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Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice

Clippings, Obituary,  & Scrapbook Section

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Bradford County PA

Chemung County NY

Tioga County PA

 

 


Postcard from the Tri-County Guest Submission Collection
Main Street - Blossburg

Continued from Page 416

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Joyce's Search Tip - February 2010 

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Do You Know that you can search just the 700 pages of Clippings and Scrapbooks on the site by using the Clippings button in the Partitioned search engine on the Current What's New Page
You'll also find obituary and other newspaper clippings using the three county-level Obits by Cemetery buttons. Additional clippings can be found in the Birth, Marriage, and some other partitions. 

 

Tri County Clippings- Page Four Hundred Eighty 

These obituaries are extracted from various newspaper that are available to us. They are arranged by newspaper and date. If you do not have the time to enjoy the luxury of sifting through our clippings they will be included in the Search Engine which you can reach from the "Front Door" of the Tri-County Genealogy & History sites by Joyce M. Tice. All Newspaper clipping in this section of the site are in the Clippings partition of the Partioned search engine that you can find at the bottom of the Current What's New page.

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1891-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

James Russell Lowell
James Russell Lowell, the distinguished poet and essayist died at 2:10 o’clock last Wednesday morning at his home at Elmwood, Cambridge, Mass.  Family friends say that Mr. Lowell had been ill for a year.  His illness began with kidney trouble but he was not confined to the house till about three months ago.  For the last month he had been confined to his bed.  His daughter, the wife of Ex-Congressman Burnett, was with him during his illness.  Mr. Lowell was born at Cambridge, Mass., February 22, 1819.  His father Rev. Charles Lowell was a representative New England clergyman of his day and his poet son who was the youngest of five children, inherited the typical New England character.  From his father he inherited high intelligence, sound principles and right deals and from his mother the poetic and imaginative faculty which was the chief element of his future greatness.  His birthplace was an old Tory mansion still standing and now called Elmwood.  The house is a large three-story square wooden building in the early colonial style situated in spacious grounds, surrounded by magnificent elms and pines planted by his father, and commanding a view of the Charles river.  Here the future poet grew up and was fitted for college by William Wells the senior of the firm who published the Wells & Lilly classics.  He entered Harvard in his 16th year and was graduated in 1838.  He took the Harvard law course, graduating with the degree of LL B, and was admitted to the bar in 1840(or 1846).  That his law practice was not extensive may be guessed from the fact that the only record of it is contained in a story entitled My First Client, written by Mr. Lowell and published in the Boston Miscellany.  His poetic faculty was first demonstrated in a class poem written in his senior year while being rusticated at Concord for inattention to his studies.  His poetic faculty was stimulated at this time by his falling in love with Maria White a young woman of genius whom, he afterward married.  In 1841 he published his first volume of poems under the title of A Year’s Life.”  The concluding stanza of this collection furnishes the keynote of their inspiration:  The poet now his guide hath found, And follows in the steps of Love.  The volume contained 70 poems and was never republished.  He married Miss White in 1844 and entered actively upon his literary career.  Lowell was a born patriot, as well as poet.  His wife was an ardent Abolitionist, and partly through her intelligence and partly through the maturing of his intellectual powers he began to consider seriously the issues he treated so lightly in his college days.  The result was that his cutting satire, at first directed toward the Abolitionists, was soon aimed with telling force at their adversaries.  He and his wife both became contributors to the Liberty Bell, and his name appeared as corresponding editor of the Anti-Slavery Standard in 1848.  Most of his poems published between 1843 and 1846 appeared in this paper.  He then transferred his contributions to the Boston Courier in the columns of which his first series of the Bigelow Papers appeared beginning in 1846 and ending in 1848.  This satire was in many respects his masterpiece.  In wit, scholarship and keen knowledge of human nature it has scarcely been paralleled on modern literature.  Unlike many productions of its kind, it bears re-perusal, and its reputation grows with age.  It is probably more universally quoted from than any other American work.  It is a poem in the New England dialect aimed chiefly at slavery and the Mexican war, but holding up to ridicule all forms of meanness can’t and hypocrisy whether displayed by politicians, preachers or journalists.  The effect of the publication of the Biglow Papers was to reverse the position of the Abolitionists in the North.  From being the butt for everybody’s ridicule they in turn were in position to ridicule their opponents with scathing effect Lowell lifted the cause of Abolition to the plane of respectability.  This work will also doubtless preserve the Yankee dialect for the study of future generations.  Lowell continued to direct the shafts of his keen satire at the apologists of slavery until the emancipation proclamation of President Lincoln, put an end to this relic of barbarism on American soil.  During all this period his interest in literature never flagged.  In 1843 he became with Robert Carter joint editor of “The Pioneer, a Literary and Critical Magazine,” to which Poe, Hawthorne, Neal, Dwight, Jonesvery, Parons, Elizabeth Barrett, Whittier and Story were contributors.  This was a financial failure, only three numbers being issued.  Lowell continued to write verse, however publishing in 1844 a volume containing “The Legend of Brittany,” and 32 other miscellaneous poems, besides 37 sonnets, among them sonnets to Wendell Phillips and Joshua R. Giddings.  “The Vision of Sir Launfal” appeared in 1845.  A third volume of poems, containing many new anti-slavery pieces, was published in 1848, followed the same year by the “Fable for Critics.”  In 1849 a collected edition of his poems, with the “Biglow Papers” and “A Year’s Life,” omitted, appeared in two volumes.  In 1851, in company with his wife, he visited Europe, traveling in England, France and Switzerland, and residing for a time in Italy.  Returning to America in 1852, he settled down to literary labor more assiduously than ever.  In October, 1853, he sustained the greatest sorrow of his life in the death of his gifted wife.  Her death, which took place on the same night with the birth of one of Longfellow’s children, called forth from the atter his poem beginning-- ‘Two angels, one of life and one of death, Passed o’er our village as the morning broke.  On the resignation of Longfellow in January, 1855, Mr. Lowell was appointed his successor as professor of modern languages and belles-lettres in Harvard University.  He spent two years abroad extending his knowledge of Italian, French and Spanish before assuming the duties of his professorship.  In 1857 he became the first editor of the Atlantic Monthly, a magazine jointly founded by Emerson, Longfellow, Holmes and himself.  The Kansas struggle revived his interest in current politics, and it is said he at one time contemplated transferring his Hosea Biglow to Kansas to report in dialect the doings there.  The outbreak of the civil war led him to revive the Biglow Papers at home instead--the second series appearing in the Atlantic and being published in book form in 1867.  In this series the disunionists at home and their sympathizers abroad were the objects of his biting satire.  With the close of the war of the Rebellion Mr. Lowell’s labors for a time were entirely of the literary order, “Fireside Travels” and “Notes of Travel on the Mediterranean and in Italy’ following in quick succession.  His two collections of prose essays “Among My Books’ and “My Study Window,” were issued in 1879 and marked the close of his greatest literary activity.  In 1872 he again visited Europe, and on his return wrote those patriotic odes commemorative of the “Centennial’ period the first for the centennial anniversary of the battle of Lexington, April 19, 1875, the second to be read under the Washington elm July 3d of the same year, and the third for July 4, 1875.  The decline of his literary activity ushered in a period of highly honorable public service extending over eight years.  He was a Presidential Elector from Massachusetts in 1876 and the following year was appointed by President Hayes Minister to Spain.  In Madrid he spent three year proving a worthy successor to Washington Irving, who employed the period of his residence at the Spanish Court in gathering materials for some of the best of his literary works.  In 1880 he was transferred to the English Mission where he remained until recalled by President Cleveland in 1885.  His residence in London was an unbroken series of successes in the world of society and letters.  Mr. Lowell’s literary reputation had been so long established that when he became the representative of the United States at the Court of St. James he was accorded the most flattering recognition.  No man of the present generation did more to recommend American institution s and American character abroad.  He was in constant demand as an orator on public occasions.  He delivered a notable address on the unveiling of the bust of Coleridge in Westminster Abbey in May, 1885.  His foreign speeches together with two addresses at Chelsea and Harvard were published in a volume entitled “Democracy and Other Addresses” in 1887.  Here visited England in 1877, receiving everywhere the highest honors that could well be accorded to a private citizen.  He was honored with the degree of D C L in 1873 by the University of Oxford and with that of LL D, by the University of Cambridge in the following year.  During his residence in England as American Minister he was elected rector of the University of St. Andrews.  Mr. Lowell’s private life was in many respects exceptionally happy.  Reference has already been made to the death of his first wife the gifted Maria White, which occurred in 1853, after a happy married life of nine years.  Four years later he married Miss Frances Dunlap of Portland, Maine, a lady who was in thorough sympathy with all his aims and who proved a thoroughly congenial companion.  She died while residing with her husband at the Court of St. James in February, 1885, leaving one daughter, the wife of Edward Burnett, of Southboro, Mass.  After his retirement to private life Mr. Lowell resided with Mrs. Burnett.  Mr. Lowell was the last survivor but one--Dr. Holmes--of a famous group of New England literary men who are leaving no successors.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John R. Gamble
Congressman John R. Gamble, of Yankton, SD, died last Friday, aged 48 years.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Butcher
William Butcher, aged 116 years, died at the New York Colored Home a few days ago.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas S. Bacock
Thomas S. Bacock, who has just died in Appomattox county, Va., at the age of 76, was elected to Congress as a Democrat in 1846 and served for seven successive terms.  When the Rebellion broke out he was elected speaker of the Confederate House of Representatives.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William T. Croasdale
The Henry George land tax movement loses one of its most active propagandists by the sudden death of William T. Croasdale editor of the New York Standard.  He was 48 years old, a native of Delaware, of Quaker parentage and had been in the newspaper business ever since coming of age.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Canon Carleton
Considerable excitement was created in Ireland by the sudden death of Canon Carleton while preaching in Kilkenny cathedral last Sunday.  The reverend gentleman had progressed to some considerable extent with his sermon, when he was suddenly seen to reel and fall.  Several persons rushed to his assistance, but he passed away almost instantly.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ogden Hoffman
Ogden Hoffman, who died at San Francisco last week Sunday in his 69th year, was the senior Federal Judge on the Pacific coast, his appointment for the Northern district of California having been made by President Fillmore in 1851.  Judge Hoffman was a son of the celebrated New York Whig leader of the same name and of a noted Knickerbocker family.  He was a graduate of Columbia and was one of the most accomplished men in San Francisco society.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Matsada R. Sorakichi
Matsada R. Sorakicki, the famous Japanese wrestler, died in New York city last Saturday.  He had been a sufferer from consumption for some time.  Of late he dissipated a good deal, and this undoubtedly hastened his death.  Sorakichi was 36 years old.  He came to this country from Japan several years ago and wrestled in all the big cities of the Union.  In his native country he was looked upon as a phenomenon and was called the strongest man in the world.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Charles Latolff
The music publisher Henry Charles Latolff has died in Paris in his 74th year.  Although Latolff will be remembered long as the founder of the collection of standard music which bears his name, he had also a considerable fame as a organist and composer, having left something like a hundred works, ranging, from small pianoforte pieces to concertos, symphonies and grand operas.  In America his most ambitious works have never been heard, and his brilliant overture entitled “Maximilian Robert pierre” is the thing he is chiefly know by.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jabez Pitt Campbell
Jabez Pitt Campbell, Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, recently died at Philadelphia in his 76th year.  When he was a lad his father, a free negro, mortgaged him as security for a boat to fish in on Delaware bay, and the white creditor failing to get his money proposed to foreclosure.  Jabez heard his father and the creditor discussing the matter, and ran away.  He reached Philadelphia and went to work there, with the result indicated in the facts that he was made Bishop in 1864, when he was 49 years old, and that he left $50,000 to his wife.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. James K. Polk
Mrs. James K. Polk, widow of the 10th President of the United States, died at her home Nashville, Tenn., last Friday morning.  Her death was peaceful and she was in full possession of her mental faculties to the last.  Mrs. Polk had been in perfect health until last Wednesday evening, when, on returning from a short drive, she was taken suddenly ill, from which she never rallied.  Had she lived until September 4 next she would have been 18 years beyond the allotted time of three score and ten.  The cause of her death was simply exhaustion resulting from old age.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Colonel Rathier du Verge
A soldier of fortune of the old type was Colonel Rathier du Verge, who died lately in jail at Tamatave, Madagascar.  He was a native of Mauritius, called also the Isle of France, near Madagascar, and thus was born a French subject.  He served in the French army in Italy in 1859, then crossed to America served through the war for the Union, and afterward was given a Consulship.  In 1884 he gave his services to the Hovas in their outbreak against the French in Madagascar.  Colonel Du Verge published a book about that country, and coming to Boston organized there in 1888 an expedition for the purpose of gold mining in Madagascar.  He got into trouble by acts of piracy, and in resisting arrest killed the United States Consular Agent at Andakabe, Mr. Stanwood, was sentenced by the Consular tribunal at Tamatave to imprisonment, and died in jail, as aforesaid.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Jones
George Jones, the principal proprietor of the New York Times who died at Poland Springs, Maine, last Wednesday, is associated in the popular mind with Horace Greeley, Henry J Raymond, the elder Bennett and Thurlow Weed, because he was of their time and engaged in the same business--but he was not an editor in the sense those men were.  He was in fact an able and wise business man who supervised the affairs of a great daily journal with tact and success and by his skill in the choice of subordinates and his honorable business methods conserved the future of the Times after the death of Henry J. Raymond, removed its editor of national reputation who had with Mr. Jones founded this rival to Greeley’s Tribune.  Mr. Jones illustrated the fact, now well understood that a successful newspaper is a great institution whose success depends on strong business management far more than upon the possession of a famous editor who poses as such, and is thus subject to the same conditions that govern all sound enterprises in this world of competition.  Mr. Jones was born at Poultney, Vermont, 80 years ago and he and Horace Greeley were boys together and as boys worked for the same master.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Harvey
Last Wednesday, Charles Harvey, 23 years of age, was engaged in sawing logs on Mr. Daniel Davis’s lumber job near Arnot, when the top of a falling tree struck and fatally injured him.  Both of his legs were broken at the thigh and he sustained internal injuries.  Harvey was taken to the Cottage hospital at Blossburg on the afternoon train, and he died about 20 minutes after his arrival.  He was unmarried and was a son of Mr. James Harvey, of Liberty.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. William T. Derbyshire
Mrs. William T. Derbyshire died at her home in Delmar yesterday morning after a long sickness.  She was 79 years of age.  The funeral is to be held in Delmar tomorrow afternoon.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Edwin S. Waterman
Last Wednesday Mr. Edwin S. Waterman died of paralysis at the home of Mr. Henry M. Wolf, on Central avenue.  He was 68 years of age.  He was born in England and came to this borough in 1854 to work at his trade as a shoemaker.  “Bacchus” Sears gave him the nickname to “Hawkey,” and he was always known by that title among his acquaintances.  Some years ago Mr. Waterman opened a shoe-shop at Gaines.  A year or two ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis and was incapacitated for work.  The recent fire at Gaines destroyed his shop and all his earthly possessions.  He sold the lot, came to this borough and applied for admission to the Soldiers’ Home at Erie.  By a singular coincidence the papers granting him a home there and the transportation ticket for the journey arrived here about the hour of his death.  Mr. Waterman was a veteran of the Mexican war and of the war of the Rebellion.  He never married, and he was a very eccentric man, but he was a man of strict integrity.  The funeral was held on Thursday, Rev. E. B. Cornell officiating.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Juliette Warriner
In Delmar, Pa., August 12, 1891, of cholera infantum, Juliette, daughter of L. L. and Jennie E. Warriner, aged 3 years, 2 months and 29 days.  (Tuesday, August 19, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Amanda Bush
On Monday evening Mrs. Tunis Bush died at the home of her son-in-law Mr. N. V. Klock, in Charleston, of strangulated hernia.  The funeral is to be held at St. Paul’s church in this borough this afternoon at 1 o’clock.  Mrs. Bush’s maiden name was Amanda P. Henry.  She was born in Charleston, February 6, 1831.  She married Mr. Tunis Bush and resided in this borough for many years.  Her daughter Ada is the wife of Mr. N. V. Klock, of Charleston, and her son, H. Foster Bush, holds a responsible position in the office of the Superintendent of the Elmira Reformatory.  Mrs. Bush was a faithful member of St. Paul’s Church for many years.  She was a woman of intelligence and refinement and was possessed of great strength of character.  She was highly esteemed by a large circle of acquaintances.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Joseph Yonkin
Mrs. Yonkin, widow of the late Joseph Yonkin, of Blossburg, died last week Sunday evening.  Mrs. Yonkin was one of the oldest residents of Blossburg.  She was born in Lycoming county in 1813, and she had resided in this county for over 50 years.  Her remains were laid beside those of her husband and eight children in the old cemetery at Blossburg.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. G. W. Sweetland
Mr. G. W. Sweetland, an old and respected citizen of Tioga died last Sunday after a long sickness.  He was upward of 76(?) years.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Murdaugh
Mrs. John Murdaugh, a sister of Mr. D. H. Pitts and Capt. A. M. Pitts, of Mansfield, died at Corning, NY, a few days ago of heart disease.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jean Joseph Thomssen
Jean Joseph Thomssen, the Belgian economist, is dead at the age of 74.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Louis Paulsen
Louis Paulsen, the famous chess-player is dead.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry W. Beckwith
The State Department has been informed of the death at Hinesdale, IL, of Henry W. Beckwith, United States Consul at Bermuda.  He was appointed by President Cleveland in January, 1889.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lieutenant Rujon
Lieutenant Rujon, of the Alpine Chasseurs, while ascending the Chambeyron peak fell down a precipice 1,500 feet high and was crushed into a pulp.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Inglis
The Lord Justice General of Scotland, Right Hon. John Inglis, died last week, aged 81.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Israel Fleishman
Israel Fleishman, the Philadelphia theatrical man, is dead.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John K. Boise
John K. Boise, one of the most prominent Republican politicians in the State, died at Hudson, Mich., Friday night of nervous prostration.  He was a brother of Governor Boise of Iowa.  (Tuesday, August 26, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Hogan
There has been a remarkable series of fatal accidents in connection with balloonists recently.  No less than five balloonists in different parts of this country and Europe were killed in two days by falls from balloons and parachutes.  A chill in the air, a slight indisposition, a sudden giddiness, a slip of the hand, a nervous tremor in such a perilous places means death.  At Detroit, Mich., John Hogan, ascended in his balloon and was performing on a trapeze, when he fell a distance of 1,000 feet and struck upon a sidewalk and was horribly mangled.  Every bone in his body was broken.  His brother, Edward Hogan, went up in Campbell’s air-ship a few days ago and was lost.  Another brother, W. M. Hogan, made numerous parachute jumps from a balloon at the Mansfield Fair last year.  (Tuesday, September 9, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Reuben Hammond
Mr. Reuben Hammond died last Sunday night, and his funeral was held in the Brookfield Methodist Church on the 1st instant, when Rev. Mr. Dillenbeck, of Rathboneville, Steuben county, preached a splendid sermon.  The burial was in the Brookfield cemetery.  Mr. Hammond was born in the town of Howard, Steuben county, NY, January 22, 1812.  He was married to Miss Rebecca Loper, 54 years ago, and they moved to this township 46 years ago.  They were great workers and accumulated a goodly amount of property by farming.  They helped each of their two eldest boys to pay for a good farm, and the youngest now lives on the old homestead with his mother.  Their eldest child--a daughter--is living in Kansas.  Mr. Hammond will be greatly missed, for he was a good husband and father.  David Crockett.  (Tuesday, September 9, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Susan Guernsey
At Tioga, Pa., entered into the rest of Paradise, in the early morning of September 2d, in the 75th year of her age, Susan Marriott, widow of John W. Guernsey, of Tioga, and daughter of Samuel Wells, and Anna Ellis Morris, pioneers of the borough of Wellsboro.  Mrs. Guernsey was a lovely Christian woman, retaining all through life traits of her Quaker ancestry and education, as always manifested in her dress and her ample tastes and deportment.  For more than 40 years a devoted and active member of the Episcopal Church, it may be truly said that she “adorned the doctrine of God her Saviour” in her daily life, and her end was peace.  At her funeral on Saturday, September 5th, three of her bearers were mature men who, as boys and youths, were members of her Sunday-school and Bible class--which she continued to teach until the beginning of her last illness.  To these, as to her Church and to a wide circle of friends and relatives, her memory is precious, and thus: “The dear remembrance of the just, Smells sweet, and blossoms from the dust.”  Mrs. Guernsey survived her husband nine years, and leaves two daughters.--Sophie, Mrs. John H. Putnam, of Tioga, and Anna, Mrs. W. Oscar Farr, now of Whatcom, near Tacoma, Washington.  (Tuesday, September 9, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George M. Bastian
At his home in Delmar, Pa., September 1, 1891, of cancer of the stomach, George M. Bastian, aged 49 years, 8 months and 1 day.  (Tuesday, September 9, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Willard
Mr. Joseph Willard died at his home in Charleston last Sunday morning.  He was taken sick on Wednesday with cholera morbus.  Mr. Willard was born near the poor-house in Charleston township nearly 78 years ago.  He enlisted in Company G of the 45th regiment and served during the war.  “Uncle Joe,” as he was familiarly called, was a most genial man and an excellent citizen.  He leaves a widow and five children.  The funeral was held yesterday afternoon, and the remains were interred in the cemetery near the Young’s school-house.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Curtis Fuller
At Lamb’s Creek, Pa., September 6, 1891, of cholera morbus, Mr. Curtis P. Fuller, aged 61 years, 11 months and 11 days.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary M. Wilson
In Delmar, Pa., September 11, 1891, Mary M, wife of Milan D. Wilson, aged 60 years.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Curtis P. Fuller
At Lamb’s Creek, Pa., September 6, 1891, of cholera morbus, Mr. Curtis P. Fuller, aged 61 years, 11 months and 11 days.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary M. Wilson
In Delmar, Pa., September 18, 1891, Mary M., wife of Milan D. Wilson, aged 60(?) years.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

S. C. Pomeroy
S. C. Pomeroy, a former United States Senator from Kansas, died a few days ago.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Martha Johnson
Mrs. Martha Johnson, of Syracuse, NY, is dead, having just completed her 100th year.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. B. Campbell
Major J. B. Campbell, of the Second Artillery, U. S. A., a distinguished officer, is dead.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John P. Willard
John P. Willard, Paymaster and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel of the regular army, is dead.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. B. L. Soule
Rev. J. B. L. Soule, DD., Ph. D., of Chicago, a prominent author, poet and educator, died recently.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Armand Achille Testelin
Armand Achille Testelin, a Parisian life-Senator, is dead at the age of 83 years.  He was a prominent politician, a friend of Gambetta and a founder of the Republique Francaise.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ezra Cornell
Mrs. Ezra Cornell, widow of the founder of Cornell University, died a few days ago.  She leaves three sons and two daughters.  She died of cancer and had been an invalid for many years.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jonas M. Bundy
A cablegram received in New York, last Wednesday from Paris, announced the death of Major Jonas M. Bundy, of apoplexy.  Major Bundy was editor of the New York Mail and Express.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jules Grevy
Mr. Jules Grevy, ex-President of the French Republic, died last Wednesday.  He had for four days been suffering from a severe attack of congestion the lungs, which was the immediate cause of his death.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Fillmore Harris
Mrs. Julia Fillmore Harris, the last survivor of a family of eight brothers and sisters, one of whom was Millard Fillmore, the 13th President of the United States, died recently in San Francisco.  She was born in 1812 and went to California in 1872 from Minnesota.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

G. W. Schofield
Ex-Judge G. W. Schofield died at Warren, Pa., a few days ago, of disease of the heart.  He was a well-known citizen of Pennsylvania and had held many positions of honor and trust.  He served two terms as a member of the State Legislature and was a member of the 38th, 39th, 40th, 41st, 42nd, 43rd Congresses.  He was appointed Judge of the Court of Claims by President Garfield, which position he filled until July last.  Judge Schofield was born at DeWittville, Chautauqua county, NY, March 11, 1817.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Ramsey Speer
Dr. James Ramsey Speer, the eminent Pittsburgh physician, died in that city a few days ago in the 95th year of his age.  He was born in Chambersburg, Pa., and was uncle to President Buchanan, and his wife, Sarah Ramsey Speer, was great-aunt of President Harrison.  Born under the Presidency of Washington, he lived under every President of the United States, and was one of the gentlemen who welcomed Lafayette to Pittsburgh in 1826.  His reputation as a physician was widespread.  He operated over 600 times for cataract, and performed operations for aneurism, the removal of cerebral injuries by trepanning, the extirpation of cancers and the removal of tumors, in the days before specialism became the fashion.  (Tuesday, September 16, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lewis Manning
Mrs. Lewis Manning, an old resident of Westfield, died on the 15th instant.  She was over 80 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 23, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James Cushing
Last week Tuesday afternoon Mr. James Cushing, a well-known farmer of Covington, was killed by lightning.  He left his house, after one storm had passed over, to go to his brother’s place, which was nearby.  He was returning home and was walking across the fields with a potato-fork over his shoulder as another storm was gathering.  Mr. Cushing’s continued absence from home caused alarm and his family found his body in the middle of the field after dark.  From the appearances the bolt seemed to have struck him in the head and passed down his body to his feet.  The crown of his hat was torn completely off and a small blue mark was visible along the full length of his body.  On his breast a large spot was burned.  Mr. Cushing was 38 years of age.  He leaves a wife and two young children.  He was a highly respected citizen.  The funeral was held at St. Andrew’s church at Blossburg last Thursday.  (Tuesday, August 23, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gallo VitoSolvagia and Tasson Vito
Last Friday evening, about 6 o’clock, a fatal accident happened on the new switch-back railroad on the mountain at Tiadaghton.  One Italian laborer, named Gallo VitoSolvagia, was instantly killed, and another, named Tasson Vito, was so badly injured that he died on Saturday morning.  There were about 25 Italian workmen riding on two car-loads of logs, coming down the mountain after their day’s work.  One car had been run down into the last switch, where the grade is very steep, and the other was following, when it was discovered that the brakes on this car would not hold and the car was running away.  The boss shouted for the men to jump off the cars, and they all did so except these two men who remained stubbornly on the forward car.  When the collision came they hung fast and the cars thundered down the mountain side at terrific speed and finally jumped the track and were wrecked.  Vito Solvagia was thrown 125 feet to the bank of the creek and was horribly mutilated.  Vito’s head was crushed by the flying logs, his arm was broken and he was covered with bruises.  He lived until the next morning.  The logs were thrown high in the air and more than 100 feet from the scene of the wreck.  All the other workmen escaped injury.  The men who were killed were apparently about middle-aged.  The bodies were brought to VanHorn & Chandler’s undertaking-rooms in this borough on Saturday, and Sunday afternoon they were interred in St. Peter’s cemetery.  (Tuesday, September 23, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Eleanor Clark
In Rutland, Pa., September 13, 1891, Eleanor, wife of James Clark, aged 72 years.  (Tuesday, September 23, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Gladys Edith Waters
At Arnot, Pa., September 12, 1891, Gladys Edith, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. D. C. Waters, aged 8 years, 7 months and 20 days.  (Tuesday, September 23, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary M. Wilson
In Delmar, Pa., September 11, 1891, of consumption, Mary M, wife of Milon D. Wilson, aged 59 years, 11 months and 7 days.  Mrs. Wilson recently united with the First Baptist Church of Shippen.  She leaves a husband, three daughters and one son to mourn her loss.  (Tuesday, September 23, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ira Berry
Ira Berry, Grand Secretary of the Masons of Maine, died last week Sunday, aged 90 years.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Agop Pasha
Agop Pasha, formerly Minister of Finance, was thrown from a horse and killed in Constantinople last week.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Ferrel
William Ferrel, esteemed in the West as “probably the most eminent meteorologist in the world,” died at Maywood, Kan., on September 18th.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John D. Hough
John D. Hough, a Brevet Brigadier-General of Volunteers, was found dead in his bed at the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Home in Quincy, IL, last week Sunday.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Franklin Foster Flint
General Franklin Foster Flint, a veteran of over 20 years service in the regular army died suddenly at Chicago a few days ago of apoplexy, aged 71 years.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. L. Scott
Ex-Congressman W. L. Scott, of Erie, died at Newport, RI, last Saturday week.  He was in the 36th year of his age.  Mr. Scott’s estate is estimated at $20,000,000.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry S. Walker
Hon. Henry S. Walker, of Charleston, W. Va., died in Philadelphia a few days ago of heart disease.  He had long been a prominent figure in politics.  He was editor of the Wheeling Register from 1865 to 1870.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

F. G. Bruce
F. G. Bruce, founder of the Turf, Field and Farm and editor of the Live Stock Record, died at his home in Lexington, Ky., last Wednesday, aged 63.  He knew fully as much about the turf as any man in the country.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel D. Burchard
Rev. Dr. Samuel D. Burchard, the Presbyterian preacher whose short address in New York city in October, 1884, undoubtedly lost Mr. Blaine the election to the Presidency, died at Saratoga, NY, last Friday afternoon at the age of 79.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

The Grand Dutchess Paul
The Grand Dutchess Paul, wife of the Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovitch, youngest brother of the Czar of Russia, died in childbed last Wednesday.  The Grand Duchess was, previous to her marriage, the Princess Alexandria of Greece, eldest daughter of King George, of Greece.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John W. Gardner
Lieutenant John W. Gardner, of the United States navy, died at his residence in Athens, Greene county, NY, a few days ago, at the age of 53.  For brave and meritorious service during the war and on detached duty, Lieutenant Gardner a few years ago was placed on the retired list with full pay.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

S. S. Shultz
Dr. S. S. Shultz, superintendent of the Danville Insane asylum, died last Sunday in the 62nd year of his age after being sick about three weeks with nervous prostration.  He was considered an expert in insanity cases.  He was the first superintendent at Danville, being appointed when the asylum was built.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Borden Biddle
Mrs. Elizabeth Borden Biddle died in Philadelphia last week Sunday, aged 92.  Her father was Judge Joseph Hopkinson, author of “Hail Columbia;” her grandfather, Francis Hopkinson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and her great-grandfather, Thomas Hopkinson, a member of the Provincial Council and Judge of Vice Admiralty under George II.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William E. Kemble
Ex-State Treasurer William H. Kemble, the well-known Philadelphia financier and street-railway magnate, died very suddenly late Saturday night at his summer residence near Glenside station, on the North Penn railroad.  He was attacked with heart-disease while in bed and died in 10 minutes after making known his condition.  He was in the 64th year of his age.  At one time he was ambitious of becoming the representative of the State in the United States Senate, but his political career closed with the scandal growing out of the riot-bill corruption at Harrisburg.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Caspar Wistart Hodge
Dr. Caspar Wistar Hodge, professor of New Testament literature and exegesis in the Theological Seminary at Princeton, died last Sunday of cancer of the throat.  He was born in Princeton, February 21, 1830, and at 18 years of age graduated with high honors from Princeton College.  He took his degree from the Theological Seminary in 1851.  He held subsequently the chair of Greek, and later engaged in the ministry.  In 1861 he was called from his pastorate and made professor of New Testament, literature and Biblical Greek, and in 1879 was appointed to the chair which he held the rest of his life.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Webb
Early yesterday morning Mary Hastings, wife of Dr. Clarence W. Webb, of this borough, died very suddenly at her home on Water street.  She had been sick for about 10 days, but her case was not considered alarming until last Monday morning, when the disease became acute, and in 17 hours she entered into rest.  The death of Mrs. Webb is peculiarly sad.  She was in the full bloom of womanhood, being but 32 years of age.  She leaves three young sons, aged respectively 9, 6, and 3 years.  She was very highly esteemed by her associates, being a woman of bright intellect and cheerful temperament, generous, warm-hearted and loyal in her attachment to her friends.  She was born in this borough, being a daughter of Mr. Hiram S. Hastings.  She was graduated at the High school in 1877 and was married about 10 years ago.  The funeral was held at the family residence yesterday afternoon, Rev. A. W. Snyder, of St. Paul’s Church, conducting the service.  It was largely attended by sympathizing friends.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Stephen S. Packard
Last Friday evening Mr. Stephen S. Packard, a well-known resident of Covington borough, and for years a leading merchant at that place, died after a few days of sickness.  He had been in poor health for a number of year, however.  He was 78 years of age.  Mr. Packard came to Covington from Bainbridge, NY, in 1839.  He was engaged in lumbering and mercantile pursuits for about 40 years.  For 20 years he was Justice of the Peace.  He retired from active business about 10 years ago.  The funeral was held at the Methodist church last Monday afternoon, and it was largely attended.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Earl B. Frutiger
At English Center, Pa., September 22, 1891, of cholera infantum, Earl B., son of Henry and Bertha Frutiger, aged 6 months.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Martha Kizer
In Deerfield, Pa., September 15, 1891, Martha, widow of the late James Kizer, aged 72 years.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Esther M. Mott
At Knoxville, Pa., September 16, 1891, Esther M., wife of Mr. E. F. Mott, aged 44 years.  (Tuesday, September 30, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Samuel Bullock
Mrs. Samuel Bullock, who died at Tioga, on the 24th ultimo, had been a member of the Baptist Church at that place for 20 years.  She was faithful to all the duties of life and her memory is that of a pure Christian character.  The funeral was conducted by Rev. F. Wilson at the house of Mrs. Bullock’s son-in-law, Mr. George Green, and it was largely attended.  The remains were laid to rest in Evergreen cemetery.  (Tuesday, October 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

A. M. Pitts [SRGP 04220]
Last Friday morning one of Mansfield’s prominent citizens died after a long sickness.  Capt. A. M. Pitts was one of the oldest business men of that borough, and he had watched with interest the growth of the place and its educational institutions, and he was public spirited and foremost in all business enterprises.  He was about 58 years of age.  Captain Pitts had suffered from consumption for some years and for the past few months he had been rapidly failing.  Capt. Pitts was a veteran of the late war.  He had held numerous local offices and was one of the Democratic leaders of the county.  He leaves a widow, one son and one daughter.  The funeral was held on Monday and all the business places in the borough were closed.  (Tuesday, October 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Brown
Last Friday night the six year old son of Mr. Jefferson Brown, of Morris, died of diphtheria.  The same night a young man named Bullock died of a malignant type of the same disease.  The germs of the disease are believed to have come from pools of stagnant water.  (Tuesday, October 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary F. Bullock
At Tioga, Pa., September 25, 1891, Mrs. Mary F., relict of the late Samuel A. Bullock, aged 75 years.  (Tuesday, October 7, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Tullett
Last Wednesday afternoon Mr. William Tullett, a Corning saloon keeper, committed suicide by placing a pistol to his temple and coolly pulling the trigger.  No reason can be surmised for the act unless he was temporarily deranged.  Tullett was about 40 years of age.  For 20 years he was employed by the Fall Brook Coal Company, and for five years prior to last spring he had charge of a freight train running between Corning and Williamsport.  He was then discharged.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. C. E. Griffin
Mrs. C. E. Griffin died at her home in Tioga yesterday of typhoid fever.  She was about 30 years of age, and she was the youngest daughter of the late William English, of Delmar.  The funeral is held at Tioga today, and the remains will be brought to this borough for interment.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alanson E. Niles
Last Thursday morning Colonel Alanson E. Niles, of this borough, died at the German hospital in Philadelphia, where he went on the 21st of September to undergo a delicate surgical operation.  He stood the operation well and seemed to be on the way to recovery, when Bright’s disease was developed and he rapidly grew weaker until the end.  Mrs. Niles and his son Lieut. Nathan E. Niles were at his bedside.  The remains were brought home on Friday, and on Saturday afternoon the funeral was held at his late residence on Main street, the burial being with military honors.  Alanson Erric Niles was the son of Mr. Nathan Niles, one of the early settlers of Charleston township.  He was born on his father’s farm near this borough October 5, 1816.  He inherited the homestead and was engaged in farming until 1857, when he came to this borough and engaged in the mercantile business with Mr. Aaron G. Elliott, the firm of Niles & Elliott doing business in the old wooden building which stood on Main street on the corner just below the First National bank.  In 1861 Mr. Niles was among the first to respond to the call for volunteers to suppress the Rebellion.  He enlisted in this borough, recruiting a company of men, and was elected Captain of Company E of the 1st Pennsylvania Rifles, better known throughout the country as the “Bucktails.”  He was mustered into service May 31, 1861.  At Dranesville on December 20, 1861, the Bucktails are credited with winning the first victory of the war for the army of the Potomac.  Here Captain Niles was severely wounded, being shot through the lungs.  He was in the hospital some time, but as soon as he was able he hastened back to his regiment.  On the morning of the 2nd day of the battle of Gaines Hill six companies of the Bucktails were stationed on a hill above a swamp to guard a bridge, the only crossing for miles in either direction.  When the armies retreated, Companies D and E, with Captain Niles in command, were left to hold the bridge.  The boys stood their ground until a Rebel brigade came up in their rear to within 10 rods, when they retreated over the brow of the hill to fall into Jackson’s advancing corps.  They were completely surrounded and taken prisoners.  Company E was the color company of the regiment and rather than have their flag fall into Rebel hands they buried it in the swamp.  Captain Niles was in Libby prison for 49 days, when he was exchanged, together with most of the members in his company, and they at once went to the front again.  Captain Niles was promoted to the rank of Major on March 1, 1863, and on the 15th of May following he was made Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment.  It was while with the Bucktails in their charge on Little Round Top at Gettysburg, on the 2d of July, 1863, that he was wounded in the left thigh.  Lieut. Col. Niles was afterward transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps with promotion to the rank of Colonel.  He commanded the corps during the raids of the famous Mosby in eastern Virginia, and at White House Landing he held the field against Mosby’s men for one whole day, when he was relieved by Gen. Sheridan.  Colonel Niles was then sent to Point Lookout, a general depot for prisoners, where he remained in charge until after Lee’s surrender.  He then went to Washington.  On the night that President Lincoln was assassinated Col. Niles was in Ford’s theater, and he heard the pistol shot and hastened to the hallway and saw the wounded President being carried out.  Col. Niles participated in the following battles during the war.  New Creek, Hunter’s Mills, Dranesville, Gaines Hill of the seven days fight before Richmond, Fredericksburg, South Mountain, Antietam and Gettysburg.  When the war closed and the grand review was held in Washington, Colonel Niles was selected from among the thousands of officers to be the officer of the day, and he had full military charge of the city at that time.  Col. Niles was then commissioned as Captain in the regular army, and for three years he was stationed at Plattsburgh, NY, in command of the military barracks.  On account of disability by reason of his wounds he was retired in 1869 with the rank and pay of a Captain, and he came to this borough to reside.  On account of disability by reason of his wounds he was retired in 1869 with the rank and pay of a Captain, and he came to this borough to reside.  After his retirement he lived here quietly, enjoying the respect and esteem of his neighbors, and always taking a lively interest in the affairs of the Government.  He was an ardent lover of rifle-shooting and recently notwithstanding his years, he made some remarkable scores on the rifle range.  It can truthfully be said of Col. Niles that he was a stranger to fear and a martyr to duty.  His record during the war was one of great personal courage, and of thorough devotion to the exact discharge of military duty in every station.  At home among his friends although of a naturally retiring nature, he was cheerful, genial and steadfast.  Col. Niles was married November 19, 1842, to Angeline Austin, of Charleston.  Two sons and two daughters were born to them.  His widow and Lieut. Nathan E. Niles, of the Navy, survive him.  The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon at the family residence and it was largely attended.  Rev. Dr. A. C. Shaw conducted the service.  The Cook Post, G. A. R. attended in a body, and 25 members of Col. Niles’s company acted as a military escort to the cemetery and tenderly committed the remains of their late commander to the dust.  Each member wore the distinguishing bucktail on his hat.  Among the many floral tributes was a buck constructed of white flowers, which was a testimonial of respect from the surviving members of Company E of the Bucktails.  At the cemetery the service was in charge of the Cook Post, No. 315, G. A. R.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Burr Clifton Shaff
At Mills, Pa., October 4, 1891, of cholera infantum, Burr Clifton, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Shaff, aged 7 months and 21 days.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Stewart Parnell
Charles Stewart Parnell, the great Irish leader, is dead.  He expired last week Tuesday evening in his wife’s arms at their home in Brighton.  His death came unexpectedly.  Mr. Parnell arrived at his home at Brighton on the 1st instant and complained of suffering from a chill.  On the next day he was unable to leave his bed and his regular physician was summoned.  He seems to have considered Mr. Parnell’s illness of a serious nature, for he soon sent for another physician with whom he held a long consultation over the sickness of the Irish leader.  This consultation was resumed on Sunday, when Mr. Parnell was found  to be in great pain and apparently growing weaker every hour.  His sickness was pronounced to be an attack of acute rheumatism, and every attention and care was paid to the sufferer.  He was carefully and untiringly nursed by his wife, who hardly left his bedside from the moment her husband’s sickness was pronounced to be of a serious nature.  Mr. Parnell, in spite of the care and attention which he received did not seem to rally from the rheumatic attack, and grew weaker and weaker.  Several hours before his death he became unconscious and so remained until he died in intense agony.  Charles Stewart Parnell was born in Avondale, county Wicklow, Ireland, in June, 1846.  His mother was an American, being the daughter of Admiral John Stewart, known during the war of 1812 as “Old Ironsides.”  His father John Henry Parnell, came of an old English family which went over to Ireland during the reign of Charles II.  Parnell’s early education was carried on at private institutions.  While a boy he suffered from a severe attack of typhoid fever, from which he never fully recovered.  He was graduated at Cambridge college, England, and after making a tour of the United States, returned home and was made High Sheriff of Wicklow in 1874.  After the execution of the Manchester murders, and partly as a result of that episode, he determined to enter Parliament as a Home Ruler.  He made his first attempt to enter public life contesting the county of Dublin with the late Colonel Taylor in 1874.  He was defeated by an overwhelming majority, but in the following year--1875--he was returned for the county of Meath.  In February, 1877, Mr. Parnell made his first appearance as a public legislator when he introduced the Irish Church act amendment bill, designed to facilitate the purchase of their holdings by the tenantry of the disestablished Irish Church.  The bill was defeated.  The introduction of the Prison bill by Sir Richard Cross gave rise to what became known as the obstruction policy, in which Parnell took the lead.  From that time on he became as the recognized leader of the Irish party, and in 1879 he joined the new land movement.  In December of the same year he came to this country to disseminate the principles of and obtain financial aid for the Irish National League.  In 1881 Parnell and his friends made a desperate fight against the Coercion bill, and a few months later he was arrested for addressing a Land League convention, the League having been declared an illegal organization.  He was imprisoned for six months, but when he was released he kept up the fight with vigor during the next few years.  In 1886, as a result of the investigations of the “Parnell Commission” he was cleared of the imputation of advocating assassination, and the London Times was forced to pay him 5,000 English pound for having published forged letters which apparently sustained the charge.  The Mrs. O’Shea episode is still fresh in the minds of the public.  Captain O’Shea obtained a divorce upon the only ground recognized by the English courts, and Parnell was named as the co-respondent.  A few months since Parnell was married to Mrs. O’Shea by a civil ceremony, being unable to obtain a clergyman to perform the marriage service.  This incident caused a split in the ranks of the Irish party, and Gladstone refused to treat with Parnell.  The latter was making an effort to resume his old place as leader, but was meeting with little success when death ended his checkered career.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Vincent Vela
Vincent Vela, the Italian sculptor, is dead.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Carroll Sawyer
Charles Carroll Sawyer, a well-known writer of war songs, died last week in Brooklyn.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

W. H. F. Lee
W. H. F. Lee, the son of Gen. Robert E. Lee, died in Virginia last week, aged 54.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Sanford Down
Sanford Down, an old soldier of Iowa, died at Eldon last week, aged 87 years.  He was married three times and had 31 children.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Eli Foster
Capt. Eli Foster, one of 109 officers who escaped from Libby prison through the famous tunnel, died last week Sunday at his home in Chicago, aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Turner
Hon. Jacob Turner, ex-Congressman from the 21st district, died on Sunday at his home in Greensburg, of gangrene, the result of an accident.  He was 66 years of age.  (Tuesday, August 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Henry Smith
Hon. William Henry Smith, Government leader in the British House of Commons and First Lord of the Treasury, died last week Tuesday after a brief illness.  He was born in London in 1825.  (Tuesday, August 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

King, Karl I. of Wurtemburg
King Karl I, of Wurtemburg, died at Stuttgurt last week Tuesday after a long illness.  He was born on March 6, 1823, and ascended the throne at the death of his father, King William I, on June 25, 1864.  His mind had been weak for years.  (Tuesday, October 14, 1891, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA

Chemung County NY

Tioga County PA

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Published On Tri-Counties Site On 28 DEC 2010
By Joyce M. Tice
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