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1871- Luman Putnam of Granville
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1871 Diary of Luman Putnam of Granville
Transcribed by Betsy Shirk - bshirk2002@yahoo.com
Formatted and Published by Joyce M. Tice
Transcription copyright 2010 Betsy Shirk and Joyce M. Tice

1854 Diary and Introduction. Also access to many more LumanPutnam Diaries

Luman Putnam Jerusha Bailey, his first wife
L. Putnam

Granville Centre

Penna

Part One

January

Sunday, 1

Froze a little last night. The morning and the forenoon were cloudy, calm and mild, thawing a little; the afternoon was partially fair and quite pleasant; & the evening is also quite mild and being partially fair is favored with moonlight.

Bathed in the morning on rising as is my daily habit when at home, read some, and at the proper time went up to the Centre and attended meeting there, Br. Greenlaw officiating as the minister. Came away immediately after the conclusion, and after supper spent some time in making preparations for an early start tomorrow morning for Towanda, having business at the U. S. Collector’s office at Monroe, and the Register office at Towanda relating to the Stevens Estate; and intending to proceed from thence to Woburn in Mass. to pay off Mrs. Buell her share in the estate. In the evening Wallace and Theodore came in.

Monday, 2

The morning was cloudy and moderately cold. The sun shone some at intervals in the course of the day. The evening is colder & is quite cloudy.

Arose early in the morning and after breakfast started on my journey. Harvey sent his team and buggy to take me down to Monroeton, called at A. L. Cranmer’s, and learning that I could do no business there walked down to Towanda where I succeeded in finding officers to assess and receive the Internal Revenue tax on the Stevens Est. filed my final account at the Register’s office, and was then ready to proceed to Mass. to pay off Mrs. Buell. Waited until nearly night for a train then took a car for Waverly, arriving there after dark, and proceeding to the house of E. M. Clark I put up with him for the night.

Tuesday, 3

The morning was cloudy & quite cold. The sun shone out at intervals during the day. The evening is partially cloudy, bringing a flurry of snow. Continues cold.

According to arrangement I arose at an early hour without disturbing the family, and proceeded to the depot where I procured a through ticket for Boston for $12.50, and took the first train Binghampton. Arriving there I had to wait till afternoon for an Albany train. While waiting there a man was ran over by a train and was killed as I suppose, although he was alive when I saw him last. Went about the city some while I was waiting there, and between two and three o’clock in the afternoon took my seat in a car bound for Albany. Arriving at Otego some time after dark, I got off the train and called on my friend Theodore H. Briggs, & tarried over night.

Wednesday, 4

The morning was partially cloudy and was also quite cold. The same sort of weather continued through the day and evening, the sun shining occasionally, but producing no thawing.

After breakfast Mr. Briggs walked with me back to the station and waiting with me till the arrival of the first morning train, he took leave of me and I took a seat in a car and proceeded on my route to Albany. Arriving there in due time was carried across the city to the Union Depot in a carriage, and very soon thereafter went aboard of the Boston train, and proceeded, without delay in that direction. Passed on through Pittsfield and arriving at Springfield after dark, got off the train there and taking a hack was carried to No. 72 High St. & stopped with Geo. C. Buell.

Thursday, 5

This day, in regard to the weather, was very nearly of the same character as yesterday, except that the temperature was a little milder, especially in the evening.

After breakfast, George and Charles having gone to their places of business, walked down to Whitney’s Avenue where I found Mrs. Patterson, formerly Anne(?) Waters, with whom I remained to dinner. Returned to George’s and with Ellen started for the depot, calling on her sister Mrs. Garfield, on the way. We took a train for West Springfield, stopping with Mrs. Wells another sister of hers. Found George in the Agawarm(?) Paper Mill in that place, who showed me the whole establishment after which we all took tea with Mrs. Wells. We returned with George to his house in the city, where I took my baggage and my leave of Mrs. Buell and Ellen and in company with George walked down to Mr. Garfield’s where I staid over.

Friday, 6

The morning was fair and the weather quite moderate. The principal part of the day was cloudy and a moderate rain in the afternoon. The evening is some colder, and a moderate snow is falling.

After a pretty early breakfast I took my leave of Mrs. Garfield and started for the depot in company with Mr. Garfield who was going that way. Went aboard of an eastern train which took me into Boston; then took a carriage which, after some delay, took me across the city to the Lowell depot, and then after waiting an hour proceded on another train to Woburn Where I found Mrs. Buel, her son James, and his family in good health and glad to see me. I presented them a copy of my final account filed in Register’s office which showed a balance of $3045. in Mrs. Buel’s favor, handed over the funds & took a receipt in full.

Saturday, 7

The morning opened fair and the weather was considerably colder. The day was also fair, with a cold north west wind prevailing. The evening is quite cold.

Took an early train in the morning with James and went down to Boston, we then crossed over into Charlestown and visited the navy yard, going aboard of some of the Monitors lying there; then went up to the Bunker Hill Monument, going in and up to the top of it from whence we had a splendid view over the city and towns, and off at sea; we then went back into Boston and visited Faneuil Hall, the old "cradle of liberty"; went through Quincy Market, and down onto the old "long wharf" where the tea was thrown overboard; went into the U. S. Custom House, visited many other places of interest, and at night took passage back to Woburn.

Sunday, 8

A very freezing night, sharp morning, but very fair and pleasant, continuing till the middle of the day. Afternoon cloudy, and the extremely cold weather continues through the evening.

Spent the morning very agreeably with the family. In the course of a conversation at the breakfast table concerning the different churches in that place, Miss Hattie Mitchell, their hired girl declared herself to be a Baptist, and I having express leaning that way, Mr. Buel, at the proper hour, conducted me to the Baptist meeting. The house is of good size and style, and was very well filled, and the discourse was very good. In the evening we attended the meeting of the Congregationalists. Their house if very large and elegant, and is said to be capable of affording seats for 1500 persons. The audience was large and the lecture was quite interesting.

Monday, 9

The morning was fair but was considerably the coldest of the season. The weather continued fair and also very cold through the day. The evening is fair and bright but it remains very cold.

Intended to have renewed my journey this morning, but was persuaded to stay another day by James, who offered to go with me to Lexington, & show me the battle ground where the first revolutionary blood was shed. The distance from his house is about five miles. So, pretty soon after breakfast we set out in his carriage, to visit that famous place. Arriving there, we drove around the ground which is now converted into a triangular park in the center of the village, and on it is erected a monument commemorating the event, and giving the names of the slain. We returned by another road.

Tuesday, 10

The morning was fair and the weather was very cold. The fair cold weather continued through the day. The evening is cloudy without much abatement of the cold.

Friends tried to persuade me to make a longer stay with them & offered to go with me today to see the factories at Lowell but I could not consent. We had an early breakfast, and bidding the old lady and the family good by, I started for the depot with James, who was going as far as Boston with me. We took a seat and were soon there. Walking thro the city to the Providence depot I found I had left my fur collar & James agreed to send it to Middletown Conn. for me. I took my leave of him, & went aboard a train for Providence, R. I.; waited there some time & then took another train to New London Conn.; got off there & waiting for the next train, proceeded to Stoney Creek, & there stopped with Mr. & Mrs. Cook.

Wednesday, 11

The morning was cloudy, cold and uncomfortable, and weather of this character continued through the day. The evening is quite cloudy and dark and the temperature is much more mild and agreeable.

Had a very restless night on account of a violent cold I took yesterday in consequence, I suppose, of going out in the cold without my fur collar. Was quite unwell today and remained with my friends. Had a very sore throat and considerable pain in my head. Walked about the village a little, going down to the landing on the shore of the sound, which is now locked up with ice. Rhoda cooked some oysters for supper and made some excellent tea which caused me to feel considerably better. Spent the evening very agreeably with Mr. Cook & Rhoda, & her niece Isabel Wetherill who is there on a visit. Mr. Coe, Rhoda’s brother in law residing there called in the evening.

Thursday, 12

Rained a little in the night and afterward freezing, the ground was quite icy in the morning. The day was fair and the weather being more mild. There was considerable thawing. The evening is clear and bright.

Rested very well through the night and feeling very much better this morning concluded to proceed on my journey. Therefore, after an early breakfast bade Mr. Cook and Rhoda & Isabel good by, went to the depot and took my seat on a train and in a short time found myself at the city of New Haven. Having to wait an hour or two for a train, I walked out on to Elm and College streets and took a view of the buildings constituting Yale College. At the proper time took a seat on a train and proceded on the Air Line Road to Middlefield, & walking about a mile from the depot to Baileyville, stopped with Capt. Alfred Bailey.

Friday, 13

Another bright, beautiful morning which was the harbinger of a fair pleasant day. The thaw is making considerable progress, and the roads are becoming quite muddy. The evening is also fair.

Took breakfast with Captain Bailey and his wife, then went over and made a call at Roswell Bailey’s, returning to the Captain’s he went with me up to his son Alfred’s water works, then he returning, I called on Alfred at his house, and after looking at his domestic establishment, took took dinner with him; then taking my leave returned to the Captain’s for my satchell, bade them good by and went down to Mr. Hall’s, but finding nobody at home there and being in a hurry concluded to go on to Mr. Atkins’ where I arrived before night and stopped with them. Sent by Thomas to city & got my collar all right.

Saturday, 14

Froze a little in the course of the past night. Morning opened fair but was cloudy before noon. The afternoon was fair and the evening is partially cloudy. The weather continues mild and open, and, on the whole, is very agreeable.

Spent the day very agreeably with Mr. Atkins and his family, which now besides himself, consists of Mrs. Atkins; his sister Sally; his son Thomas; Osmin’s wife, Delia; her mother, Mrs. Knowlton; and Osmin’s son, the little Albert Sumner Atkins, seven members in all. Osmin is away in Florida this winter, seeking better health, leaving his particular family in his father’s charge. Thomas is engaged as teacher in the district school and boards at home, assisting his father about the chores &c. Mrs. Knowlton & Delia take care of the little boy & assist Mrs. A.

Sunday, 15

The morning was cloudy, the weather continuing mild & warm, not freezing any during the past night. The weather through the day was of the same character, and at night a rain storm commenced, continuing in the evening.

Remained in the house through the day, spending a portion of the time writing a letter to wife informing her and the friends at home of my success, my progress, any intended movements and my welfare; according to her request at the time I started from home. Intending to depart tomorrow morning for Great Barrington I improved the opportunity before me to finish my visit with Mr. Atkins and his interesting family. Mrs. Atkins and Thomas attended meeting in the city.

Monday, 16

The morning was quite rainy, continuing till towards noon, then clearing off the remainder of the day was quite pleasant. The evening is also fair and the weather mild though freezing a little.

Resisting all importunities for a longer stay I made arrangements for an early start this morning, and after taking my breakfast with the family I took my leave of them, and Mr. Atkins took me in a buggy to Rockfalls, the nearest R.R. Station, from whence I took a train on the Air Line for New Haven, and after a short stay there took another for Bridgeport, and immediately after my arrival there took a seat on a Housatonic train for Great Barrington where I arrived some time before night. Called on Wilcox at his shop & left my satchel, went to P.O. & delivered my letter & then went down to Geo. Harris’ & staid with them.

Tuesday, 17

The morning was fair and frosty, the day was mostly fair, the weather remaining quite mild and agreeable. Thawed considerable in the course of the afternoon. Fair weather continues through the evening, & it is freezing some again.

Remained with George and Evaline until towards noon then bidding them good by went back to Clark Wilcox’s and visited with them until the latter part of the day, and then, not intending to visit the village again, took my leave of them and started to walk up to my old friend Pelton’s, when having proceeded about half way there I discovered that I had left a part of my baggage at my last stopping place I started to go back after it, but concluding to return for it tomorrow, I proceeded on my way until I arrived at the old brick house where I found my friends well.

Wednesday, 18

The morning opened fair but was rather cold, the ground having frozen considerable in the course of the night. The weather continued fair through the day but was colder than yesterday, thawing but a little.

Had a good night’s rest and a very agreeable morning interview with my friends. After breakfast Mr. Pelton took me in his carriage and went with me to town. I called at Wilcox’s and got things I had left, then went to a clothing store and bought a pair of pantaloons of excellent quality for $5.50, having torn the pair I had on. Here I met Asa who appeared glad to see me. We then called on Mrs. Rood and and another daughter of Mr. Pelton who was there on a visit from North Adams. We were invited to come down there tomorrow and take dinner with them. We returned & then we walked over to VanDeusenville to see his new place.

Thursday, 19

The morning was a little cloudy but soon came off fair, and the weather through the day was fair and pleasant, and considerably less cold than yesterday. The evening is quite fair and only moderately cold.

Notwithstanding the kind and friendly treatment I everywhere received, I grew more and more anxious to move along towards home, and found it necessary to cut my visits short, and to forgo some of them entirely. I concluded that I must take the two o’clock train this afternoon for Albany, and therefore could not attend that two o’clock dinner at Mrs. Rood’s. So I had to resist the resist the remonstrances and importunities of my friends, and bidding them good by I left them to go to the village without me and I went over to VanDeusenville and waited for the train. I arrived at Albany at five o’clock took a ticket for Rochester, went on to Schenectady, got off there & waited for midnight train, so that I could get off at Clyde.

Friday, 20

Morning partially cloudy with a pretty cold southerly wind. The afternoon was quite cloudy and the weather more mild, thawing some. A storm commenced at night, and snow is falling moderately this evening.

Left Schenectady in the night at half past twelve o’clock on a western train, and continued my journey until after seven in the morning, at which time I got off at Clyde, got my breakfast and there being no stages to have there for the north, started off on foot, and going by the way of my former place of residence, I stopped at Roswell Marsh’s where rested some time and got some dinner, and then, rejecting their friendly offers, I left my satchel with them and resuming my walk I proceeded on to Benham’s where I found him, as I had expected, very sick with dropsey. All glad to see me.

Saturday, 21

A light covering of snow on the ground this morning, with snow continuing to fall moderately. Storm changed to rain in the course of the forenoon and soon thereafter ceased. Snowed again in the evening, with wind from the northwest.

Benham had a very restless, bad night, being filled up with water again. His daughter Clarissa is at home now, and his son Luman is with him, besides, Benham jr. and John and Charley. Andrew is with his brother Henry who has taken a farm a few miles west of Clyde. Spent the morning at Benham’s, and then went down to Hiram’s and made a call there. In the afternoon Hiram brought his wife and little girl, Mertie, up to his father’s, and they did not return till night. Benham felt so badly that he sent to Wolcott for his doctor but he was away & did not come.

Sunday, 22

The morning was cloudy and quite cold, with a brisk wind from the north west blowing the snow about pretty lively, and making the weather very blustering. The evening also is cloudy and very cold and blustering, the wind not abating much.

Intended to have gone down to Hiram’s and make another call today but on account of the inclemency of the weather, concluded not to go out, and therefore remained with Benham and his family. He had another bad night, being in much pain and distress. The doctor came and tapped him again, taking away 20 pounds of water which had accumulated in one week. After this operation he felt much easier, sitting up some and conversing considerable.

Monday, 23

The weather in the morning was very cold altogether the coldest of the season. Cold, cloudy weather continued through the day with a very little snow falling, which did not amount to much.

Benham continues to feel better and sat up most of the time this morning, conversing with me until the time of my departure. They urged me to make a longer stay, but being so anxious to be on my way home. Young Benham took me away in a sleigh, and calling at Roswell Marsh’s we took a lunch, and having thoroughly warmed ourselves I took my satchel I had left there and bidding them good by, we proceeded on to Clyde and from thence three or four miles west to his brother Henry’s where we tarried over night. I found Andrew there with his brother, & had a good visit with them.

Tuesday, 24

The morning was considerably cold, but not extremely so. The day was partly cloudy and the temperature was quite tolerable. It is colder this morning.

Andrew hitched up a horse and cutter and started with me, immediately after breakfast, for Clyde so that I could take an early train for Rochester. Benham also came along, and being in season, when the train arrived I bade the boys good by and took my seat. Arriving at Rochester I left my satchel at the depot and walked over to Mr. Anderson’s and took dinner with them, and going back to the depot called at the Chronicle office and paid another year’s subscription, then went on to the depot & at the proper time, took a seat on the Northern Central train, getting off at Troy went to Azor’s, found wife there, but they were all in bed.

Wednesday, 25

The weather continues pretty cold and quite winterlike. The day was partially fair, but became quite cloudy at night indicating storm. The evening is quite cold, with a snowstorm commencing.

We remained at Azor’s until some time after breakfast and then, I being very anxious to be moving towards home, after trying to persuade me to tarry another day without success, Azor harnessed his horses to his sleigh and we all rode down to Benjamin’s where we make a visit, and towards night Azor and Eliza returned home, there having been an arrangement that we should continue there over night, and tomorrow Benjamin is to provide for us a passage home. Consenting to this arrangement, we therefore are remaining with them to conclude our visit.

Thursday, 26

The morning was considerably cold with snow falling pretty rapidly. The snow storm continued through the day and evening with very slight intermissions in the afternoon, and was quite tedious.

Benjamin complained this morning of being more unwell than common, in consequence of a cold he has lately taken. Remained there till near the middle of the day and then Lucien came with a sleigh and brought us home, Fanny and Maria riding with us as far as Burton’s. Arrived home early in the afternoon and found the family all well, and prospering. Remained with them through the remainder of the afternoon, related to them some of the incidents of my journey, kindled a fire in my room, and resumed my habit & mode of time. Bathed before retiring for the night.

Friday, 27

The morning opened fair after a cold, freezing night, the day was fair and in the middle was quite warm where the sun shone. The fore part of the evening was also fair, after which the clouds came on again.

Remained at home and about the house through the day and evening. Spent a considerable portion of the time in the Library, mostly alone, trying to look over and read a portion of the mass of newspapers that had accumulated on my table during the time of my absence from home, but being very much inclined to sleep when sitting down to read I made but little progress. Put the picture of the late Mrs. Atkins in a frame and hung it in our room. Luman & a Mr. Smead came from Barclay at night and staid.

Saturday, 28

The morning opened cloudy, and cloudy weather continued through the entire day, but it was not extremely cold. In the evening there is a little more snow falling.

Remained at home during the forenoon and spent the time looking over the newspapers same as yesterday. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, called a little while on Theodore and Esther in their new gallery, went into the Post Office and got the Courier and the Reporter and the Gleaner, then went over to Wallace’s and called a short time on Helen, after which returned home and spent the remainder of the day reading the newspapers and chopping and bringing in a quantity of wood.

Sunday, 29

The morning was partially fair but the day was mostly cloudy. The weather has been moderate, thawing some about noon. The evening is quite mild and cloudy, with prospect of a thaw.

Arose early and attended to bathing after I had made a fire. Spent some time reading after breakfast, and then went up to the Centre where I attended meeting. Br. Greenlaw was present and delivered a discourse. The attendence was very good. Met Br. Brigham there and his daughter Julia. Came immediately home af the exercises of the meeting were concluded and found wife and Albert alone, Harvey and Lizzie having gone away from home. They did not return until nearly night. Did not have any company today at all, no person having called.

Monday, 30

The morning opened cloudy with the weather quite soft and mild, having thawed some during the night. Weather continued cloudy and mild through the day, thawing considerable. Evening fair and pleasant.

Theodore called in the morning and I lent him $10. more more, making $20 in all. Chopped some wood and spent remainder of the forenoon in the Library reading most of the time. Afternoon went up to the Post Office and got the Tribune, sending a Reporter to James Buel and another to his brother George. Made a short call on Theodore and Esther, and then came home. Spent some time looking over the Tribune, but Harvey Holcomb coming in I laid it aside and chatted with him an hour or two.

Tuesday, 31

Another cloudy morning, and warm, cloudy weather continued through the day. In the afternoon there was a little rain which materially contributed to the progress of the thaw. The weather continues in the evening cloudy and warm.

Remained at home through the day, and in the house most of the time, spending a considerable portion of it with my newspapers and books, especially the former. Did nothing in the line of writing and occasionally amused myself with the little children. Theodore came down in the morning and helped Harvey put on a load of hay at Taylor’s barn, which he took over to Barclay for Luman. Returning towards night he brought home with him Mr. and Mrs. Brewer, who tarried with us over night. Attended to my bath in the morning.

February

Wednesday, 1

The thaw continued through the night, but the wind having changed to the north west, has partially checked it today. The weather through the day has continued cloudy and quite mild. In evening is about the same.

Remained at home again through the day, reading a considerable portion of the time, writing some, chopped a small amount of wood, and spent as usual a small portion of my time with Albert and Eliza.

Harvey went to Troy, starting immediately after breakfast, and Mr. and Mrs. Brewer went with him. Luman came in the afternoon and lodged here. Harvey and the Brewers returned here at night, and they remaining over again, spent another evening, very agreeably in conversation with Mr. Brewer.

Thursday, 2

The wind changed and it froze a little last night. The morning was cloudy and the afternoon was partially fair. Mild weather continues and so does the thaw. High westerly wind this evening and freezing again.

Arose early and, after kindling a fire in my room, attended to my bath. Luman and Mr. Brewer started away soon after breakfast, to drive some cattle and at a later hour Harvey went with his team and sleigh to take Mrs. Brewer home and to carry some things of hers they had brought from Troy yesterday. Wife rode with them as far as Samuel’s. Spent the forenoon in my usual manner, with my books and newspapers, and at my writing table. Afternoon went up to the P.O. & got the Tribune, & left my boots at shop to be tapped. Came home & went down to Sam’s staid to tea, came home at night, leaving wife to ride with Harvey. Elon here in evening.

Friday, 3

Froze pretty hard at night, the morning cloudy and cold, and the afternoon fair and mild. The snow has nearly left us and the roads are getting quite bare again. The evening is fair, with bright moonshine.

Took a bath in the morning soon after leaving the bed. Spent the forenoon at home, reading part of the time and chopping some wood for the Library, besides bestowing some attention to the little children. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre and called on Theodore in his new gallery and found some company there. Called in the Post Office and got the Reporter and Chronicle, and bought ½ lb raisins. Returning, called at the shoe shop and got my boots and paid 80 cents for mending. Spent the remainder of the day reading and chopping some more wood.

Saturday, 4

A very windy night. The morning opened fair , soon became cloudy with a little snow falling. The day has been mostly cloudy and quite cold, especially the latter portion. The evening is considerably cloudy and cold.

Attended to my bath in the morning as usual. Spent the forenoon at home engaged, according to my common custom, with my books, my newspapers, my pen, and the children. Harvey, with other men, filled his ice house today and brought me from the Post Office the Gleaner. Wife went over to help Amanda at quilting, going in the morning. After dinner Harvey sent his team and wagon after Helen and Esther, and Lizzie & I got in and went over there too. I came home at night, the rest, including the boys, staid in the evening.

Sunday, 5

Another cold freezing night followed by a very cold morning. The day has been fair throughout but has continued to be cold, the mercury at sundown standing at eight degrees below zero. The evening is fair with the moon shining brightly. It is cold but calm and still.

Made preparations and attended to my bath after leaving the bed in the morning, then attended to my reading and the children until the hour for meeting, and then walking up to the Centre attended meeting there. Br. Levi Taylor conducted the exercises as usual, in the absence of Br. Greenlaw. Came home immediately after the conclusion and attended to my reading and my fire the remainder of the day.

Monday, 6

The past night was very cold. The morning was partially cloudy but the day has been fair and pleasant. The weather although considerably cold has grown moderate so that the mercury at sundown stood at 13 degrees above zero. The evening is fair and bright without a cloud to be seen.

Remained at home during the forenoon and spent the time according to my common custom. After dinner went up to the Centre, went in the Post Office and got the Tribune, after which, called in to Theodore’s new picture gallery; but there being nobody there I concluded to proceed immediately home. Spent the remainder of the day at home and was engaged most of the time with the Tribune. Chopped some more wood for my use in the Library and brought it into the closet, kept a good fire & made myself comfortable.

Tuesday, 7

Fair beautiful morning but the air was pretty keen, the mercury resting at zero. The forenoon was fair and the weather grew more moderate and it thawed considerable in the sunshine. The afternoon was somewhat hazy, especially toward night, and the evening is quite cloudy, but the weather has become mild again.

Staid at home all day. Took a bath very soon after leaving the bed in the morning. Spent the time very nearly in the same manner that I am in the habit of doing when I am at home and without any company. Harvey being at the Centre this afternoon brought to me from the Post Office the Courier, to the perusal of which, I have devoted much of the evening.

Wednesday, 8

The weather continued quite moderate through the day, the mercury remaining at about 32 or the freezing point, where the sun had no influence. The entire day has been cloudy with a little snow falling occasionally but it did not amount to anything. Cloudy, mild weather continues this evening also; Mer. at 30.

Remained at home through the entire day, devoting a large portion of the time to reading, especially in the forenoon. Wrote a short letter to the Tribune in the afternoon, and another to the Hon. Mr. Mercur at Washington D. C. and copied them in my book. spent some time also with the little children. Towards night I chopped and brought in a little more wood for my fire in the Library. In the evening commenced to write a letter to Mr. Atkins. In the afternoon Amanda sent for her ma to go there Lelia being very sick. Harvey took her over.

Thursday, 9

The weather was quite mild in the morning and continued so through the day, thawing so much that the roads were quite muddy. Most of the day has been cloudy and so is the evening.

Attended to my morning bath, after I had kindled a fire and made the necessary preparations. Soon after breakfast Mr. Alfred M. Bailey from Middlefield, Conn., came in, he having arrived at the Summit last evening. After we had chatted a while I went with him down to the Corners, calling at Julius’ first and introducing him there, after which we called a spell at Robert’s. Meeting Elon and Alva on our return I gave him an introduction to them. Afternoon went up to the P.O. & got the Tribune, & introduced him there to Levi & Silvester & Luman D. Went into the Gallery where he had an ambrotype taken. Evening Elon came in, & I finished my letter to Mr. Atkins. Mr. Chattle made a call in the afternoon.

Friday, 10

Morning fair with a fair day following it. The weather has been much colder than yesterday, mercury at about 20 above zero. The evening is partially cloudy & weather more moderate.

Bathed in the morning the first thing after kindling a fire, and then carried all my letters to the P.O. for the next thing. After breakfast, according to previous arrangement, Elon went with his team & wagon & took us over to Leroy, calling at Calvin’s on the way. We made short calls on Electa, on Hugh & Dwight, and on Rhodolphus Bailey, after which we drove up to Harvey’s and calling there we found that he and his wife had gone away to Troy, so we proceeded on up to Orator’s where we stopped and had the horses fed and staid to tea. After having a very pleasant interview with him and his family, including his soninlaw and daughter, we returned by way of Mr. Bunyan’s, calling there to see him, but he was not at home. Left an invitation there for him to go to Barclay with us next Monday. After our return Luman came home & met Mr. Bailey for the first time.

Saturday, 11

The morning was partially cloudy but the day was quite fair until towards night, it then became cloudy, and there is snow falling in the evening. The temperature is about 20.

Attended to my morning ablution as usual. After breakfast Luman went to Troy and I went with Mr. Bailey first over to Elon’s and then down to Samuel’s. While we were stopping there Alvah came along with a wagon for our accommodation and we got in with him and rode over to Elisha’s where we stopped and visited with them till after dinner, then we drove over to Harry’s and after stopping and making him and Amanda a short visit we continued on and around until we came to Alanson’s and calling there we spent the remainder of the afternoon returning home only a little before night. Found that Benjamin and Azor’s folks had been here in our absence and had gone away again.

Sunday, 12

The snowstorm continued through the night, moderately, and until the middle of the day. The entire day has been cloudy, & there has been occasional flurries of snow through the afternoon, continuing in the evening. The weather has not been very cold, mercury about 13.

Arose in good season, attending first to my fire and then to my bathing as is my habit when at home, if circumstances are favorable. At the proper hour went up to the Centre to attend meeting, Mr. Bailey going with me. We called at Levi’s on the way where we met Br. Greenlaw who officiated in the meeting and delivered a discourse. On account of the storm the attendence was small. After meeting we stopped with Levi at his request and took dinner, Br. Greenlaw and others being present. We departed soon after dinner and went to Elon’s, where we had promised to call, and took tea there, and staid with them until night. Mr. Bailey returned with me.

Monday, 13

Another cloudy day, with a very little snow falling in the morning only. Snow now about 6 inches in depth, just enough to make poor sleighing. Evening is fair. Temperature about the same as yesterday.

According to arrangement Harvey started with his horses and sleigh after Mr. Bunyan, then took Mr. Bailey & me, and at 9 in the morning we started for Barclay. Elon also went with his sleigh, taking with him Julius & Robert. We all went down to Percival’s and took dinner, after which we took a view of the big sawmill, and then of the works & operations at the foot of the plane. I went up the plane, on the cars, with Alfred to show him the works there, and returned the same way. Bunyan went up & went on to Barclay to visit his friend Muir. Elon went home with his load, Alfred & I went up to Barclay on the cars and put up at Brewer’s where we found Luman who had just arrived from Troy. Harvey came there also with his team and staid.

Tuesday, 14

The weather has not been very cold, temperature about the same that it has been for several days past. the day has been cloudy with snowflakes flying in the air part of the time. The evening is again fair.

Immediately after breakfast we started out to visit the mines, Mr. Bunyan having called to notify us that he had engaged Mr. Muir to go in with us for a guide. I, with Mr. Bailey and Harvey followed our conductor into the mine, Mr. Bunyan declining to go. After we came out I went with Mr. Bailey about the village to see the various operations that were carried on there until towards noon, & then we hitched up and came home. Alfred stopped at Julius’& Bunyan stopped with me till after tea. Towards night I went down to Julius’ and then went with Alfred over to Amanda’s a short time. Lelia is quite sick & they had sent for Lurenda to come and stay with them. We returned to Julius’ & met a considerable number of Bailey’s who came in to see Alfred. He bid them good by at bed time, & returned with me.

Wednesday, 15

Another cloudy morning and cloudy day, the weather continuing at about the same temperature that we have had of late. The evening is partially fair.

After breakfast Mr. Bailey & I went over to Amanda’s again to see Lurenda who came there last night to help take care of Lelia. We found Lelia better and soon took our leave. Mr. Bailey took his leave of my family and with me started for Troy in a sleigh with Elon and Alva. We called a short time to see Isaac and Abby and drove up to Azor’s, stopping there only a few minutes, we invited them to come down & visit with us at Manville’s, we went on there and they came afterward. Went about town some with Alfred and towards night Elon & Alva went home, and the rest of us, including Manville & Ellen, rode home with Azor and Eliza and spent the evening and the night with them.

Thursday, 16

The morning fair, continuing so till the middle of the day. The afternoon was cloudy at intervals, with several pretty lively flurries of snow. The evening is mostly cloudy.

Pretty soon after breakfast Azor hitched up his team and took us all into the village. Manville and Ellen got out at the store, and Azor, after leaving Eliza and me at the depot with Mr. Baley, returned home. We, waiting till the train arrived, took our leave of Mr. Bailey and saw him depart for his home. We then returned to Manville’s house, remained till after dinner, then Ellen and Eliza going out for an afternoon visit, I read there alone a spell then laying aside the book went about town, calling at the bank & the book store and finally on Manville at the store where he is employed. Towards night he returned with me to his house where we took a lunch, and waiting till the girls came back, & Azor came after us, I returned with him & Eliza & staid over.

Friday, 17

The morning was fair at the opening but became considerable cloudy before noon. The remainder of the day continued cloudy, with very mild weather, thawing enough to make the roads quite muddy in some places. There is a snow storm in progress this evening with a pretty brisk wind.

Waited at Azor’s until he had done his chores after breakfast, then having hitched his horses to the wagon I rode with him and Eliza over to Luther’s where they came for a visit. Visited with them till towards night and then they came down and brought me to the Center and went home from thence. Called into the Post Office and got the Reporter and two letters for A. M. Bailey, both having been mailed on the 14th. Also brought a letter for Mr. Gilman.

Saturday, 18

The snow storm last evening changed to rain in the night and continued through the morning till near the middle of the day. The sun shone some in the middle of the day, and there some intervals of sunshine in the course of the afternoon. The weather is correspondingly mild, and the water is high in the streams. The stars are shining brightly this evening.

Spent the morning, after having attended to bath, about the house, reading part of the time, and assisting Lizzie in taking care of the baby who is quite sick with a cold, having a high fever. Harvey being away at work with his team for Luman at Barclay, I went down to see Sam. but he was at Calkin’s in Troy. I got some medicine, and then went up to the Centre, got a horse of Levi for Theodore to ride after him, got the Courier at the Post Office and then came home. Not long after this Sam came and prescribed for the child, and at night Harvey came home.

Sunday, 19

The morning was fair at the opening but clouding over soon, the remainder of the day continued cloudy. The weather has not been very cold, but considerably colder than yesterday, having frozen up again and mercury at 30 in the afternoon, not thawing much of course. The weather this evening is very much the same as the afternoon has been.

Made preparations and took my bath in the morning as usual. At the proper time got ready and went up to the Centre and attended the meeting there. The audience was quite small today. Br. Levi Taylor conducted the exercises of the meeting and delivered a discourse, as he usually does in the absence of a more experienced preacher. Returned immediately after the conclusion of the meeting, & spent the remainder of the day with reading, & with the children. Eliza is very much better. Elon called this evening.

Monday, 20

The morning was fair and also pretty cold. The day continued fair and and the weather growing warmer thawed considerable in the afternoon, making the roads quite muddy. The evening is cloudy, and towards the latter part there was snow falling.

Attended to my bathing in the morning according to my custom and after breakfast had seated myself with a book when Mr. Innes came in to inform me that I could ride to Towanda with him and Mr. Bunyan. I made a hurried preparation and went with them. We stopped at the Elwell house. I left Mrs. Buell’s receipt as residuary legatee at the Register’s office, & in the afternoon we all three attended the Republican Convention in Mercur’s Hall, Mr. Bunyan and I being called by the convention, served as delegates for the township of Granville. After the convention rose we started for home, I arriving at about half past 7 in the evening.

Tuesday, 21

The morning was partially cloudy but the day has been quite fair, and the weather mild, thawing considerable, until towards night, when it was very much colder. The evening is fair with the mercury only 11 degrees above zero.

The first thing in order, after making the necessary preparations was my morning bath, which was duly attended to. After breakfast sat down in the Library and was engaged in reading when Valentine came in and the remainder of the forenoon was spent in chat with him. Afternoon went up to the Centre, looked in to the Post Office but finding nothing in my box went into Theodore’s gallery and remained there till towards night, and then came home and chopped some wood wood for the Library and brought it into the closet.

Wednesday, 22

The morning was fair and was quite cold after a freezing night, the mercury standing at only 2 degrees above zero after the sun had risen. The day has also been fair and thawed some early in the afternoon. The evening too is fair and bright, with the mercury at sundown standing at 20.

Arose early and after starting a fire in the Library attended to my morning bath. Spent the greater part of the forenoon in my room reading. In the middle of the day went up up to the Centre, called at the gallery and found that Theodore had gone to Troy, then went into the Post Office and left two letters to be returned to him at Middlefield, Conn. and got a letter & newspaper sent by him to me; then called at Wallace’s to see Lydia & Mr. Bruce who have returned from Greenwood; then went back to the gallery & staid some time with Esther; then came home & chopped some wood. Elon called in the afternoon; and in the evening Alvah came in a little while.

Thursday, 23

The morning opened partially fair with the mercury at 20 degrees above zero and the wind from the south or south west. As the morning advanced it grew more cloudy and the weather more mild. The afternoon has been quite cloudy with some thawing, and the evening also continues cloudy with a brisk wind.

Attended to my morning bath as usual and after breakfast spent the forenoon mostly in the Library reading. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, calling first on Theodore at his gallery, then went into the Post Office and got the Tribune, and then after giving Theodore another call of half an hour or so, returned home & looked the Tribune over, reading some of the most interesting articles. Chopped some more wood towards night, & in the evening, Harvey & Albert being sick, went after Sam.

Friday, 24

Morning was cloudy and the weather quite mild; mercury at 34 befor the sun rose. The day remained cloudy with a boisterous wind from the south, and the mercury up among the forties. The sun shone out towards night and the evening is bright and clear, but there is considerable wind.

Arose early, kindled a fire and then attended to bathing according to my common practice. Read a little while after breakfast, and then took my seat at the table and wrote a long letter to Rhoda and copied it into the letterbook. Did not go abroad at all today but Harvey feeling a little better, went up to the Centre and brought from the Post Office the Reporter. Chopped a little wood towards night and in the evening commenced a long letter to Mr. James Buel of Woburn Mass. Sat up till nearly eleven o’clock writing mostly but reading some. Lizzie has been quite sick all day with a high fever, and has not been able to leave the bed. Children better.

Saturday, 25

Thawed all night and the ground quite bare this morning. The day opened and continued fair with mercury up to 50. The evening is considerable hazy and is quite calm, the wind having subsided.

The first thing in order after kindling a fire in the morning was the bath, and having been attended to, breakfast came next, after which took my place at the writing table in the Library and finished my letter to Rhoda and copied it, then commenced and finished a long letter to my friend Pelton and copied it in the evening. Luman called towards night, and went away again to Troy. Went up to the Centre between sundown and dark, called at the Post Office and got the Courier and a letter from Mr. Atkins, then went into Theodore’s gallery and spent a short time, bringing away from there two pictures, one of Lizzie, and the other belonging to Sara. Lizzie is better today, Harvey is about the same.

Sunday, 26

Another thawing night but it was quite cloudy and the morning was cloudy also, and quite mild for winter weather. The entire day has been of the same character, with strong indications, towards night of storm of rain. The weather remains about the same this evening, but the rain storm has not commenced yet, but the indications remain.

In the morning, after leaving the bed, and kindling a fire, I took my bath and read a spell before breakfast, and after breakfast had another spell of reading and then got ready and went up to the Centre and attended meeting. Br. Greenlaw was there and delivered a discourse and conducted the exercises of the meeting. The attendence was very good. Carried up my three letters and deposited them in the Post Office box. The sick members of the family are better.

Monday, 27

First quarter at 5-4, morn.

The morning and forenoon were quite cloudy, the weather being somewhat cooler. The afternoon has been mostly cloudy but with some short intervals of sunshine. There has been several slight snow squalls with a brisk wind from the north west. The weather this evening continues about the same as the afternoon has been.

After kindling my fire in the morning and attending to my customary ablution, took my breakfast, and then devoted several hours to reading, bestowing some attention to the little children in the mean time. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, calling first on Theodore a little while, then went into Wallace’s and chatted a spell, then stopped a short time with Mr. Bruce, then stepped into the P.O. & got the Tribune and the Chronicle, then came home and read them, and then chopped & brot in some wood.

Tuesday, 28

Second day of first quarter.

There was a little flurry of snow in the course of the night, the morning was not very cold and was cloudy at the opening, but became clear before noon. The afternoon has been quite fair and fine with the mercury standing at about 35 degrees. The evening is considerably hazy with a brisk wind from the west, indicating a storm at hand.

Attended to my bathing in the morning and after breakfast spent some time in the Library reading, and at intervals giving my attention to the little children. A short time before noon went up to the Centre and returned a weekly Tribune that had been sent by mistake, then went into Mr. Bruce’s and left some ink for him according to his request, then stepped into Theodore’s gallery a minute to see how he is getting along, and then returned home and visited with Burton and Mary who came down for that purpose and spent the afternoon. Samuel was here this evening. Sara is sick now.

March

Wednesday, 1

Third day of first quarter.

Haze cleared off in the night and there was a pretty smart frost this morning. The day opened fair and continued so until near the close. The weather has been mild and springlike and quite agreeable. The evening is somewhat hazy again.

Attended to my bathing in the morning according to my general rule. Spent the morning and the forenoon very much as usual, at reading and occasionally with the little children. Wife is quite unwell. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, called at the Post Office and then went into Theodore’s gallery a short time. Esther came home with me. Spent the afternoon about the house and towards night, wife getting no better, went down to get Samuel to come and see her, but he was not at home. At night Theodore came down and Esther went home with him. At bedtime Harvey went after Sam. again but did not find him.

Thursday, 2

Fourth day of first quarter.

Morning fair at the opening, and fair pleasant weather continued through the day, it being also quite mild, the mercury standing as high as 50 degrees, with the wind form the south. The evening too is fair and bright, the wind remaining in the south and blowing quite briskly.

Omitted the bath this morning, circumstances not being favorable. Wife about the same. Did not go to bed, employing the time in part in writing a long letter to Daniel Bush which I finished and copied before the break of day Samuel called a little after midnight. Wife sat up some in the afternoon. Went up to the P. Office at noon and got the Tribune, making a short call on Lydia, having delivered my letter at the office. In the afternoon worked a spell at splitting and preparing some wood for the Library, and also looked over the Tribune. Towards night Amanda came over and staid till in the evening, and before dark Luman also came and staid over night.

Friday, 3

Fifth day of first quarter.

The morning was cloudy at the opening with a moderate rain falling. Clouds broke away soon after and there was a little sunshine. At 10 o’clock it was cloudy and rainy again with mercury rising above 50. The afternoon was also cloudy with intervals of rain. The evening too is cloudy and considerably warm.

Wife had a painful, restless night. Arose at 4 o’clock in the morning and made a fire. Wife arose and felt some better. After bathing I returned to bed for a short time. After breakfast Luman departed for Barclay. Towards noon Amanda Shepard and Electa and Philena came. Went up to the Post Office & got the Reporter, making a short call on Theodore. Samuel came soon after my return and spent most of the afternoon. Electa and went over to Volney’s after tea, & Amanda staid till nearly night. Wife is a little better but not much. Tended baby a good deal today & read but little. Electa returned in the evening & staid.

Saturday, 4

Sixth day of first quarter.

Cloudy morning at the opening, and the day has been mostly cloudy, with a little sunshine only at intervals. The weather continues mild and springlike and the ground is nearly dry enough to receive the early crops. The evening is partially fair affording a little moonshine.

Got up pretty early in the morning, bathed and had a pretty good spell to read before the breakfast was ready. Wife continues considerably unwell, but is better in some respects. She sat up a part of the time, and has been able to walk about the house some. Electa staid till towards noon and then went down to the Corners, expecting to go home from thence this afternoon. About the middle of the day went up to the Centre, going first into the Post Office and got the Tribune, then made a short call on Lydia and another on Theodore, came home and chopped & brot in some wood.

Sunday, 5

Seventh day of first quarter.

In the morning the sun shone brightly at its rising but passed immediately behind a heavy cloud. The clouds all passed away be before 9 o’clock leaving the atmosphere clear and bright. The latter part of the afternoon has been cloudy but continues warm, mercury indicating 40 degrees at sundown. Evening clear with moon shining brightly.

Arose early and took my morning bath, after which sat down and read until breakfast was ready. Continued my reading after breakfast till meeting time, then got ready and attended meeting at the Centre, Br. Taylor and others discoursing. Returned immediately after the conclusion and found Amanda and Lucella here. They staid till after tea. Samuel and Amanda called in the morning on their way up to the meeting. Wife continues to recover slowly, sitting up most of the time. Her appetite continues poor.

Monday, 6

Full moon at 10-43, even.

Morning cloudy with wind from the south and with rain falling intermingled with some flakes of snow. The rain continued, moderately, until the middle of the day, then the wind changed to the north west and the weather was a little colder. The afternoon was mostly cloudy, and the evening is about the same.

Arose at 4 o’clock in the morning, kindled a fire in the Library, prepared and took my bath, and then waited for the family to arise and prepare the breakfast. Wife continues, slowly, to get better. Read till towards the middle of the day, then dressed and went up to the Centre to attend the funeral of Martin Wilcox’s child. Went into the Post Office and got the Tribune but spent my time while waiting for the funeral at Theodore’s gallery. Br. Greenlaw spoke on the occasion. Came home and read my paper and then chopped some wood.

Tuesday, 7

Second day of full moon.

Cleared off and froze some in the night, mercury standing at 22 this morning at sunrise. The day has been fair except a small portion of the afternoon. The weather continues quite mild, mercury at 40 after sunset. The evening is mostly fair.

Attended to bathing in the morning according to my general rule, then employed my time with a book till breakfast. After breakfast worked a spell at picking up and carrying away pieces of boards and other thrash that lay around the house and door yard and then took my fishing rod and went down on the flat and tried angling a short time for the first time this season. Caught a few small dace. After dinner went up to the Centre, went into the P.O. but got nothing, made a call at the gallery, & then made another at Wallace’s where I found Daniel’s wife. Stopped again at Theodore’s and then came home & split & brot in some wood.

Wednesday, 8

Third day of full moon.

Fair pleasant morning with the mercury standing at 34 before sunrise. Fair weather continued through the day til towards the close and then it became quite cloudy, and continued so through the evening. Mercury at

Was employed during the early morning period with bathing, reading, &c. according to my common custom. After breakfast spent a part of my time with my books and newspapers, and a part with the children and various other ways until towards noon, and then Azor and Eliza came. Soon after this went up to the Centre, called at the Post Office and got a letter from Rhoda Cook and also one from Daniel Bush in which he sent me two of his pictures one of which I gave to Eliza, and the other I design to send to Mrs. Wilcox of Great Barrington Mass. Azor and Eliza departed towards night.

Thursday, 9

Fourth day of full moon.

South wind and quite cloudy at the opening of the morning, some short intervals of sunshine towards the middle of the day, and clouds prevailed through the afternoon. The weather continues mild and appears to be growing warmer, mercury being up to 57 at sundown. The evening is also cloudy and warm & begins to rain & thunder.

Attended to my bath quite early in the morning and then read the Tribune until the call for breakfast. Spent a portion of the forenoon with my books and newspapers, and a portion with Samuel who came in and chatted with me some time. Towards the middle of the day went up to the Centre, stopped in Theodore’s gallery till the mail came in, then went into the Post Office and got the Tribune and a newspaper that Daniel Bush sent to me after which I came home. Siegfeld called this afternoon.

Friday, 10

Fifth day of full moon.

The morning was rainy and the night had also been considerably rainy. The clouds disappeared before the morning was far advanced and the remainder of the day was fair. The weather continues warm and agreeable. The evening is also clear and bright with starlight.

Attended to my morning bath & then read a spell before breakfast. After breakfast went to work at the windows in the Library and Dining room and loosened them so they could be opened. After this Benjamin and Lurenda having come, spent my time visiting with them until towards night when they went home. Harvey brought the Reporter from the Post Office, & a letter from Lydia Caywood. Wrote a letter to Mrs. Wilcox & sent her a picture of Daniel Bush. In the evening finished copying it and carried it to the Post Office.

Saturday, 11

Sixth day of full moon.

Another fair day with the exception of a few clouds in the early morning. The weather continues mild and springlike, the mercury ranging between 50 and 60 degrees. There has been a pretty brisk southerly wind most of time during the day. The evening is clear and calm.

Arose quite early and kindled a fire, and then attended to my morning bath. After this took a book & read till called to breakfast. Read a spell after leaving the table, and then concluding to go down on the flat and try my luck at angling again, got some bait and took my rod and line and went at it. Spent two or three hours and caught a pretty good string of small fish. Went in the afternoon up to the Centre called at the P.O. & got the Chronicle, & made a short call at the gallery.

Sunday, 12

Seventh day of full moon.

Clouded over in the night and commenced raining about sunrise this morning. Mercury standing at 50. The weather grew some colder as the day progresed and at 3 o’clock in the afternoon the mercury was down to 36. The rain storm continued with scarcely any intermission until the latter part of the day and then partially changed to snow. The rain has produced a heavy freshet in the streams, the water being quite high on the flat at an early period in the afternoon. The storm of snow and rain continued, moderately till evening, and then ceasing, the clouds passed away and the stars are now shining.

Arose in the morning and took my bath as usual, then took a chair and a book and read till breakfast was announced. Intending to go to meeting I watched for an opportunity but the rain fell so furiously I gave it up and spent the day at home, reading much of the time.

Monday, 13

Last quarter at 5-24, even.

The morning as partially fair and continued so through the forenoon but the afternoon has been quite cloudy. The past night was fair, and being colder, froze some; mercury this morning standing at 27. Rain commenced falling towards night, changed to snow which continues falling this evening.

After kindling my fire this morning and bathing sat down and read till the time of breakfast and after attending to this resumed my reading and devoted the most of my time that way till near the middle of the day and then walked up to the Centre, called first at Theodore’s gallery a spell, then went in to the Post Office and waited there until the mail came in, then, receiving the Tribune came directly home & looked it over. Made a call also at Mr. Bruce’s. Luman came at night from Barclay.

Tuesday, 14

Second day of last quarter.

Cleared off in the night and the morning opened fair, and continued so until the middle of the day. The afternoon was considerably cloudy, producing a storm of rain which commenced moderately just at night. Froze again last night, the mercury at sunrising stood at 25, and at its setting had risen to 40. The evening is very dark and the storm continues.

Attended to the morning bath and other matters in regular order, and after breakfast spent a part of the time reading until the middle of the day, and then went up to the Post Office and got a Agricultural Report by Mr. Mercur, called at the gallery and then went in & left my book with Lydia & went up to the stream above Phylander’s & fished a little while, caught a trout & throwing it back into the water again, returned to the Centre, called a short time on Helen, got my book & meeting Valentine he gave me another sent by Webb. Luman went to Troy at night.

Wednesday, 15

Third day of last quarter.

The storm continued through the past night, leaving the ground covered with snow this morning and rain falling moderately with mercury at 34. Storm continued thro the day, raining at intervals, quite smartly. There is now another heavy freshet in progress. The evening is quite cloudy and dark, and the rain continues to fall.

Arose before the sun, made my fire, attended to my morning bath, and then spent my time in the usual way until the breakfast call. After breakfast resumed my reading and continued it thro the day, or until towards night, with only occasional intervals of rest. During some of these periods I was employed at regulating things about my room and arranging them in better order. Could not go abroad today on account of the storm. Chopped a little wood in the rain, towards night.

Thursday, 16

Fourth day of last quarter.

The storm abated in the latter part of the night but the morning was cloudy and the water in the streams was very high. Cloudy weather continued through the day, but there were a few intervals of sunshine along about the middle. The evening is cloudy and the weather warm.

Attended to my morning matters in regular order according to my common practice, and after breakfast continued my reading until towards noon, finding considerable interesting matter in those books I brought home day before yesterday. Went up to the Centre a little before noon, stopped a while with Esther then went in to the P.O. & got the Courier, & sent a paper to Mrs. Wilcox & Reporter to Geo. Buell, made another call at gallery & then came home. Luman called with A. K. Pomeroy. Luman staid over night, & Pomeroy went home after supper.

Friday, 17

Fifth day of last quarter.

Continued cloudy through the night and the morning cloudy and warm, mercury standing at 47 before sunrise. Weather continued cloudy till towards noon, then the clouds broke away and we had a little sunshine. Became cloudy rain afternoon and rained a very little, and remained cloudy till night. The evening, like the afternoon, is cloudy and warm.

Left the bed at an early hour & kindled a fire, and then having bathed and put my room in order, sat down to reading as usual. After breakfast continued my reading a portion of the time until towards noon, then went up to the Centre and stopped first a while with Esther at the gallery & there heard Caty’s death at Leroy. Went into the Post Office & when the mail came in got the Tribune & the Reporter & the Chronicle. Came home & went down on the flat a fishing, getting a pretty large string of small fish.

Saturday, 18

Sixth day of last quarter.

Another cloudy morning but at about nine o’clock the clouds broke and the remainder of the day was partially fair. The weather continues warm, the mercury ranging among the fifties. The evening is very clear and the stars are bright and beautiful.

Arose in the morning soon after day light appeared, and after attending to my customary matters went into the kitchen and took care of the little girl till breakfast was ready. After breakfast went out and split a quantity of wood, and prepared it for my use in the Library, bringing it into the back stoop. After this spent some time reading in the Library, and towards noon went up to the Centre, calling at the Post Office and waiting there till the mail came in, I got the Courier, and leaving a Reporter to be sent to Mrs. Buel at Woburn Mass., came home without making any other calls. After dinner went afishing again but did not succeed well. Spent the remainder of the afternoon reading.

Sunday, 19

Seventh day of last quarter.

The morning was frosty and fair, the mercury standing at 28, or four degrees below the freezing point at six o’clock. The day has been fair and pleasant and the weather mild and agreeable, with the mercury coming up to the neighborhood of 50 degrees. Grew cooler again towards night. The evening is also fair.

Arose and attended to the routine of my morning affairs as usual. After breakfast, concluding, with wife, to go to Leroy and join the procession of Caty’s funeral, we got ready and started with Harvey’s horses and buggy at a little after 9. Met & joined the procession while it was coming up the hill, soon after starting. Arriving at the meeting house here at the Centre the funeral was attended, the services being conducted by Elder Lake from Leroy. Azor and Eliza, and Fanny & Mary Smiley being in attendence, came down here & took tea before they went home.

Monday, 20

New moon at 11-4, even.

Another frosty morning with mercury at 28, and fair, except that it was hazy around the horizon. The forenoon was mostly fair the afternoon only partially so, but towards night it became quite cloudy with a brisk wind from the south. The temperature of the weather continues mild. The evening is also quite cloudy.

After attending, in regular order, to the business of the morning, including breakfast, went to work at the strawberry ground, digging up the surface, and inverting it with a shovel, until I had gone over one half of it, then went into the Library and read till nearly noon, and then went up to the Post Office, waited till the mail came but getting nothing, came home and chopped a little wood and then spent some time looking over the newspapers that were lying on my table. Luman and Charley came in the afternoon, and started away with some cattle for Barclay.

Tuesday, 21

Second day of new moon.

Rained a little some time in the night the morning remained cloudy and the mercury above the freezing point. The entire day has been cloudy and rather cool but there has been no storm except that in the afternoon there were some flakes of snow falling. The evening is also cloudy.

The business of the morning was attended to in regular order until after breakfast, then went out and resumed my work on the strawberry ground, digging it up and preparing it for replanting. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, calling a while on Mr. Bruce and Lydia, and after the arrival of the mail went in the Post Office, found my box empty, and returned home. In the afternoon went to work with the wheel barrow and took away the stones, and the coal ashes that lay near the house, on the west side.

Wednesday, 22

Third day of new moon.

Froze a little last night although cloudy. The morning was also cloudy until about nine o’clock, then the clouds began to break away and the remainder of the day was fair. The weather has not been very warm on account of a chilly wind from the west. The evening is also fair.

Continued the regular order of morning business and after breakfast went to work at the strawberry patch and transplanted three rows of plants, manuring the ground in each row, then came in to the Library and read till dinner time. After dinner went up to the Post Office to see if the Tribune, due last Monday, had arrived yet, but found it had not, so I gave it up for lost. Made a short call at Theodore’s gallery and then came home. Went to work at the strawberry planting again and put in three rows more, manuring as before.

Thursday, 23

Fourth day of new moon.

The morning was cloudy, but cleared off soon after sunrise and at nine o’clock began to be cloudy again. The remainder of the day was mostly cloudy, with short intervals of sunshine in the afternoon. The weather has been quite mild except a chilly wind from the west, towards night. Evening is very cloudy and dark.

After breakfast spent an hour or two in the Library reading and then went to work at my strawberry patch again. Finished preparing the ground, & transplanted all but one row. At noon went up to the Centre, called a few minutes at Theodore’s gallery, then went in to the Post Office and got two numbers of the Tribune and came home and looked them over. Lincoln and Fremont called a short time in the forenoon.

Friday, 24

Fifth day of new moon.

Froze a little again last night, and the morning cloudy. Cleared off in the course of the forenoon and the remainder of the day was mostly fair. A chilly wind from the west has prevailed through the day and rendered the weather decidedly cool. The evening is clear and bright, receiving considerable aid from the new moon.

Attended to my primary morning matters, and then went out and finished setting out my strawberry plants before breakfast. After this went to work at raking and cleaning off the dooryard in front of the house, and carrying on some chip manure and placing it around the trees and shrubs and plants growing there. After dinner went up to the Centre to attend the funeral of Solon Saxton’s little boy. Went into the P.O. & got the Chronicle and the Reporter, and then went into Mr. Bruce’s and waited till the funeral procession came. Br. Greenlaw officiated.

Saturday, 25

Sixth day of new moon.

Froze considerable in the course of the last night. The day has been quite fair, gut there has been a continuation of that brisk, cold breeze from the west which has rendered the weather unpleasant, and considerably chilly. The evening is clear and calm.

After accomplishment of the first business of the morning, sat down and read till called to my breakfast; and after that went out and cleaned off another portion of the front door yard or lawn, and then went to work at the woodpile and chopped up a quantity for my use in the Library and brought it into the wood closet and the back stoop. Harvey brought me the Courier from the Post Office. He and Lizzie & the children went up to Azor’s, to stay all night. Went on the flat a fishing this afternoon. Did not get many.

Sunday, 26

Seventh day of new moon.

Another freezing night. Mercury standing at 21 between day light and sunrise. The morning was partially fair at the opening, became quite cloudy before noon, and in the course of the afternoon a snow storm commenced, which continued till night, covering the ground with snow, and now, in the evening, is still in progress.

Attended to the business of the morning in regular order then read till meeting time, made preparation and went up to the Centre for that purpose and gave my attendence at the morning meeting. According to appointment Br. Greenlaw was present and delivered a very good discourse. After meeting came home immediately as usual, expecting to find wife alone as I left her, but she had the company of Amanda. Harvey and Lizzie came home at night. Luman came at eve.

Monday, 27

Eighth day of new moon.

Storm continued moderately through the night, the snow being about four inches deep this morning and thawing. Continued snowing a little till towards noon, and after this the clouds broke away so that the sun shone out a very little. Afternoon remained cloudy but continued to thaw. The evening is partially fair and the moon is shining brightly.

Attended to the affairs of the morning as usual and then devoted the principal portion till noon to reading. At noon went up to the Centre, stopped a few minutes at Theodore’s gallery, then went in to the Post Office and got the Tribune, brought it home, read it a spell and lent it to Mr. Gilman for a short time. About the middle of the afternoon Stephan and Delia came and staid till night. Luman went away in the morning with a pair of fat oxen for Barclay.

Tuesday, 28

Ninth day of new moon.

There were some clouds at the opening of the morning, more after the sun had risen, and the remainder of the forenoon was quite cloudy. The afternoon was partially fair, so that there was occasional sunshine. Thawed some but so much as yesterday. The evening is mostly fair.

After the usual morning matters had been attended to, devoted the time till breakfast to reading. Read some time after breakfast and then went to work at my fishing rod and repaired it. Looked over some papers in the afternoon & arranged them and also spent a considerable portion of the time with my books and the Tribune. Luman came again before night. He went up to the Centre after tea to look at some cattle there belonging to Sam. Manley.

Wednesday, 29

First quarter at 1 - 48, morn.

Froze pretty hard last night. The morning was very fair and bright, and the day continued fair until late in the afternoon, becoming quite cloudy at night. The weather has been moderately warm thawing considerable and has left the ground quite bare again. The evening is

Attended to the first business of the morning according to my common practice, then took my breakfast and sat down to read a spell when learning that Luman was going to the Windfall with his buggy, concluded to ride up as far as Luther’s with him. We halted at the Centre and he bought of Sam Manley a couple of young cattle. I got out at Luther’s and waited till some time in the afternoon and then, he returning, rode back with him. He went away again up the road. Chopped some wood and put it in north stoop.

Tuesday, 30

Second day of first quarter.

A pretty warm night, not freezing any and continuing cloudy. The morning was also quite mild but grew some colder as it advanced, continuing cloudy. The afternoon was also cloudy but grew milder again towards the close of the day. The evening is of about the same character as the afternoon.

After giving due attention to the customary duties of the morning and taken breakfast, devoted an hour or two to reading and then went down to the creek and caught a few small fish and coming up went down as far as the corners to help Luman get some cattle started for Barclay. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, calling a spell at Bruce’s, and getting the Tribune at at Post Office came home and after reading a spell went over to Amanda’s, wife having gone before. Came home after tea.

Wednesday, 31

Third day of first quarter.

Cleared off in the course of the night; and the morning was fair and a little frosty. The middle of the day was a little cloudy and there were some clouds in the afternoon. The weather continues quite mild. The evening is clear and bright with the mercury down to 30 degrees.

Spent the morning as usual, and after breakfast read a spell then then went to work at some chestnut timber Harvey had hauled for the purpose and hewed out two posts for trellis for the grape vine. Afternoon went up to the Post Office and got the Tribune, making a short call at the gallery. Spent the afternoon reading and arranging things around the house; and towards night hewed out two more trellis posts. Benjamin and Lurenda made a short call in the course of the afternoon.

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Published On Tri-Counties Site On 03 December 2010
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M. Tice