Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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1892-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Charles Gayler

Charles Gayler, the pioneer American playwright, is dead at the age of 71.  His death was caused by Bright’s disease and heart failure.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

George W. Bond

George W. Bond, a well-known wool broker of Boston and a wool expert of National reputation, died in Boston last week, aged 80 years.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Miss Maud Morgan

Miss Maud (“Middy”) Morgan, the pioneer woman reporter of the United States, died in New Jersey last Wednesday, in her 64th year.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Reuben Dimond Mussey

Gen. Reuben Dimond Mussey, a gallant officer in the war for the Union, died of dropsy at his home in Washington, D. C., a few days ago.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

J. R. Buchtel

J. R. Buchtel, president and founder of Buchtel College, died recently at Akron, of paralysis and old age.  He gave all save $42,000 of his fortune of $500,000 to the College.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Sir Alexander Campbell

Sir Alexander Campbell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, died at Toronto a few days ago.  He was born in England, but came to Canada an infant, was educated at Kingston and studied law with John A. Macdonald, whose partner he became.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Prof. Halfli

Prof. Halfli, a well-known litterateur, author of several notable works on Nihilism, was found in a dying condition in his room at Salt Lake City last week Sunday and 10 minutes later breathed his last.  Death was due to laudanum poison, but whether taken for suicidal or medicinal purposes is not known.  Deceased was a native of Zurich, Switzerland, aged 45 years, and leaves a wife and five children in destitute circumstances.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Thomas A. Rowley

Gen. Thomas A. Rowley, the notable citizen of Pittsburg, who died suddenly a few days ago in his 85th year, was the son of emigrants from Ireland, and was born in Pittsburg in 1807.  He went to the Mexican war as Second Lieutenant in the 1st Pennsylvania regiment, and rose to the rank of Major.  After his return he became a valued citizen of Pittsburg, and an influential member of the Republican party when it was started.  He volunteered in the war for the Union, became Colonel of the 18th regiment, and was a Brigadier-General at the end of 1862.  When Maj-Gen. Reynolds fell at the battle of Gettysburg, Gen. Rowley took command of the Third division of the First army corps.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. George K. Miller

At Millerton, Pa., May 27, 1892, Mr. George K. Miller, aged 74 years.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Miss Elma Smith

At Keuka College, NY, May 27, 1892, Elma, daughter of DeWitt and Norah Smith, aged 4 months and 1 day.  (Tuesday, June 8, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Addie and Earl Fowler

Last Friday Addie and Earl Fowler, the only children of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Fowler, were drowned in Marsh Creek.  The girl was seven years of age and the boy five.  The bodies were found 40 rods from where they fell in, clasping tightly together.  There were no witnesses of the accident; but from the marks on the bank it is supposed the little boy fell in first and his sister, in trying to rescue him, lost her footing.  A portion of the bank had caved where the little feet made their last impression.  Mrs. Fowler has been sick for a long time, and is now totally prostrated by the shock.  The father is employed in the lumber woods away from home.  The funeral was held last Sunday, the bodies being interred in one grave at Ansonia.  (Tuesday, June 15, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Emmons Blaine

Emmons Blaine, the second son of ex-Secretary Blaine died at Chicago last Saturday shortly before noon.  Blood poisoning, the result of inflammation of the bowels, was the cause.  It was not until about a quarter of an hour prior to the fatal moment that the least intimation that Mr. Blaine was in a dangerous condition became known and then it was only to a few.  The news of young Blaine’s death reached his father at Bar Harbor, Me., a little after noon.  The family is greatly prostrated by grief.  Mr. and Mrs. Blaine left for Chicago on an afternoon train.  Young Mr. Blaine was a notable figure in the exciting scenes at Minneapolis.  He took the result greatly to heart and was confined to his room shortly after his return home.  During the Convention he seemed in perfect health and no one who heard of his sudden passing away was more shocked than those who saw his partic pating in caucuses, early and late night and day, in his father’s interest.  It is thought possible by many that the strain and excitement at Minneapolis followed by the keen disappointment at the outcome, had not a little to do with his physical prostration.  The water at Minneapolis also affected him as it did a great many others.  The death scene took place in the great brownstone mansion of the McCormick family on Rush street, Chicago.  Mrs. Emmons Blaine and her two year old son McCormick Blaine were the only persons present besides Mrs. Cyrus McCormick, young Mrs. Blaine’s mother.  Death came so swiftly that there was no time to summon the other members of the McCormick family, who were in the house at the time.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Sidney Dillon

Sidney Dillon, the Pacific Railroad magnate, died at New York the other day.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

George F. Gilson

George F. Gilson, the inventor, died a few days ago at Kalamazoo, Mich., aged 60 years.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Henry F. Formad

Dr. Henry F. Formad, an eminent pathologist and microscopist of Philadelphia, died suddenly a few days ago of cholera-morbus, aged 45 years.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Father Mollinger

Rev Father Mollinger, the famous priest and physician died near Pittsburg last Wednesday a few hours after undergoing an operation for a rupture of the stomach.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

James S. Rutan

Ex Senator James S. Rutan died early last Saturday morning.  He was 54 or(64) years of age and had been a member of the State Senate for three terms besides holding other important offices by appointment.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Cyrus S. Haldeman

Cyrus S. Haldeman died in Boston on Thursday.  He was 65 years old and was the personal friend of James Buchanan, and worked in his interests during his campaign.  When the Rebellion broke out Mr. Haldeman was editor of the Philadelphia Record.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Orrin Smith

Mrs. Orrin Smith, of Sullivan, did the family washing one day and died the next day.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Starr L. Barber

Mrs. Starr L. Barber, a former resident of Covington, died very suddenly at her home in Bradford, McKean county, last Thursday.  She was 45 years of age.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Mary Burdick

Mrs. Mary Burdick, wife of F. Burdick, died at her home in Elkland last week Monday of malignant scarlet-fever.  She was 24 years of age.  The remains were taken to Sylvania, Bradford county, for interment.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Mary Babcock

Mary Davenport, wife of Mr. Oliver P. Babcock, died at her home in Elkland on the 12th instant after a sickness of nearly six months.  Mrs. Babcock was born 48 years ago on the farm where she died, and she had lived there all her life.  She was the youngest daughter of the late Colonel Davenport, one of the pioneers of the Cowanesque valley, and she was married to O. P. Babcock, July 5, 1863(?).  A husband and two sons survive her--Charles Babcock, a successful merchant at Nelson, and Oliver Babcock, a lad of 10 years.  Mrs. Babcock was a generous, noble-hearted woman, faithful in all the duties of life, and her many deeds of charity, will long be remembered in that neighborhood.  She had been a great sufferer for nearly a year past with a dropsically affection superinduced by an attack of the grip, and her death was not unexpected.  The funeral was held in the Presbyterian church on Tuesday, Rev. Dr. Moon preaching the sermon, and the remains were laid in the family plot in Fairview cemetery in Osceola.  (Tuesday, June 22, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. E. A. Van Valkenburg

Mrs. E. A. Van Valkenburg died this morning at the home of her mother, Mrs. A. D. Spalding, on Central avenue.  She was 25 years of age.  She had been a great sufferer for a long time with a disease which was thought to be catarrh of the stomach.  For days she had hovered between life and death; but her mind was clear, and with remarkable philosophy she arranged the details of her funeral, disposed of her keepsakes, and left instructions about the care of her young daughter.  She also requested an autopsy, that others might perhaps be benefited.  She was a woman of strong character and was greatly beloved by a large circle of friends.  The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 4 o’clock at Mrs. Spaulding’s residence.  (Tuesday, June 29, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Child Lloyd

The 16 months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Lloyd died last Wednesday evening of brain fever.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Mary Morse

Last Friday Mary, wife of Mr. Willard C. Morse, President of the Chemung Valley Tobacco Growers Association, died at her home in Painted Post, NY, after being sick 18 months with lung disease.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. William B. Stowell

Mrs. William B. Stowell died at her home in Delmar last Monday morning, of cancer.  She had been in poor health for some time, but she was not considered dangerously sick  until a few days before her death.  She was 59 years of age.  The funeral is to be held this afternoon.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Miss Clara R. Leonard

Miss Clara R. Leonard, aged 17 years, whose parents live at Jackson Summit, was found dead in her bed at the house of James Collins, in Elmira, NY, last week Monday morning.  She had taken an overdose of laudanum to relieve toothache, and it is believed that she died from the effects of the drug.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Charles G. Denison

Mr. Charles G. Denison, a well-known citizen of Corning, NY, who had an extensive acquaintance in this county, died very suddenly last Saturday morning of muscular rheumatism.  Mr. Denison had been complaining for two weeks, but his condition was not considered serious.  On Thursday he spoke of acute pain around his heart, but on Friday he felt much better and retired that night in good spirits.  Very early on Saturday morning he called his daughter and said that he was again suffering with the pain near his heart.  Before a physician could be summoned Mr. Dennison died.  Charles G. Denison was 63 years of age.  He was born in Montrose, Susquehanna county, and when he was 20 years of age he went to Corning, and with the exception of two years spent in Tioga he resided in Corning the rest of his life.  He was first employed as a clerk in a store, then he became part owner of a mill, and for the past 30 years he had been engaged in the management of the wholesale and retail coal business and the warehouse.  Mr. Denison was a genial, enterprising and sagacious man, and he was successful in business and very popular among his fellows.  He was Canal Collector in 1877 and 1878 and for 20 years he had been a member of the Corning Board of Education.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Archibald D. Knox

Mr. Archibald D. Knox, a resident of Deerfield, was stricken with paralysis on the evening of the 23d ultimo while engaged in milking.  He lingered until the evening of the 25th, when he died.  He was 71 years of age.  Mr. Knox was widely known and much esteemed.  He was superintendent of the county poorhouse in 1879, and he had held with credit several local offices.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Miss Mary A. Bernaner

Last Wednesday Miss Mary A., daughter of Samuel and Catharine Bernaner, died at the home of her parents in Delmar.  Her disease was consumption and she had been sick a long time.  She was 36 years of age.  The funeral service was conducted by Rev. A. C. Shaw, D. D., last Friday afternoon.  The floral offerings were numerous and beautiful.  The father and sister of this excellent young woman have the earnest sympathy of many friends.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

John Robson

Hon. John Robson, Premier of British Columbia, died in London last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Albert Bigelow

Rev. Albert Bigelow, of Buffalo, died in Harrisburg last week.  He was a musician, painter, poet and historian as well as preacher.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Nettie Colburn Maynard

Mrs. Nettie Colburn Maynard died at White Plains, NY, last week.  She had a national reputation as a Spiritualistic medium, and was the author of the book entitled: “Was Abraham Lincoln a Spiritualist?” which attracted wide attention.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Henry Weld Fuller

Henry Weld Fuller, a druggist and a scientific chemist and microscopist, and only brother of Chief-Justice Fuller, died at New Rochelle, NY, last week Tuesday, at the age of 61 years.  His native place was Augusta, Me., and his business life was mainly spent in Chicago.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Charles Cullis

Dr. Charles Cullis, who died in Boston a few days ago, was noted for his philanthropic enterprises, among which were the Grove Hall Consumptives’ Home, a Cancer hospital at Walpole, Mass., and city missions and coffee-rooms.  The doctor was a believer in the power of healing in answer to prayer, and many stories were told of the recovery of his patients.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Justus B. Clark

At Mansfield, Pa., June 24, 1892, Mr. Justus B. Clark, aged 92 years, 4 months and 20 days.  (Tuesday, July 6, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. James L. Coon

Mrs. James L. Coon died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Sumner M. Copp, on East avenue, last Wednesday.  Mrs. Coon had been in poor health for some time, and on Sunday she was stricken with paralysis and rapidly declined until the hour of her death.  Mrs. Coon was 57 years of age.  She was a most estimable woman.  She leaves three children, Mrs. A. V. Pierce, of Genoa, IL, Mrs. S. M. Copp, of this borough, and C. J. Coon, of Corning.  The funeral was held on Friday morning, Rev. O. S. Chamberlayne conducting the service, and the remains were taken to Corning, NY, her former home, for interment.  (Tuesday, July 13, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Sophia Seeley

Last Thursday evening Sophia, wife of Mr. Charles M. Seeley, died at her home on Grant street.  Mrs. Seeley was unconscious for 10 days before her death, her ailment being an acute form of Bright’s disease.  Her age was 37 years.  Mrs. Seeley’s maiden name was Bullard, she being the eldest daughter of the late M. Bullard, of this borough.  She was an excellent woman and a devoted wife and mother.  She leaves seven children, the oldest 18(or 16) years of age and the youngest four weeks old.  The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon, when Rev. Dr. A. C. Shaw read the Episcopal burial service.  Mrs. Seeley was a member of St. Paul’s Church.  (Tuesday, July 13, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Brewster H. Vance

Mr. Brewster H. Vance died at his home in Mansfield last week Sunday morning after a lingering illness, aged about 72 years.  He was unable to take nourishment of any kind for more than two weeks before his death.  He leaves a wife and three sons.  (Tuesday, July 13, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. John W. Bailey

Yesterday morning about 7 o’clock Mr. John W. Bailey died very suddenly at his home on Pearl street in this borough.  Although he had not been feeling well for several days his condition was not considered alarming and his death was quite unexpected by his friends.  He had been in failing health for a year or more, but since is return from the Democratic National Convention at Chicago he had not been feeling as well as usual.  His trouble was of a dropsical nature, and he suffered from insomnia.  However, he was able to ride about town and greet his friends in his accustomed genial why as late as last Sunday afternoon.  On Sunday he was troubled in breathing and went out for a ride.  His physician was called and administered an opiate for his sleeplessness.  Mr. Bailey rested well during the night and until nearly noon.  On Monday afternoon he began to suffer from pain in the abdomen.  His condition soon became more alarming, and he seemed to realize, and so expressed himself, that the end was near.  He passed peacefully away, retaining his faculties to the last.  In the death of Mr. Bailey this borough loses one of its most genial and public spirited citizens.  He always had a warm, kindly greeting for his friends, and he was always prompt to second with his energies and his means any enterprise for the advancement of the business interests of the borough.  Mr. Bailey was nearly 68 years of age.  He was born on a farm in Charleston, which still belongs to his estate, November 27, 1824.  He was the eldest of five children of Roswell Bailey, who was one of the pioneers at Dartt Settlement.  His father took up a tract of land, and John helped to clear up the place and make the homestead.  On Christmas in 1843 he married Margaret Lewis, and they lived together for 40 years.  She died in the fall of 1883.  They had 12 children, and 10 of the number lived to an adult age.  For a number of years Mr. Bailey was extensively engaged in buying cattle, and he was very successful in that business.  He made an extensive acquaintance among the residents of this and Adjoining counties during this time.  In 1870 Mr. Bailey left his farm and moved to this borough, where he resided for the rest of his life.  On November 28, 1889, Mr. Bailey married Mrs. Julia McClelland, of Jersey Shore, who survives him.  Mr. Bailey was a member of the firm Bailey & Valkenburg, in the wagon and implement business, of Bailey, Borden & Co., lumber dealers, and of the Antrim Sand Company and  he was a partner in the ownership of considerable real estate in this region.  He had been a director of the First National Bank since its organization in 1864, and he was also a director in the Pine Creek Railway Company and one of the managers of the United Glass Company.  He was a member of the firm that established the large tannery at Stokesdale.  Politically, Mr. Bailey was a Democrat of the most stalwart stamp, and his loss will be severely felt by his local party associates.  It was as a district delegate that he attended the recent National Convention at Chicago.  Mr. Bailey leaves seven children--Mrs. Morgan L. Bacorn and Mr. E. L. Bailey, of this borough; Mr. Lloyd Bailey, of Albany, Ore; Morton S. Bailey, of Fairplay, Col; Leon O. and Fred. W. Bailey, of Indianapolis, Ind, and Miss Mildred Bailey, now at Leipsie, Germany.  The funeral is to be held tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock at the family residence.  (Tuesday, July 13, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Benjamin Sturdevant

Mr. Benjamin Sturdevant, of Nelson, who fell under the car-wheels and was crushed at Lawrenceville on the 4th, died from his injuries the next morning.  Sturdevant was a blacksmith, and he leaves a family.  (Tuesday, July 13, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Louisa B. Stowell

In Delmar, Pa., July 4, 1892, Louisa, wife of William B. Stowell, aged 59 years and 9 months.  (Tuesday, July 13, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. William VanDusen

Mr. William VanDusen died at his home in Farmington last Thursday after a long sickness.  He was 69 years of age.  He had resided in that township for nearly 60 years and he was a man greatly respected by all who enjoyed his acquaintance.  (Tuesday, July 20, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Ransom H. Guinnip

Mr. Ransom H. Guinnip died last Sunday at his home in Elmira, NY, at the age of 72 years.  He had been a merchant in Elmira for many years.  Several years ago he established a branch store in this borough which was managed by his son for some months and then discontinued.  (Tuesday, July 20, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. James Cudworth

Mr. James Cudworth of Sullivan, died last Saturday after a long sickness.  Mr. Cudworth was about 66 years of age.  He had been gradually failing in health for the past two years.  He was a leading Democrat in that part of the county and he held the office of Postmaster under President Cleveland.  Mr. Cudworth was a brother of Mrs. E. A. Fish, of this borough.  (Tuesday, July 20, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. F. A. Crew

Mr. F. A. Crew, foreman of McLain’s saw mill at Cedar Run, was killed last Friday evening by a log rolling over him.  Mr. Crew was working at the bottom of the incline and a large log was going up.  The cable broke and its load came down with a crash burying Mr. Crew underneath its weight.  His fellow workmen who saw the accident, hurried to his assistance, but when he was removed he was unconscious and died shortly afterwards.  He was a prominent citizen of Bellefonte, to which place his remains were taken Saturday.  He left a wife and five children.  (Tuesday, July 20, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Carris Abels

In Farmington, Pa., at the home of James Abels, July 6, 1892, of consumption, Carris F., wife of Arthur Abels, aged 18 years, 10 months and 10 days.  Elmira papers please copy.  (Tuesday, July 20, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Ralph Lewis

At Elkland, Pa., July 10, 1892, of typhoid fever, Ralph Lewis, aged 19 years.  (Tuesday, July 20, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Thomas Cowley

Thomas Cowley, whose home was in Corning, died suddenly at Tioga last Sunday.  Cowley was a cigar-maker by trade and was 26 years of age.  The young man’s remains were taken to Corning on Monday.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Richard Marks

Mr. Richard Marks died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Helen Shay(?), at Youngstown, Ohio, on the 18th instant after a sickness of nine months.  Mr. Marks was born in Schoharie county, NY, May 8, 1808(?).  He moved to Farmington, in this county, in 1862(?).  For most of the time for the past 20 years he had resided with his daughter in Ohio.  The remains were brought back to Farmington and laid beside those of his wife, who died in 1867.  Besides his daughter, Mr. Marks leaves one son, R. T. Marks, a prominent physician at Erie, Pa.  Both his children were present at the interment last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Margaret Sticket

Mrs. Margaret Sticket died at Elkland last week Tuesday of cholera morbus, at the age of nearly 62 years.  The Journal says that Mrs. Sticket was as well as usual up to the Saturday before her death, when she went berrying.  She traveled some distance from home and when passing through a pasture lot she was ordered out, with the threat that she would be shot if she made another visit thereto.  The shock to her nervous system was so great that soon after reaching home she was prostrated and medical aid was summoned.  The physician, however, found other symptoms for her sick and pronounced it cholera morbus.  Mrs. Sticket was a native of Germany.  She had resided at Osceola and recently at Elkland.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Fred. W. Moore

Fred. W. Moore, a well-known Bradford oil-producer, committed suicide a few days ago by shooting himself through the head with a revolver.  Money losses by speculation and domestic difficulties are said to be the cause.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Truman Conover

Truman, the nine year old son of Merritt Conover, residing about a mile north of Corning, near Walker’s mills, fell from a load of hay on his father’s farm last Thursday.  He landed directly behind the horses’ feet and was fatally injured by a kick from the horses.  His skull was fractured in several places, the bone being depressed over an inch in some places.  He died soon after the accident.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Rosel Gile

Last Wednesday morning Mr. Rosel Gile died very suddenly at his home on Marsh creek.  He was 62 years of age.  Mr. Gile had the grip last winter and he did not fully recover.  On Tuesday evening he took a dose of morphine and went to bed and slept heavily.  On Wednesday morning his family found it impossible to rouse him, and he soon after passed away.  It is supposed that he took an overdose of the morphine.  Mr. Gile was born in Vermont.  He came to Crooked Creek with his father’s family when he was but eight years of age.  For many years he was engaged in farming in Charleston and Richmond townships.  Five years ago he bought a farm on Marsh creek where he had since resided.  The funeral was held last Friday, and it was largely attended.  The remains were interred in the cemetery in this borough.  Mr. Gile leaves a widow and one son, Mr. Walter Gile, groceryman at Eau Claire, Wis., and one daughter, Mrs. Eva Mitchell, of Philadelphia.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Martha Tuttle

At Canoe Camp, Pa., July 17, 1892, Martha, wife of H. H. Tuttle(?), aged 62 years.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Thomas Cook

Thomas Cook, the founder of Cook’s excursions, is dead at the age of 84.  He died last week at his home in Stonycroft, Leicester, England.  He had amassed a large fortune by his peculiar vocation.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Rose Terry Cooke

Rose Terry Cooke, one of New England’s leading literary women, died at Pittsfield, Mass., last week of congestion of the lungs.  She was a native of Hartford, Conn., and was in her 66th year.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Fraser C. Fuller

Dr. Fraser C. Fuller, a well-known physician and medical writer, died last week at his home in New York city.  The Doctor who was 31 years of age, recently lost a suit for divorce he brought against his 19 year old wife, Lizzie Holland Hastings, a California girl who inherited $1,000,000.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Charles D. Scudder

Dr. Charles D. Scudder, son in law of ex Senator Evarts, committed suicide at Northport, L. I., last week by stabbing.  He was 35 years of age and had been suffering from nervous prostration caused by over study.  His wife formerly Louisa Evarts, and her 7 year old daughter were at Mr. Evart’s home in Windsor, Vt.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Samuel H. May

Lieut. Samuel H. May of the United States Navy, committed suicide last week in the United Service Club in New York city, by shooting himself behind the right ear with a 38-caliber revolver.  He died almost instantly.  Temporary aberration of the mind is given as the cause.  Lieut. May was born in New Hampshire 45 years ago.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Thomas Cooper

Thomas Cooper, the English chartist, who died a few days ago, began to agitate for extended suffrage and various popular reforms half a century ago.  In 1842 he was imprisoned for lecturing at the Leicester potteries during the riots for in those days anyone who taught the masses doctrines of political equality was deemed by the ruling class a public enemy.  Cooper was born in 1804 and while a shoemaker’s apprentice he taught himself Latin, Greek, French and Hebrew.  During his later life he wrote fiction poetry, travels religious and economic essays in abundance.  As a lecturer he was for years a familiar figure on popular platforms.  (Tuesday, July 27, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

George K. Sistare

George K. Sistare, formerly a well-known broker, committed suicide at the Manhattan Club-house in New York last week.  He was 50 years of age and his firm was under a could on account of its failure in 1890.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Male Masten

The four year old son of Dr. N. W. Masten died yesterday afternoon of diphtheria.  The funeral is to be held this morning at 10 o’clock.  Miss Lottie Masten is recovering from an attack of the same disease.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Ezra Bowen

Mr. Ezra Bowen died suddenly at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Gleason, in Knoxville, last week Tuesday morning.  He was nearly 75 years of age.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Harris Fowler

Harris, the 14 year old son of Rev. F. K. Fowler, was drowned near Olean, NY, a few days ago.  While he was attending a Sunday-school picnic, he went in bathing with his younger brother and several companions and got into deep water.  Rev. Mr. Fowler was formerly pastor of the Blossburg Baptist Church.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Morris Verrill

Morris, the eight year old son of Prof. and Mrs. Charles Verrill, of Little Falls, NY, died very suddenly a few days ago while visiting with his father at Franklin, NY.  The child was sick only two days, and the case was so peculiar that the physicians were baffled.  The case was not considered alarming until just before the lad’s death.  The remains, together with those of an infant who died several years ago, were brought to Mansfield for interment.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Katharine Quinn Keating

Mrs. Katherine Quinn Keating, who lived in Chester county, died a few days ago, at the remarkable age of 104.  She was a native of Ireland, and until four weeks ago was able to take care of herself.  Paralysis caused her death.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Elizabeth Helser

Mrs. Elizabeth Helser, of Corning, NY, aged 73 years, was struck and killed by an Erie train a short distance west of Painted Post a few days ago.  She was picking coal on the track and did not see the train in time to step out of its way.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. S. W. Paine

Mr. S. W. Paine, an old and respected citizen of Troy, Bradford county, died a few days ago.  He was at one time one of the foremost business men of Troy, owning and running an extensive foundry and machine-shop.  Out of respect to his memory, all business was suspended in Troy during the funeral services.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

John F. Raney

John F. Raney, aged 16, of Pardoe, Mercer county, was killed by lightning, a few days ago, while building a load of hay which his father and grandfather were pitching on the wagon.  The men were slightly stunned, and one horse was knocked down.  The boy was struck on the left side of the head, the bolt running down his left side and tearing the clothes from his body.  (Tuesday, August 3, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Charlotte Campbell

Mrs. Charlotte Campbell died in Delmar on the 2d instant at the age of 68 years.  Her funeral last Thursday was attended by six sons and their wives and six daughters and their husbands.  She left 29 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, nearly all of whom were present.  Mrs. Campbell was a member of the Delmar Freewill Baptist Church.  Rev. O. C. Hills conducted the funeral service.  (Tuesday, August 10, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

James Curley

Last Friday morning the dead body of a man was found by the roadside near Och’s brewery in Tioga.  The body was taken to the undertaker’s and Coroner A. Niles was summoned.  At the inquest it was ascertained that the dead man’s name was James Curley and that his relatives reside in Corning.  He had been a hard drinker and had been on a spree since the 4th of July.  He was seen going along the road on Thursday evening in a drunken condition, and some children had noticed him sleeping by the roadside at the place where his body was found the next morning.  The Coroner’s jury rendered a verdict that the man’s death was caused by alcoholism.  (Tuesday, August 10, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. George Gernet

Mr. George Gernet, of Troy, Bradford county, was instantly killed on the Northern Central railroad track half a mile above Roaring Branch last week Tuesday evening.  He was walking on the track, and the express train struck him.  It was quite dark and the engineer did not discover the man until the engine was fairly upon him.  The train was running at the rate of 40 miles an hour, and Gernet was thrown 75 feet, by actual measurement, from the place of the collision.  When found he was without anything on his feet.  Investigation developed the fact that he had been thrown clear out of his boots by the force of the shock.  The boots were both found near the place where the engine had struck him.  Strange as it may seem, a pint bottle of whisky was found intact in his inside coat-pocket.  (Tuesday, August 10, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Miss Nellie Duvall

At Elkland, Pa., July 25, 1892, of cholera infantum, Nellie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Duvall, aged 19(?) months and 17 days.  (Tuesday, August 10, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Henry E. Heise

At the house of D. W. Heise, in Wellsboro, Pa., August 7, 1892, Henry E., son of John W. Heise, aged 19 years, 11 months and 4 days.  (Tuesday, August 10, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. F. I. DeWitt

Mr. F. I. DeWitt, a destitute quack doctor, died at Mixtown in Clymer township last Saturday, at the age of 70 years.  He was buried at the expense of the county.  (Tuesday, August 17, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Joseph Riberolle

Last Wednesday evening Mr. Joseph Riberolle died at his home on Main street in this borough.  He had been failing in strength for some time and his death was therefore not unexpected.  He was 82 years of age.  Mr. Riberolle was born June 11, 1810, on a farm near Clermont in the eastern part of France, and he was one of a large family of children.  While he was yet a lad he learned the tanner’s trade, and as soon as he became of age he started for America.  He remained in New York city for a time, where he was married, but in a few years he bought a tannery at Washington Rock, NJ.  There his wife died, and in 1847 he came to this borough and built a tannery at the intersection of Main and Charleston streets.  Soon after coming here he was married again, but his wife lived only a short time.  In 1851 he married Miss Elizabeth Titus, who survives him at the age of 80 years.  Mr. Riberolle conducted his business here successfully until 1881, when he sold out to Mr. John Gisin and retired with a well-earned competency.  Since that time until too feeble to get about he enjoyed a green old age; being genial, cheerful and bright in intellect--a man whom it was a pleasure to meet socially.  Mr. Riberolle was a man of strict integrity in all his dealings with men, and his memory is honored by the whole community.  The funeral was held last Friday morning and was largely attended.  The members of Tyoga Lodge and the Wellsboro Encampment of Odd Fellows attended in a body and conducted the burial service of their honored brother.  Rev. O. S. Chamberlayne led the religious service.  Mr. Riberolle leaves four children, namely:  Mrs. George Bower, of Elmira, NY, Mrs. M. V. Purple, of Academy Corners, and Mrs. Frank Sears, of Sabinsville, who were daughters by his first wife, and Mr. George P. Riberolle, of this borough, the only child of his surviving widow.  (Tuesday, August 17, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. E. Hulslander

Mr. E. Hulslander died at his home at Somers Lane a few days ago.  Of a family of 10 brothers and sisters only one survives him.  Mr. Hulslander was 75 years of age.  He was the father of 11 children, six of whom are now living.  His wife is also surviving.  She had been his helpmate for nearly half a century.  Mr. Hulslander was a genial man who always had a cheerful greeting for every one.  It is said of him that he never turned a hungry person from his door.  The funeral was largely attended by mourning neighbors and relatives.  (Tuesday, August 17, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Josephine R. Morris

At Galion, Ohio, August 10, 1892, Josephine R., wife of James W. Morris and daughter of the late Rev. Edward C. and Almira Ambler, formerly of Danbury, Conn.  (Tuesday, August 17, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Katharine Rees Richards

Mrs. Katharine Rees Richards, wife of Capt. R. G. Richards, died at her home in Steubenville, Ohio, on the 9th instant.  She was born in Charleston township in 1843.  November 22, 1865, Miss Rees married Capt. Richards, and in 1867 they moved to Irondale, Ohio, where they reside for some years.  She had many warm friends in this county.  (Tuesday, August 24, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Franklin Boose

Mr. Franklin Boose, of Delmar, died yesterday at the age of 33 years.  (Tuesday, August 24, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Patrick Hallihan

Last Monday morning as express train No. 1 bound south drew up to the water tank about 30 rods from the Hammond flag station in Middlebury, young Patrick Hallihan stepped on the platform to ride up to the station, where he intended to jump off.  The train started up and before it was under full headway it reached the platform, and Hallihan jumped.  He was seen to strike the platform and fall backward and disappear under the passenger coach.  Those in the rear of the car felt a jolt as the wheels of the rear truck crushed the unfortunate man, and in an instant he was seen lying across the rails after the train had passed.  A passenger pulled the bell-cord and the train was stopped.  Many of the passengers ran back to the spot and found Halliahan with both legs cut off near the hips, but still alive and conscious, uttering a prayer.  He was picked up and taken to the station, where he died in about five minutes after the accident.  Young Hallihan was about 18 years of age, and he was a son of Mr. William Halliahan, the section-boss at Hammond.  He was a bright young man, and for some time he had been engaged in learning telegraphy at the station.  It is stated that he had frequently boarded trains and jumped off on this platform while they were moving at a much greater speed than the express.  Just how he came to fall under the wheels will never be known.  The funeral is to be held in Elmira today.  (Tuesday, August 24, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Edgar Smith

Edgar Smith, a lad who lived at Yeagertown, Mifflin county and ten other boys went on the mountains recently to gather huckleberries.  A large rattlesnake bit young Smith twice.  His companions ran home to bring aid and when found again the unfortunate boy was unconscious.  He died five hours after being bitten.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Madame Trebeth

Madame Trebeth, the well known singer, died in France the other day.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Dr. Thomas F Wood

Dr. Thomas F. Wood, one of the most prominent physicians in North Carolina, died last week.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Ex Chief Justice Bermudez

Ex Chief Justice Bermudez of the Supreme Court of Louisiana died in New Orleans last week.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Marshal Deodora da Fonseca

Marshal Deodora da Fonseca, the 1st President of the Republican of Brazil, died at Rio Janero last week.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

E Louis Lowe

E Louis Lowe, ex Governor of Maryland, died at his home in Brooklyn, NY last week aged 70 years.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Hon. Myron H. Clark

Hon. Myron H Clark, who was the first Republican Governor of New York, died in Canandaigua last week, aged 86.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

The Duke of Manchester

The Duke of Manchester who was widely and unfavorably known as Lord Mandeville, died in Ireland a few days ago.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Chief Justice Irving

Chief Justice Irving of the First Judicial Circuit Court of Maryland, died at his home in Princess Anne last Wednesday, aged 64 years.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Prince Charles A Perkins

Prince Charles A Perkins, formerly Secretary of Legation at Stockholm and Consul at Barcelona who married Princess Maria Isabella of the Spanish royal family was found dead in his chair of heart disease at Syracuse one day last week.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Infant Parks

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Parks who resides near the Brewster school house, mourn the death of their infant child, who died on Sunday evening of whooping cough.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Jacob S. Wainwright

Mr. Jacob S. Wainwright died very suddenly at his home in Knoxville last Sunday morning of neuralgia of the heart.  His age was 68 years.  Mr. Wainwright appeared to be in his usual health when he returned on Saturday evening.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Myron Stratton

An accident occurred on the Tun Grays Run railroad on the Proctor lumber job in Lycoming county a few days ago by which Engineer Myron Stratton was killed and Fireman George Horning was seriously injured.  From the facts learned it appears that as the locomotive was starting from the top of the incline the engineer lost control of his train by the brake gearing getting out of the order.  The train rushed down the hill at a rapid rate and the engine left the rails and landed in a ditch alongside the track.  Engineer Stratton was caught beneath the engine and life was almost instantly crushed out of him.  When found he had one hand on the throttle and the other on the brake lever.  Fireman Horning was thrown to the opposite side of the engine from Stratton and was seriously injured.  He was also badly scalded.  The engine was badly wrecked.  Stratton was 64 years old and was a resident of Blossburg.  Fireman Horning is 27 years of age and his home is in Blossburg where his widowed mother resides.  His condition is reported as being favorable for his ultimate recovery.  While Engineer Stratton was employed by the Fall Brook road several years ago an engine he was running ran away and plunged into Seneca lake at Watkins.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. L. A. Ridgway

Mrs. L. A. Ridgway formerly of Mansfield, died at her home in Spencer, NY, a few days ago.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. F. D. McNaughton

In Westfield, Pa., August 18(?), 1892, Mrs. F. D. McNaughton.  (Tuesday, August 31, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Dr. L. S. Townsend

Dr. L. S. Townsend, a well-known physician of Covington, died last Friday of apoplexy.  (Tuesday, September 7, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Elias Tipple

Mr. Elias Tipple, a prominent citizen of Charleston, died last week Monday.  He was 74 years of age.  Mr. Tipple was a prosperous farmer, an intelligent citizen and a good man.  He leaves a widow and two sons.  (Tuesday, September 7, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. John J. Burgin

Last Wednesday evening Mr. John J. Burgin, an aged and well-known citizen of this borough, died at his home on Hastings street.  He was about 74 years of age, and he had been in failing health for some time.  Mr. Burgin was born in Basel, Switzerland.  He was a baker by trade, and he came to this place and established a business about 25 years ago.  About two years ago he sold out his bakery and confectionery store here on account of his poor health.  The family moved to Corning, where his daughter Minnie conducted “The Candy Kitchen.”  Last April, when the establishment was burned, Mr. Burgin was sick, and the excitement and exposure during the fire had a serious effect upon him.  He returned here in June and had been steadily failing since.  Mr. Burgin leaves a widow, three daughters and two sons.  The funeral was held at the family residence last Saturday.  (Tuesday, September 7, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Male Snyder

Last Wednesday a barn on the place of Mrs. Lizzie Snyder, at Salladasburg, was destroyed by fire.  Two children of Mrs. Snyder, a boy aged 4 years and a girl aged 7 years, were playing in the buyonow(?) at the time the flames broke out.  The little girl managed to make her escape, but the boy was not so fortunate and was burned to death.  After the fire had burned out, the charred remains of the little fellow were found in the ruins.  The barn was completely destroyed.  The origin of the fire is not known, but it is the supposition that the children started the fire while at play.  (Tuesday, September 7, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Talton Hall

Talton Hall, said to have killed at least 40 men, was hanged at Richmond, Va., last Friday.  (Tuesday, September 7, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Ellsworth Beach

Chatham, September 5.---Ellsworth Beach, only son of Curry E. Beach, died suddenly at 9 o’clock last Thursday morning.  He had been afflicted with fits from his infancy, which affected his mind somewhat, but he appeared to be in robust health.  About a week ago he commenced having fits more frequently and during the last 13 hours of his life he suffered from 45.  His last evening on earth was spent in doing his chores as usual.  He was 27 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 7, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. Russell Brigden

Mr. Russell Brigden died on Friday, and his funeral was held yesterday.  He was a great sufferer from Bright’s disease.  He leaves a widow and six adult children.  (Tuesday, September 7, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mr. John Greenleaf Whittier

Peaceful Close of a beautiful life---from the plow and the cobbler’s bench to the temple of the muse‘.---John Greenleaf Whittier, the poet of Freedom, died at 4:30 o’clock last Wednesday morning at Hampton Falls, NH.  About 3 pm on Tuesday unfavorable symptoms became apparent and unconsciousness followed.  The patient continued in this condition through the night gradually sinking until the end.  The funeral took place at Amesbury, Mass., at 2:30 pm on Saturday.  According to the Quaker custom, the services were very simple, and no sermon was preached.  The New York Press gives the following sketch of the poets pure and blameless life.  A pure, clean soul went to its reward when the Quaker poet---the “Hermit of Amesbury”--breathed his last.  It was in the little village of Haverhill, Mass, on December 17, 1807 that John Greenleaf Whittier first saw the light.  His early life and surroundings gave no indication that he would be loved and admired for his genius as few men have been soon after he reached his majority.  Whittier came of old Quaker stock his ancestors being among the Friends who came to this country in 1638 only to suffer persecution at the hands of the Puritans in Plymouth.  His descent can be traced on the paternal side to Thomas Whittier or Whittle, as the name was then written who settled in Haverhill and on the maternal side to Christopher Hussey(?), a member of one of the most widely known Nantucket families.  His father was a farmer and the boy followed the plow, handled the scythe and hoe and worked in the wood lot like any other ordinary farmers boy.  He attended the district school in winter and during his early youth learned shoe-making.  His first poetic inspiration was awakened at 14 by a copy of Burns’s poems and his early attempts to follow the muse were crude imitations of the famous Scotch bard.  Of this period of his life he said many years later.  I was a callow youth when I first began to rhyme a mere strippling who loved the song of the bird while I was hoeing in the cornfield and often paused in my work of planting potatoes to think of the far away East.  My first poem The Diety was published in the Newbury port Free Press edited by William Lloyd Garrison.  The manuscript was taken from my room by my sister and given to John Morse the paper-carrier who was told to place the copy in Garrison’s office and preserve the utmost secrecy regarding its author.  He did so and when the paper reached me I was working in the field.  I was transfixed with delight when I saw that my poem was published.  It was one of the happiest moments in my life.  He was then 17.  At 20 he had earned enough money at the shoemaker’s bench to pay for six months tuition at the Haverhill Academy and by teaching the district school during the following winter he earned enough money to pay for another six months term at the Academy.  In life, long friendshiop of Whittier and William Lloyd Garrison leg in while the poet was a mere youth.  Garrison was in 1826(?) conducting an Abolitionist paper called the Free Press in Newbury port and some verses submitted by young Whittier for publication led to his introduction to the poet Garrison sought out the author of the poem that had attracted his attention and found young Whittier at the cobbler’s bench.  He told Whittier of the unusual promise he had detected in his versus and urged him to continue writing poetry.  Other versus attracted more wide spread attention and Judge Pickering of Salem and a party of ladies called at the farm house to see the young poet.  He was then as he afterward said an awkward boy of 17 and when they arrived at the house he was under the barn looking for eggs.  His appearance as he came up with his hat full of eggs was anything but that of a disciple of the muse.  They came to see the Quaker poet he said and they found him.  Whittier soon after the incident became a regular contributor to Garrison’s journal and to other Abolitionist papers.  He became in 1829 editor of the American(?) Manufacturer and later he took editorial charge of the New England Weekly Reader(?) and of the (-----) whose publication office was burned and (?) by a mob on account of its anti slavery utterances.  Whittier was as strong as his friend Garrison in his Abolitionist views and his poetry was full of his anti slavery opinions.  On this account as he himself says.  For twenty years my name would have injured the circulation of any literary or political journal.  In 1835(?) he represented his fellow townsmen in the lower branch of the State Legislature.  Five years later he removed from the village of his ancestors to Amesbury, a hamlet with which his name has ever since been identified as the Hermit of Amesbury.  Here his poetical work was resumed with greater productiveness after his retirement from active work in which he had had little time for persistently courting the muse.  His first volume Legends of New England, had appeared in 1831 and his second Songs of Labor, was published in 1851.  Snow Bound came out in 1866.  During the period of the civil war Whittier’s literary activity was at its best and he poured out verse after verse of anti slavery poetry singing the song of freedom for the slave before the Emancipation Proclamation was written.  Some of his early poems were published as follows Megg Megone(?) (1836), Lays of My Home (1848?), The Stranger in Lowell (1849?), the Supernatural in New England (1847), The Bridal of Pennacook (1849), Songs of Labor (1850?) and Old Portraits of Modern Sketches (1851?).  Whittier never married.  He was a Quaker and the simple quiet life of his later years at his favorite Oak Knoll led to his being known as a hermit.  Among his best known poems are Lays of My Home and Other Poems published in 1848.  Old Portraits and Modern Sketches 1850(?), Home Ballads and Poems 1860, Snow Bound 1862, In War Time and Other Poems 1863, The Tent on the Beach 1867, Among the Hills 1868, Hazel Blossoms 1864(?), The Vision of Echard, The Kings Missive, Bay of Seven Islands and Poems of Nature published more recently. Whittier’s friends among whom were all of the prominent literary men of his times loved him as much for the simplicity and purity of his character and life as for the beauty and melody of his works.  His themes were mainly chosen from his own beloved New England or from National issues like slavery and his convictions shone through them with out disguise.  In personal appearance Whittier was tall slender and erect.  His most striking feature was his deep-set flashing black eyes.  When he had passed his therescure years and ten his eyes retained their brilliancy and his form its vigor.  His mind remained undimmed till the end.  His strength had been gradually failing him for the past few years and he had been a great sufferer from acute neuralgia.  His quiet life was broken every year by the celebration by his friends of his birthday.  He received greetings from North and South alike as well as from abroad.  On his 80th birthday the colored people of the country met in his honor as their benefactor.  Only a few days ago Whittier wrote his congratulations to Oliver Wendell Holmes, the other great literary octogenarian on the occasion of his 83 birthday.  (Tuesday, September 14, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Mrs. Mary E. Richards

Last Sunday morning Mary E., wife of Mr. J. K. Richards, died at her home on Tioga street, her disease being consumption.  She was 42 years of age.  For many years she had suffered from asthma, and she had been an invalid for some time from the development of lung disease.  Mrs. Richards was a daughter of General and Mrs. R. C. Cox.  She was born in Liberty township, and on February 28, 1871, she was married.  The family moved to this place about 10 years ago.  Her husband survives her, and she leaves one daughter and one son.  Mrs. Richards was a woman of beautiful character, and she was devoted to her family and friends.  She was a faithful and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  The funeral was held yesterday afternoon, Rev. O. S. Chamberlayne conducting the service.  (Tuesday, September 14, 1892, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 08 November 2012
By Joyce M. Tice
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Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.