Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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1891-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Mr. Poepe
Mr. Poepe, the Belgian Socialist leader, is dead.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Louis Eugene Carpenter
Louis Eugene Carpenter, the well-known French painter, is dead.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Adolphe Belot
Adolphe Belot, the French dramatist and novelist, is dead.  He was born in 1829.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Nassau Molesworth
Rev. William Nassau Molesworth, M. A., the well-known English author, is dead.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry C. Noble
Henry C. Noble, a prominent attorney and brother of John W. Noble, Secretary of the Interior, died at Columbus, Ohio, recently.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Catharine P. Foulke
Mrs. Catharine P. Foulke, for 60 years a minister of the Society of Friends, died at Stroudsburg, Pa., the other day at the age of 83.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Glover Perrin
Colonel and Assistant Surgeon General Glover Perrin, U. S. A., died recently at St. Paul, Minn.  He served 40 years, and was retired in 1887.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Emma Wetherell
Mrs. Emma Wetherell, known on the operatic stage as Emma Abbott, died at Salt Lake City last Monday.  She was born in Chicago about 40 years ago.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alfred H. Terry
Major General Alfred H. Terry, of the regular army, died at New Haven, Conn., the other day in his 64th year.  He was retired two years ago on account of poor health.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

August L. Sieghortner
August L. Sieghortner, a New York restaurant-keeper only less famous than the Delmonicos, and by many veteran epicures ranker higher, died of pneumonia at his home and his latest eating place on Fifth avenue a few days ago.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Parker
Last Sunday night George, the six year old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Parker, who reside on the Willcox farm in Delmar, died of diphtheria.  A 12 year old son died of the same disease only a few weeks ago.  The family have the deepest sympathy of the community in their great bereavement.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George W. Kennedy
Mr. George W. Kennedy died at his home in Delmar last Friday evening of dropsy after a sickness of more than a year.  He was about 62 years of age, was a prominent farmer in that section and was universally esteemed.  He leaves a widow and three children.  The funeral was held on Monday afternoon at one o’clock.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Lay
On Monday evening James Lay, who had been engaged in putting up an engine for Mr. R. H. Edwards in Messrs. T. B. Field & Son’s saw mill at the Summit, was sitting in the business office, waiting for the Antrim train, when the men went out to their supper.  When they came back the train had gone and Lay was sitting in a chair near the door of the office.  When the men entered it was found that his head was thrown back and that he was dead.  His friends here were immediately notified, and the remains were brought to the young man’s home on McInroy street early yesterday morning.  Young Lay had been at work in Edwards’s machine shop in this borough for the past five years.  He had appeared to be as well as usual on Monday, and just before the men left the office he had remarked that he expected to have the engine upon which he was at work in running order on Tuesday morning.  It is supposed that his death was due  that his death was due to heart disease.  He was an inveterate cigarette smoker and it is thought that the heart trouble might have been induced by this habit.  Lay was a competent machinist, and he was a genial young man and much esteemed by his employer, fellow workmen and acquaintances.  He was nearly 23 years of age.  He leaves a wife, to whom he had been married about three years, and a young child.  The hour of the funeral has not yet been appointed, as his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Levi Lay, reside near Coudersport and no communication has been received from them.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Almira Scranton
Mrs. Almira, wife of Samuel Scranton, of Shippen township, died last Thursday afternoon at the age of 68 years.  Mrs. Scranton had been a great sufferer from rheumatism for 10 years and recently she was afflicted with consumption.  She was born in Chautauqua county, NY.  She was an excellent woman and she was remarkably philosophical and cheerful through all her years of suffering.  The funeral was held at the Ansonia church last Saturday after noon, Rev. O. C. Hills conducting the service.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. Guy Barker
At Chicago, IL, January 4, 1891, J. Guy Barker, formerly of Osceola, Pa., aged 42 years, 2 months and 16 days.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Grace Putnam
At Blossburg, Pa., December 19, 1890, Grace, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Putnam, aged 29 years.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Hannah E. Roe
At Keeneyville, Pa., December 16, 1890, Hannah E., youngest daughter of T. E. Roe.  (Tuesday, January 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lovell R. Watkins
Last Friday afternoon Mr. Lovell R. Watkins died at the Garfield Hospital in Washington, D. C., of consumption.  Young Watkins was well known here where he spent a couple of months last summer.  He had been in the regular army for two years but his health began to fail and he resigned and came here to recuperate.  In the fall he went South with his grandmother, Mrs. M. A. Rousseau, and a few weeks ago they returned to Washington and he went to the hospital at once.  Watkins was about 23 years of age.  He was a very intelligent and genial young man and he made many friends during his stay here.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William C. Holden
William C. Holden, a son of the late Clinton Holden, of Mansfield, was killed by falling under the wheels of a freight train at Sabula, Iowa, on the 31st ultimo.  His body was horribly mangled.  Young Holden had been a news agent on western railroads for several years.  He visited his mother and sister at Mansfield just before Christmas.  (Tuesday, January 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Kerran Connors
Mr. Kerran Connors, who lived near the broom factory on Water street, died last Monday evening of hemorrhage of the lungs.  He was about 65 years of age.  He leaves a widow.  The remains will be taken to Corning, NY, today for interment.  Connors was a member of the George Cook Post.  He served during the war in the 19th Illinois Regiment and then enlisted in the regular army and served several years.  He was wounded, but having no hospital record he never secured a pension for his disability.  He was expecting a pension under the new law.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Baynes
Mr. John Baynes, an old resident of Mansfield and a section track hand for the railroad company, died last Friday morning of heart disease.  He complained of feeling badly a few minutes after going to work and started to walk home, when he fell dead in front of the cemetery gate.  He was 55 years of age.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Thomas B. Caulking
Mr. Thomas B. Caulking, son of Hiram Caulking, of Tioga, was killed by the cars of Mt. Morris, NY, on the 10th instant.  He was a brakeman on a Delaware, Lackawanna and Western freight train and he attempted to step from one car to another, when the cars separated and he fell to the track and was crushed under the wheels.  He lived for several hours after the accident and was able to tell how it occurred.  Mr. Caulking was 22 years of age.  He was a pruter(?) by trade and had been railroading out a few months.  He leaves a wife and young child.  The remains were brought to Tioga last week Monday for interment.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel Williams
Mr. Daniel Williams, a young man of 21 years, who resided with his step-father, Mr. Daniel M. Evans, at Blossburg, died last Thursday night.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Benson
At Daggett’s Mills, Pa., December 11, 1890, Mrs. John Benson, aged 44 years.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Roswell Crippen
At Rutland, Pa., January 7, 1891, of consumption, Roswell Crippen, aged 73 years.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Dunn
At Millerton, Pa., January 7, 1891, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Dunn.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ethel Hyers
At Galeton, Pa., December 22, 1890, Ethel Hyers, aged 3 years.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elvira Scranton
On Marsh creek, Pa., January 1, 1891, Elvira Scranton, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, January 21, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John McCaslin
Mr. John McCaslin, formerly of Tioga, died at the Soldiers National Home in Ohio on the 22d ultimo.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Bailey
The four year old son of Mr. Lazelle Bailey, of Carpenter, last week Sunday got hold of a bottle of laudanum and drank its contents and died soon after.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Hugh McKinney
Mr. Hugh McKinney, a miner at Arnot, suddenly dropped dead while at work in the mines last Wednesday morning.  He was about 60 years of age and he leaves a large family.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Luman Sanders
Mrs. Luman Sanders died instantly a few days ago while riding in a sleigh through the streets of Mansfield.  He was nearly 84 years of age and he leaves a widow and one child.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Calvin Benn
Mrs. Calvin Benn, a well known resident of Lawrenceville died a few days ago after a long sickness.  Her maiden name was Story and she was born in Charleston township, April 8, 1830.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Callahan
Mr. John Callahan of Cedar Run, who celebrated his 100th birthday on the 17th ultimo, died last Wednesday.  The funeral was held on Friday.  He was the father of Mr. O. P. Callahan of Delmar.  (Tuesday, February 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David D. Porter
Admiral David D. Porter died suddenly at 8:15 in the morning of last Friday at his home on H street in Washington city.  His death resulted from fatty degeneration of the heart from which he had suffered since last summer.  Mental disturbances were added to his other troubles, and the patient did not realize the seriousness of his condition.  His death was calm and peaceful and came almost without warning.  A pathetic incident of his last sickness, in view of the subsequent events, was a visit made to the Admiral by General Sherman about three weeks ago.  Admiral Porter happened to be asleep at the time, and General Sherman told the family not to awaken him.  He left a message of sympathy, and sadly said:  “I would rather not see Porter unless I could see him as he always was when I have met him.”  Turning to Mrs. Logan, the Admiral’s daughter, he said half jokingly, but with a tinge of pathos; “I will be the next one, and perhaps I may go before Porter does.”  Then with a shrug of his shoulders, he added:  “Anyhow, it’s nothing to die, as it’s just as natural as it is to be born.”  The funeral of Admiral Porter took place yesterday at 2 p. m from his late residence, and his body was buried at Arlington cemetery with the highest military honors.  David Dixon Porter came of a line of sailors, his father, David Porter, being a noted naval officer and his grandfather captain of a merchantman.  The date and place of his birth are disputed; but according to the best authorities he first saw the light at Philadelphia, June 8, 1814.  When his father took command of the Mexican navy in the war against Spain, in 1826, young Porter was made midshipman and was captured on the Guerrero after a severe fight.  In 1829 he became a midshipman in the United States navy and served in various waters until 1845, when he was stationed at the Washington Observatory.  In the Mexican war he served at Vera Cruz and other points.  He was afterwards engaged in the coast-survey, and in 1847 he entered on the command of the California mail steamer.  At the outbreak of the war of the Rebellion he held a Commander’s commission and was sent to the relief of Fort Pickens, at Pensacola.  He prepared a flotilla of mortar-boats for service in the expedition against New Orleans, and after the capture of that city the flotilla was employed against Vicksburg, and Porter with the rank of Rear-Admiral and command of all the naval forces on the Mississippi.  Steamboats covered with iron plates were used in many places for attack and for transport.  Arkansas Post was captured in January, 1863, and the Grand Gulf batteries were destroyed in April of that year.  Porter’s co-operation in the siege of Vicksburg was zealous and efficient and elicited the hearty thanks of General Grant.  Porter assisted in General Banks’s Red River expedition in the spring of 1864, and in the same year he was transferred to the James river.  Here he had command of the naval forces which took part in the expedition against Fort Fisher and captured it January 15, 1865.  He was made Vice-Admiral in 1866, and was Superintendent of the Naval Academy two years.  On the death of Farragut in 1870 Porter succeeded him as Admiral.  During recent years Admiral Porter published several books, among which were a “Life of Commodore David Porter,” his father; “Incidents and Anecdotes of the Civil War;” two novels and “History of the Navy in the War of the Rebellion.”  Admiral Porter was a brilliant naval officer and richly deserved the highest honors of the service.  He was not only a vigorous and judicious fighter, but he achieved standing and reputation as an educator while at the head of the Naval Academy at Annapolis.  For his distinguished services during the war of the Rebellion he was four times publicly thanked by Congress.  (Tuesday, February 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William T. Sherman
General William T. Sherman died last Saturday afternoon at 1:50 o’clock, at his residence in New York city.  His death was the result of a cold which he contracted on the night of the 4th instant while attending a performance at the Casino.  He was really taken sick only on Sunday, the 8th instant, which was his 71st birthday.  Symptoms of erysipelas were then developed, and the disease ran its fatal course in six days.  He was attended during his short sickness by his children, except one son who was abroad, and by his brother, Senator John Sherman, and a married sister.  He remained in bed from Friday morning until his death without being able to speak a word, his several attempts to speak only resulting in a hoarse gasp.  But he seemed to recognize those about him until about two hours before his death, when he became unconscious and remained so to the end.  It is expected that his funeral will take place the latter part of this week, at St. Louis where, in accordance with his own directions, all that was mortal of the great soldier is to be laid at rest in Calvary cemetery, “alongside by faithful wife and idolized soldier boy.”  The funeral ceremonies are to be entirely of a military character, also in accordance with his own request.  William Tecumseh Sherman was born at Lancaster, Ohio, on February 8, 1820, being the 6th of 11th children.  On the death of his father--a lawyer by profession and Judge of the Supreme Court of Ohio--he was adopted at the age of 9 by Thomas Ewing, of Lancaster, who afterward became Senator from Ohio and Secretary of the Interior.  Sent as a cadet to West Point when 18 years old, he was graduated in 1840 sixth in a class of 42, which included George H. Thomas.  After serving as a Lieutenant in the Southern States he was detailed as a recruiting officer during the Mexican war, and later was assigned to the Pacific coast.  In 1850 he returned to Washington and married Miss Ellen Boyle Ewing, daughter of the Secretary, and soon after was made a Captain in the Commissary Department.  Three years later he resigned from the army and engaged in various pursuits, practicing law for a time at Leavenworth, Kansas.  In 1801 he was President of a street railway in St. Louis, and then at last the war opened to him his great career.  Appointed Colonel of the 13th Infantry, a regiment to be raised for the regular Army, Sherman commanded at Bull Run the Third brigade of Tyler’s division, and there, as he said, “for the first time saw cannon balls strike men and crash through the trees.” Soon after this disastrous battle he was made in Brigadier-General of Volunteers and was assigned to the Department of the Cumberland, under General Robert Anderson, whom he soon succeeded in command.  There he astounded the Washington optimists by declaring that so simply retake the Mississippi valley would require 209,000 men.  The newspapers said he had gone crazy, and he found his own officers and soldiers looking askance at him.  This odium, hard to bear at the time, vanished a few months later, when, in April, 1862, in command of a division of Grant’s army, he bore the brunt of the tremendous Confederate attack at Shiloh, the bloodiest battle ever fought till then on this continent.  He was made a Major-General of Volunteers, to date from May 1, 1862, and was assigned to the command of Memphis.  Then Sherman took part with his corps--the 15th--in Grant’s campaign against Vicksburg, which, after the victories of Champion’s Hill and the Big Black, was crowned with the surrender of the city and its works, containing more than 250 cannon and 30,000 men, all that was then left of Pemberton’s army.  That same day, the 4th of July, 1863, Sherman was hurried off against the co-operating force of Johnston.  The spring of 1864 opened with Grant in Virginia, commanding all the armies as Lieutenant-General, and Sherman in charge of the campaign in the West, succeeding Grant as commander of the Military Division of the Mississippi.  Starting from Ringgold, in front of Chattanooga, with nearly 100,000 men, including Thomas’s Army of the Cumberland, over 60,000 strong, McPherson’s Army of the Tennessee, and Schofield’s Army of Ohio, Sherman drove back his opponent, the wary and skillful General Joseph E. Johnston, in a series of remarkable movements, now fighting and now flanking him.  He forced him from his stronghold at Rocky Face Ridge by turning his left, and when he fell back to Resaca, Sherman fought him there; then, threatening his flank again, threw him back to Cassville and across the line of the Etowah.  He fought him at New Hope Church and at Dallas, and assaulted him on the impregnable heights of Kenesaw.  Then returning to his old maneuver of a flank march to the right, he executed it with a superb skill that placed him firmly on the Chattahoochee with all north Georgia in his power.  Alarmed at the progress of the Union arms, Jefferson Davis displaced Johnston by Hood, the dashing Texan, who tried the offensive only to be severely defeated at Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church and Jonesborough.  Then Sherman entered Atlanta in triumph.  The whole North rang with applause, and President Lincoln sent him the thanks of the Nation “for the distinguished ability and perseverance displayed in the campaign in Georgia, which, under Divine favor, has resulted in the capture of Atlanta.”  Hood then started northward for a campaign in Tennessee, hoping to force Sherman’s retreat.  But the Union strategist sent Thomas to confront that danger, and in due time Hood was checked with severe loss by Schofield at Franklin, and then overwhelmingly defeated by Thomas at Nashville in one of the few pivotal battles of the war.  Meanwhile Sherman, cutting loose from his base, and foraging on the country as he went, started from Atlanta eastward on the great March to the Sea, one of the most memorable examples in history of the great movable column.  Approaching Savannah, he carried Fort McAllister by assault, and the country was thrilled with this message from him to President Lincoln:  “I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and plenty of ammunition; also about 25,000 bales of cotton.”  Refitting without delay, Sherman set out, when February opened, upon another great march, this time for the conquest of the Carolinas and an approach to Richmond.  His right wing was under Howard and his left under Slocum, with Kilpatrick commanding the cavalry, as in the March to the Sea.  Wading swamps, fording rivers and scattering opposition before it, his triumphant army pressed northward.  Charleston was evacuated by Hardee when Sherman passing in its rear, cut its communications; Columbia fell into his hands; the line of North Carolina was crossed, and the enemy was fought at Ayersboro and Bentonville.  Then Sherman joined hands at Goldsboro with Schofield, who had marched up from the coast and taken Wilmington.  And now the end was at hand.  Lee, trying to escape from Richmond, was pursued by Grant, overwhelmed and forced to surrender at Appomattox.  Then Johnston capitulated to Sherman at Greenville, the latter granting terms which were disapproved by Secretary Stanton and disavowed by the Government.  Grant was sent down to straighten out the tangle, and Johnston was granted the same terms as Lee.  It only remained for the two great conquering armies to march in triumphal review through Washington--Grant’s on the 23d of May, and Sherman’s the day following.  Then the conquering forces melted back into the current of simple citizenship, and peace came with a restored Union.  The country testified its admiration by creating for Grant the grade of General, and raising Sherman to that of Lieutenant-General.  When Grant became President, Sherman in turn took his place as General, and by special exception retained the full pay of this grade on his retirement from the active list at the age of 64.  General Sherman removed soon after from Washington to St. Louis, where he resided for about two years, but in the early part of 1886 transferred his residence to New York city, where he afterwards bought a modest house on Seventy-first street, where he passed his closing years.  In November, 1888, his wife died at the age of 64 years.  The General’s family surviving consists of six children, two sons and four daughters.  General Sherman was a thorough organizer, prompt in execution, demanding full service from all whom he commanded.  He was an admirable writer, and without being a natural orator, he always expressed himself so clearly and forcibly in public that his meaning could not be misunderstood.  In personal appearance he was a typical soldier and commander; tall and erect, with auburn hair carelessly brushed and short, cropped beard, his eyes dark hazel, his head large and well formed.  His association with his friends and comrades was exceedingly cordial, and his affection for those allied to him was as tender as that of a woman.  In 1875 he published his “Memoirs of General William T. Sherman, by Himself,” a book which has had a large sale and which was a valuable addition to the war history of the country.  When once asked what his religious faith was, the General replied:  “I believe in God, the Almighty; that is as far as I have got.”  (Tuesday, February 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Dutcher Howell
Mary Dutcher Howell, wife of A. Spencer Howell, of Bath, NY, died very suddenly at the residence of John Sage, in Buffalo, last Wednesday evening.  She died of disease of the heart while taking a bath.  (Tuesday, February 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Louise Beatty
Mrs. Robert Beatty, of Philadelphia, all better remembered as Louise Rogers, died last week Tuesday morning of consumption, at the age of 34 years.  She was a sister of Mrs. R. B. Webb, who was with her at the time of her death.  Mrs. Ransford B. Webb and Miss Carrie Bowen went to Philadelphia last Wednesday to attend the funeral.  (Tuesday, February 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George A. Crawford
Governor George A. Crawford, who died recently at Grand Junction, Col., was a native of Pine Creek township, Clinton county.  He was a lawyer of ability, and notwithstanding his poor health was possessed of wonderful energy.  His career in the West was a brilliant one.  Governor Crawford was a cousin of the late Judge Robert G. White, of this place.  (Tuesday, February 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Marion Brown
Near Knoxville, Pa., February 5, 1891, Mrs. Marion Brown, widow of the late James Brown, aged 84 years.  (Tuesday, February 18 and 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Horace Dartt
Mr. Horace Dartt, who was well known in this neighborhood, died recently at the Soldiers’ Home at Hampton, Va.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucinda Bartles
Mrs. Lucinda Bartles died yesterday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. C. Wheeler, on West avenue.  She was in her 90th year.  Mrs. Bartles had enjoyed reasonably good health until about a week ago when she was taken ill.  She was the widow of Angus Bartles, and she resided in Delmar for many years.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Carrie Cox Dartt
Last evening about 5 o’clock Mrs. Carrie Cox Dartt, wife of Albert P. Dartt died at her home on West avenue, of consumption.  She had been alarmingly sick for several weeks.  Mrs. Dartt was a daughter of Gen. Robert C. Cox.  She had always been a remarkably robust person until last summer when she took a sudden cold and her health began to decline rapidly.  Mrs. Dartt was in the 25th year of her age.  She was married three years last fall.  She leaves a daughter eight months old.  She was a woman of excellent characteristics and her death is peculiarly sad.  The funeral is to be held at the house on Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  (Tuesday, February 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Elias Corson
Last Friday night at about a quarter past eleven o’clock Mr. Elias Corson, head brakeman on the freight train “Extra 69” on the Pine Creek railway, was instantly killed at Stokesdale Junction while in the discharge of his duty.  The train came up from Corning and, as there were some cars to be pulled out of the switch, Corson left the cab of the locomotive to go back and make the couplings.  He was walking along the track between the slowly-moving cars when his left foot was caught in a guard-rail and before he could extricate it the train was upon him.  His foot was torn from the shoe and he was thrown headlong and pushed over and over along the track for a distance of about 100 feet before the train could be stopped.  The cars did not run over his body, but he was dead when the trainmen reached him.  His neck was broken, his jaw broken, both arms and both legs fractured, and his foot broken by being torn from the shoe.  His shoe was found wedged in the guard-rail, showing plainly how the accident had happened.  On Saturday morning Corson’s body was brought to this place and prepared for burial at VanHorn & Chandler’s undertaking establishment, where Dr. A. Niles, Coroner, and the following jurymen identified the remains:  E. H. Owlett, H. E. Raesly, George M. Spalding, Arthur M. Roy, Seth Tremain and M. C. Potter.  The inquest was then adjourned to Stokesdale Junction next Monday morning at 9 o’clock.  The funeral was held at the residence of Mr. Corson’s mother, on Bache street, on Monday afternoon and it was in charge of the Tyoga Lodge, No. 230, I. O. O. F., the members attending in a body, as well as the members of Bache Hose Company, of which deceased was a prominent member.  Rev. E. B. Cornell conducted the religious services.  Elias Corson was 24 years of age.  He was a young man of good habits and stability of character.  He was genial in temperament and faithful in the discharge of duty.  He was employed by Dr. H. L. Davis, of this borough, for a number of years and was borough janitor for a time.  He had been at work on the railroad for about two years.  We understand that he expected to be married the coming summer.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David R. Davis
Mr. David R. Davis, a well-known citizen of Morris Run, died on Monday.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Harry B. Miller
Mr. Harry B. Miller, a section hand on the Tioga railroad at Millerton, had his right foot crushed by a Northern Central Railway train at Elmira last Wednesday evening.  The Millerton gang were working in Elmira that day, and at night returned home on the passenger train, but Miller for some reason was left, and it is reported was seen to catch on to a Northern, Central train.  Just how the accident occurred is not known.  The injured man was taken to the Arnot-Ogden hospital, and the leg was amputated below the knee.  Miller died from the shock on Thursday morning.  He leaves a wife and one young child.  His parents reside at Millerton.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel Hughey
Mr. Daniel Hughey, formerly a resident of Nelson, died of typhoid pneumonia at Brainerd, Minn., on the 12th instant.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Kimball
Last Wednesday evening the youngest daughter of ex-County Commissioner William Kimball, of Mitchell’s Creek, died of diphtheria.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Henry
Mr. Charles Henry, a well-known Delmar farmer, died last Monday evening of Bright’s disease.  He was 68 years of age.  The funeral is to be held today and the remains will be interred in the cemetery in this borough.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles S. Price
At Elbridge, Pa., February 15, 1891, of pneumonia, Charles S., oldest son of Isaac and Myra Price, aged 11 years.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. George E. Rich
At Mansfield, Pa., February 19, 1891, Mrs. George E. Rich, aged 37 years.  (Tuesday, February 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Salmon Sweet
Mr. Salmon Sweet, of Mansfield, died last Wednesday at the age of 73 years.  (Tuesday, March 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ira Gile
Mr. Ira Gile, a prominent citizen of Mansfield, died last Sunday.  He was in his 77th year.  (Tuesday, March 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Hollands
Last Friday morning Sarah, wife of Mr. Henry Hollands, died at her home in Blossburg after an illness of four months.  She was in her 73rd year.  Mrs. Hollands was born in Bedfordshire, England, in 1818.  She had been a resident of Blossburg for a quarter of a century, and she was endeared to many people for her excellent qualities of mind and heart.  She was an exemplary Christian and a member of the Baptist Church.  The funeral was held at the new Baptist church on Monday afternoon, and it was largely attended.  (Tuesday, March 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lloyd J. Catlin
The home of Mr. Joshua Atherton, in Charleston, was made sad by the death of his little grandson, Lloyd J. Catlin, on the 15th ultimo.  He is the infant son of Lettie and E. J. Catlin, aged 8 months and 10(or 16) days.  (Tuesday, March 4, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Edith Leib
Last Thursday morning Mrs. G. D. Leib died very suddenly at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. Harris McKinney, at Jersey Shore, where she had been spending the winter.  She was in her 81st year.  The remains were brought to this borough on Saturday and the funeral was held on Sunday afternoon at the house of her son, Mr. Joseph E. Leib, on East avenue.  Rev. O. S. Chamberlayne conducted the service.  Mrs. Leib’s maiden name was Edith Trego, and she was born in Bucks county May 21 or 24, 1810.  She had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for 57 years.  She was an excellent woman, and her circle of friends was very large.  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Levi Stone
A correspondent sends us the following particulars of the death of Rev. Levi Stone, who was well known in this county:  The death of this aged man of God occurred at Gillett’s, Bradford county, of paralysis, March 3d.  He was born at Smithfield, La., May 25, 1818.  His father was Rev. Jonathan Stone, a pioneer Baptist minister of Bradford and Tioga counties.  This death of the father is the first inroad upon his own family circle, which had remained unbroken for 52 years.  His children are Rev. C. A. Stone, of Walton, NY; Mrs. Calvin Hammond, of Hammond, Pa.; and Mrs. W. G. Sluyter, of Gillett’s, Pa.  For about 42 years, he served as pastor of Baptist Churches in southern New York and at Tioga, Charleston, Delmar, Jackson and Gillett’s, Pa.  At Gillett’s his pastorate continued 20 ½ years.  An earnest preacher, a devoted pastor, sympathizing friend, large-hearted, pure Christian man, maintaining a character and reputation above reproach, he has been the means of leading several hundreds to Christ.  It has been the lot of but few ministers to be so generally beloved and trusted. At Gillett‘s, Pa., March 3, 1891, of paralysis, Rev. Levi Stone, aged 73 years.(Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. J. T. Canfield
Mrs. J. T. Canfield, wife of Presiding Elder Canfield of this district, died at her home in Corning, NY, last Saturday morning of consumption.  She was 53 years of age.  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Catherine E. Starkweather
Mrs. Catherine E. Starkweather, wife of Alden Starkweather, died at her home at the Summit last Sunday after being sick four months with a tumor.  She was 51 years of age.  The funeral was held at the Shumway school-house yesterday.  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Edwin Boughton
Mr. Edwin Boughton, died at Painted Post, NY, a few days ago.  He was a member of Company E of the old Bucktail regiment, and during the war he was a regular war correspondent of the Agitator under the pen name of “Soldier Boy.”  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Susan Welton Douglass
At West Covington, Pa., March 4, 1891, Susan Welton, wife of Alfred J. Douglass, aged 72 years.  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Betsey Fulton
At Covington, Pa., March 4, 1891, Mrs. Betsey Fulton, aged 82 years.  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Dayton Hollenbeck
At Sylvania, Pa., March 3, 1891, Mr. Dayton Hollenbeck, aged 62 years.  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Libbie Wheeler
In Rutland, Pa., March 2, 1891, of diabetes, Libbie, daughter of Halsey B. Wheeler, aged 14 years.  (Tuesday, March 11, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Melvin S. Petrie
The death of Mr. Melvin S. Petrie, a promising young business man of this borough, early last Saturday morning of typhoid pneumonia was peculiarly sad.  He had been sick only about two weeks but his condition had been considered alarming from the first.  He was 33(or 83) years of age.  Mr. Petrie was a native of this borough being a son of Mr. Henry Petrie, now of Charleston.  He was employed for some years as a clerk at the coal yard and he then served as American Express messenger for a time.  Five years ago he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. Wade Francis in the grocery trade and the firm had been doing a successful business.  He was a young man of lean character and excellent business ability and he had a great many friends.  Mr. Petrie was fully conscious of the series ailment of his disease but he was ready to lie and with remarkable philosophy he discussed the subject with his friends and gave explicit directions to his business partner regarding the management of his affairs.  He leaves a widow and a five year old son.  The funeral was held at the First Baptist church on Sunday afternoon and it was very largely attended.  Rev. E. B. Cornell, assisted by Rev. W. H. Porter conducted the service.  (Tuesday, March 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John I. Kimball
Mr. John I. Kimball died at the home of his son, Mr. D. C. Kimball, at Mitchell Creek, on the 8th instant at the age of 89 years.  He was the grandfather of ex-County Commissioner Kimball.  (Tuesday, March 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. E. D. Fish
Mr. E. D. Fish, a prominent citizen of Farmington, died very suddenly last Monday morning.  He was at work helping his sons in logging, when he complained of feeling sick.  He was taken to the house and died in a few moments.  Mr. Fish was about 65 years of age.  (Tuesday, March 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Richard Moister
Mr. Richard Moister, a man 24 years of age, was drowned at Landrus last week Tuesday while he was engaged in floating logs.  Moister was employed by Mr. O’Connor of Hoytville, who had a crew of men splashing out logs at Landrus.  The dam was opened and in some manner the young man was caught by the logs in the rush down the ravine.  His fellow workmen are unable to tell just how the accident occurred.  The dead body was found about a mile below the dam.  Moister had no relatives in this region, and efforts are being made to find his friends.  It is said that over 100 letters were found in his trunk, but, strange to relate, the signatures and names of places from whence they were written were destroyed on all of them.  One letter bearing the post-mark of Leominster, Mass., and signed “Sister Ella” is the only clue as to any relatives.  The body was interred in the cemetery at Blossburg on Thursday.  (Tuesday, March 18, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Meehan
Last Saturday evening Mrs. Mary Meehan died at her home on Sturrock street after being sick a long time with nervous prostration.  She was 67 years of age and leaves several adult daughters.  The funeral was held yesterday morning at St. Peter’s church.  It is a singular coincidence that Mrs. Meehan’s husband, Owen Meehan, died on the same day of the same month three years ago.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Irma S. Bernkopf
Last Saturday morning Irma S., the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Bernkopf, died very suddenly of pneumonia.  She was in school on Tuesday and that day she went home with an apparent attack of tonsillitis.  She seemed to be doing well until Thursday night, when alarming symptoms suddenly developed, and the best medical skill proved unavailing.  Irma was 13(or 18) years of age.  She was a beautiful child possessed of all those qualities which go to make the perfect woman.  Her sweet disposition and bright intellect made her loved by her teachers and associates.  The remains were taken to Elmira, NY, yesterday morning for interment, the friends going thither by special car.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Levi Costley
Mr. Levi Costley, of Deerfield, died last week Sunday at the age of 76 years.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Deborah Ramsdell
Mrs. Deborah Ramsdell, who had been a resident of this county for 70 years, died at Mansfield on the 13th instant at the age of 95 years.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Encell
Mr. George Encell, formerly of Elkland, died at Saginaw, Mich., of heart disease last Wednesday.  He went from this county about a year ago.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia E. Niles
Mrs. Julia E. Niles, wife of Russell Niles, died at Niles Valley last Saturday morning, of pneumonia, after a sickness of only four days.  The funeral was held at the Niles Valley church on Monday afternoon.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mercy B. Mann
At her home near Tioga, Pa., on Sunday, March 15, 1891, Mrs. Mercy B. Mann, aged 74 years.  She left two sons, two brothers and two sisters, besides many other friends to mourn her loss.  But their loss is her gain.  She became a Christian in early life, and for nearly 50 years had been a faithful member of the Baptist Church.  She had been residing the winter with an aged sister, Mrs. Daniels, of Keeneyville, who died February 19th.  Since that time she had been with her brother, G. D. Keeney, until he took her home 10 days before her death.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Amos Sweet
At Osceola, Pa., March 8, 1891, Amos Sweet.  (Tuesday, March 25, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lucian Seely
Mr. Lucian Seely, formerly a resident here, died at Minneapolis, Minn., a few days ago at the age of 42 years.  He was a harness-maker by trade.  (Tuesday, April 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Charles McCaslin
Mrs. Charles McCaslin died at her home on Marsh creek last Saturday at the age of 73 years.  (Tuesday, April 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. J. Porter Wilcox
Mr. J. Porter Wilcox, a well-known citizen of Tioga, died last week Tuesday.  The funeral was held on Thursday afternoon.  (Tuesday, April 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David W. Ellison
Mr. David W. Ellison, a well-known and respected citizen of Arnot, died last week Tuesday, of pneumonia.  He was 55 years of age.  (Tuesday, April 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles S. Baker
Charles S. Baker, a prominent lawyer of Yates county, NY, and father of Dr. Baker, of Antrim, died at Penn Yan, NY, of pneumonia last Friday morning.  His wife died on Wednesday of the same disease, and a double funeral was held last Sunday.  (Tuesday, April 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sally Barber
Mrs. Sally Barber, who died at her home in Corning, NY, on the 20th ultimo, at the age of 75 years, left four brothers, two sisters, 10 children and 42 grandchildren surviving her.  She had been a resident of Corning for many years.  Her son, John Barber, and her brother, George Moore, reside in this borough.  (Tuesday, April 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles Wicks
Leetonia, March 27, 1891.--Mr. Charles Wicks died at his home in this place last Tuesday, of pneumonia.  He was a veteran of the late war and one of those who made the memorable march to the sea, under Sherman.  He was born October 9th, 1836, in Sullivan county, NY, where in August, 1862, he enlisted as a private, becoming afterwards a Corporal in Company C, 143d N. Y. Volunteers.  The regiment was organized at Fadsburg and left for the front in October, 1862.  It arrived in Washington, October 16, and went into permanent camp at Upton’s Hill, Va., on the 19th, having been assigned to Gen. Abercrombie’s division, in charge of the defenses of Washington.  April 15th, 1863, the division was moved to Suffolk, Va.  Leaving there on the 5th of May, it took part in the campaigns of West Point and White House, Va.  After the battle of Gettysburg, the regiment was ordered to join Meade, and was assigned to the 11th corps, Army of the Potomac, and marched to Warrenton Junction, Va., where it remained till September 25, 1863.  The corps was then transferred to the department of the Cumberland, commanded by General Thomas and endured the privations and toils of the campaigns through Lookout Valley to Mission Ridge, the memorable march to the relief of Knoxville, Tenn., and back to Lookout Valley in mid winter.  Thence they went to Bridgeport, Ala., where the corps became a part of the 20th army corps under command of Major-General Hooker, April, 1864.  It then marched with Sherman through Georgia and the Carolinas to Goldsboro and Raleigh, finally reaching Washington again, May 19, 1865.  The principle battles in which Mr. Wicks participated with his regiment during this time were Lookout Valley, Mission Ridge Relief of Knoxville, Resaca, Dallas and Atlanta, Ga., Averysboro and Bentonville, NC.  He was injured only once, and that was by being run over by a pair of runaway mules.  Throughout his long service he bore himself as a true soldier and patriot and won the esteem and warm affection of his comrades and superiors.  He was married on May 3, 1860, to Miss Nancy J. Hunt, and after his return from the war he settled down with her on a farm at home.  Eight years ago he moved to Leetonia, where he has since resided with his family.  His wife, two sons and two daughters survive him.  The funeral was held at his house on Thursday morning and the body taken to Wellsboro for burial.  (Tuesday, April 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frank L. Clemons
Leetonia, April 3, 1891.--Memorial services for the late Frank L. Clemons were held in the school-house here last Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Despite the severe storm there was a good attendance of those who desired to show their respect and affection for the deceased.  The pastor of the Methodist Church, Rev. E. T. Brush, made an address founded on I Thessalonians IV, 1-14, and appropriate music was rendered by the choir.  William Cullen Bryant’s beautiful poem on “The Future Life” was also read as appropriate to the occasion.  (Tuesday, April 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick G. Maeder
Frederick G. Meader actor, playwright and manager, died in New York last Thursday from pneumonia, which had developed from the grip, aged 50 years.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Charles Baring
Thomas Charles Baring, M. P., head of the reorganized banking firm of Baring Brothers, died in Rome a few days ago, of exhaustion resulting from a surgical operation.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William L. Forge
Captain William L. Forge, the famous fast-yacht builder, died in Keyport, NJ, a few days ago, aged 68.  Captain Forge designed and built many of the fastest yachts in this country.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Daniel G. Fowle
Gov. Daniel G. Fowle, of North Carolina, died at Raleigh, NC on Wednesday of apoplexy.  He was 60 years old.  was Adjutant-General of the State under Governor Vance during the war.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edmond Dehault de Pressense
Edmond Dehault de Pressense, the well-known French Protestant pastor and writer, died at Paris last Wednesday.  He was born at Paris, January 7, 1824.  In 1871 he was elected to the National Assembly.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Albert Pike
Gen. Albert Pike, Grand Commander of the Scottish rite Masonry of the Southern jurisdiction and the chief of the Royal Order of Scotland to this country, died at Washington a few days ago at the home of the Supreme Council of the Order, where he had lived for several years.  It is said that he appointed Josiah H. Drummond, of Maine, as his successor in the Scottish rite will be either Surgeon-General J. M. Browne, of the navy, Thomas H. Caswell, of California, or Thomas H. Dudley, of Kentucky.  Albert Pike was well known to all persons interested in Freemasonry.  He was born in Boston in 1869.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Carl Meine
Yesterday a dispatch was received here announcing the death of Carl Meine at Denver, Colorado, on Monday afternoon.  Young Meine was in his 25th year.  He studied medicine in the office of Dr M. L. Bacon about four years ago, and while here he was attacked with hemorrhage of the lungs.  He went West for his health three years ago.  He was a son of Dr. Meine, of Germania, and was an intelligent and exemplary young man.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. H. Augustus Kimble
Last Thursday morning Mr. H. Augustus Kimble, a well-known carpenter in this borough, was found dead in his bed, and it was evident that life had been extinct for several hours.  Kimble had been at work as usual on Wednesday, but he came home about 5 o’clock and told his wife that he was not feeling well, and without eating his supper he went to bed.  He said to his wife that she need not call him early the next morning, and he did not intend to go to his work.  During the night Mrs. Kimble awoke and heard her husband breathing heavily, but she thought nothing of it and did not disturb him.  She arose in the morning and got breakfast and sent her children to school, and about 10 o’clock she went in to call Mr. Kimble and found him dead with his face buried in the pillow.  Mr. Kimble was in his 38th year and he had lived here all his life.  He was a quiet, unobtrusive man and a good citizen.  He leaves a widow and four young children.  The funeral was held on Saturday afternoon at the family residence near the head of Walnut street.  Rev. E. B. Cornell conducted the service.  (Tuesday, April 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Christopher Prutsman
Mrs. Christopher Prutsman, formerly of Tioga, died last Monday at North Bingham, Potter county.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Devillo A. Stowell
Last Saturday evening Mr. Devillo A. Stowell, a well known and prosperous farmer of Delmar, died at his home after having suffered from poor health for several months.  He was in the 59th year of his age.  The funeral was held yesterday afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. Messrs. Snyder and Chamberlayne.  Mr. Stowell was born at Bainbridge, Chenango county, NY, June 9, 1832.  His father Hezekiah Stowell came here in 1833, and Devillo was educated in the common schools, and when he reached man’s estate, he engaged in lumbering with his father.  Afterward he was a successful lumberman for many years.  In 1862 he went to Oil City, but like many another man, he failed to make money in the oil business and he left that unsuccessful field of operations after two years of experience.  On the 15th of November, 1865, Mr. Stowell married Miss Charlotte Haven, of Coudersport, Pa., and moved to the farm in Delmar where he spent the remainder of his days in stock raising and farming principally, although he occasionally did something at lumbering during the winters.  Mr. Stowell leaves a widow and four children--Augustus H. Stowell, of Buffalo, NY, Belle, Milton H., and Grace.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Laugher Bache
Last Thursday evening Mr. Laugher Bache died at the home of his brother Mr. William Bache, on Pearl street, where he had resided for nearly two years.  He had been steadily failing in health for several years, but he had been able to be out of doors more or less until within a few weeks.  Mr. Bache was in his 77th year and he had lived here almost all his life.  He was a very reserved man, loving the companionship of his books, but still he was a genial man and among the few whom he chose for intimate friends he was steadfast, tender and generous.  His tastes led him to become something of a recluse in his later years.  Laugher Bache was born in this borough October 31, 1814 in the log house which stood where his brother, Mr. John N. Bache now resides.  It was probably the best log house in all this region at that time being two stories and a half high and large of area.  In one room of this old home the first court was held in the county, and the elections were held there for many years.  In another quarter of the same building Laugher was accustomed to assist his father, who was the Postmaster, in sorting the mail,--a light task in those days, when the mails were not large and arrived only once a week.  He was given the name of his grandmother’s family, her maiden name being Bridget Laugher.  He was educated on the Wellsboro Academy, which was then a school of considerable prominence in this region, and at the age of 21 he went to Illinois and took up a quarter section of land and engaged in farming for six or seven years.  About 1840 he returned to this place and entered into partnership with Col. A. E. Niles in the dry goods business, their store being located on Main street on the corner where Mr. Isaac Sears recently kept a grocery.  He was in trade for a number of years, and he then retired and studied law in the office of the late Judge Robert G. White, his brother in law, for about two years, but he never sought admission to the bar.  A few years later he again became a partner in a dry goods store in order to assist a young friend, but the business did not meet his expectations and he closed it out in a few years.  He was also at one time a partner of the late Andrew Ross in lumbering operations on Pine creek.  The funeral of Mr. Bache was held at Mr. William Bache’s residence at 3 o’clock last Sunday afternoon, and it was largely attended.  Rev. Mr. Snyder read the Episcopal burial service.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James H. Gulick
Mr. James H. Gulick, a well known citizen of Blossburg, died last Wednesday of pneumonia.  He was the second son of the late James Gulick, a leading citizen and prominent business man of this county some years ago.  Since the death of Mrs. Gulick, his mother about two years ago he had managed the affairs of the Gulick estate in a capable manner.  The funeral was held on Friday at Williamsport.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alfred W. Lewis
Mr. Alfred W. Lewis, a peddler of tinware, died last Sunday morning at Sheffer’s hotel in Blossburg, of bronchitis, resulting from an attack of the grip.  Lewis came from Canton and was in destitute circumstances.  The borough authorities took charge of the remains.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 Mrs. J. Moore
Mrs. J. Moore, of Covington, died last Wednesday.  She was a true Christian and died in the triumph of the faith.  Her funeral was held today, when her pastor, Mr. Rowley, preached from the text she selected herself: “She is not dead, but sleepeth.”  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James Westbrook
Mr. James Westbrook, a former resident of Covington, was buried at Mansfield last Tuesday.  He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of this place and also of the Odd Fellows’ Lodge, which Order buried him.  Rev. Messrs. D. Kepple, of Mansfield, and F. H. Rowley, of this place, were the officiating officers.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Warren Smith
Mr. Warren Smith was driving in a rain storm near Salladasburg, Lycoming county a few days ago, when he was struck by lightning and killed.  His horse was also killed.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Melville Fairbanks
Mr. Melville Fairbanks, of Granville, Bradford county, was standing on the porch at his home during a thunderstorm a few days ago, when he was struck by lightning and killed.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. H. Blades
Rev. J. H. Blades, a retired Methodist minister, and at one time pastor of the Church at Addison, NY, died suddenly a few days ago of heart failure super induced by an attack of the grip, at his home in that town.  He had not been in active service for some years.  (Tuesday, April 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Philip Leidy
Dr. Philip Leidy, a well-known physician of Philadelphia, is dead.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Continued on Page 417

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 17 JAN 2009
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.