Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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Tri County Clippings- Page Four Hundred Seventeen

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1891-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Ernest Moris
Ernest Moris, the naturalist, died in Indianapolis, last week, aged 82 years.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Leidy
Professor Joseph Leidy, the distinguished physician, died at Philadelphia last Thursday.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Homer A. Nelson
Homer A. Nelson, an ex-Congressman and ex-Secretary of New York, died at Poughkeepsie a few days ago.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Leconte
Professor John Leconte, professor of physics at the California State University, at Oakland, died last week at the age of 75 years.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Philip L. Moen
Philip L. Moen, the wealthy barbed-wire manufacturer about whose association with “Doc” Wilson there was so much mystery, died at Worcester, Mass., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

D. G. Mause
D. G. Mause, a well-known physician of Washington city, while suffering from pneumonia superinduced by the grip, shot himself in the breast and died by his own hands last week.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Isabella Smith Cooper
Mrs. Isabella Smith Cooper, supposed to be the oldest gypsy in this country, died at South Hadley Falls, Mass., a few nights ago, aged 95 years.  She was born in England but spent 75 years of her life in the United States.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. A. D. Kemp
Nelson, May 2, 1891.--Our little town is in sadness on account of the death of Mrs. A. D. Kemp, who was taken sick on Monday and died Thursday morning.  Mr. Kemp’s family had only recently come here, having rented their farm in Farmington and decided to take life more easy.  Every thing that loving hands and hearts could do was done; but God called her.  The large procession that followed her remains to the cemetery in Farmington showed the esteem of her neighbors and friends, and the casket covered with flowers and callas told how we tried to rob death of its terror.  She leaves, besides a host of friends, a loving husband and two sons.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Bateman Monroe
Mr. Bateman Monroe, a former landlord of the Farmer’s Hotel in this borough, died last week Sunday at the home of his daughter, near Addison, NY, aged 78 years.  Mr. Monroe resided at Hornellsville, NY, and his body was taken there for burial last week Tuesday.  He leaves a widow and two daughters.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ellen Kemp
Last Wednesday Ellen, wife of Mr. Alwert D. Kemp, died very suddenly at her home in Nelson, of heart disease.  She was a most estimable woman.  She leaves a husband and two sons.  The funeral was held at the East Farmington Methodist church last Saturday.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Eliza Spencer
Mrs. Eliza Spencer died at Covington last week Tuesday, of dropsy, at the age of 77 years.  She was the daughter of Elias Spencer, who resided in this borough many years ago, and a sister of Mrs. Lucinda Black and William and Theodore Spencer, of this borough.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Oliver Elliott
Mr. Oliver Elliott, who died at Mansfield on the 24th ultimo, had been a resident of this county for about 80 years, coming here from Maine with his parents when he was a child of four years.  For many years he resided on a 300-acre farm east of Mansfield, and he was a trusted local agent of the Bingham estate in that locality.  He also conducted a store at Cherry Flats for a number of years.  In 1876 he formed a partnership with his son Judson A. Elliott, and the firm of O. Elliott & Son has conducted a store at Mansfield ever since.  Mr. Elliott was a member of the Baptist Church.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry M. Smith
Last Thursday evening Mr. Henry M. Smith died at his home in Delmar, after having suffered greatly for several months with erysipelas.  Mr. Smith was born at Baden, Germany, in 1828, and he came to this country when he was 20 years of age.  In 1849 he married Mrs. Katherine Railing, at Baltimore, Md.  The family came to Wellsboro in 1858, where Mr. Smith worked at his trade as a shoemaker for many years and then engaged in farming.  He was an industrious man and respected citizen.  The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon, Rev. Mr. Snyder officiating.  Mr. Smith leaves a widow, three sons, three daughters and one step-son.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

D. P. Hurlburt
Prof. D. P. Hurlburt, the well-known horse-trainer, who has made frequent tours through the county, died last Wednesday at Norfolk, Neb., from the effects of serious burns which he received in a circus-ring on the 24th ultimo.  Prof. Hurlburt was giving an exhibition of his wonderful trained horses, when a large gasoline lamp which hung in the center of the tent was noticed to be leaking badly.  He attempted to fix it, and the fluid streamed down his coat-sleeves and vest and caught fire.  He ran outside and his assistants threw a carpet over him, but his arms, face and body were badly burned.  The Professor was taken to his hotel and appeared to be doing well until last week Tuesday, when he was suddenly taken worse, and he died the following day.  Prof. Hurlburt was 54 years of age.  He was a member of the firm of Hurlburt & Hunting who traveled with a small but meritorious show for several years, and then he started out with his collection of educated horses and had been quite successful in his business.  The funeral was held at Corning on Monday afternoon and the remains were buried there.  (Tuesday, May 6, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frank Johnson
Mr. Frank Johnson, the young Swede who was injured while shifting a belt in the saw-mill of Drake, Cummings & Co, at Blossburg, died of his injuries at the Cottage hospital last week Sunday morning.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Miller
The late Jacob Miller, the Blossburg merchant, left no will.  His estate, which is quite valuable, is to be divided between a niece in Blossburg, a brother in California, and a brother and sister in Switzerland.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Isaac Anthony
Mr. Isaac Anthony died at the county poor house on Sunday night of catarrhal consumption.  He returned from the Soldiers’ Home at Dayton, Ohio, a short time ago, and he had been a ward of the county only a few days.  He was 50 years of age.  The funeral was held yesterday afternoon.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James B. Harrower
Mr. James B. Harrower, a well-known citizen of Lawrenceville, was found drowned in the Tioga river last Thursday afternoon.  He was last seen on the previous evening.  It is supposed that he fell into the water while walking along the river bank.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Alta Brooks
Mrs. Alta Brooks, widow of the late Hiram Brooks, died at the home of her son, Otis Broolks, in Charleston last Saturday evening.  She was 74 years of age.  She was born in Charleston and had always resided in the same neighborhood.  The funeral was held on Sunday afternoon.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane W. Olmstead
Mrs. Jane W. Olmstead, a respected lady of Delmar, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Dalman, in Mansfield last Saturday.  The funeral was held at the Draper Baptist church on Sunday afternoon and was largely attended.  Rev. James A. Boyce conducted the service.  The remains were buried in the Olmstead cemetery.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Amos Tyler
Mr. Amos Tyler, who was a well known resident of Delmar, for many years and who went to Washington Territory something like 10 years ago, died at the residence of his son, John Tyler, on the 24th of April, in his 93rd year.  Mr. Tyler moved to Middle Ridge some time in the forties.  His family consisted on his wife and six children--three girls and three boys.  One girl died when quite young, and the others were--Ambrosia, the eldest, who became the wife of Mr. C. L. Willcox and who died several years ago, and Maryette, now Mrs. Calvin Dibble, of this place.  Uriah, their first son, went West many years ago, and the last the family heard from him he had started for California.  Walden, the second son, is now living in Minnesota, and John, the youngest, with whom Mr. Tyler was when he died is living at Cheney, Spokane county, Washington.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane W. Olmstead
At Mansfield, Pa., May 9, 1891, Jane(or June) W., widow of the late Stephen Olmstead, of Delmar, Pa., aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, May 13, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Madame Blavarsky
Madame Blavarsky, the well known Theosophist, died in London a few days ago, aged 60 years.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Julius E. Hilgard
Professor Julius E. Hilgard, late Superintendent of the United States Coast Survey, died at his home in Washington a few days ago after a long and very painful illness.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lawson Valentine
Lawson Valentine, of the well-known firm of varnish makers of New York city, and one of the proprietors of the Christian Union died the other day at Mountainville, NY.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Barry Sullivan
Barry Sullivan, the tragedian, is dead.  In 1857 he made a professional tour of the United States and met with great success throughout the country.  He was born in Birmingham in 1824.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

The Archbishop of York
The Archbishop of York died of influenza a few days ago.  Dr. Magee was a native of Ireland and was a man of eminent ability and eloquence.  He was appointed to the Archbishop of York in January last.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel M. Pettingill
Samuel M. Pettingill, one of the pioneer newspaper advertising agents, died at his home in Brooklyn, NY, a few days ago.  He sold out his business in New York in 1886 to J. H. Bates but for many years previous his agency was one of the most prominent and prosperous in the country, having branches in Boston and Philadelphia.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Frederick May
Dr. John Frederick May, an eminent physician of Washington, died a few days ago from pneumonia, in the 79th year of his age.  He was the first American surgeon that ever made a successful amputation at the hip joint, all attempts previous to his in this country resulting disastrously to the patient.  At the time of the killing of President Lincoln he fully identified the body of the assassin, John Wilkes Booth, by a scar that marked the seat of an operation he had performed on him.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Hattie Baer
Mrs. Irvin Baer died at Binghamton, NY, on the 19th instant of heart-failure.  She was about 30 years of age.  Mrs. Baer formerly resided in this borough, her maiden name being Hattie Blatchley.  She was a sister of Mrs. George Riberollo.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Carl Meine
Last Wednesday the body of Dr. Carl Meine, who died at Denver, Col., on the 13th of April, of typhoid fever, was brought to his father’s home at Germania by his mother.  The funeral was held at Germania on Thursday last, and it was attended by a remarkably large congregation.  Mrs. Meine, who attended her son during his sickness, is now seriously sick with inflammatory rheumatism.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Hone
Last Wednesday morning Mr. William Hone was found dead in his bed at the residence of Mr. Charles Loop, in Nelson, where Hone had been staying.  The Tioga Express says that Hone retired early on Tuesday night, and just before going to his room made a remark to the effect that should he not live till morning his watch was to be given to a friend living in Farmington; but the family thought nothing of his remark.  On the stand in his room was a morphine bottle partly emptied, enough having been taken to produce death.  The Coroner’s inquest resulted in a verdict in accordance with the facts stated.  Hone was a hard-working, industrious man liked by all who knew him.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Leonard Palmer
Last Wednesday Mr. Leonard Palmer, formerly a resident of Stony Fork, died at Lindley, NY.  The remains were brought here for interment on Friday.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John A. Hammond
Mr. John A. Hammond, the oldest citizen of Elkland, was found dead in his bed last Saturday morning.  Mr. Hammond was in his 88th year.  He was born at Elkland in 1812.  Some eight weeks ago the deceased had an attack of the grip, which affected his heart, and some days ago the doctor notified the family that his death might occur at any time, and with the weight of years upon him it came suddenly and painlessly.  He was one of the incorporators of Elkland borough in 1850, and now there remains but one who voted at the first borough election.  The funeral was held at the residence of Mr. Hammond’s son on Monday afternoon.  Rev. John Cairns, of Monterey, NY, conducted the services.  (Tuesday, May 27, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Verus H. Metzgar
Ex-State Senator Verus H. Metzgar, of Williamsport, died last Thursday, aged 32.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rear Admiral Carter
Rear Admiral Carter of the Navy, retired, died last week at his home in Washington.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Edmond Becquerel
Prof. Alexander Edmond Becquerel, the well-known French physician and author, died in Paris the other day.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Deekson
Dr. William Deekson, Assistant Chief of the United States Bureau of the Animal Industry, died at Washington a few days ago.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Thomas Beaver
Mr. Thomas Beaver, the wealthy philanthropist, died at Danville a few days ago.  He was an uncle of ex-Governor Beaver.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Nicholas Fowler
Sir Robert Nicholas Fowler, Conservative member of Parliament for the University of London, is dead from heart disease.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Roumanille
Joseph Roumanille, the Provencial poet, born in 1818, and created a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor in 1874, died last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. Henry VanDyke
Rev. Dr. J. Henry VanDyke, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, dropped dead at his residence last week Tuesday.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George W. Dobbin
Ex-Judge George W. Dobbin, of Baltimore, died last Thursday, aged 82 years.  He was a well-known lawyer and had filled many places of trust.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lemuel Todd
Hon. Lemuel Todd, of Carlisle, Pa., died of paralysis a few days ago.  He was the Chairman of the first Republican State Committee of Pennsylvania.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James McHenry
James McHenry, well known as the principal litigant in the suit against the management of the Erie Railway some years ago, died in London last week.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles William Naegeli
Professor Charles William Naegeli, the distinguished German botanist died last Wednesday at Berlin.  Professor Naegeli was born in 1817, and was educated at the universities of Zurich, Geneva and Berlin.  His writings are among the most valuable contributions to the literature of the science of botany.  (Tuesday, June 3, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Payne Logan
Joseph Payne Logan, one of the most eminent physicians in the South, died at Atlanta, Ga., last week.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Benson J. Lossing
Benson J. Lossing, LL. D., the well-known historian died at his residence at Chestnut Ridge, NY, last Wednesday, aged 78 years.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Allen Judge
William Allen Judge of the Massachusetts Supreme Court died suddenly last Thursday morning at his home in Northampton, of neuralgia of the heart, aged 69.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Antoine Aim Dorion
Sir Antoine Aim Dorion, once the Premier of Canada, and formerly Chief Justice of the Court of Queen’s Bench at Quebec, is dead at the age of 73.  Sir Antoine was prominent as a Liberal member of the Quebec Parliament until Confederation, and was active in favor of the Union.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Mason Jones
Mrs. Mary Mason Jones who died in New York, her native city, a few nights ago, in her 90th year, was one of the wealthiest women in the land.  This was practically the result of real estate investments in the city made by her father, John Mason, whose country place comprised the territory bounded by 54th and 63rd streets and Fifth and Park Avenues.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Maynard
Dr. Edward Maynard, dental surgeon and inventor, died recently at Washington, D. C., of Bright’s disease.  His inventions in instruments and modes of using them in his profession have been numerous and many of them have become well known and generally adopted.  He was at one time employed by the imperial family at St. Petersburg as court dentist.  Dr. Maynard patented the breech-loading Maynard rifle and also a method of converting muzzle loading arms into breech loaders.  (Tuesday, June 10, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Morgan Sherwood
Mr. Morgan Sherwood, a well known citizen of this borough, died at his residence on Walnut street at half past 9 o’clock last Monday evening.  He had been in failing health for several years, being troubled with heart difficulty but the immediate cause of his death was Bright’s disease.   Mr. Sherwood was a native of Chenango county, NY, where he was born December 28th, 1814.  He came to this borough about 1834 and followed his trade as a shoemaker for several years.  He then moved to Michigan and afterward went to St. Louis, Mo., being engaged in the shoe trade at the latter place for some time.  He returned to this borough something over 20 years ago and had resided here ever since.  He married a sister of A. S. Brewster, Esq., two or three years after he first came here and for more than half a century the couple lived happily together the union being dissolved by Mrs. Sherwood’s death about two years ago.  Four children were born to them and two survive--Charles C, who is now a resident of Omaha, Neb., and Miss Mary, who has resided here with her father.  Mr. Sherwood was a good citizen and a genial good hearted man, and was well liked by a large circle of friends.  His funeral is to be held in St. Paul’s church this afternoon at 5 o’clock.  (Tuesday, June 17, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Winfield Scott
Mrs. Winfield Scott died at her home in Westfield a few days ago.  She was a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor.  (Tuesday, June 17, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph Klein Emmet
Joseph Klein Emmet, the comedian, died at Cornwall, NY, of pneumonia, last week.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George B. Wiestling
George B. Wiestling, the prominent engineer and charcoal iron manufacturer, died at his home, Mont Alto Park, Pa., last week.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Frances James
Mrs. Frances James, widow of the late George Payne Rainsford James, the English novelist, died at Eau Claire, Wis., recently aged 90.  Her distinguished husband died at Venice, 31 years ago.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Patrick O’Gorman Mahan
Captain James Patrick O’Gorman Mahon, M. P., is dead.  He was born in 1808(?), and was known as the Grand Old Man of the Irish party.  He entered Parliament in 1839(or 1830) and was a follower of Daniel O’Connell.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Syphax
William Syphax, one of Washington’s most respected colored citizens, died last week.  He was connected with all the prominent movements for the advancement of his people.  He entered the Interior Department in 1851 and served under nine different Secretaries.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John E. Lovejoy
John E. Lovejoy, who died at his home in Monticello, Iowa, a few days ago, calls to mind again that anti slavery tragedy in Alton, IL, in 1857(or 1867), when Elijah Lovejoy was murdered.  John Lovejoy was the famous Elijah’s brother and was employed by him in Alton at the time of the riot.  John was the last of the Lovejoy family.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel L. Holden
Mr. Daniel H. Holden, an old and respected citizen of Mansfield, died last Wednesday night at the age of 78 years.  Mr. Holden had resided at Mansfield nearly all his life.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. T. C. Twitmire
The wife of Dr. T. C. Twitmire died on the 11th instant at Glen Richey, Pa.  She was the daughter of the late James Arrowsmith and was the first female child born in Arnot.  She was 25 years old.  The body was taken to Blossburg for burial in the Odd Fellows’ cemetery.  (Tuesday, June 24, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucy Whitman
At Antrim, Pa., June 24, 1891, of cholera morbus, Lucy, wife of Charles Whitman, aged 66 years.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lyman Beach
Lyman Beach, an old and respected citizen of Mansfield, died at the home of his daughter, in Elmira, NY, last Friday morning.  He had been visiting in Elmira for several weeks and was taken sick with a disease of the stomach.  Mr. Beach was 77 years of age, and he had resided in this county for many years.  The remains were brought back to Mansfield for interment.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Simeon I. Power
Last week Tuesday morning Mr. Simeon I. Power died at his home in Lawrenceville after a lingering illness.  He was 71 years of age.  He was born at Tioga, and he was Sheriff of this county in 1859-1861.  Mr. Power was a genial, whole-souled gentleman, and he had a great many warm friends in this region.  His father was also Sheriff in this county from 1815 to 1819.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Shaw
Mr. John Shaw, of Covington, died last Thursday from the effects of prostration by the heat while he was at work in a fallow on the previous Saturday.  (Tuesday, July 1, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Kane
Last Saturday forenoon about half past 11 o’clock, Mr. John Kane, of Stokesdale, was instantly killed by being run over by the cars while he was walking on the track within sight of his own home.  Engineer John Barber, who was running the train from this station to Stokesdale Junction, just as he whistled for the “Wright crossing,” saw Mr. Kane on the track ahead, and he blew the whistle several times as a warning.  Mr. Kane, whose back was towards the train, seemed not to hear the signal, and he was struck and crushed beneath the wheels.  Several others who were also walking down the track ahead of Mr. Kane heard the train and stepped aside.  The train was stopped, and the horribly-mutilated remains of Mr. Kane were picked up by the trainmen and placed in the baggage-car and taken to Stokesdale depot.  Justice A. S. Brewster was notified, and as Acting Coroner he summoned a jury and took evidence in the case on Saturday afternoon.  The jury rendered a verdict that Kane’s death was purely accidental, and that no blame attached to the employees of the Railway Company.  John Kane was about 60 years of age.  He had been a “sponger” at the Stokesdale tannery for many years, and he was respected as a citizen of that community.  On Saturday morning he came to this borough and purchased a scythe and some other small articles and started for home, walking as usual down the railroad track.  He was not hard of hearing, but it is supposed that he was engrossed in thought and, although he might have heard it, paid no attention to the whistle.  The funeral was held on Monday forenoon at St. Peter’s church, and it was largely attended.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Charlotte Brooks
Last week Tuesday evening Charlotte, the nine year old daughter of Daniel Brooks, of Morris Run, died of sunstroke.  The child had been working the previous day in picking potato-bugs and was prostrated by the heat.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Nabby Fox
Mrs. Nabby Fox died near Harrison Valley on the 25th ultimo at the age of 99 years, 3 months and 12 days.  She was buried at Potter Brook by the side of her husband Silas Fox, who died in 1885 at the age of 99 years.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Tunney
Last Thursday the five year old daughter of Mr. Luke Tunney, of Hoytville, died of cerebro-spinal meningitis.  The funeral was held at Sunday and it was very largely attended.  The interment was made at the Catholic cemetery in this borough.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David Dartt
Last Monday Mr. David Dartt, who was injured in a runaway accident some weeks ago, died from his injuries at his home at Hedgesville, NY.  The remains are to be brought to Dartt Settlement for interment.  Mr. Dartt was 43 years of age, and he was a prosperous farmer.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ada M. Atwell
At Galeton, Pa., June 30, 1891, of influenza and meningitis, Ada M., wife of Fred A. Atwell, and daughter of E. H. and M. E. Tremain, aged 17(?) years and 18(?) days.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Susan Clark
In Deerfield, Pa., June ?, 1891, of cancer, Miss Susan Clark.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Nabby Fox
Mrs. Nabby Fox died near Harrison Valley on the 25th ultimo at the age of 99 years, 3 months and 12 days.  She was buried at Potter Brook by the side of her husband Silas Fox, who died in 1885 at the age of 99 years.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hannibal Hamlin
Last Saturday--Independence-day--ex-Vice-President Hannibal Hamlin was stricken with heart-failure at about 6 o’clock in the afternoon, at the Terrantine Club-rooms in Bangor, and he died at 8:15 o’clock.  He was engaged in a game of pedro with three of his intimate friends, when one of them noticed that he appeared unwell, and asked him if such was not the case.  Mr. Hamlin replied that he was feeling very badly and leaned forward on the table.  He was removed to a lounge and asked to be bolstered up.  In a short time he became unconscious.  Physicians were called, and everything was done to restore the stricken man.  He recovered consciousness at intervals.  Five minutes before he died the physicians and attendants thought he was a little improved.  He remarked to the physician:  “I am very warm.”  The physicians replied that they were trying to make him comfortable.  “But you are making me very uncomfortable,” answered Mr. Hamlin, and five minutes later he expired.  Mr. Hamlin’s wife, his son, General Charles Hamlin, and wife and their son were present when he died.  Mr. Hamlin’s sudden death was talked of everywhere, and the greatest sympathy was expressed by everybody in Bangor, where he was loved by all.  His health of late had failed somewhat, but he had been about as usual.  His last appearance in public was about a week before his death, when he attended the memorial exercises of the Penobscot Bar Association in honor of his life-long friend and neighbor, the late Chief-Justice Appleton.  At that time, Mr. Hamlin spoke only a few words of eulogy, excusing himself for not making a more lengthy address by saying he was not feeling well that day.  Hannibal Hamlin was born in Paris, Me., August 27, 1809, and after completing his education was admitted to the bar in 1833.  Three years later the rising young lawyer was elected to the Maine Legislature, of which he was Speaker for three years.  He ran for Congress on the Democratic ticket and was elected in 1843, re-elected in 1844, and four years after was chosen to fill a vacancy in the United States Senate.  In 1861 he was elected for a full term of six years.  During this latter period he experienced a change of heart politically, withdrew from his party and became a Republican.  At the expiration of his term he was elected by the Republicans of the States Governor of Maine, but he resigned that office on being again elected Senator.  In 1860, when Lincoln was elected President, Mr. Hamlin was chosen as Vice-President of the United States.  He was not re-nominated in 1884, and in 1885 he was appointed Collector of the Port of Boston.  He soon resigned this position, however, and again went to the Senate, where he remained until 1881.  In this last year he was appointed Minister to Spain.  After a year’s service the now aged statesman concluded that he had had enough of politics.  He thereupon resigned his position and retired to his home in Maine, where he has been living quietly since.  When he appeared in public it was always in a long black frock coat and trousers that carried memories of the Senate’s broadcloth days.  His last visit to New York was February 12, for the purpose of attending the Lincoln anniversary dinner.  The coal-black hair of the old days was turned to gray and the swarthy cheeks, once almost Spanish in their depth of color, were pale and furrowed.  In spite of this he was a magnificent specimen of the statesman of the mid century period.  The home life of the venerable statesman was simplicity in the extreme, and his one enjoyment was superintending his little farm.  He took a great interest in clubs and was a prominent member of many, but most of his evenings were spent at home.  Mrs. Hamlin, who was knows as the greatest favorite in Washington society when Mr. Hamlin was Vice-President was perfectly devoted to her aged husband and is greatly loved and respected.  He was an inveterate smoker, but seldom drank.  He decided, he said, to abstain from intoxicants when he first went to Washington, because if he behaved himself his constituents might see fit to return him.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Fitzgerald
Colonel Thomas Fitzgerald, founder of the Philadelphia Item, died in London a few days ago.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Edward Weber
Professor William Edward Weber, the well-known electroscientist, died a few days ago at Goettingen, Hanover.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Bronsart Von Schellendorf
General Bronsart Von Schellendorf, who was formerly German Minister of War, died at Berlin, the other day.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Francis H. Brown
Francis H. Brown, the well-known composer and author, died at his home at Stamford, Conn., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Professor Northrop
Professor Northrop, of Columbia College, New York, who was burned by an explosion of alcohol a few days ago, died of his injuries.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Catharine W. Sinclair
Catharine W. Sinclair, the widow of the tragedian, Edwin Forrest, from whom she was divorced, died in New York a few days ago, aged 74 years.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph W. Alsop
Dr. Joseph W. Alsop, the Democratic candidate, for Lieutenant-Governor in the last campaign in Connecticut, died suddenly a few days ago at his home in Middletown.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Howard L. Johnson
Howard L. Johnson, son of William Johnson, founder of the firm of MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan, type-founders, committed suicide a few days ago by shooting himself.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. G. Crate
Rev. J. G. Crate, a well-known member of the New Jersey Methodist Episcopal Conference, with which he had been connected since 1855, died the other day at Elmer, aged 61 years.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Rollin Manville
Rollin Manville, superintendent of the Pennsylvania Division of the Delaware and and Hudson Canal Company, died a few days ago.  He was one of the best known railroad managers in the Eastern and Middle States, and his connection with the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company date from 1856.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Fred Brokaw
Fred Brokaw, son of the millionaire clothier, J. V. Brokaw, of New York, and catcher of the Princeton Baseball Club, was drowned in front of his father’s cottage at Elberon, a few days ago while trying to save from drowning two servant girls employed by Charles Hess, who occupies the adjoining cottage.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel McCarter
Colonel Samuel McCarter, one of the most widely-known mechanical engineers of Pennsylvania, died at Norristown recently of apoplexy.  He was a member of the famous family of fighting McCarter’s during the war and abandoned a lucrative foundry business to go into the army.  He possessed considerable inventive genius, and the most notable of his inventions is the machinery for manufacturing asphalt blocks.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Phoebe Sebring
Mrs. Phoebe Sebring died in Liberty on the 21st of June in the 67th year of her age.  She was the widow of the late R. C. Sebring and had been a respected resident of our village for nearly half a century.  She was afflicted with what her attending physician called nervous consumption.  She left four children--two sons and two daughters--who are all married.  She was an affectionate, Christian mother, and her loss will be severely felt.  (Tuesday, July 8, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Runciman
James Runciman, the English litterateur, is dead.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Burgess
Edward Burgess, the yacht designer, died at his home in Boston last Sunday, of typhoid fever, after an illness of six weeks.  Mr. Burgess designed the yachts Volunteer, Puritan, Mayflower, and many others.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederic Louis Ritter
Dr. Frederic Louis Ritter, of Poughkeepsie, NY, whose sudden death at Antwerp, Ger., has been announced, was widely known in American musical circles as a composer, musical director and writer on musical subjects.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William A. Schubert
Rev. Dr. William A. Schubert was crossing the street opposite his residence at Washington, DC., last Wednesday, when he was run down by a boy on a bicycle and fatally injured.  The doctor was carried into his house and died at midnight.  He was 60 years old and a native of New Jersey.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Aquilla Jones
The venerable Aquilla Jones died at Indianapolis last Sunday, aged 80 years.  He had been Treasurer of Indiana and was Postmaster of Indianapolis during President Cleveland’s Administration.  He cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson, and was an intimate friend of John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, Daniel Webster and all the prominent statesman of antebellum days.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Dolan
Edward Dolan, a marble-cutter who formerly worked for Messrs. Johnson & VanDusen, in this borough, was found dead in the shop of Messrs. Buck, Spencer & Moore, at Binghamton, NY, early last week Monday morning.  Mr. Dolan was the first workman to reach the shop that morning.  It was evident that he had taken a broom to sweep out and had fallen to the floor when the job was half completed.  A fellow workman, who arrived a few minutes later, found him, and, supposing that Dolan had fainted, summoned assistance; but Dolan was dead.  It is supposed that his death was caused by heart disease.  Mr. Dolan left this place about a year ago, and he had been working at Waverly, NY, until a few weeks ago, when he went to Binghamton.  He leaves a widow and nine children.  Dolan was a member of Bache Hose Company of this place, and he was a pensioner.  He was an industrious man and was respected as a citizen.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. H. N. Fish
Mr. H. N. Fish, an aged and respected citizen, of Bradford county, died on the 4th instant, of blood-poisoning resulting from an injury to one of his feet.  He was 74 years of age.  For 35 years he had held the office of Constable in Troy, and in the early days he gained a wide reputation as a shrewd detective.  Mr. Fish was an honorable man and a faithful official.  He spent his early life in this county, and his remains were brought to his old home in Sylvania for interment.  He was a brother of ex-Sheriff Fish, of this borough.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jason Cooper
Mrs. Jason Cooper, of Chatham township, committed suicide last Monday by taking a dose of arsenic.  No reason is known why the woman committed the act, but it is supposed that she did it in a fit of temporary insanity.  The funeral was held at the Wormer school-house yesterday afternoon.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Brann
Last Wednesday afternoon John Brann, 20 years of age and a son of Mr. Thomas Brann, was killed  by the cars near the saw-mill at Fall Brook.  Young Brann jumped on the train to ride up to the store.  Some cars were being pushed into the mill-yard switch, and he attempted to jump from a gondola to the platform of the caboose just as they were detached.  He fell to the track and was run over and instantly killed, his body being terribly mangled.  Brann was a young man of good habits and he was generally popular in the community.  The remains were taken to Elmira on Friday for interment.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Parmelia Mitchell
Miss Parmelia Mitchell died last Sunday at the county poor-house.  She was mildly insane, and she had not been an inmate of the institution since its establishment in the fall of 1868.  She was 83 years of age.  Her home was in Lawrence.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Abijah. P. Lent
Tioga, July 18, 1891.--Last Monday afternoon a fatal accident occurred at the railway crossing near Russell’s mill.  While A. P. Lent, of Lamb’s Creek, was crossing the track with a load of bark his horses shied at a car that stood near the road, throwing him off in front of the wagon and under the horses heels.  It is thought that one of the horses kicked him in the abdomen.  The wagon wheels run over his left arm above the elbow.  Dr. S. P. Hakes was called in to attend him.  He died about 1 o’clock Tuesday afternoon.  Lamb‘s Creek, July 11, 1891.--Mr. Abijah P. Lent, of upper Lamb‘s Creek, died at Tioga last Tuesday, aged about 48(or 43) years.  The cause of his untimely death was an accident which befell him while drawing bark to the Tioga tannery last Monday.  All went well during the day until he reached the railroad crossing near Russell’s mill.  It attempting to cross the track his team became frightened at the cars and started to run, and he was pulled off in front of the load.  He was picked up and carried to a house near by, where he spent his last hours on earth.  The funeral was held on Thursday at the church here.  He was buried at Mansfield.  A large circle of friends join in mourning with his bereaved wife and only daughter.  His father and several brothers and sisters survive him.   (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William M. Newell
Our esteemed fellow-citizen, William M. Newell, of Union, departed this life a few days ago and was buried last Sunday.  Rev. Mr. Faus, of Ralston, conducted the services.  “Uncle Bill,” as he was called by so many, is another victim to the long marches and bad water in Virginia.  He was past 63 years of age, had always lived in Union and was called one of the foremost men in the township.  (Tuesday, July 15, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alexander Gaylord
Mr. Alexander Gaylord, who died at Blossburg a few days ago at the age of 70 years, was a brother of Mrs. Joseph Harman.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Frederick Thomas
The remains of Mr. Frederick Thomas, who died recently at Denver, Col., were brought to Liberty, his former home, for interment.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alexander H. Gaylord
Mr. Alexander H. Gaylord, one of Blossburg’s oldest and most respected citizens, died on the 11th instant at the age of 75 years.  He had lived in this county almost all his life.  In 1837 he assisted in developing the Blossburg coal mines and in the construction of the railroad, and he was known in later years as one of the leading citizens of that part of the county and was respected for his integrity of character and his usefulness as a member of society.  The funeral last week Tuesday afternoon was largely attended.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Chapin
Mrs. Sarah Chapin recently died at her home very suddenly.  She was a Christian woman and leaves many friends to mourn her loss.  (Tuesday, July 22, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Blakely
John Blakely, the veteran boat builder at Cambridge, Mass., died a few days ago aged 56 years.  He made himself famous by his skill in turning out racing shells.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

B. F. Kelley
General B. F. Kelley, “the hero of Phillippi,” died at Oakland, Md., a few days ago.  He had been suffering for some time from the effect of an old bullet-wound received at Philippi during the late war.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas M. Browne
Gen. Thomas M. Browne, of Indiana, who died a few days ago, was one of the ablest men who sat on the Republican side of the National House from that State in many years.  He served throughout six Congresses  and declined re-nomination last fall because of poor health.  He was a member of the Ways and Means Committee in the latter part of his service, and became well known for his opposition to the course of his party on the tariff.  (Tuesday, July 29, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Zilphia Loran Prutsman
Mrs. Zilphia Loran Prutsman, a daughter of Ebenezer Jackson, a pioneer of this county, recently died at her home near Princeton, IL, at the advanced age of 85 years.  She was formerly the wife of John Icenhower, of Virginia, and after his death married Adam Prutsman, of this county, who moved to Illinois in 1840.  (Tuesday, August 5, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Myrtle Russell
On the 24th ultimo Myrtle, the 13 months old child of Mr. C. C. Russell, who lives near Harrison Valley, was playing about the stove, when her clothes caught fire.  The mother was at the barn at the time with several of the other children and, hearing the cries of the child, they rushed to the house, but before the child could be rescued she was so badly burned that she died the next day.  (Tuesday, August 5, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Peake
In Charleston, Pa., August 1, 1891, of cholera infantum, the infant son of Mr. Seth Peake, aged 1 year and 8 months.  (Tuesday, August 5, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Laflin
A news dispatch from Lawrenceburg, Ind., dated last Wednesday, says Samuel Laflin is dead from wounds received in a fight with muskrats.  Last Friday, he went fishing in Hogan creek.  He missed some fish he had left on the bank, and looking about saw the tail of one of the fish protruding from beneath a ledge of rock just at the water’s edge.  Laflin began to tear away the rock and earth from above, when he discovered a nest of muskrats.  The young rats began to squeal in fright, and their cries attracted the attention of the older ones.  With screams the animals, anxious for their young, attacked the farmer.  Their cries attracted other rats, and from a dozen nests came answering cries.  Before Laflin could realize his danger the fierce little animals were all on him, biting his face, neck and limbs.  The farmer yelled with pain, struck, stamped and kicked at the rats, but they hung on like bull-dogs until, bleeding from a score of wounds, he broke away from his desperate assailants, and reached home nearly dead.  Blood poison set in, and death resulted last night.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

The Earl of Dartmouth
The Earl of Dartmouth is dead, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Brewer Crane
James Brewer Crane, one of the Dalton, Mass., Cranes of papermaking fame, died in that town last week Tuesday, aged 74.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel B. Axtell
Samuel B. Axtell, ex Governor of Utah  and New Mexico, died at Morristown, NJ, last Thursday, in his 72nd year.  He was born in Franklin county, Ohio.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Bayliss Hanm
Bayliss Hanm, the picturesque Indiana Democrat who was Minister to the Argentine Republic during the Cleveland Administration, died at his home in Crawfordsville a few days ago.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Baron Osten Sacken
Baron Osten Sacken, a descendant of Napoleon’s field marshal rich and unmarried, committed suicide lately in Dubbein, a seaside resort in Livonia, because “life was too monotonous.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George K. Anderson
Hon. George K. Anderson, a former State Senator from Crawford county, died at Trinidad, Col., last week Monday.  Mr. Anderson had been appointed as Register of a Land-office in New Mexico by President Harrison and had only been in that southwestern country a few months.  He was at one time a very successful oil producer, but he lost the bulk of his fortune in speculations which proved disastrous.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Slingerland
Mr. George Slingerland, an aged and respected citizen of Mansfield, died last Wednesday night after a long sickness.  He was about 70 years of age.  Mr. Slingerland had long been an agent for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and he was an earnest worker in that cause.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Timothy Coates
Mr. Timothy Coates, a well-known citizen of Elkland, died last Sunday.  He was about 80 years of age.  The funeral was held yesterday.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Stage
The Troy Gazette says that Samuel Stage, a young man 19 years of age, who was married about a year ago to a girl at Tioga and who left her about two months ago, committed suicide by taking arsenic at his home in Smithfield on the night of the 1st instant.  He died the next day about noon.  He was not on good terms with his people, and foolishly tried to solve the problem of life by poison instead of trying to live down his difficulties.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Horatio Hulslander
Frost Settlement, August 8, 1891.--Last Saturday the people in this neighborhood were shocked by the news that Horatio, the 14 year old son of Marion and Delle Hulslander, was killed on the 31st ultimo while he was at work in the lumber woods with his father, near Grover, Bradford county.  The facts regarding his death are stated by an eyewitness as follows:  Mr. Hulslander had sent Horatio to help some other workmen to get out a large log.  The log was on a skid, and the boy was in front of it when the team started.  The log rolled and caught his feet, and when it was stopped it was upon the lad’s body.  His father got there just in time to witness the accident and assist in removing the log.  He asked Horatio if he was badly hurt, and he replied, “I guess not.”  He was carried to a shanty nearby, where in about an hour death came.  The remains were brought to this place on Sunday, and the funeral was held on Monday.  Rev. U. G. White preached the funeral sermon from the text, I Thou knowest not what I do now, but thou shalt know hereafter.”  The interment was made in the cemetery near Mr. L. E. Frost’s.  Hattie, the eight year old daughter of Mr. Edwin Willcox, fell a few days ago as she was walking across the floor with a baby, and broke her arm.  The rains of late have improved the looks of the crops immensely in this region.  Equal Rights.  (Tuesday, August 12, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles W. Wolfe
The Pennsylvania World’s Fair Commission met in the Senate at Harrisburg last Thursday afternoon elected Hon. Charles Spyker Wolfe of Lewisburg, Union county, to the onerous position of Executive Commissioner and listened to his earnest speech of acceptance.  An hour later the Commission met again to speak in subdued tones of the fate which had suddenly overtaken him to eulogize his memory and to arrange for the funeral which was to be the last scene in the career of a man who for nearly 20 years has been prominent in the public affairs of the State.  Mr. Wolfe was in his happiest mood when the Commission adjourned shortly after 3 o’clock.  He had been elected Executive Commissioner on the first ballet and was pleased with the compound paid to his intelligence and energy.  He walked down street after meeting with his close friend, ex-Senator Lewis Emery and they took dinner together at the Grand hotel.  All through the dinner Mr. Wolfe was in a happy mood his only fear being that his appointment might make some other candidate feel hurt at defeat.  He ate heartily and concluded his dinner with ice-cream.  Senator Emery suggested that it was dangerous to eat such a cold dish after a meal.  “I never felt better in my life” replied Mr. Wolfe.  “I am in better health now than ever before and I can eat anything with impunity.  After dinner the gentlemen separated.  Mr. Wolfe started back to the capitol where the Executive Board was to meet at 5 o’clock and decide upon the amount of his salary.  As he crossed at the corner of Walnut and Third streets, he reeled and fell face downwards on the sidewalk at the steps leading into the park.  Several masons at work there ran to him, and with the assistance of Wells Buser, and Speaker C. C. Thompson, who had been walking close behind, turned the body over.  The dying man gasped feebly once or twice and was dead.  A patrol wagon had been hastily summoned and responded quickly, but it was too late to render aid.  The body was taken to an undertaker’s rooms and there Dr. D. S. Funk was called in and he pronounced the cause of death valvular disease of the heart.  The dead man’s face was cut and bleeding from his fall on the sidewalk.  Upon M. W. McAlarney, who is an old schoolmate of Mr. Wolfe, devolved the sad duty of sending the news of the death to the family at Lewisburg.  A telegram was sent, and it trod closely upon the heels of the dead man’s messenger of victory sent so shortly before.  An inquest was held and the jury returned a verdict to the effect that Mr. Wolfe died of valvular disease of the heart.  Charles Spyker Wolfe was born at Lewisburg, Union county, April 6, 1845.  He leaves a wife, formerly Miss Mattie Meixell, of Lewisburg, and five children, two sons and three daughters.  The eldest son, Joseph, is a student at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.  Mr. Wolfe was of Pennsylvania Dutch extraction on his father’s side of the house.  His mother came from a Huguenot family driven from France by religious persecution.  He was graduated from Lewisburg University in 1866 with the highest honors of his class, and two years later was graduated at the Harvard Law School.  While a boy at college he entered a company of independent cavalry and served in the Cumberland valley under General Couch.  He was admitted to the Union county bar in 1868.  He was elected to the Legislature from the district composed of Union and Snyder counties in 1872, and again in 1873.  In 1874, 75’ and 76 he was elected to represent Union county and had a large share in drafting the legislation to carry into effect the new constitution.  He first came into prominence by his conduct of the famous Boom bill investigation, which resulted in the expulsion of Lynoff and Petroff.  He was the choice of the county for the State Senate, but was defeated in the District Conference.  Mr. Wolfe ran for the Legislature in 1878 on the distinctly avowed platform that if elected he would not vote for Cameron for United States Senator and was nominated and elected by a large majority. Twenty seven members and Senators refused to go into the caticue that nominated Cameron, but excepting Wolfe and four others they all yielded at the last moment.  Mr. Wolfe headed the opposition to the famous Pittsburgh Riot bill was a member of the investigating committee that exposed the tribery by which it was attempted to pass the bill and was the leading spirit in prosecuting the bribers.  Again elected to the Legislature, he was one of the 36 who refused to be bound to the caucus nomination of Henry Oliver for United States Senator and brought about the election of Representative John I. Mitchell.  He declared open war against the machine methods of the Republican party after the Convention of 1884 ran independent for State Treasurer without a Convention State Committee or any organization behind him, stumped the State in a campaign of four weeks and polled almost 50,000 votes.  He supported the Independent Republican ticket in 1882 and thereby contributed to the election of Governor Pattison.  For this service he expected to be offered the Attorney Generalship, but failed to secure the position.  In 1886 he ran for Governor on the Prohibition ticket.  After that time he did not take a very prominent part in politics, except to declare at the last election that he was a Democrat and would support Pattinson.  His name has been mentioned in connection with the State Bank Examinership an office created by the last Legislature, but for which no appropriation was provided.  Mr. Wolfe was in good financial circumstances owning valuable farms located at Lewisburg, Mifflin and in the Buffalo valley.  He had been considering a removal to the West but gave up the idea a few months ago.  He was a deacon in the Baptist Church and was very popular in his community.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 17 JAN 2009
By Joyce M. Tice
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Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.