Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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1894-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Mrs. Mary A. Hall
Mary A., wife of Mr. Reuben T. Hall, died at her home in Ewing, Neb., on the 4th instant at the age of 55 years.  Mrs. Hall was a resident of Farmington, in this county, for many years, and she was esteemed by all who knew her.  She had been in poor health for two years; but only an hour before her death she sat at the breakfast-table with her family.  She leaves two daughters in the East, Mrs. A. J. Crippen, of Rochester, NY, and Mrs. O. L. Butts, of this borough.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Polly Butler
At Asaph, Pa., March 17, 1894, Mrs. Polly Butler, aged 75 years.  (Tuesday, March 21, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph L. and George Williams
Mr. Joseph L. Williams, a brother of Justice Henry W. Williams, fell dead on the platform of the Delaware and Hudson railway depot at Scranton on Friday afternoon, the 16th instant.  Mr. Williams’s home was at Harford, Susquehanna county.  He was in Scranton on business the day of his death.  The funeral was held at Harford last week Sunday.  Mr. Williams resided in this borough some years ago, and he was a genial, companionable man who had many warm personal friends.  On the 7th instant Mr. George Williams, of Ottawa, Canada, another brother of Justice Williams, died of paralysis.  He was a prominent man in his home, being a zealous worker in the Church and devoted to his friends.  Judge Williams has the sympathy of many friends in this county in his double bereavement.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James A. Owens
Mr. James A. Owens died at his home in Jackson on the 15th instant, of pneumonia, at the age of 61 years.  He had resided in that neighborhood nearly all his life.  Mr. Owens was an excellent citizen, his life being an example of pure Christian philosophy.  His widow, three daughters and one son are surviving.  The funeral was held last week Sunday, and the funeral sermon were preached by Rev. G. P. Watrous.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Belle Tuttle
Miss Belle Tuttle, of Elkland, who was burned by the explosion of a lamp on the 10th instant, died last week Monday from her injury.  It was thought that she was improving, and it was confidently hoped that she would recover.  She was suddenly taken worse on Monday morning, and before the physician arrived she expired.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Sanford Dewey
At Blossburg, Pa., March 15, 1894, of pneumonia, Mr. Sanford Dewey, aged 64 years, 9 months and 2 days.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Anna Miller
At Tioga, Pa., March 15, 1894, Mrs. Julia Anna Miller, aged 71 years.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Margaret Moriarty
At Blossburg, Pa., March 21, 1894, Mrs. Margaret Moriarty, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Louis Kossuth
Louis Kossuth, the Hungarian patriot, died at 11 o’clock Tuesday night, the 20th instant, at Turin, Italy.  His son, sister, and other relatives were present when he died.  He passed away holding the hand of the Hungarian Deputy Karoly.  The agony of his last hours was extremely harrowing.  In his home at Turin, Louis Kossuth, orator, patriot, General, dictator, the head and front of the fight for Hungarian independence, who is his varied career had been both President and pauper, a liberator and an exile from the land to which he sought to give independence, spent the last years of his life in quiet.  Not the reverential love of the Hungarian people nor the admiration of the whole civilized world could give to the old patriot any joy of life, and only a few years ago he sadly spoke of himself as one who looked “to no hope in the future, no consolation in the past.” Louis Kossuth, once Governor of Hungary, was born in Monok, Hungary, on April 27, 1802, of a noble Croation family.  His tendency to opposition to Austria may well have been hereditary, for between 1527 and 1716 seventeen members of this family were prosecuted by the Austrian Government for high treason.  This instinct was fostered by his course in the college of Patak, an institution whose traditions were all anti-Austrian.  Shortly after his graduation be became an Assessor for the county of Zemplion and spoke in its Assembly.  He was at that time a lawyer.  His political influence among the people grew rapidly, and at the age of 30 years he was sent to the Diet of Presburg as an alternate for an absent member, but when he endeavored to speak he was set upon by the party in power.  Finding freedom of speech denied to him, he began publishing reports of the Diet’s proceedings, and his articles were the subjects of much attempted repressension by the Government.  Feeling that he had the people behind him, he published a series of letters in Pesth, criticizing the Government with such courage and bitterness that in 1837 he was sentenced to four years imprisonment.  Two years later, when the liberal party came into power, he was released, and in 1841 became the editor of the Pesth Hirlap.  For seven years his unceasing efforts were for the establishment of Hungarian independence.  As a member of the Diet he proposed the address to the Emperor Ferdinand asking that Hungary be restored to independence, and when this was done Kossuth became Governor of Hungary.  But the bloody war for independence was close at hand.  Kossuth saw it coming and prepared as best he could.  Against combined armies from without and treachery from within Hungary fought her brave but hopeless fight, and lost.  The ex-Governor fled to Turkey, where he was imprisoned.  Austria demanded his extradition, but the Porte, strengthened by the support of the United States and England, refused.  These two nations demanded that Kossuth be released, and the United States sent the warship Mississippi to bring him to this country as the Nation’s guest.  His request to be allowed to pass through France was denied by Louis Napoleon, to the great indignation of the French people.  In England he was enthusiastically received, and on December 5, 1851, he landed in this country, where he was received with such enthusiasm as he never before nor since been accorded to any foreigner save Lafayette.  His course through this country was a succession of triumphs.  While in prison he had learned English by the aid of a lexicon and an edition of Shakespeare, and he spoke in many of the large cities of this country, always to tremendous audiences.  Those who heard him pronounced him the greatest orator in the world.  At a dinner given him by representative journalists in New York city, at which William Cullen Bryant presided, there were present Henry Ward, Beecher, Parke Goodwin, George Bancroft, Charles A. Dana, Henry J. Raymond and Charles Loring Brace.  From New York he went to Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Annapolis, Pittsburg, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Louisville, St. Louis, Mobile, New Haven, Springfield, Worcester, Boston, Salem, Albany, Syracuse, Utica, and other cities.  At Washington, at a public banquet, given to Kossuth, Senator King presided, with the Great Hungarian and the Speaker of the House at his right hand and Daniel Webster at his left. A gentleman who was present at the dinner in New York writes of him:  “He was not merely the most versatile but the most eloquent orator I ever heard.  He never repeated his thoughts or his expressions, and his mastery of the secrets of language was complete.  There was one peculiarly in his use of English that was remarkable; it was for the most part the English of the Elizabethan age and of the older English writers, and in that way he acquired at times an exceedingly quaint, if not obsolete air.  It arose from the fact that he had learned English while he was in prison, with no other books obtainable than a dictionary and Shakespeare’s plays.  There was a richness and originality in his English vocabulary that is not often showed by modern speakers.  Kossuth returned to Europe in 1852, and for years lectured, in the hope of winning other nations to help in the fight for Hungarian independence.  His last great effort was to get Hungarians to repudiate the Deak compromise with Austria.  Failing in this he settled down to a life of exile in Turin.  For some time this advertisement appeared in the Turin Courier:  Lessons in German, English, and Hungarian given at moderate rates by L. Kossuth, 164 Strade Nuova.  Thus he supported himself, declining a gift of 50,000 florius offered to him by Hungarian admirers.  After publishing his memoirs he lived in comparative comfort from the proceeds of the sale of the book, his sister, Louise Kossuth Ruttkny(?), keeping house for him.  In 1892 the city of Budapest presented him with the freedom of the city, and he was the recipient of hundreds of testimonials of his countrymen’s admiration.  Nevertheless he considered that he had lived his life in vain, not seeing that Hungary, practically fres today, owes her liberty in a great measure to his fight in past years.  Kossuth was married when about 85 years old and had three children, two sons and a daughter.  His wife and daughter are dead; his sons survive him.  Kossuth had three nephews in the Union army at the time of the Rebellion:  Col. Zulyavsky, Col. Ruttkay, and Major Albert Ruttsky.  Mrs. Albert Ruttsky and her son, Louis Kossuth Ruttsky, a namesake of his great uncle, live in Brooklyn.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Ludwig August Frankl
Ludwig August Frankl, the Austrian poet, died at Vienna a few days ago.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

L. T. Goodnow
L. T. Goodnow, one of the most prominent pioneers of Kansas, died at Manhattan, Kan., last week.  He was the first Superintendent of Public Instruction in the State.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elizabeth Noble
Elizabeth Noble, wife of John W. Noble, Secretary of the Interior under President Harrison, died a few days ago at the family residence in St. Louis, Mo.  She was 57 years old.  Heart failure was the probable cause of death.  (Tuesday, March 28, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alonzo Kimball
Mr. Alonzo Kimball died last Sunday afternoon at his home in this borough, after a painful sickness.  Mr. Kimball was 77 years of age.  He was born in Tioga county, NY.  He came to this county in 1839, and in 1840 he engaged in farming in Charleston.  He was a genial, large-hearted man and had many friends.  He was brother of Mr. John Kimball, of this borough, and Mr. Lazelle Kimball, of Charleston.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Jeremiah Hart
Mr. Jeremiah Hart, formerly a resident of Charleston township, died on the 20th ultimo at Thomasville, NC, at the age of 72 years.  Mr. Hart left this county for the South in 1869.  He was a successful farmer, owning a large plantation.  His health had not been good since he was mustered out of the army.  He was a brother of the late Capt. Morgan Hart and Mrs. John Kimball, of this borough.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Herrick Smith
Mr. Herrick Smith, of Farmington, who was fatally injured by falling upon a circular-saw in his portable mill, died from his injuries two days after the accident.  He was 47 years of age, and he leaves a widow and one child,--a daughter.  The interment was last week Sunday and the funeral was held last Sunday, being conducted by the Tioga River Odd Fellows Lodge.  There were about 60 Odd Fellows in the procession.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary E. Blackwell
Mary E., wife of Mr. Enoch Blackwell, of Morris, died of heart-disease on the 23d ultimo, at the age of 64 years.  Her maiden name was Webster, and she was a native of Morris township.  She married Mr. Blackwell, October 3, 1857, and her eight children survive her.  Mrs. Blackwell had been an invalid for about three years.  She was a woman of much intelligence and of a genial nature.  She was a consistent Christian and a member of the Baptist Church.  The funeral was held on Sunday, the 25th ultimo.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. A. J. Hughes
Mr. A. J. Hughes, founder of the Port Allegany Reporter, died last week Sunday in Buffalo, NY, where he had resided for a year or two.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Brigden
Chatham, April 2.--Mrs. Brigden, widow of Russell Brigden, deceased, late of Chatham, was found lying dead on the floor of her house at Shortsville last Thursday.  From all appearances and all that could be learned it is believed she had been dead for at least 48 hours.  She was living along, as her three girls, who were at home part of the time, were all away teaching last week.  The last time she was seen was on Tuesday.  Mrs. Brigden was a kind neighbor, a loving mother and a loyal Christian woman.  She leaves six children.  One son lives in Wisconsin, Mrs. George Spaulding at Hammond, Mrs. George A. Ferris at Chatham, and there are three unmarried daughters.  The funeral was held at the house Saturday at 2 o’clock in the afternoon.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Female Benjamin
The only child--a daughter of 17 years--of Mr. and Mrs. Wat. Benjamin, died at their home in Rochester, NY, last week.  They formerly resided in Mansfield, and have the sympathy of the people here.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Hubert Parry
Charles Hubert Parry, the English musician and composer, died in London last Thursday.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Baron Hannen
Baron Hannen, president of the Parnell Commission and an English representative at the Bering-sea tribunal, died in London last Thursday.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Ticknor Curtis
George Ticknor Curtis, the lawyer and writer on political economy and constitutional history, died last Wednesday at his home in New York city from heart failure super induced by a brief attack of acute pneumonia.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elvira Wood
Marshfield, March 30.--There died at the home of her son, J. H. Wood, of Gaines, on March 26, 1894, Mrs. Elvira Wood, aged 82 years lacking eight days.  Mrs. Wood was born in New Haven county, Conn., but removed to Chenango county, NY, where she lived with her parents some years, and subsequently removed to this county more than 60 years ago.  She encountered many of the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life in the wilds of Tioga county at that early day.  Mrs. Wood was a sister of the writer of this note, and perhaps it is worthy of record that death has not claimed any of the children of my father’s family before since August 8, 1857.  I was then 22 years of age, and my brothers and sisters--there were six of us at that time--ranged in age from 8 to 25 years older than myself, yet we lived an unbroken circle for almost 37 years.  O. A. Smith.  (Tuesday, April 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jane G. Austin
Mrs. Jane G. Austin, the novelist, died at Boston, Mass., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Owen O’Conor
The actor James Owen O’Conor died in an asylum at Morristown, NJ, the other day.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank Bell
Maj. Frank Bell, for 29 years an examiner in the Pension Bureau at Washington, committed suicide last week.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles Edward Brown-Sequard
Charles Edward Brown-Sequard, the famous physician at Paris, died April 2d.  He was born in 1818 in Mauritius.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph O’Farrell
Right Rev. Joseph O’Farrell, a distinguished Roman Catholic, died at Trenton, NJ, from Bright’s disease, a few days ago, aged 61.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. C. D. Warner
Mr. C. D. Warner died on the 14th at his home in Keeneyville.  He had been feeble a long time, and his death was not unexpected.  He lived in this district nearly half a century, but failing health made him wish to be near his son and only child.  He also leaves a widow and adopted daughter.  The funeral was held in the church on Friday, Rev. W. R. Kenyon officiating.  He was a member of the Knights of the Honor, of the Alfred Toles Post, G. A. R., No. 705.  Members from each organization attended the funeral in a body.  The interment was in the Middlebury cemetery, where the service was very impressive.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Alonzo Kimball
Mr. Alonzo Kimball, who died at his home in Charleston last week Sunday, left a widow and one daughter, Mrs. Truman Wheeler.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary Lindsey
Miss Mary Lindsey died at her home on Central avenue last Saturday, of paralysis, after a short illness.  Her age was 79 years.  She was born in this borough in a log house that stood on the site of the Presbyterian church.  Her father, Mr. David Lindsey, was Clerk for the County Commissioners in the early days of the county.  Miss Lindsey was a very intelligent and capable woman, although remarkably retiring in disposition.  The funeral was held last Monday afternoon, Rev. A. C. Shaw, D. D., pastor of the Presbyterian Church, reading the Episcopal funeral service.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Stella Toles
Mrs. Edwin W. Toles died in childbirth last Sunday night at her home in Westfield.  Her maiden name was Stella Campbell, she being the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Newell Campbell, of Delmar.  Her death is a crushing blow to her parents, they having lost their only son a few years ago just as he reached manhood.  Mr. and Mrs. Toles were married October 10, 1888, and for several years they resided at Little Marsh and then moved to Westfield, where Mr. Toles was engaged in business.  Their four year old daughter has recently been staying with her grandparents and she is now critically sick with diphtheria.  The remains of Mrs. Toles were brought here yesterday morning, and the funeral is to be held at the house of J. W. Mather, Esq., on Walnut street, this morning at 10:30 o’clock.  Rev. Dr. Shaw is to conduct the service.  Mrs. Toles was a woman of lovable character, and she was thoroughly devoted to her family and friends.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William W. Truax
Mr. William W. Truax, formerly a resident of Tioga, died at Tarpon Springs, Fla., on the 29th ultimo, of Bright’s disease.  He was 71 years of age.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James King
Mr. James King, one of the oldest citizens of Westfield township, died at his home on the Jemison creek last Wednesday, after a long and painful sickness.  He was well known and respected through that part of the county.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. J. Frank Sweely
Mr. J. Frank Sweely, of Lycoming county, died a few days ago at the age of 38 years, from blood poisoning.  While doctoring a horse afflicted with distemper, Mr. Sweely became inoculated with the poison through a cold-sore on his lip, and this caused his death.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Holden
By the death of Mrs. Sarah Holden on the 22d of March, the borough of Mansfield lost one of its oldest and most respected citizens.  She was a loving mother and a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist Church of that place over 50 years.  She leaves one son, Edgar Holden, of McGregor, Iowa, and a daughter, Mrs. Kittie Crandall, of Mansfield, a brother, Hon. Levi Fuller, of West Union, Iowa, and a sister, Mrs. Edward Grosjean, of this borough.  (Tuesday, April 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John S. Bliss
Mr. John S. Bliss died at his home in Charleston last week Tuesday night after a long sickness.  He had an attack of the grip, and his rapid decline began at that time.  Had he lived until the 7th of June next, Mr. Bliss would have been 77 years of age.  He had lived in this county almost all his life.  Many years ago he was in partnership with Mr. B. T. VanHorn in the furniture factory in this borough.  About 40 years ago he bought the farm in Charleston where he afterward resided.  Mr. Bliss left a widow, who is a sister of Mr. B. T. VanHorn, and six sons and one daughter.  All his children reside within two miles of the old homestead.  At the funeral last Thursday the sons bore their father’s remains to the grave in the cemetery in this borough.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Nelson Butler
Mr. Nelson Butler, formerly a resident of Blossburg, was killed at Patton, Pa., a few days ago in a collision on the railroad.  He was an engineer on the Beech Creek railway, and his engine was standing on the main track near the depot when a number of runaway coal cars crashed into it and he sustained fatal injuries.  He left a widow.  (Tuesday, April 18, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Corydon C. Ford
Dr. Corydon C. Ford died at his residence at Ann Arbor, Mich., a few days ago, aged 81.  For 40 years Dr. Ford was professor of anatomy and physiology in the University of Michigan and was one of the best anatomists in America.  He was born in New York State.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Clifton Comly
Major Clifton Comly, United States Army, was stricken with paralysis, last week Tuesday while taking part in the tests of the Crozier-Buffington gun-carriage at Sandy Hook, and died Tuesday night.  Major Comly was about 50 years old.  He was graduated from West Point in 1862.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James M.. Harvey
Ex-Gov. James M. Harvey, of Kansas, died near Junction, Kan., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David Dudley Field
David Dudley Field, the distinguished lawyer, died in New York city a few days ago.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry S. Ives
Henry S. Ives, otherwise called the Napoleon of Finance, died at Asheville, NC, last week.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Ware Slocum
Maj. Gen. Henry Ware Slocum, a distinguished Union officer and an ex Representative, died at Brooklyn a few days ago.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph B. Kershaw
Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw, and ex-Confederate officer and the Postmaster at Camden, SC, died at Camden this other day.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Oliver Lathrop Shepherd
Brig. Gen. Oliver Lathrop Shepherd, died at New York city last week, aged 81.  He was graduated at West Point in 1840 and served with distinction in the Seminole, Mexican and civil wars, and on the frontier.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. C. F. Spencer
Mrs. C. F. Spencer, the eldest daughter of the late David Dartt, formerly of Charleston, died of quick consumption, at her home in Greenwood, NY, last Wednesday morning.  She was 23 years of age.  Her husband and one young daughter survive her.  She had a large circle of relatives in this county.  The remains were brought to the home of Charles Scott, in Charleston, last Thursday, and the funeral services were held in the Baptist church on Friday at 11 o’clock, being conducted by Rev. W. H. Porter.  The remains were interred in the Charleston cemetery.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Juliet Taber
Last week Sunday Mrs. Juliet Taber committed suicide at the home of her son, Mr. T. B. Taber, at Daggett’s Mills by hanging herself.  Her grandson found her body suspended in the woodshed.  Mrs. Taber was 76 years of age.  She had been in poor health for a number of years and had become tired of life.  The funeral was held last week Monday and the remains were laid beside those of her late husband.  (Tuesday, April 25, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

R. S. Granger
General R. S. Granger, a retired Army officer, died at Washington last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, May 2, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William B. Daniels
William B. Daniels, ex-Governor of Idaho, died a few days ago at Tacoma, aged 76 years.  (Tuesday, May 2, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James W. Throckmorton
James W. Throckmorton, ex-Governor of Texas, died a few days ago at McKinney, Tex., at the age of 69 years.  (Tuesday, May 2, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Reed
Edward Reed, a retired merchant of Orange, NJ, died the other day, aged 72 years.  He left half of his fortune of $2,000,000 to charities.  (Tuesday, May 2, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Michael Boland
Michael Boland, alleged to have been at one time a member of the famous “Triangle” of the Clan-na(?) Gael, died at Kansas City last week.  (Tuesday, May 2, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William McGarrahan
William McGarrahan, the celebrated claimant to the New Idria mine, died in Washington last week.  He had been a familiar figure at the capital for years and was well known to a majority of Senators and members.  (Tuesday, May 2, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Eva Margaret Sticklin
Mrs. John Sticklin died last Saturday afternoon at her home on Meade street after a long sickness.  She was nearly 63 years of age.  She had been helpless for a number of years from paralysis, and although she suffered greatly for many months before her death she showed remarkable patience and fortitude.  Mrs. Sticklin’s maiden name was Eva Margaret Banerschmidt(or Bauerschmidt), and she was born at Upper Franken, Bavaria, Germany.  She came to this borough in 1851, and married Mr. Sticklin 41 years ago.  Her husband and three children--one daughter and two sons--survive her.  The funeral was held last Monday afternoon at the home on Meade street, Rev. Father Manley conducting the service.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Eunice McInroy
Mrs. Eunice McInroy, widow of the late Edward McInroy, Jr., died last Friday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James A. Mallen, in New York city.  Her death resulted from an attack of pneumonia, and she was sick only about a week.  She was 63 years of age.  Her maiden name was Dugan, and she was born in New York city.  She lived in this borough and vicinity for 35 years.  About three years ago, soon after the death of her husband, she went to New York to live with her sister.  Her remains were brought here last Saturday, and the funeral was held last Sunday afternoon and was largely attended.  Mrs. McInroy was a member of St. Peter’s Church.  She was an estimable woman and was beloved by a large circle of friends.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David A. Clark
Mr. David A. Clark, died at the home of his son John Clark, in Farmington, on the 26th ultimo, and the funeral was held last Sunday in the Presbyterian church in Farmington, the service being conducted by Rev. L. P. Thurston.  Mr. Clark had spent most of his time recently in Farmington, although his home was with his daughter, Dr. Anna Clark, at Scranton.  For more than 20 years he had been an officer in the Methodist Church.  He leaves a widow, two sons and two daughters.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Abram Slingerland
Mr. Abram Slingerland, a prominent citizen of Sullivan, died last week Sunday at the age of 60 years.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Wilkinson
Another one of the old residents of Charleston has passed away.  Mr. William Wilkinson died at the home of Mr. Samuel Catlin, in Catlin Hollow, last Thursday of Bright’s disease.  He was 73 years of age.  He was born in Rhode Island and moved to Charleston over 60 years ago.  He was a very hardworking, industrious man.  He leaves to mourn his loss one daughter, Mrs. Nathan Austin, and two sons, Mr. George Wilkinson and one in the West, also one brother and one sister and a large number of relatives and friends.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Francis B. Stockbridge
United States Senator Francis B. Stockbridge, of Michigan, died at Chicago, IL, on April 30th, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank Hatton
Frank Hatton, editor of the Washington Post and ex-Postmaster General, died at Washington, D. C., on April 30th, aged 48 years.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George W. Abell
George W. Abell, owner of the Baltimore Sun, died at his home last week, Tuesday.  He was the son of the late A. S. Abell, who lived to a great age and accumulated a large fortune from the Sun, which he founded.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Montgomery Gibbs
Montgomery Gibbs, a young lawyer and real estate dealer of Buffalo, was mysteriously shot and killed on Delaware avenue, one of the best streets of that city, about 10 o’clock on the night of April 30th, by some unknown person or persons.  Now clue to the murderer has been found.  (Tuesday, May 9, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jolm Jay
Jolm Jay, ex-Minister to Austria and civil-service reformer, died at New York on May 5th.  (Tuesday, May 16, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert F. Brattan
Representative Robert F. Brattan, of the First Maryland district, died in Princess Anne, Md., on Thursday.  (Tuesday, May 16, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Harriet I. Bruckhart
Miss Harriet I.(or J.) Bruckhart, for many years principal of the Presbyterian Women’s College at Yokohama, Japan, died in Lancaster county last week, aged 42.  (Tuesday, May 16, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert P. Dechert
Robert P. Dechert, Brigadier-General of the first Brigade, N. G. P., died at the home of his brother, Henry M. Dechert, in Philadelphia, last Saturday, from a complication of diseases.  (Tuesday, May 16, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Joseph H. Moore
Col. Joseph H. Moore, who died at his home in Indianapolis last week Monday, was the man who planned and superintended the construction of all the pontoon bridges used by Gen. Sherman’s army on the march from Atlanta to the sea and thence through the Carolinas.  He bridged the Chattahoochie river for Sherman 13 times.  Col. Moore went to the front in 1861 as Lieutenant-Colonel of the 58th Indiana regiment and served with it until the end of the war.  (Tuesday, May 16, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel Bly
Mr. Daniel Bly, a former resident of Millerton, died at East Hebron, Potter county, a few days ago at an advanced age.  (Tuesday, May 16, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Clara VanDusen
Miss Clara VanDusen died last week Sunday at her home in Olean, NY.  She was a former resident of Chatham in this county, where many friends knew and loved her for her excellent qualities.  She was a sister of Messrs. Charles H. and D. L. VanDusen, of Osceola, and Mrs. H. F. Daniels, Jr., and Mrs. Morris Seely, of Deerfield.  (Tuesday, May 16, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Griswold
Mrs. Julia Griswold died yesterday morning of consumption at her home in Elmira, NY, aged 58 years.  She was a daughter of the late S. E. Ensworth, of this borough.  She was a lovely Christian woman.  (Tuesday, May 30, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jonas S. Brewster
From the New Orleans Picayune we learned of the recent death of Captain Jonas S. Brewster, a native of this borough, and a half brother of A. S. Brewster, Esq.  Captain Brewster was born in 1821.  He went South in 1849 and engaged in steamboating on the Atchafalaya river and bayou Teche.  In 1878 his wife and daughter died of yellow fever.  Soon after this bereavement he became totally blind and was compelled to relinquish his position as captain of a steamboat, and he made his living thereafter by furnishing the boats with bread, vegetables and other supplies.  During the past six months he had been gradually declining and he died in the charity hospital in New Orleans.  (Tuesday, May 30, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Morse
Mrs. Julia Morse, of Tioga, died last week Monday of typhoid fever.  She was 61 years of age.  (Tuesday, May 30, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Levi Brown
Mr. Levi Brown, a well-known citizen of Lawrenceville, died a few days ago at the age of 46 years.  (Tuesday, May 30, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles C. Drake
Mr. Charles C. Drake, formerly passenger agent of the Tioga railroad, died at his home in Corning, NY, last Friday afternoon of rheumatism of the heart.  He was 47 years of age.  (Tuesday, May 30, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Roe, Jr.
Thomas Roe, Jr., died at his home in Keeneyville on the 19th instant.  The funeral service at the church was conducted by Rev. W. R. Kenyon.  Mr. Roe came back to Oregon this spring in hopes that the air of his native State would restore him to health.  (Tuesday, May 30, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Martha McCauley
The funeral of Mrs. Martha McCauley was held at Keeneyville last Friday.  She died at the home of her niece, Mrs. Archie Howe, in Bradford, who accompanied the remains here.  Her girlhood was spent here, but since her husband’s death she had lived at Mansfield until last fall, when she went to Bradford.  (Tuesday, May 30, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. H. H. Metcalf
Mr. H. H. Metcalf, one of the oldest residents of Sylvester, died last week Monday morning.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. J. G. Spaulding
Mrs. J. G. Spaulding, wife of the telegraph-operator at Roaring Branch, died last week Tuesday of gastritis.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Barney McAndrews
Mr. Barney McAndrews, who was killed in the riots near Scottsdale recently, was formerly a resident of Arnot.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Barnhart
Mr. John Barnhart, a well-known citizen of Gaines, died on the 19th instant from the effects of his injuries in a runaway accident a few days before.  While he was driving near the Watrous mill his team became frightened and ran away, throwing him out.  As he fell, the brake on the wagon caught his shoe, holding him fast, and in that position he was dragged a considerable distance.  He was aged and feeble from continued poor health and he did not recover from the shock.  Mr. Barnhart was highly esteemed by all who enjoyed his acquaintance.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. H. C. Johns
Mr. H. C. Johns, once a prominent citizen of the county and Superintendent of Public Schools, died last week in Kansas.  The remains were brought to his old home in Sullivan and the funeral was held last Sunday.  He was 62 years of age.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary DeWitt
Mrs. Mary DeWitt, widow of the late Caleb DeWitt, died at her home in Mainesburg last Thursday at the age of about 70 years.  She was apparently as well as usual last week Sunday and attended church.  She was the mother of ex-County Commissioner DeWitt.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Martin Griffin
Last Thursday afternoon at Blackwell’s lumber-camp, in Lycoming county, John D. McClelland cut a tree that in falling struck a dead tree which also fell and caught McClelland and Martin Griffin under it.  Griffin’s head was crushed and he died in three hours.  McClelland escaped with a broken leg, but the fracture is so serious that it is feared amputation may be necessary.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Gladys E. Mathews
At Blossburg, Pa., May 31, 1894, of pneumonia, Gladys E., daughter of Rev. and Mrs. J. T. Mathews.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Moses Metcalf
In Brookfield, Pa., May 28, 1894, Mr. Moses Metcalf, aged 82 years.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Otis R. Richards
At Nelson, Pa., May 27, 1894, Mr. Otis F. Richards, aged 65 years.  (Tuesday, June 6, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Dwight Whitney
Prof. William Dwight Whitney, professor of philology at Yale, died last week Thursday, aged 66 years.  (Tuesday, June 13, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

G. W. Wilson
G. W. Wilson, a Chicago capitalist and inventor of the Wilson sewing machine, died last week of heart disease, at the home of his son-in-law, in San Jose, Ca.  (Tuesday, June 13, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Roscher
Prof. William Roscher, the eminent German authority on political economy, died at Leipsic last week, aged 77 years.  Prof. Roscher was born at Hanover, October 21, 1817, and studied at the universities of Gottingen and Berlin.  (Tuesday, June 13, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lewis W. Gibson
Rev. Lewis W. Gibson, a native of this borough, died last Thursday at his home at Dover, Delaware.  He was the eldest son of the late Dr. O. L. Gibson, once the leading physician here.  Lewis was graduated at Yale College and became an Episcopal minister.  He preached in Philadelphia and Sunbury, and for a number of years he had been pastor of a Church at Dover.  He was about 58 years of age.  (Tuesday, June 13, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Louden
Last Friday Mr. Robert Louden received intelligence of the death of his brother, Mr. John Louden, at Ransom, North Dakota.  It seems that he had been deranged for some time and had been in an asylum, but was sent home as cured.  He soon lapsed into his former state, and his family were about to send him back to the hospital; but last week Monday night Louden left his bed and traveled two miles barefooted, went into a barn and set fire to the building and perished in the flames.  He was 36 years of age, and he leaves a widow and four young children.  He visited in this borough for about six weeks last winter.  (Tuesday, June 13, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Abram Bradley Lindsey
Mr. Abram Bradley Lindsey died at his home in Lawrenceville last week Tuesday, of paralysis, in the 82nd year of his age.  He was born in Lindley, NY, and he resided there until about 12 years ago, when he purchased the Granger property in Lawrenceville and moved there.  He was a genial, upright citizen whom it was a pleasure to know.  (Tuesday, June 13, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Foster Spicer
Last Thursday evening Foster Spicer, or “Focht” Spicer, as he was familiarly known in all this region, was shot through the heart and instantly killed by Constable Higgins in the Farmers’ hotel at Galeton.  It seems that Constables Higgins and Gallup, of Austin, acting as Deputy Sheriffs, went to Galeton on Thursday with warrants for the arrest of a number of persons who were violating the Potter county prohibitory law by selling liquor in places known as “speak easies,” or “pig sears.”  The proprietors got wind of the offices and skipped out, Spicer being among the number.  He went down to Gaines and returned at night, it is said, somewhat the worse for liquor.  Constable Higgins was half reclining on a bench in the hotel when Spicer rushed in, pointed a revolver at Higgsins’s head and demanded all the warrants he had for the Galeton parties.  Higgins replied that he had no warrant for him; but Spicer fired his revolver, the bullet striking Higgins in the neck and lodging in his left shoulder.  He then rushed upon the Constable, who drew his own revolver and shot Spicer twice.  One bullet hit Spicer in the abdomen and the other in the left breast, and Spicer fell upon the floor.  Constable Higgins wad badly wounded, and he was taken home to Austin the next morning.  At last accounts it was feared that the wound would prove fatal.  Foster Spicer was born and raised at Stony Fork in this county.  He was 58 years of age.  During the war he was engaged in bounty-jumping, and after the war he served two terms in the penitentiary, once for counterfeiting and a term of eight years for burglary.  While in prison he learned the tinner’s trade.  About a year ago he came out of prison and very soon went to Galeton, where, it is stated, he was engaged in the illicit sale of liquor.  (Tuesday, June 13, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Martha Harrington
Martha, wife of Mr. Martin R. Harrington, of Ogdensburg, died on the 6th instant after a short sickness, in the 68th year of her age.  She was an estimable woman and was widely known in that region.  (Tuesday, June 20, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Joseph Rickner and daughter
Last Wednesday evening there was a terrific boiler explosion in the saw mill of Messrs. Grosser & Co., at Deloy’s siding, near Cammal station on the Pine Creek railway by which Mr. Joseph Rickner and his five year old daughter were instantly killed.  It was a new mill, but the boiler, of 65 horse power, was an old one.  Saw dust was the fuel used under the boiler, and as there was a great quantity of this on hand--more than was needed to make steam--it was the custom of the fireman to go to the mill evenings and burn it.  He was accompanied by his little daughter on this occasion, the child considering it a great pleasure to go with her father to the mill.  As soon as possible after the explosion, the frightfully mangled and scalded bodies were taken from the ruins of the boiler house.  The large boiler was hurled through a 12 foot bank of earth and fell to the bed of the creek.  A collection was taken up among the passengers on the Wednesday evening Fall Brook train for the benefit of Mr. Rickner’s widow.  (Tuesday, June 20, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Amelia Fredericks
At Niles Valley, Pa., May 13, 1894, Nellie Amelia, youngest daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Fredericks, aged 2 years, 7 months and 24 days.  (Tuesday, June 20, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas M. Bayne
A Washington dispatch says ex-Congressman Thomas M. Bayne, of Pennsylvania, who has been residing in Washington, shot himself last Saturday morning and expired instantly.  Mr. Bayne was entirely alone in his handsome residence on Massachusetts avenue at the time of his death, his wife being absent from the city, and no possible motive for the suicide has thus far been suggested.  Beriah Wilkins, of the Washington Post, who is a near neighbor and friend, was one of the earliest to arrive at the house after firing of the fatal shot, but was unable to give any clue that would account for the tragedy.  At present the sad termination of a promising career seems to be a deep mystery.  Later information discloses the fact that Mr. Bayne shot himself through the head, and indicates that the inciting cause was alarm at a slight hemorrhage of the lungs which occurred Saturday morning.  Thomas M. Bayne was born at Allegheny City this State, January 14, 1836.  He was educated at the public schools and at Westminster College.  He served in the Union army as Colonel during the war of the Rebellion.  He was a student at law and was admitted to practice in 1866.  He was District Attorney for Allegheny county from 1870 to 1874.  He made an unsuccessful run for Representative in the 44th Congress, but was subsequently elected a Representative from the Allegheny district to the 45th, 46th, 47th, 48th and 49th Congresses.  He also took a prominent part in the Senatorial fight at Harrisburg a few years ago, in which Galusha A. Grow was one of the principal figures, and was also in the front of Pennsylvania Republican politics.  (Tuesday, June 20, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James B. Carpenter
James B. Carpenter was hanged at Mifflintown on Thursday, for the murder of his blind father.  (Tuesday, June 20, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Johann Kuffman, wife and three children
Johann Kuffman, laborer, killed his wife and three children and then himself at Camden, NJ, on Thursday.  He was suffering from poverty.  (Tuesday, June 20, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Fred. Preston
Fred. Preston was instantly killed in the lumber woods near Trout Run last Wednesday morning by being struck by a log train.  He was at work on the Proctor lumber job.  He was 24 years of age, and he leaves a widow and one child.  The remains were taken to Lawrenceville, his former home for interment.  (Tuesday, June 27, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Orrin Miller
Mr. Orrin Miller, a well-known citizen of Jackson, died last week Sunday.  He was 41 years of age.  (Tuesday, June 27, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

G. P. Watrous
Rev. G. P. Watrous died suddenly at Jackson Summit on Monday, of typhoid pneumonia.  He was about 70 years of age.  He was a well-known Baptist minister and had been an active and earnest preacher in this county most of the time during the past 30 years.  Rev. and Mrs. Watrous were missionaries among the Karens in Burmah, Indiana, for seven years.  The funeral is to be held this afternoon and Rev. J. L. Williams will conduct the services.  Rev. G. P. Watrous, whose death at Jackson Summit was mentioned in last week‘s Agitator, was 69 years of age.  He was a student of Madison University and a graduate of Rochester University and Theological Seminary, and was a missionary to Burmah from 1854-1860.  After returning from the foreign field Mr. Watrous was pastor at Tioga, Covington, Mansfield, Canton, Athens, Knoxville, Roseville, and of the three Baptist Churches in the township of Jackson, all of Pennsylvania.  He was also the supply pastor of Tacona Church, Philadelphia and of College Church, Lewisburg, Pa.  Mr. Watrous was a good preacher, a faithful pastor and a man of unblemished character and scholarly attainments.  He leaves a wife and two children, E. A. Watrous, of New York, and Mrs. O. W. Spratt, of Philadelphia.  The funeral was held at the church at Jackson Summit last Wednesday, and the remains were taken to Lewisburg for burial.  (Tuesday, June 27, and July 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Edwin Porter
Last Friday morning as Mr. Edwin Porter, a traveling agent at the Canton Cigar Company was driving through the streets of Troy, his horse balked, reared and threw itself.  Mr. Porter and several other persons attempted to hold the horse down while they loosened it from the wagon; but the maddened animal suddenly reared and struck Mr. Porter a vicious blow on the breast, and falling on him, crushed him against the curbing, inflicting injuries from which he died the same afternoon without regaining consciousness.  He leaves a widow and one daughter.  (Tuesday, June 27, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ellen Samantha Daggett
Ellen Samantha Daggett, wife of Lewis Daggett, died at their rooms in the Park hotel in Tioga last Friday afternoon.  She was born at Barrington, Yates county, NY, January 30, 1821, and was married to Lewis Daggett, March 4, 1839.  Thus of her 73 years of life, 55 were passed with her husband, who, at the age of 78, is left to mourn her.  During those years of sunshine and shadow, joy and sorrow, there were born to them seven children, three of whom only are now living.  These are Seth O. Daggett, of Tioga, Wells L. Daggett, of Bellefonte, and Mrs. Fred. Fletcher, of Newberry.  During the past few years, and the last year especially, she had been a continuous sufferer from nervousness, and as her death had been expected, she was surrounded during the last days by her family and relatives.  She was a member of the Presbyterian Church and died in the possession of the hope and joy which is the life of the Christian.  The funeral services were held at the Park hotel last Sunday afternoon, Rev. J. H. Elliott officiating.  (Tuesday, June 27, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Selden B. Dimmick
Mr. Selden B. Dimmick died on the 20th ultimo at the home of his daughter Mrs. Frank Martin, at McDonough, Chenango county, NY.  He had been suffering from a tumor in the stomach for several months.  Mr. Dimmick formerly resided in Delmar and for several years he was a blacksmith in the railroad shop in this borough.  About a year ago he was forced to give up active work on account of his health, and he soon after went to his daughter’s home.  Mr. Dimmick was a veteran of the war, being a member of Company I of the 45th regiment.  He had an excellent record as a soldier.  He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was 64 years of age.  (Tuesday, July 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Mordecai M. Canedy
Mr. Mordecai M. Canedy, a respected citizen of Tioga township, died on the 22d ultimo at the age of 81 years.  He had been an invalid for 17 years.  He was a native of Vermont.  (Tuesday, July 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William S. Purdy
Dr. William S. Purdy, of Corning, NY, died last Saturday at the age of 86(?) years.  (Tuesday, July 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

B. F. Taylor
Rev. B. F. Taylor died last Thursday at his home in Lawrenceville, at the age of 80 years.  (Tuesday, July 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Seth B. Hackett, Jr.
Mr. Seth B. Hackett, Jr., died at his home in Middlebury last Wednesday at the age of 45(or 46) years.  He left a widow and three children.  Mr. Hackett was esteemed by a wide circle of acquaintances.  The funeral was held in the Keeneyville Methodist church last Saturday.  Rev. Fremont Kerrick conducting the service.  (Tuesday, July 4, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Lizzie Crandall
Miss Lizzie Crandall died at the home of her parents on Sunday.  She had been sick since February last.  She was able to be up in a chair and out of doors only two weeks ago, but the warm weather prostrated her last week Thursday, and she died on the Sunday following.  She was buried on Monday, Dr. S. H. Moon officiating.  (Tuesday, July 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Charles C. Mathers
Last Wednesday afternoon about 2 o’clock Mr. Charles C. Mathers died at his home on Bacon street in this borough, of consumption.  He was in the 48th year of his age.  For a number of years Mr. Mathers had been battling against the insidious progress of the malady, and he had passed many months at the South and had sought the best medical advice in the vain effort to stay the march of the destroyer.  Charles C. Mathers was the son of the late John Mathers, and he was born in Shippen township, November 4, 1846, being of a family of 11 children.  His father was Sheriff of this county for two terms.  At the expiration of his second term, in January, 1859, the family moved to a farm at Round Top, where Charles spent some years in farm work during the busy season and at school in the old academy here during the winters.  He spent one year at Evansville, Ind., at work in a bank, and he managed a general store at English Center, Lycoming county, for one year.  In 1870 he purchased the dry-goods business of the late Laugher Bache, which he conducted successfully for eight years.  He then took Mr. Fred. W. Graves as a partner, and the firm was known as Mathers & Graves for some years.  Mr. Fred. W. Siemens afterward became a partner about the time Mr. Mather’s health began to fail, and the firm has since been conducted under its present style of Mathers, Graves & Co., Limited.  Mr. Mathers found his health failing, and he went to California in the hope that the change of climate would effect a cure.  Then he spent a winter in the South without avail.  He returned to this borough about a year ago, having consulted noted physicians and tried the most celebrated health-resorts, and settled down to a philosophical battle with his foe, patiently and bravely waiting the summons to join the majority.  Mr. Mathers married Miss Mary Bryden about 18 years ago, and she, with one son, survives him.  Mr. Mathers was a very successful merchant, possessing the qualities of a shrewd buyer and a successful salesman, and by his genial manner winning and holding customers.  He was interested in a number of other business enterprises at different times in an advisory capacity, and he served for a term as Burgess of this borough.  He was a member of the Presbyterian Church.  The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon at the family home on Bacon street.  Rev. A. C. Shaw conducted the service, being assisted by Rev. C. W. Cushing, D. D.  The members of the Masonic Lodge attended in a body and escorted the remains to the grave, where the service was conducted according to the ritual of that order.  Sympathizing friends sent many floral tributes, and the funeral was largely attended by friends of the deceased.  (Tuesday, July 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John J. Bowen
Mr. John J. Bowen, a prominent Charleston farmer, died yesterday at his home in Cherry Flats, of cancer of the stomach.  He had been a great sufferer for 15 years.  He was 51 years of age.  He was born in Wales, but for upwards of 30 years he had resided in this county.  The funeral is to be held next Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock.  Mr. Bowen leaves a widow and one daughter.  (Tuesday, July 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Martin Sheffer
In Liberty, Pa., July 2, 1894, Mr. Martin Sheffer, aged 63 years.  (Tuesday, July 11, 1894, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 28 DEC 2010
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.