James Melvin, a war veteran, portions of whose body had become ossified within a few years, and for whom a pension of $100 a month, specially passed Congress last month, died at Concord, Mass., a few days ago.  His sufferings for several years have been excruciating, and his case attracted wide attention.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Parkman Tuckerman
Samuel Parkman Tuckerman, one of the chief American composers of church music, who died at Newport, RI, the other day, came of old New England stock.  He was born in Boston 71 years ago, and was quite an “infant prodigy” in music.  He leaves behind nearly 200 compositions, all ecclesiastical in style, and largely used in England.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gilman Marston
General Gilman Marston died recently at Exeter, NH.  He was appointed United States Senator from New Hampshire from March 4, 1880, until the Legislature held an election in June.  In 1850 he was elected to Congress.  At the outbreak of the Rebellion he was appointed Colonel of the Second New Hampshire regiment, and was promoted quickly to Brigadier-General.  In 1865 he was elected for a second term in Congress.  Since 1872 his services in the Legislature have been almost continuous as a leader on the Republican side.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Addison F. Ellas
The people of Bath, NY, were shocked last Friday morning by the startling report that Addison F. Ellas, one of its oldest and most highly respected citizens, had committed suicide by hanging.  At about 5 o’clock, his usual hour for raising, he got up, dressed himself and went out to his barns.  About half an hour afterwards his brother-in-law, John Little, not seeing him about the yard, believed he had gone up in the fields for the cows and so started in that direction.  Not finding him there, he returned to the house, noticing the barn door open, went in and there found the lifeless body hanging by a rope.  He immediately cut it down, but life was extinct.  Mr. Ellas was born at Bath in 1811.  At an early age he began work on a farm and after following it for a few years engaged in the mercantile business.  This he forsook in a few years to pursue his chosen occupation, that of farming, purchasing one of the fine farms near Bath.  He was a good farmer, and success crowned his efforts.  Of upright character and strict honesty, he was elected to many local offices whose duties he discharged with credit, and at one time was President of the Steuben County Agricultural Society.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gottfried Keller
Gottfried Keller, a popular poet of Switzerland, died at his native city of Zurich last Tuesday, being 71 years old.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Emerson
Samuel Emerson, one of the best-known turf man in New England, died at Natick last Wednesday after a brief illness, aged 65.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eugene Schuyler
Eugene Schuyler, the well-known diplomat, who has held many important positions abroad, died last Friday at Cairo, where he was the American Consul-General.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

C. D. Donaldson and Miss Lottie Spurgeon
Lieutenant C. V. Donaldson, of the 24th United States Infantry, and Miss Lottie Spurgeon, daughter of W. H. Spurgeon, were drowned last Tuesday at Newport Beach.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

E. H. Elwell
E. H. Elwell, the editor of the Portland, Maine, Transcript, died suddenly last Wednesday morning of heart-disease at Bar Harbor, while about to return from the excursion of the State Press Association.  He was 64 years old, and he had been a lifelong newspaper man, having had charge of the Portland Transcript since 1848.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Alling
William Alling, one of Rochester’s best known and most highly esteemed business men died last week.  For several years his health had been gradually failing, and since last New Year’s day he had been confined to his house.  With the exception of his sight, which partly failed him several years ago, his faculties remained almost unimpaired till the last.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Daniel T. VanBuren
General Daniel T. Van Buren died at his home in Plainfield, NJ, last Thursday, in the 67th year of his age.  He had long suffered from heart trouble.  He entered the West Point Academy in 1843.  He served in the Mexican war and entered the Union service immediately after the outbreak of the civil war.  He was Captain of Engineers.  20th New York Volunteers and afterwards Chief of Staff of Major-General John A. Dix.  Later he was Assistant Adjutant-General on the staff of Major-General Hooker.  On March 13, 1865, he was brevetted Brigadier-General of Volunteers for faithful and meritorious services during the Rebellion, and was mustered out of the service March 20, 1866.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Rodney R. Woodhouse
Mr. Rodney R. Woodhouse, the well known and genial proprietor of the restaurant near the depot at Blackwell’s, died last Sunday evening of paralysis.  He was born at Middletown, Vt., in 1824.  He leaves a widow, four sons and one daughter.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Bridget Hart
Mrs. Bridget Hart, wife of A. W. Hart of Charleston, died very suddenly last Sunday.  She was feeling well and was laughing and talking when she complained of a pain in the region of the heart.  She was assisted to a couch and expired immediately.  She was 34 years of age.  The funeral is to be held at St. Peter’s church tomorrow.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. S. A. Barber
Mr. S. A. Barber, an old resident of Covington died on Sunday.  He was in his 76th year.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. D. Kilbourn Coolidge
Mr. D. Kilbourn Coolidge of Delmar, died last Wednesday morning of paralysis.  He was attacked eight weeks before but his great vitality enabled him to combat the great destroyer for so long a time.  He had resided in Delmar for half a century and he was an energetic and enterprising citizen.  His age was 76.  He leaves a widow, three sons and one daughter.  The funeral was held on Thursday afternoon.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Solomon Travor
Mr. Solomon Travor of Millerton, an inmate of the county poor house, died last Saturday morning at the age of about 80 years.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. T. S. Griswold
Mr. T. S. Griswold died in Union township on the 12th instant at the home of his son-in-law, Mr. Clarence Landon.  He was 65 years of age.  Mr. Griswold returned from Maryland about three weeks ago where he went to purchase a home to which he expected to move in the fall.  Mr. Landon’s youngest son Harry died on the 12th(?), aged 2 years and 2 months.  The funeral services for both were held at the same time and place at the Stull church last week Monday afternoon, and they were very largely attended.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lee Hill
A sad accident occurred at Rasling’s hall in Lawrenceville about midnight last Tuesday by which Lee Hill, a young man about 21 years of age lost his life.  The Adorn Club was holding a dancing party in the hall and the evening was being greatly enjoyed by the young people.  Young Hill had been dancing with Miss Kittie Kuhl and they were promenading about the hall when Hill suggested that they step out upon the roof of the one story addition to the building to enjoy the cool evening air.  The roof is flat and covers the office of Wing & Bostwick.  It is a few inches below the sill of one of the hall windows but extends only about half way across the second window.  Both windows were wide open for ventilation.  Many of the dancers had stepped out of the first window to the roof in safety.  By mistake the young couple approached the second window.  Hill stepped out intending to assist his partner.  Miss Kuhl heard his foot touch the edge of the roof, then he swayed suddenly and pitched off into the darkness.  She screamed and several gentlemen ran down to the young man’s assistance.  Hill was found lying unconscious upon the walk with his head bent under his body.  His head had struck on the edge of the office steps, causing concussion of the brain.  He was carried to the hall and then taken to his home.  He lingered in an unconscious condition until Thursday noon, when he died.  Lee Hill was the only son of Mr. James N. Hill and he was idolized by his parents and loved by the whole community.  He had best a clerk in the store of Messrs Wing & Bostwick for some time.  He was a young man of excellent habits, genial disposition and bright intellect, and he had won the respect and esteem of all who knew him.  His tragic death has cast a gloom over the whole community.  The funeral was held on Saturday afternoon, and it was largely attended.  It is related that Hill’s grandmother held a strange presentiment in connection with this accident.  She lives with the family in Lawrenceville, but at the time of the accident was visiting relatives at Beaver Dams, NY.  The old lady arose on Wednesday morning and told her friends that she must return immediately to Lawrenceville as she had a strange presentiment of trouble at home, and refused to be dissuaded from her purpose.  She took the first train arriving home at 11 o’clock a. m., and knew nothing of the accident until informed of it by the bus driver upon her arrival at the Lawrenceville depot. (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. E. B. Campbell
Mr. E. B. Campbell, the general superintendent of the Pennsylvania Joint Lumber and Land Company, died at his home in Williamsport last Thursday after a short sickness.  His trouble was Bright’s disease.  Mr. Campbell was 70 years of age.  He was well known in this county, where he held intimate business relations with many people for a long period.  The Williamsport Gazette and Bulletin says that in the death of Mr. Campbell, Williamsport loses one of its best citizens, and his family an affectionate husband and father.  Ebenezer B. Campbell was born in Johnson, Scotland, March 4, 1820.  He came to this country in the year 1836, at the age of 16 years, landing in New York.  The day after his arrival in New York he secured a position in Schleffelle’s(?) drug store on Canal street and remained there five years.  In 1841 he left New York to accept a clerkship in the store of A. C. Bush at Tioga.  In 1843 he came to Wellsboro to serve as a clerk in the store of C & J L Robinson, where he remained until 1845, when he entered the employ of Phelps, Dodge & Company, locating at Manchester Mills.  He took charge of all the business of the firm in Tioga county.  From there he removed to Phelps Mill still in the service of the Company, and while there he supervised the building of a saw mill and dam for Messrs. Phelps, Dodge & Company.  He had the general management of the business in Phelps, Dodge & Company from 1845 until 1871 in Tioga county, and in that year removed to Williamsport and took charge of the Dodge mills, which property was subsequently transferred to the Pennsylvania Joint Lumber and Land Company.  Mr. Campbell becoming general superintendent of all.  From the above it will be seen that he started with the business of Phelps, Dodge & Company in its infancy and continued with it up to the time of his death, seeing it grow up to immense proportions.  This great firm had so much faith in his judgment and general business ability that at his suggestion they would contract for the purchases of many thousands of acres of timber lands and Mr. Campbell would handle the money to pay for the property.  Greatly through the remarkable ability of Mr. Campbell the Dodge mills are what are they are today.  His first marriage was on August 6, 1847, to Encte(?) DePui at Tioga.  By this lady his children were William, Elijah, Jennie and Jerusha.  Elijah was drowned at Phelps Mills in 1858, where the mother died June 2, 1854.  His second marriage was on June 26, 1855, at Jersey Shore, to Mary A. Imms who survives him.  The following were born to him by this lady Eben, Elijah, Henry, Charles, Kate, Frank and Mary.  Kate and Charles are numbered with the dead.  While a resident of Tioga, Mr. Campbell became a member of the Baptist Church, this was in 1841, and from that time up to his death, he had been a consistent and earnest Christian gentleman, and liberal in his contributions to the Church.  He was one of the first to establish the First Baptist Church of Williamsport, and that congregation will most severely mourn the death of Mr. Campbell.  The funeral was held yesterday morning at 11 o’clock at the family residence.  Rev. George Cooper, D. D., of Richmond, Virginia, and formerly pastor of the First Baptist Church of Williamsport, was the officiating clergyman.  The remains were interred in Wildwood cemetery.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 Miss Maria T. Hunt
Miss Maria T. Hunt died at her home at South Addison, NY, last Monday.  Her funeral was held at the Austinburgh Free Will Baptist church on Wednesday and her remains were buried in the cemetery at that place.  She was born on Troup’s creek in this township about 55(or 56) years ago.  She was an excellent Christian woman and had many friends.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. S. Aldrich [SRGP 05232]
In Tioga, Pa., July 13, 1890, of heart disease, J. S. Aldrich, aged 74(?) years.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ray Maxwell
At Blossburg, Pa., June 28, 1890, Ray Maxwell, aged 4 years.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ruby Pixley
At Millerton, Pa., July 3, 1890, Ruby Pixley, aged 16 years.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Evan Lewis
Mr. Evan Lewis, of Welsh Settlement, died early this morning.  The funeral is to be held at the Welsh church tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jacob R. Miller
Mr. Jacob R. Miller, one of the old residents of Jackson, died a few days ago at the age of 79 years.  He was a noted character in that region for his many eccentricities.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Martin
Mr. Martin, father of Mrs. F. A. Allen, of Mansfield, died at 5 o’clock last Sunday morning at the advanced age of 95 years.  He had been sick only a week or so and before his sickness was quite hale and hearty.  He was formerly a resident of Potter county, but for the last few years he had lived with his daughter, Mrs. Allen, at Mansfield.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Betsey Tripp
Osceola, July 26, 1890.--The body of Mrs. Betsey Tripp, who was one of the persons drowned here in the flood on the 7th of June last, was found near Cook’s station on the Corning, Cowanesque and Antrim railroad yesterday, and parties here were notified of the fact.  About 2 o’clock in the afternoon John Thompson, a son of the deceased, and I. P. VanZile, her brother, started for the place, taking with them the undertakers from Elkland and everything necessary for bringing the body home.  The body identified as that of Mrs. Tripp was found about eight feet above low-water mark and mostly covered by roots, leaves, small sticks, sand, etc.  It had evidently been left there as the water had gone down.  I understand it was on a pile of flood-trash or something of the sort.  Of course the body was badly decomposed, remaining as it had unburied for nearly six weeks at this season of the year.  The party arrived at this place about 9 o’clock last evening and buried the remains in the cemetery.  I am told that the Coroner was notified and a Jury summoned, who found a verdict in accordance with the facts in the case.  Now and Then.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Harriet Fuller
At Wilkesbarre, Pa., July 18, 1890, Mrs. Harriet Fuller, widow of the late Hon. Henry M. Fuller, aged 69 years.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel Swartwood
At Mitchell’s Creek, Pa., July 21, 1890, Mr. Daniel Swartwood, aged 66 years.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Ribble
Mr. Charles Ribble, an old citizen of western Liberty, died last Thursday.  He was over 60 years of age, and had been in poor health for several years, being afflicted with asthma.  (Tuesday, August 5, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Moreheas
On Thursday, the eldest son of Mr. Samuel Moreheas died from the effect of a severe cold caught last spring while floating logs.  I understand the young man was about 21 years of age.  (Tuesday, August 5, 1890, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 16 JAN 2009
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.