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1871- Luman Putnam of Granville
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1871 Diary of Luman Putnam of Granville
Transcribed by Betsy Shirk - bshirk2002@yahoo.com
Formatted and Published by Joyce M. Tice
Transcription copyright 2010 Betsy Shirk and Joyce M. Tice

1854 Diary and Introduction. Also access to many more LumanPutnam Diaries

Luman Putnam Jerusha Bailey, his first wife
L. Putnam

Granville Centre

Penna

Part Four

October

Sunday, 1

Fourth day of Full Moon.

The morning was considerably frosty and at first was quite fair. The temperature at six o’clock was 28 degrees. The day has been temperately warm and was mostly fair until the latter part and then it became more cloudy. The evening is quite cloudy and considerably warm the mercury, at six o’clock, indicating 59 degrees of temperature.

Read a spell in the morning both before and after breakfast, and then got ready and went up the road a little before the hour for meeting, calling in to see Br. Levi Taylor who is not so well now, he being confined to his bed. Called a short time also at Isaac’s and then at the ringing of the bell attended the meeting. Br. Greenlaw was present and delivered a discourse. Returned directly home at the conclusion of the meeting and spent remainder of the day with family.

Monday, 2

Fifth day of Full Moon.

The morning at the beginning was partially cloudy and quite mild, the temperature at six o’clock being 43 degrees. As the morning advanced the clouds increased, but they disappeared in the middle of the day, so that the afternoon was nearly fair. The day has been quite mild, and the evening is not very cold. It is clear and bright except a little hazy in the horizon.

Spent the morning till breakfast time reading, and read a spell after this and then, concluding to go a fishing, took my rod and went down to the creek and tried a little while, but having no success returned to the house and resumed my reading again. Immediately after dinner Luman called he being on his way to Barclay with five head of cattle whitch he had bought of his uncle Luther. At his request I concluded to go along and drive the buggy, and we arrived at Mr. Brewer’s about sun down.

Tuesday, 3

Sixth day of Full Moon.

The morning opened partially fair but soon became quite cloudy and a moderate fall of rain commenced , continuing most of the time until after noon. The afternoon had a little sunshine, but was more or less cloudy till night. The evening is hazy but is otherwise fair and with a temperature of 49 degrees at six o’clock.

Read a little while before breakfast and after that went out into the street where I met Mr. Haflett and Mr. Stiles, and other pedlars who had brought vegetables and provisions up there to sell to the miners. Went with Luman to the slaughterhouse to get some beef and spent much of the forenoon in the house reading. After dinner Luman hitched up his carriage and we started off the mountain. Coming to West Franklin he went up to Leroy and I came directly home, riding with Stiles. Spent remainder of day reading.

Wednesday, 4

Seventh day of Full Moon.

The morning at first was a little in the cloudy order and became more so as it advanced. The temperature at six o’clock was 49 degrees. The middle of the day and the afternoon were tolerably fair. The evening is somewhat hazy and there are some light clouds, with the mercury at six o’clock standing at 55 degrees.

Spent the morning about the house, and a considerable portion of it with my books and newspapers. Some time after breakfast brought up from the well a quantity of water for Lizzie to wash with, and a little before noon went up to the Centre, calling an hour or more on Br. Levi, and then went down to Theodore’s, stopping a short time, then went into the Post Office and found a letter from Rhoda bringing news of the death or Osmin Atkins & Rosella Hall. Luman called here to dinner.

Thursday, 5

Eighth day of Full Moon.

The morning was fair and frosty and the temperature at the hour of six was 32 degrees. The day has been fair and warm and considerably smoky. The weather in the evening appears to be of about the same character, the mercury at six o’clock standing at 65 degrees.

Read a spell in the morning before breakfast and after that spent the principal part of the forenoon in the library with my books and newspapers. After dinner went up to Theodore’s, Lizzie having gone up there with the children to have their pictures taken. Called at the post office and got the Tribune and a Middletown paper sent by Mr. Atkins containing an account of Osmin’s death. Came home with Lizzie before night and chopped some wood for the Library.

Friday, 6

Last quarter at 0-36, even.

The night was warm and the morning quite cloudy and dark. At six o’clock. the temperature was 60 degrees. The forenoon continued cloudy and warm. Clouds broke away in the middle of the day and there was a little sunshine. Continued partially fair until towards night & then there was a moderate thunder shower. The evening is cloudy and dark with the mercury, at six o’clock, resting at 58 degrees.

Spent the morning and the forenoon about the house, and most of the time in the library with my books and newspapers. After dinner started out and went up the road, calling on Br. Levi and spending an hour or more at his bed side, then went down to the Post Office and got the Reporter and the Chronicle, made a call at Theodore’s and spent some time with Esther and her mother whom I found there, then came home and looked my papers over, and at night went down to the road to meet Lizzie who had been visiting at Robert’s.

Saturday, 7

Second day of Last Quarter.

The morning was quite cloudy at the dawn and the temperature was also quite mild. At six o’clock the mercury stood at 42 degrees. The clouds broke away early and the remainder of the day has been mostly fair, with the weather growing cooler towards the close. The evening is also partially fair and is also rather cool the mercury at six o’clock resting at 42 degrees, the same as morning.

Spent the morning reading as usual. Towards noon went up into the Hickory field and gathered about four quarts of hickory nuts and then went into the chestnut field & gathered a few chestnuts. Just at night went up to the post office and got the Courier, returning without making any calls. Esther was here early in the morning, to do the milking, and came again in the afternoon.

Sunday, 8

Third day of Last Quarter.

The past night was clear and cold. The morning opened fair and with a heavy frost. At six o’clock the mercury was down to 25 degrees. the day has been fair and pleasant but very smoky. It has also been tolerably warm in the afternoon. The evening is without clouds, but is considerably darkened by the smoke. The mercury is up to 52 degrees at six.

Spent most of the time this morning reading, and a little before the hour for meeting went up to the Centre for that purpose, calling a little while on the way to see Br. Levi. Br. Greenlaw was in attendence at the meeting and delivered a discourse. Returned immediately home after the meeting and spent the remainder of the day about the house, with the family and with my books. Towards night Amanda and her little girl came over to see us, and staid over night.

Monday, 9

Fourth day of Last Quarter.

The morning was smoky and hazy but otherwise was fair. At the time of six o’clock the temperature was 43 degrees. The day has been fair and smoky as usual, and also pretty warm. The evening also is fair with the exception of considerable haze and smoke, and at six o’clock the mercury was ranging at 65 degrees.

Spent most of the time through the morning and fore part of the day in the library employed with my books. Amanda departed for home soon after breakfast. Towards the middle of the day, concluding to go a fishing, I got ready, and going up the creek, I commenced above Taylor’s mill and fished up as far as the head of the race, returning at three o’clock with a pretty fair mess of fish. Spent the remainder of the day reading.

Tuesday, 10

Fifth day of Last Quarter.

The morning opened with a very clear atmosphere and mild temperature. The mercury at six o’clock indicated 52 degrees. The middle of the day was quite cloudy but the afternoon became fair and continued so till night. The evening is fair and mild and pleasant, the temperature at six o’clock being 64 degrees.

Arose in the morning pretty early and after attending to my usual morning bath spent the most of the time till nearly noon reading. After this got ready and went up to the Centre to attend the General Election. Went to the Post Office first, and then went to the polls and deposited my votes, among which was one for my friend Charles Stockwell of Canton, to Associate Judge. Spent some time around there chatting with friends and then returned, walking down in company with Elon and Mr. Bunyan. Chopped and brought some wood into the library and then resumed my reading. Luman came at eve.

Wednesday, 11

Sixth day of Last Quarter.

The morning was cloudy and rainy at the opening, with the mercury up to 52 degrees. The weather continued cloudy through the entire day with a little rain falling most of the time. At six o’clock in the evening the clouds continue and the rain is falling more copiously, but the mercury is down to 46 degrees.

Spent a part of the time in the morning with Luman and a part of it reading. Luman started away for Troy after breakfast and Harvey went with him. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, calling an hour or more to visit Br. Levi and then going down to the Post Office spent some time there in conversation with Mr. Bunyan. Called at Theodore’s, and finding Samuel there rode down with him. He stopped with me to look at my apples in the orchard.

Thursday, 12

Seventh day of Last Quarter.

The weather continued cloudy and rainy through the night and the storm was in progress at the opening of the morning. At six o’clock the mercury was down to 37 degrees. The forenoon was cloudy and wet, in the afternoon the clouds were broken and there was sun shine occasionally. Evening is fair with temperature at six o’clock of 41.

Spent the morning hours in and about the house as usual, with the family and with my books. Luman called a little while in the morning before starting for Barclay. Went up the road towards the middle of the day, calling a little while to see Levi, then went down to Theodore’s & meeting Harvey there he gave me the Tribune and the Chronicle and a letter from Mr. Atkins which he had taken from post office, I then went up to Luther’s and spent the afternoon, going to see the new grist mill in progress there, and after supper returning home, and arriving there before dark.

Friday, 13

Eighth day of Last Quarter.

The morning at the opening was quite smoky and hazy but not cloudy. The temperature at six o’clock was only 28 degrees, and there was a very heavy frost. The day has been mild and fair and quite pleasant. The evening is fair and the mercury at six o’clock is up to 47.

Spent the morning in my usual manner. After the frost was off went into the orchard and commenced gathering my small crop of apples. At noon went up to the Post Office but found no mail matter for me. Stopped there and read some further accounts of the terribly great fire in Chicago, where the property already destroyed is estimated at $300 000 000, besides 500 lives. Made a short call on Esther and came home. Spent the afternoon in the library & at night brought the winter squashes from the garden into the cellar.

Saturday, 14

New moon at 1-23, morn.

The morning is considerably smoky and a little cloudy at six o’clock, and the temperature is 43 degrees. The forenoon was quite cloudy but it cleared off in the middle of the day and the afternoon was fair. The evening is considerably cloudy again and at six o’clock the temperature, as indicated by the mercury was 57°.

Devoted a portion of the morning to reading and to matters about the house. After breakfast Samuel and O’Meara came to get some apples. Went with them into the orchard and after setting them to work, I picked a few more for myself. Went up the road a little before noon, called to see Levi a little while and then went on to the Post Office and got the Reporter and the Courier, made a call at Theodore’s and on my way homewards stopped a spell with Levi again, then came home and spent the remainder of the day reading.

Sunday, 15

Second day of New Moon.

At six o’clock the morning was considerably cloudy, with a brisk southerly wind. The temperature, according to the thermometer, was 56 degrees. The weather has continued quite mild, and the day was cloudy all the way through. There has also been considerable wind. The evening too is quite cloudy and quite warm, the mercury at six o’clock, being up to the mark of 61 degrees.

Attended to my daily ablutions in the morning immediately after rising to my common practice when at home, and then devoted the principal portion of the morning hours to reading. At the proper time made preparation and attended the meeting at the Centre, which, in the absence of other leading brethren, was conducted by Br. Charles Ross. Returned home immediately after the conduction, not stopping to make any calls.

Monday, 16

Third day of New Moon.

The morning, at the opening, was quite cloudy and smoky and mild, the mercury, at six o’clock indicating 45 degrees. The day continued cloudy until afternoon, and then became partially fair. There is considerable smoke and some haze this evening at six o’clock, but otherwise it is fair. The mercury stands at 49 degrees.

Read a spell after breakfast and then got ready and rode with the family up to visit Azor and Eliza. After dinner rode with Harvey and Azor over to the village. Called on L. W. Paine and paid him $1.25 for a book bought of him on the 28th of Aug. last, and then went to Grant’s and got a mainspring put into my watch for which I paid $1.25. Waited till Harvey and Azor got ready to return then went back and after tea we all started for home again. Called at the Post Office for the Tribune and found it had been sent down by Mr. Gilman. Arrived home a little before dark.

Tuesday, 17

Fourth day of New Moon.

The morning was fair and frosty. At six o’clock the temperature was 31 degrees only. Some clouds appeared and the forenoon became partially fair only. The afternoon was more bright, and the weather comfortably warm. The evening is also fair, considerably smoky, and the temperature at six o’clock is 48 degrees.

Arose early and spent the morning hours according to my common custom. In the course of the forenoon went out into the orchard and gathered a few more apples which I have left in a pile near the house intending to sell them. Spent the principal portion of the time in the afternoon about the house reading some and dozing some. Chopped and brought in some wood at night. Luman called in the morning, after breakfast.

Wednesday, 18

Fifth day of New Moon.

The morning opened with a cloudy atmosphere and a mild temperature. At six o’clock the mercury indicated 40 degrees. The day has cloudy most of the time, and as it progressed grew some cooler. The evening is quite fair and at six o’clock the temperature is only 39 degrees.

Spent the morning hours mostly in the library engaged with reading according to my common custom. In the middle of the day went down towards the Corners and got a few hickory nuts in Frank’s field. Returning, found the cattle in the road and turned them into the meadow and put up the fence along the road. Spent the afternoon about the house, a part of it with the family, and the remaining portion in the library with the books and newspapers. Amanda & Lelia came & staid over night. Elon was here in the evening.

Thursday, 19

Sixth day of New Moon.

Morning fair and bright and a little frosty besides. At six o’clock the temperature was 32 degrees. As the morning advanced it became smoky and windy and somewhat cloudy. Afternoon quite fair but very smoky. The weather in the evening is of the same character, and and at six o’clock the mercury indicates a temperature of 54 degrees.

Devoted several hours in the morning to reading, both before and after breakfast. Azor, on his way to Barclay with a load of pork, invited me to ride over there with him, but not being ready I declined to go. Chopped a little wood for the library and towards the middle of the day went up the road. Called first at Levi’s, then at the Post Office and got the Tribune and the Chronicle, called a spell on Mr. Bruce, & then came home. Dug a few early Rose potatoes I had in the lower garden.

Friday, 20

First quarter at 6-58, even.

There were plenty smoke and haze in the morning and some clouds. The temperature was quite mild but the thermometer was not consulted. The day has been tolerably fair but was considerably colder at the close. The evening is very fair and bright, and at six o’clock the mercury was down to 34 degrees.

Spent the morning hours reading, according to my usual custom; then went out and chopped some pine roots to be used for my library fire; then started off with wife to go down and visit at Julius’. We found Mrs. Griffin there and Julius was out in the field. Concluding to come home and get my last papers to read, I stopped in Frank’s field and picked up a pocket full of hickory nuts on the way. Returned to Julius’ and found him in the house. We spent the remainder of the afternoon there, returning after sun down. Made up a fire in the library and resumed my reading.

Saturday, 21

Second day of First Quarter.

The night was clear and cold. The morning was fair and there was a very heavy frost. At six o’clock the mercury marked only 19 degrees. The day has been fair with the exception of very much smoke, and the weather has been quite mild. The evening is not cloudy but quite smoky, and at six o’clock the temperature was 45 degrees.

Attended to reading most of the time through the morning, going to the barn occasionally to see the operation of the threshing machine. Philander and Ben were here threshing Harvey’s oats. Afternoon went up to the Centre, calling first to see Br. Levi and then at the Post Office but got no mail. After returning, sold my apples to Burton for $1.00 per Bu. Repaired an earthen pot and planted the monthly rose in it, and read the remainder of the afternoon.

Sunday, 22

Third day of First Quarter.

The morning is very smoky but not cloudy, and the weather is considerably warm and very dry. At six o’clock the mercury was up to 46 deg’s. The day passed over without clouds but with a great deal of smoke. The evening is not cloudy but is very smoky and at six o’clock the temperature is 59 degrees.

Devoted the morning hours to reading as usual. At the hour for meeting went up to the Centre and attended at the Meeting House as is my custom. Br. Greenlaw was in attendence and delivered a discourse. Returned at the close without making any calls, and devoted a considerable portion of the afternoon to reading. Towards night Theodore and Esther came down, and at the beginning of the evening Amanda came over with her little girl. There are destructive fires raging in the upper and lower portions of our township in the woods.

Monday, 23

Fourth day of First Quarter.

The morning is partially cloudy and very smoky. The temperature at six o’clock was 54 degrees. The day has been considerably smoky but otherwise fair. The weather has been quite warm. The evening is also smoky but without clouds, and the temperature at six o’clock is 64 degrees.

The morning was devoted to reading and affairs about the house. Towards the middle of the day took a walk up the road, calling and spending some time with Levi, then went down to the post office where I found the Tribune and a letter from Miss Ellen F. Buell, enclosing her photograph and her brother Charles also. Called again and spent some time with Levi and then came home and read my letter to my wife, arranged the Photographs in the Album, inserting my new ones, and then, after reading The Tribune a spell, chopped and brot in some wood for the library.

Tuesday, 24

Fifth day of First Quarter.

The morning opened cloudy after a very warm night, commencing to rain a little at six o’clock, at which time the temperature was 52 degrees. The day continued cloudy and moist but there was not rain enough to amount to much. The evening like the day is cloudy and smoky and a little wet, with a temperature at six o’clock of 48 degrees.

Read a spell in the morning and in the course of the forenoon went up into the chamber and spent some time there picking up and laying up and arranging the old newspapers and other things that were scattered about and lying in the way. Afternoon went up to the Centre, calling at the post office but finding no mail matter, and then, after calling a few minutes on Esther, came home. Read some in the afternoon, and towards night commenced to write a letter to Mrs. Rhoda A Cook.

Wednesday, 25

Sixth day of First Quarter.

Another warm night and smoky, cloudy, wet morning. It is rainy but does not rain. At six o’clock the temperature was 47 degrees. The weather through the day continued of about the same character as that of the morning, with only rain enough to make it a little damp. The clouds in the afternoon were very dark and towards night it was pretty dark. The evening like the day was cloudy and considerably warm.

Did not spend much time in the morning reading, but took my seat at the library table and finished my letter to Rhoda and the copying, and after spent an hour or more reading and chopping some wood for the library, and placing it in the wood closet, I commenced and finished a long letter to Mr. Atkins and copied it, working in the evening till bed time. Did not go away from the house today but sat at my writing table most of time.

Thursday, 26

Seventh day of First Quarter.

The morning was cloudy and a little wet but no rain of any consequence. At six o’clock the mercury stood at 48 degrees. The weather through the day continued cloudy and wet and there was not any more rain than enough to lay the dust. The evening is very cloudy with a scanty sprinkling of rain. At six o’clock the mercury was standing at 58 degrees.

As soon as the first business of the morning was attended to, including breakfast, resumed my place at the writing table and commenced a long letter to Mrs. Emaline Harris, wife of George Harris of Great Barrington, Mass. Worked at the letter and the copying until some time in the afternoon and then having finished them, took the letter, with those I had written to Rhoda and to Mr. Atkins and carried them up to the post office, and received there the Tribune and the Chronicle and the last week’s Courier. Brot them home and read some.

Friday, 27

Eighth day of First Quarter.

There was a copious rain in the night and the morning was cloudy and wet as usual. At six o’clock the temperature was 53 degrees. In the course of the morning there was another pretty smart fall of rain and about noon the clouds broke away, leaving the afternoon fair and pleasant but with the weather considerably cooler. The evening is mostly fair and at six o’clock the mercury was down to 47 degrees.

Devoted the morning hours principally to reading, and finally most of the time during the forenoon. Early in the afternoon, Mr. Bruce and Lydia came down to see us, and during the time they remained here I devoted my time to them. Towards night when they went away I went up the road with them and called at the Post Office and got the Reporter. Soon after noon a hungry Irish man called here and got his dinner.

Saturday, 28

Full moon at 3-18, even.

The morning at the opening was very fair and bright with the mercury at six o’clock down to 34 degrees. Before eight o’clock it had become very cloudy and with a cool northwest wind, continued so through the day. The evening also is quite cloudy and cool, and is calm besides, the wind having abated. At six o’clock the mercury was only up to 36 degrees.

Read a little while in the morning and then concluding to send a letter to my friend A. M. Bailey of Middlefield conn. I commenced to write it, and spending a considerable portion of the day at it, I finished the writing and coping towards night, and then putting a copy of the Reporter into a wrapper addressed to I carried them up and delivered them at the Post Office but found no mail matter in my Box. I found an opportunity to ride back with Mr. Barnes. Read some after supper, and in the evening.

Sunday, 29

Second day of Full Moon.

At six o’clock in the morning it was very cloudy and the temperature the same as it was last evening, the mercury standing at 36 degrees. The forenoon remained quite cloudy, but clearing off in the afternoon the latter part of the day was fair. The evening is bright and pleasant and considerably cool. The mercury at six o’clock is down to 34 degrees.

Read a spell in the morning, and at the proper time went up to the Centre to meeting, calling a little while to see Br. Levi on the way. Found him feeling not quite so well this morning on account of the effect of some medicine that he had taken, but in a general way appears some better than he has been. The meeting was carried on by Mr. Larcum, there being no other speaker present. In the afternoon Azor came here with Amanda, and after supper, took her home with him to do some weaving there.

Monday, 30

Third day of Full Moon.

There was a heavy frost in the morning and the atmosphere was a little cloudy; the clouds passing away in a short time. The mercury at six o’clock was down to 21 degrees. The day was quite pleasant, the weather growing warmer as it advanced. The evening was considerably cloudy and the mercury at six o’clock was up to 47 degrees.

Devoted the principal part of the time during the morning hours to my books and papers in the Library. Worked a spell at chopping some wood for the library and bringing it in. Towards the middle of the day went up to the Centre, stopping a moment only with Theodore, who is making preparation to move his family up to Barclay tomorrow, having taken his photograph business up there some time since, and then went into the post office, got the Tribune and the Courier and returned again. Some time in the afternoon Luman called he being on his way to Troy, with the intention of returning to Barclay tomorrow, and agreed to go with him. Spent some time in the evening with my papers.

Tuesday, 31

Fourth day of Full Moon.

The morning was quite cloudy and the weather continued mild. At six o’clock the temperature was 42 degrees. The weather continued mild through the day, and was considerably cloudy most of the time. The evening was quite cloudy and a very little rainy, with a pretty brisk southerly wind.

Spent the morning in the library reading some, and getting ready to go with Luman. He came along about ten or eleven o’clock. I went with him then over on to the Charles Taylor hill where he bought some sheep and a cow, and driving them over to his pasture in Franklin, and there making up a lot of cattle and sheep we started with them for Barclay where we arrived just before night. Went with Luman in the evening over to Dr. Hillis’ office where, among others, I found Mr. Luther W. Tiffany with whom I was, a long time ago, acquainted in Towanda. Spent the evening there & then went back to Brewer’s.

November

Wednesday, 1

Fifth day of Full Moon.

The morning was densely cloudy and there was another slight sprinkling of rain. The clouds broke away some in the course of the morning and the remainder of the day was partially fair. Weather mild but grew cooler towards night. Evening considerably cloudy and quite cool besides.

Spent the morning at and around Mr. Brewer’s, reading some, and looking about the premises of the Meat Market. Took breakfast at Mr. Brewer’s. Called into Theodore’s Picture Gallery which he has just established in Barclay, and toward the middle of the day walked out with Esther to show her the village and the operations about the mines. We went down to the place the coal is dumped & down the stairs to the R.R. track, down the track to the depot, up the road, and round past the Catholick Chapel, & then, after looink the mine at that point we returned. Spent some time in the gallery in the afternoon went out to the shooting match to find Luman, and came back and took supper with Theodore, having had dinner at Brewer’s where I went to lodge.

Thursday, 2

Sixth day of Full Moon.

At the opening of the morning The weather was quite cool and only partially fair. Continued cloudy and cool through the forenoon with only some slight intervals of sunshine. The afternoon was partially fair. The evening is considerably cloudy and with fall like weather.

Spent the morning and the forenoon at Mr. Brewer’s and in that immediate vicinity, frequently going in to Theodore’s picture gallery, and the market shops. Devoted a considerable portion of the time to reading books and newspapers which I found at Mr. Brewer’s. Took all my meals there. In the afternoon rode with Luman over to Fall Creek, returning directly. He went over to get some pork he had engaged there, but failed to get it. After our return I spent some time in visiting and viewing the works where the Fall Creek coal is brought in and transferred to the large cars. Expected to go home today but Luman had to assist so much in their operations here, that we concluded to postpone our departure until another. Lodged at Brewer’s.

Friday, 3

Seventh day of Full Moon.

Another cloudy morning with cool weather continuing until the middle of the day. The afternoon was considerably fair and pleasant, but the weather continued quite cool. The evening, like the afternoon, is fair and bright, and the temperature continues pretty low, the mercury being down to 36 degrees at six o’clock.

Arose and walked out around the plan there, making a short call at Theodore’s, and then went back into Mr. Brewer’s and read a spell before breakfast. After breakfast, spent the forenoon in very nearly the same way expecting Luman to get ready and start with me off the mountain. Called several times on Theodore in the course of the forenoon. In the middle of the day Elon and Volney Taylor came up there to see Luman on business. After dinner Luman got ready and started for Franklin and I rode with him as far as the Hawley place and the remainder of the way I rode with Elon, arriving home before night.

Saturday, 4

Eighth day of Full Moon.

The morning morning is frosty and was partially cloudy at the opening. At six o’clock the mercury was down to 22 degrees. The fore part of the day continued considerably cloudy & the latter part was a little fairer. The weather grew warmer as the day progressed. At six o’clock in the evening the temperature was 42 degrees and the weather was quite cloudy again.

Spent a considerable portion of the morning looking over the Chronicle and other newspapers which I found on the table in the living room, they having been brought down from the post office late last evening by Harvey. After this went to work at writing a very long letter to Miss Ellen F. Buell of Springfield, Mass and continued at my writing table most of the time during the remainder of the day; stopping a little while in the afternoon when Luman and Charlie called here, being on their way to Troy; and again, just at night to chop some wood for the library fire. Finished the letter and the copy in the evening.

Sunday, 5

Last quarter 7-59, morn.

The morning at the opening was quite cloudy and considerably cool, the temperature at six o’clock being 33 degrees. The clouds continued until near the middle of the day, and then breaking away, the remainder of the day was partially fair, but did not become very warm. The evening continues partially cloudy and the temperature is rather low, the mercury at six o’clock being down to 32 degrees.

After attending to my morning matters and devoting some time to reading, got ready & went up to the Centre to meeting, calling a short time to see Br. Levi whom I found lying on his bed as usual but with the appearance of mending slowly. Br. Greenlaw was present at the meeting and delivered a very good discourse on the subject of Following Christ. Came home directly after the close of the meeting and found Azor and Eliza here, who, remaining until after supper, then departed for their home. Spent the remainder of the day with my reading in the library and the evening in much the same way.

Monday, 6

Second day of Last Quarter.

The morning at the opening was considerably cloudy and very frosty, and the temperature at six o’clock was 22 degrees. The day was quite cold, freezing where the sun did not shine. It was mostly fair till toward the close. The evening at six o’clock was considerably cloudy and the mercury was only up to 24 degrees.

Read a spell in the morning and in the course of the forenoon commenced a letter to Mary, wife of Hiram Andrus, Wolcott, N. Y. Wrote through the day by spells, leaving off many times to attend to other matters. After noon went up to the post office and got the Tribune and the last week’s Courier, brought them home and spent some time with them. Chopped and brought in a small quantity of wood for the use of the library fire and in the evening finished writing & copying the letter.

Tuesday, 7

Third day of Last Quarter.

The morning at six o’clock was cloudy and the temperature was the same as at six last evening, the mercury resting at 24 degrees. As the morning advanced the clouds disappeared and the sun shone brightly. The day continued fair. The evening is also fair and at six o’clock the mercury is standing at 31 degrees.

Read a little in the morning before breakfast and immediately after went up to the Centre and delivered my letter which was mailed while the carrier waiting. Came home and spent the forenoon in the library, looking over papers and things in the drawers and other places and putting them in order. Brought up from the well water for Lizzie to do the washing. After dinner spent some time reading and then went to work and placed some boards over the main stairway, prepared some whitewash and put it on to the ceiling of the stairway and of the hall in the chamber, and bean to whitewash the ceiling of the anteroom.

Wednesday, 8

Fourth day of Last Quarter.

The morning at six o’clock was quite cloudy but considerably more mild than yesterday morning. The mercury was at 32 degrees. The forenoon continued cloudy but in the afternoon the clouds broke away and towards night it was mostly fair. There was considerable wind in the forepart of the day. The evening at six o’clock is becoming quite cloudy and the temperature is growing milder, the mercury being up to 37 degrees.

Spent my time about the house today, not going abroad at all. Devoted a short time in the early morning to reading, and after breakfast went into the chamber and finished my whitewashing. After this cut the little boy’s hair and then went to reading again and dozing in my chair. In the afternoon spent some time with the children and chopped some wood for the library fire.

Thursday, 9

Fifth day of Last Quarter.

At six o’clock the morning was quite fair and the temperature was 23 degrees. The day has been moderately mild and quite fair all the way through. The evening too, at six o’clock is fair and bright with the mercury standing at 29 degrees.

Spent the morning in the library with the time employed in my usual manner. Read a short time after breakfast and then learning that Harvey was at work on the road went out & worked with him till nearly noon. After dinner went up to the post office and got the Tribune and also a letter from Mrs. Emeline Harris of Great Barrington, Mass., and returned immediately home with them without making any calls. Isaac came down with me and made a call. Mekul(?) came in the afternoon and repaired some plastering. Walked down to the Corners just at night.

Friday, 10

Sixth day of Last Quarter.

There was a brilliant display of Aurora Borealis last night, and afterward clouded up and rained a little. The morning was cloudy and very much milder than last evening. At six o’clock the mercury was up to 34 degrees. The day continued cloudy, with south wind, and little more rain in the afternoon. The evening is also cloudy with a temperature of 39 degrees at six o’clock.

Attended to my morning matters as usual and after breakfast sat down and read a spell and then went out and chopped some wood for the women to burn in the kitchen. In the middle of the day went up to the post office and got the Reporter and spent an hour or more looking it over. Luman called in the afternoon with Mr. Lewis and were here to supper, and then went away to Troy.

Saturday, 11

Seventh day of Last Quarter.

The morning was cloudy and quite windy. At six o’clock the mercury indicated 33 degrees. The day has been pretty cold, and was cloudy till some time afternoon, then clouds broke away and the close of the day was fair. At six o’clock the evening is fair, with considerable wind and the mercury standing at 32 degrees.

Attended to the first business of the morning and after breakfast read a spell, and then went out & chopped a good supply of wood for the library fire and also for the use of the kitchen. Spent the remainder of the forenoon reading and then went up to the post office and got the Courier, calling a little while on Helen, then came home and devoted the remainder of the afternoon to reading and dozing. Luman returned here some time in the night and departed after breakfast this morning with a drove of cattle.

Sunday, 12

New moon at 0-13, even.

The morning was partially cloudy at the opening, and the temperature was pretty low, the mercury being down to 21 degrees at six o’clock. The clouds soon passed away and the day was very clear but the weather too is fair and at six o’clock the temperature, as indicated by the thermometer, is 26 degrees.

After rising attended to my morning matters and read until the breakfast was ready. After this read a spell and then got ready for meeting and having agreed with Alva to go with him to Leroy today, I went over to Elon’s and rode with Alva over there. Br. Churchill delivered a very good discourse, and we came immediately home without making any calls. On coming home found Amanda and Lelia here, and remained with us over night.

Monday, 13

Second day of New Moon.

The night was cold and freezing, the morning was fair at six o’clock and the temperature was only 16 degrees above zero. The day continued fair until towards night and then it became a little cloudy. The afternoon was more mild and the evening at six o’clock was partially cloudy with the mercury standing at 32 degrees.

Arose early and spent the morning before breakfast in my usual manner. After breakfast made preparation and rode to Troy with Harvey and Lizzie. We went to Azor’s and after dinner I walked over to the village they driving over afterward. Bought some wall paper, and some stationary, &c. and then walked back to Azor’s, and thence down to the main road where I met Harvey and then got into the waggon and rode home with them. Called at our post office for the Tribune but Mr. Gilman had been there and got it. Found it at home and read it in the evening.

Tuesday, 14

Third day of New Moon.

A warmer night, a cloudy morning, and at six o’clock a temperature of 36 degrees. The entire day was cloudy & a rain, commencing in the forenoon, continued through the afternoon with very little intermission. The evening too is quite rainy and at six o’clock the mercury is resting at 40 degrees.

Spent the early morning according to custom. After breakfast sat down to my reading a spell and sometime in the middle of the day went to work and carried my Early Rose potatoes out of the chamber in to the cellar. After another interval of reading I went out and placed some tubs and other vessels under the eaves in order to save some rain water for washing purposes, our well, on account of the long drouth beginning to fail. Spend the evening in the library as usual.

Wednesday, 15

Fourth day of New Moon.

A rainy night and a cloudy and wet morning. At six o’clock the mercury was up to 43 degrees, and the wind which was southerly last night and boisterous, changed to the west and became calm. Weather continued cloudy, and grew colder through the day. There was considerable wind and a sprinkling of snow towards night. The evening is cloudy at six o’clock and the mercury is down to 30 degrees.

Devoted the morning hours and also the greater portion of the forenoon; principally to reading in the Library. In the afternoon carried my calfskin boots up to Charles Kenyon’s shop to have them mended, and then went over to the post office but found no mail matter there for me, Harvey having brought down the last week’s Chronicle last night. Came home and spent a short time chopping and bringing in some wood for the library fire, devoted the remainder of the time mostly to reading.

Thursday, 16

Fifth day of New Moon.

The ground was covered with snow at the dawn of the morning and a snow storm appeared to be, very moderately, in progress. The temperature, at six o’clock, was down to 20 degrees. The day was cloudy all the way through, and most of the time the snow continued to fall. The evening at six o’clock is also cloudy with the mercury resting at 22 degrees.

After the first business of the morning had been attended to, took my breakfast and then took my seat in the library again and resumed my reading. In this manner my time was employed, at intervals, through the fore part of the day. Soon after noon went up to the Centre, calling first at the shoe shop for my boots, but they not being mended went on to the post office, got the Tribune and brought it home and looked it over. Chopped some wood for the library and brought it in, and brought up some water for Lizzie.

Friday, 17

Sixth day of New Moon.

The morning was cloudy, and cloudy weather continued through the day. At six o’clock the temperature was 24 degrees, and as the day advanced it grew considerably warmer. The evening was cloudy too, but the weather was quite moderate & the snow, which remained over yesterday, continued, gradually, to melt away.

Read some before breakfast and continued my reading afterward, most of the time till about the middle of the day, and then took my staff and started off on a tramp. Went up to the Centre, calling first at Kenyon’s shop and paid him for mending my boots, then called at the post office and got the Reporter and the Chronicle, and then taking Mr. Bunyan’s mail, went over to his house, staying there till night, and wishing to go from there to Luther’s. Mr. Bunyan went with me down to Valentine’s south line, he going back, and I going on to Luther’s, where I tarried over night.

Saturday, 18

Seventh day of New Moon.

The morning was cloudy at the opening and the temperature a little lower, so that the road had become slightly frozen. The weather continued cloudy through the day, and to grow warmer too, so that the snow had almost entirely disappeared except on the tops of the hills. The evening is also cloudy, and is a little cooler, the mercury, at six o’clock, indicating 32 degrees.

Arose in good season and spent the morning chatting with Luther and Sally. After breakfast went out and looked at Luther’s new grist mill and saw him grind some corn. The proprietor is Mahlon Luther. Soon after this I started homeward going over the hill and calling to see Mary where I spent an hour or more and then getting on to a waggon with Ben I rode down to the house where he lives and then walking along down to the Centre, called at the P.O. but getting no mail came on home and chopped some wood and spent the remainder of the afternoon in the library, wife being away.

Sunday, 19

First quarter at 3-51, morn.

The morning was cloudy at the opening, and was also considerably foggy. at seven o’clock the temperature was 25 degrees. The day was cloudy all the way through but was not cold, the wind being southerly. The evening was of about the same character it being cloudy and mild with a sprinkling of rain. Neglected to observe the thermometer.

Arose in the morning and attended to my bath and other matters as usual. Started early for meeting at the Centre and called on Br. Taylor a spell. Brs. Greenlaw and Hyatt were both present at the meeting, and Br. Hyatt delivered the discourse. He made an appointment for the evening and came home with me for refreshment. At night went up with him to the meeting, and at the conclusion, he returned with me again and put up for the night, he having left an appointment for tomorrow evening again. Just at night Hirah Champney came and his sister Julia, and staid with us.

Monday, 20

The morning, as usual, was cloudy and, at the opening, was a little rainy, the temperature at seven o’clock, being up to 40 degrees. Cloudy, warm weather continued through the day, but the clouds broke away about noon so that there was a very little sunshine. The evening is quite cloudy, and, at five o’clock the mercury is up to the mark of 44.

Arose quite early in the morning and made preparations for our company. After breakfast, Hirah and Julia got ready and departed for home, but Br. Hyatt concluded to remain with me part of the day in order to do some writing as well as visiting, so he devoted his time according to that programme, alternating between the writing table and the fireside. Some time after dinner I went with him up the road and called at Br. Levi Taylor’s. I went down very soon to the P.O. and got the Courier, made another short call at Br. Taylor’s & then came home and chopped some wood for the library.

Tuesday, 21

The morning was cloudy again at the opening, with the temperature mild, the mercury standing on the mark for 34 degrees at seven o’clock. The cloudy mild weather continued through the day. The evening is cloudy also and the weather soft and mild, the mercury, at five o’clock, indicating a temperature of 36 degrees.

Despatched the business of the morning, took my breakfast; and then, as soon as it was light enough, sat down at my writing table and commenced a long letter to Mrs. Emelina Harris of Great Barrington, with which I was engaged at intervals until some time in the afternoon, when I finished the letter and the copy and carrying it to the post office I delivered it there and received a letter from A. M. Bailey of Middlefield Conn. Came home and chopped some wood for the library, and in the evening went over and Elon a call of an hour or two. Eli Rockwell called in the middle of the day and sold us some spectacles. Luman called a few moments at night.

Wednesday, 22

Fourth day of First Quarter

The weather continues cloudy and dull. The morning at seven o’clock was cloudy and a little cooler, the mercury standing at 30 degrees. The weather through the day has been cloudy except an interval early in the afternoon that was partially fair. The evening at five o’clock is cloudy and is pretty cool, the thermometer indicating a temperature of 30 degrees, same as morning.

After the morning matters and the breakfast had been attended to, went into the library and commenced to write a letter to Arletta Lane at Jersey Shore. Spent most of the time until some time in the afternoon writing at intervals and employing a portion of the time at reading and otherwise. Some after breakfast went down to the Corners call a spell at Julius’ and also at Robert’s and then came home and went to work at my letter again. After I had finished it and copied it, I carried it up to the post office and got the Tribune that was due last Monday. Looked it over a little, and then chopped & brot in some wood.

Thursday, 23

Fifth day of First Quarter.

A cold night, and the morning opened with the ground slightly covered with snow, but it was quite fair, a circumstance that has not happened before in the last ten days. At seven o’clock the mercury was down to 15 degrees, the lowest of the season. Became quite cloudy again in the course of the forenoon & snowed a very little in the middle of the day. Some sunshine in the afternoon. Evening at five o’clock is considerably cloudy, and mercury at 25 degrees.

Spent the morning according to my long established custom, and after breakfast went back to the library and read a spell and then went out and chopped a parcel of wood and brought it into the closet for my use. Spent the remainder of the forenoon looking over my correspondence and arranging some business papers. After dinner went up to the Centre, calling at Volney’s on the way, and meeting Mr. Gilman in the village, he gave me the Tribune which he had just taken from my box in the P.O., and I came home and looked it over. Burton called in the morning, Harry in the forenoon, and Luman made a very short call in the middle of the day, being on his way to Barclay.

Friday, 24

Sixth day of First Quarter

At five o’clock the morning was cloudy and a snow storm was just commencing. At seven o’clock the temperature was 25 degrees the same as last evening, and the snow was moderately falling. Snow and sleet continued to fall until afternoon and then changed to rain, which towards night abated and the clouds partially broke away. The evening at five o’clock is cloudy and the mercury stands at 34 degrees.

Made preparation in the morning to go over to Lurenda’s today, but on account of the storm, gave it up. Wife rode with Harvey up to Burton’s in the morning. Spent the forenoon in the library almost exclusively, devoting the greatest part of the time to reading, but also a considerable portion of it to dozing and sleeping. At noon went up to the Centre but made no calls except at the Post Office, where I got the Reporter and then returned immediately home. Looked the Reporter over a little while and then lent it to Mr. Gilman. Harvey returned at night but wife concluded to remain at Burton’s a day or two longer.

Saturday, 25

Seventh day of First Quarter.

Thawed a little through the night. At seven o’clock the morning was cloudy and a little foggy, and the temperature, according to the mercury, was 31 degrees. The clouds began to disappear in the forenoon and the afternoon has been quite fair. The evening is fair and pleasant, with the moon shining brightly, and the temperature a little lower, the mercury at five o’clock being down to 28 degrees.

Attended to my morning matters as usual, ate breakfast at half past six, and then returned to the library again, devoting my time to reading principally, and a small portion of it to writing, until towards the middle of the day, and then went up to the Centre. Called to make Br. Levi a visit but finding that he had gone out, went on down to the store and found him there. Waited there an hour or more for the mail and soon after its arrival got the Courier and the Chronicle and came home. Read the papers and then chopped some wood. Wife has not returned from Burton’s yet.

Sunday, 26

Full moon at 8-57, even.

The morning at seven o’clock was cloudy and the weather considerably warmer again, the mercury having risen to 35 degrees. The wind was southerly and the snow was disappearing. There was a little rain in the forenoon and a little sunshine in the afternoon. At five o’clock in the evening the weather was cloudy again and continued quite mild. The mercury was resting at 40 degrees.

Arose pretty early in the morning, attended to my washing, and read a spell before breakfast. Got ready and went up to meeting a little before the hour, calling at Isaac’s on the way. There being no other preacher present, E. F. Larcum was the chief speaker. Returned home immediately after the meeting was concluded and found wife at home and Burton and Mary here. Soon after this Azor and Eliza, who were over to Amanda’s, came and they and they all until after remained until after tea, and till towards night.

Monday, 27

Second day of Full Moon.

The night was quite rainy and at seven o’clock in the morning it was still cloudy and rainy and moderately warm, the mercury indicating the temperature of 37 degrees. Cloudy weather continued through the day, growing colder as the day advanced until the close. The evening was cloudy at five o’clock with a cold wind from the west, and the mercury was down to 21 degrees.

Spent the early morning according to my common practice, and after breakfast sat down to my writing table and began a letter to Br. Wells. Finished the letter and copied it, and enclosed it, and a little after noon went up to the Centre and delivered it at the Post Office, and got the Tribune and returned immediately home and devoted some time to looking it over and reading some parts of it. After this went out and chopped some wood for the library and brought it into the closet, and then, sat down in the library.

Tuesday, 28

Third day of Full Moon.

The night was quite cold and the morning too, besides being considerably cloudy at the beginning. At seven o’clock the mercury was down to 10 degrees above zero. The clouds wore off as the morning advanced and at nine o’clock the sun appeared. The remaining part of the day was fair and it continued cold all the way through. The evening is quite cloudy again and at five o’clock the temperature was 16 degrees.

Attended to my morning matters before breakfast, according to my constant practice. After breakfast went into the library and spent some time at the writing table and at reading, and then took my cane and walked over to Amanda’s and found Lucella there, who had just returned from Elmira. Sat there and chatted with them an hour or more and then came home again without making any other calls. Spent the afternoon mostly in the house, going out only to chop a little wood for the library fire.

Wednesday, 29

Fourth day of Full Moon.

Found about three inches depth of snow on the ground and the morning cloudy and cold. At seven o’clock the mercury stood at 11 degrees. The forenoon continued cloudy, clouds broke away in and the latter part of the day was fair. The weather thro the day cold and blustering, and decidedly wintry. The evening continues fair and cold, and at six o’clock the temperature is only 7 degrees.

Spent the morning before breakfast in the customary manner, and after breakfast went out and chopped a little wood for the fire in the library, and after this worked a spell at the cradle, shaving the rockers into better shape. Spent the remainder of the forenoon in the library up to eleven o’clock, and then went up to the post office and waited there some time for the mail but failed to get anything when it arrived. Came home and spent the remainder of the afternoon in the library and with the family. Towards night Dr. Hillis called, and wishing to see Harvey who had gone to Troy, and till in the evening for his return.

Thursday, 30

Fifth day after Full Moon.

Another very cold night. The morning at seven o’clock was partially cloudy and the temperature was quite low, the mercury being down to 5 degrees above zero only. As the morning progressed it grew more fair until the clouds had nearly all disappeared, and the latter part of the day was quite fair and pleasant excepting the cold. The evening is clear and stars are bright, and at five o’clock, the mercury rested at 9 degrees above zero.

Spent the early morning in the usual manner, had breakfast at the usual time, and after this spent some time in the library among my books and papers. Samuel called about eleven o’clock and after a short stay I walked with him up to the post office where I got the Tribune, the Reporter and a letter from Mr. Atkins. Came home and read my letter and looked the newspapers over a spell, and then went out and chopped some wood for the library and brought it in.

December

Friday, 1

Sixth day after Full Moon.

The morning, at the opening, was quite cloudy again and continued so until towards noon when it became partially fair for a little while. The temperature at seven o’clock was 14 degrees, being a little more moderate than any morning since last Monday. The afternoon has been considerably cloudy. The evening continues cloudy and at five o’clock the mercury rests at 20 degrees above the cypher.

After breakfast read a little while in the library and then finished a long letter to A. M. Bailey, Middlefield, Conn., and the copy having begun the same two or three days before. Chopped some wood and then went up to the post office, but had to wait some time for the mail. After it came in got the Chronicle and came home. Spent some time wife in the kitchen, reading the paper. Harvey and Lizzie and Albert having gone to Barclay. Chopped and brot in some more wood at night.

Saturday, 2

Seventh day of Full Moon.

As usual, the morning was quite cloudy at the time of dawning, and the weather was slowly moderating, the mercury being up to 16 degrees at seven o’clock. Towards noon the clouds broke away and the sun appeared at intervals. The afternoon was considerably fair and mild. The evening is fair at five o’clock, and the mercury stands at 20 degrees.

After breakfast went back into the library and resumed my reading that I had commenced before, and after some time spent in this manner, went out and attended to some matters outdoors, among which was chopping some wood. At noon went up to the Centre, and meeting Br. Greenlaw there he came home with me and spent the afternoon. At night we went back to the Meeting House where he had an appointment to preach in the evening. After meeting he came back with me and staid. Sent my letter for A. M. Bailey to the Post Office by Lucella.

Sunday, 3

Eighth day of Full Moon.

The morning at early dawn was partially fair, the weather remaining moderately cold. At seven o’clock the temperature was 13 degrees only, but grew some warmer in the course of the day. The forenoon was mostly cloudy, and the afternoon was partially fair again. The evening is considerably fair and at five o’clock the mercury is resting at 25 degrees.

Arose early and did my washing and put my room in order before Br. Greenlaw left the bed. After breakfast chatted with him until near the hour for meeting and then Br. Greenlaw went along, he having some calls to make, and I went up at the proper time and attended the meeting. Br. Greenlaw delivered a very good discourse on the subject of "entering in at the strait gate". Returned immediately home after the conclusion of the meeting, Br. Greenlaw stopping with some one at the Centre. Spent the principal portion of the remaining portion of the day in the library, reading some and sleeping some.

Monday, 4

Ninth day of Full Moon.

Another cloudy morning with the weather quite mild, the mercury at seven o’clock being up to 32 degrees. The day continued cloudy all the way through thawed some but grew colder towards & snowed a little. The evening is quite cloudy, with a brisk wind, and at five o’clock the mercury was down to 28 degrees.

Arose early and had a considerable spell of reading before breakfast. Read a spell immediately after breakfast & then concluding to repair the library floor where it was badly worn in front of the fireplace, commenced the job. Worked very busily at it until some time in the afternoon before I got through with it. After this I rested a spell, and Harvey coming along about that time I rode up to the Centre with him, and meeting Mr. Gilman there who had just left the post office with my mail, I received the Tribune & Courier and walked home with him.

Tuesday, 5

Last quarter at 1-50, morn.

Cleared off in the course of the night and the morning opened very fair and very cold, the mercury at seven o’clock, being 1 degree below zero. The day continued clear and cold all the way through. The evening also is clear and bright and considerably cold. At five o’clock the temperature, as indicated by the thermometer was only 6 degrees above zero.

Arose early, built a fire in the library, and took my morning bath, notwithstanding the cold, and after putting the room in order, sat down and read till I was called to breakfast. After breakfast went to work at repairing the library hearth, by taking up all in front of the jambs and laying it over again more level. In the afternoon relaid and nailed down the oilcloth in front of the fireplace in the library, and also put down a rug on the carpet in that room at the entrance from the hall. Spent the entire day about the house.

Wednesday, 6

Second day of Last Quarter.

The morning at the opening was partially fair and the temperature at seven o’clock was 7 degrees. As the morning advanced it first became quite cloudy, then broke away and finally was quite fair. The weather has been quite cold but more moderate than yesterday. The evening is cloudy and considerably cold the thermometer measuring only 15 degrees above zero at five o’clock. Wind from the south & brisk.

After breakfast devoted an hour or so to reading, and then went to work in the library again and repaired the chimney, by covering the plinths of the pilasters with tin in order to protect them from fire, and to hide some places already burned. Afternoon went up to the Post Office expecting some letters but returned without finding any. Spent some time reading, and then went out and split up some wood & brought into the library. Elon called in the forenoon. Luman came & staid over.

Thursday, 7

Third day of Last Quarter.

The weather continuing to moderate, the temperature at seven o’clock this morning was up to 22 degrees, and the weather was partially cloudy. The day became quite cloudy and continued so all the way through. The evening is cloudy and is quite mild, the temperature at five o’clock being 34 degrees.

The business of the day has been with us generally, to make preparations for the expected gathering here tomorrow. Read a little in the morning, and at several intervals in the course of the day; but my main employment has been to assist in putting things in order about the house. Burton and Mary were here to assist on the occasion. Luman remained until after noon and then went to Troy. Went up to the Centre and meeting Fremont there received from him the Tribune & the Chronicle, who had just taken them from my box in the office. He also assisted here. Elon called again this afternoon.

Friday, 8

Fourth day of Last Quarter.

The weather was cloudy in the morning but quite mild, the temperature at seven o’clock being 31 degrees. The day was mostly cloudy, the sun only shining a little in the course of the afternoon. The evening was cloudy too, and the weather had grown some colder, but the thermometer was not observed.

This day completes the term of 50 years since the marriage of myself and wife, & and according to the wishes of our children, preparations were made and all our living descendents and many other friends assembled here in honor of the occasion, and among them were Brs. Greenlaw and Wilson, and their wives from Alba. The company was pretty large but very quiet and pleasant. They were also very generous too, the value of the presents they gave amounting to more than $70.00. Theodore & Esther, & Sister Mary, and Luman remained with us over night.

Saturday, 9

Fifth day of Last Quarter.

The morning at the opening was quite cloudy, the weather continuing moderate. At seven o’clock the mercury rested at 20 degrees above zero. The day has been considerably cloudy and the weather grew colder all the way through. At seven o’clock the evening was cloudy and the temperature was down to 19 degrees.

Did not engage in any business of consequence today, hardly giving any attention even to reading; but had company most of the time. Luman, not being very well, remained through the day and over night again. Theodore’s folks and aunt Mary departed a spell after breakfast, going up to the Centre. Assisted some in putting things in order about the house, after the gathering of yesterday. Went up to the post office early in the afternoon, and got the Reporter and the Courier, and a letter from the Tribune office and also a letter that I had sent to Jersey Shore for Lettie Lane, returned. Tried to read some after I came back, but slept most of the time. Elon called in the forenoon.

Sunday, 10

Sixth day of Last Quarter.

The morning at the opening was partially fair, but soon became quite cloudy and considerably windy as well as cold. At seven o’clock the mercury stood at 16 degrees. The clouds remained until about the middle of the day, they then broke away and dispersed, leaving the afternoon quite fair. The evening at five o’clock is fair with the mercury stopping at 27 degrees.

Spent the principal part of the morning after breakfast, with the family in the sitting room. Luman remaining with us again today, he being not yet recovered from the severe cold he had taken. Attended meeting at the Centre in the forenoon which was conducted by Br. C. D. Ross, there being no other leader in attendence. Came home immediately after meeting and spent part of the afternoon reading. Luman stays.

Monday, 11

New moon at 11-6, even.

The morning opened quite cloudy but not very cold. At seven o’clock the mercury was standing at 26 degrees. The has continued more or less cloudy all the way through and not warm enough to thaw any. The evening is also cloudy and cool, the mercury at five o’clock indicating 29 degrees.

Arose and disposed of my morning matters in season for an early breakfast, after which Harvey started away with Theodore and Esther for Barclay, Luman remaining until towards noon, he feeling a little better. Did not engage in any business today; but spent a part of the time in the forenoon reading, but more of it with the family and with Samuel who called here. About noon went up to the post office and got the Tribune, and after looking it over a spell went over to Elon’s and made a call of moderate length, then came home and attended to my wood and made preparations for the night.

Tuesday, 12

Second day of New Moon.

The morning at dawn was partially fair but became more cloudy as it advanced. The weather was not very cold, the mercury at seven o’clock being up to 27 degrees. The middle of the day was quite fair, but it became very cloudy again towards night. The evening remains cloudy too, and the temperature does not vary much from the morning, the mercury standing at 28 degrees at the hour of five.

Was attacked in the evening with Cholera Morbus, or something similar to it, and had a very sick night. The disorder continued through the morning and through the day, but the pain was very much abated. Have not eaten anything through the day, and have sat up but a small portion of the time. Elon called, and then went home & brought me over some medicine, and after taking some of it I felt better. Feel quite weak this evening, but have little or no pain. Have done but very little at reading or writing today.

Wednesday, 13

Third day of New Moon.

The morning was cloudy, and snow commenced falling at break of day. The temperature at seven o’clock was 28 degrees, the same as at five last evening. The snow fell moderately until near the middle of the day, the afternoon remaining cloudy and mild. The evening is quite cloudy and at seven o’clock the temperature, by the thermometer, is represented to be 32 degrees.

Rested and slept well last night, and find myself well recovered this morning. Took a light breakfast with the family, which is the first food I have taken since the afternoon of Monday. Read some in the course of the forenoon, and afternoon went up to the post office but received no mail. Finding that Mr. Bruce and Lydia had returned from their long visit at Roaring Branch, called in to see them a spell before returning home. After this went over to Elon’s and made a call, carrying home his bottle of medicine. Spent the principal part of the remaining time, after my return, reading.

Thursday, 14

Fourth day of New Moon.

Another very cloudy morning, with the weather a little cooler. The temperature at seven o’clock was down to 17 degrees. The forenoon remained cloudy but the middle of the day was quite fair. The afternoon became cloudy again and the weather through the entire day has been pretty cold. The evening remains cloudy and at five o’clock the mercury was at 17 degrees, same as morning.

Expecting to go to Towanda today with Mr. Bunyan, got ready in the morning and waited for him till towards noon, & then giving up his coming, concluded to go up to Br. Greenlaw’s Donation Party at Sam Rockwell’s. Went up to the Centre calling first on Lydia & then at the post office and got the Tribune & the Chronicle, then went up on the hill to Br. Churchill’s & took dinner with him, then came back to Samuel’s as the company were beginning to arrive. Remained till nearly night and then came home having donated $5.00.

Friday, 15

Fifth day of New Moon.

The weather at the morning dawn was quite cloudy and dull, the same as it has been for some time of late, and the cold weather continued also. The mercury at seven o’clock was 18 degrees above zero. The day continued cloudy and cold. The evening is fair with the mercury only 8 degrees above zero at five o’clock.

Spent the morning in the usual way and after breakfast went into the library and read a little while and then, Mr. Bunyan coming in, he being on his way to Towanda, I got ready and rode down with him. Stopped at the Elwell House, went into the Commissioner’s office with Mr. Bunyan and, with Col. Mason, signed with Mr. Bunyan his official bonds. We then went with the Col. and stopped at his bank a little while, then went back to the Hotel to dinner, then went over to see the new jail, then went into court a little while, & then started for home, arriving before dark.

Saturday, 16

Sixth day of New Moon.

Another very cold night and morning to match. The morning was very clear, but in its progress became quite cloudy and grew warmer. At seven o’clock the mercury stood at 6 degrees below zero. The sun shone some in the middle of the day, but the afternoon became cloudy again. The evening is fair and the mercury, at 5 o’clock is at 26 degrees.

Harvey started away very early this morning for Tioga county. After breakfast sat in the library a spell and then went out and split some wood, and while thus engaged, Elon came over and spent two or three hours with me. After he went away, walked up to the post office and got the Reporter and three letters, one from Mrs. Emaline Harris of Great Barrington Mass., one from Mrs. Rhoda A. Cook of Middlefield Conn., and one from Alfred M. Bailey of same place. Called at Mr. Bruce’s and read my letters; then came home and read them again. Towards night went out and split a quantity of wood for kitchen & library.

Sunday, 17

Seventh day of New Moon.

The morning was cloudy and the weather appears to be growing a little more mild. At seven o’clock the mercury was standing at 26 degrees, the same as last evening. The clouds broke away so that the forenoon was partially fair, and the afternoon was quite fair & pleasant. The evening is also fair and bright, and at five o’clock the mercury stands at 31 degrees.

After attending to the first business of the morning, took my breakfast and then took my seat in the library and read until the morning hour for meeting, and then got ready and proceeded to the Centre and attended at the meeting house as usual. Br. Greenlaw being present took the charge of the meeting and delivered a discourse. Came immediately home after the exercises were concluded, and devoted my time to reading, mostly, and a portion of it with the family. Elon came over towards night to borrow a book and spent an hour or so with me in conversation.

Monday, 18

First quarter at 3-45, even.

At the dawn of day the morning was quite cloudy, and about that time it commenced to snow a little. At seven o’clock the mercury stood at 26 degrees. Ceased snowing after a little and clouds broke away in the middle of the day and the afternoon was mostly fair. The weather has been quite mild. The evening is cloudy and at five o’clock the mercury stood at 30 degrees.

Spent the early morning according to rule, and after breakfast took my seat at the writing table for the purpose of writing a letter to my friend Atkins. Worked at by spells until noon, and then went up to the Centre to get my mail matter at the post office, but meeting Harvey who had just taken it out I received the Courier from him and came home. Spent some time with the paper and then resumed my letter. Chopped some wood towards night and then went at it and finished the letter and the copying.

Tuesday, 19

Second day of First Quarter.

The morning was quite cloudy and the weather appears to be growing a little cooler again. At seven o’clock the mercury stood at 22 degrees. There have been a few short intervals of sunshine, but most of the day has been cloudy, and there was quite a little fall of snow in the afternoon. The evening at five o’clock was quite cloudy and the mercury stood the same as morning, 22 degrees.

Attended to my bathing and other morning matters according to my invariable rule when not prevented by something extraordinary. Sat down to my writing table after breakfast, and at different intervals in the course of the day wrote and copied and finished a letter to Mrs. Emaline Harris of Great Barrington, Mass. In the middle of the day went up to the post office and got the Tribune, and delivered my letter for Mr. Atkins, and then returned directly home and after chopping some wood for my use in the library, employed the remainder of the afternoon at the writing table.

Wednesday, 20

Third day of First Quarter.

The morning was pretty cold and was also considerably cloudy. At 7 o’clock the mercury had gone down to 3 degrees above zero. The day has been partially cloudy, the sun shining out at intervals, and at others snow would be falling. It was quite cold and blustering towards night. The evening at five o’clock is very cold with the mercury down to zero, and sinking lower.

Spent the day at home altogether, not going abroad at all. After attending to my morning matters, read a little while till breakfast was ready, and then attended to that. After all this sat down to my writing table again and commenced a letter to Mrs. Rhoda A. Cook of Middlefield Conn. Wrote at intervals through the day but did not finish it. My letter to Mrs. Harris I sent to the post office by Harvey, who went to Troy in the afternoon. Went out in the blustering weather towards night and chopped some wood for the library, & brot it in.

Thursday, 21

Fourth day of First Quarter.

Coldest morning of the season, altogether. At five o’clock the weather was fair and the mercury was 19 degrees below zero and sank another degree before eight. The day has been fair all the way through, and without much wind. The evening continues fair and at five o’clock the mercury stands at 3 degrees above zero.

Arose pretty early and attended to my bath as usual. Read some before breakfast and after breakfast finished copying my letter to Rhoda and enclosed it, and soon after eleven o’clock carried it up to the post office and delivered it, and received the Tribune and a letter from my old friend Joseph K. Pelton of my native town, called a spell at Mr. Bruce’s, and then came home and after reading my letter, spent some time reading the Tribune, after this repared Eliza’s chair, and towards night went out and chopped a pretty good supply of wood for the library fire. In the evening we had an oyster party, consisting of Amanda’s family and Robinson’s.

Friday, 22

Fifth day of First Quarter.

The weather was cloudy this morning and a little more moderate. At seven o’clock the mercury stood at 6 degrees above zero, and soon afterward snow began to fall quite moderately. The day became partially fair but there was a little snow falling most of the time. The evening at five o’clock is considerably cloudy and the thermometer gives the temperature of 26 degrees above zero.

Our company did not retire till after one o’clock this morning, and we did not retire to bed until nearly two. Arose about six on account of Harvey who started away for the Pine Creek region with his team to work. Read a little in the morning and in the middle of the day went up to the post office and got the Reporter and some trifles for the children on Christmas, called a spell on Lydia and then came home and tried to read the paper but slept most of the time. Towards chopped some wood for the library & split some for kitchen.

Saturday, 23

Sixth day of First Quarter.

The morning opened quite cloudy, with south wind, and the weather growing milder. At seven o’clock the mercury had risen to the mark for 32 degrees, or freezing point, and it is still going higher. Thawed, and was cloudy all day and the afternoon was quite rainy, especially towards night. The evening is also rainy, and at five o’clock the mercury is up to 38 degrees.

In the early morning read some and after breakfast commenced to write a letter to my early friend Joseph K. Pelton. Spent some time splitting some wood for the library, and bringing it into the closet. A little afternoon went up to the post office and got the Chronicle and returned without making any calls, except to chat a little while with Mr. Bunyan whom I met at the store. Resumed my letter after my return without stopping to read my papers which I lent to Mr. Gilman, but wrote only at intervals. Wallace called here a little while towards night. Read some in the evening and wrote some, but did finish the letter.

Sunday, 24

Seventh day of First Quarter.

The morning was fair and pleasant, the weather continuing mild. At seven o’clock the mercury stood at the mark for 29 degrees. The day has been remarkably fair and mild and pleasant except that it was a little cloudy towards night. The evening is partially cloudy but remains mild and pleasant, the temperature at five o’clock being 30 degrees.

Spent the early morning as usual and there being no appointment for a meeting at the Centre today on account of a general meeting being now in progress at Smithfield, I remained at home. Spent some time reading and finished writing and copying my long letter to Mr. Pelton of Mass. At the beginning of the evening went went up to the post office and delivered my letter in the letter box and returning found Charly and Mr. Kumer at the house but they returned to Barclay Luman is sick.

Monday, 25

Eighth day of First Quarter.

The morning at first was partially cloudy but cleared off in its progress and was very pleasant and mild. At seven o’clock the mercury was up to 30 degrees, the same as last evening. The day continued mild and pleasant all the way through, but was a little cloudy towards night. The evening at five o’clock is also a little cloudy and the temperature is up to 42 degrees.

Spent the morning in the amusement of the children with Christmas presents, and a portion of the forenoon reading and towards noon went up to the Centre, carrying up Lizzie’s shoes to be repaired, and calling at Mr. Bruce’s and inviting them to come down and spend Christmas with us. When the mail arrived went into the post office and got the Tribune and the last week’s Courier. Returning called at Isaac’s and invited him and Abby also to come down. They all came and spent the afternoon, and Luman also was here from Barclay, he having gotten some better. Towards night he proceeded on to Troy, having some business there.

Tuesday, 26

Full moon at 4-39, even.

The morning was quite cloudy at the beginning, and the weather a little cooler, the mercury at seven o’clock, being down to 27 degrees above zero. The day continued cloudy all the way through and the weather was quite mild, growing colder some towards night. Rained a little in the afternoon, winding off with sleet. The evening was partially fair, and at five o’clock the temperature as indicated by the thermometer was 30 degrees.

Attended to the business of the early morning, and after breakfast devoted an an hour or more to reading and then concluding to begin a letter to my friend A. M. Bailey of Middlefield, Conn took my seat at the writing table and commenced. Did not not employ the whole time but wrote some at several different intervals the course of the day, leaving off occasionally for the purpose of cutting some wood, for reading some, and for attention to various other matters, including rest. Did not finish the letter quite.

Wednesday, 27

Second day after Full Moon.

The morning at the opening was, considerably fair, with clouds appearing as it advanced. At seven o’clock the temperature was shown by the mercury to be 29 degrees. The day has been partially cloudy with considerable wind, and growing colder towards night. The evening is partially fair and is very cold and blustering.

After breakfast resumed the writing and the copying of my very long letter to A. M. Bailey. In the middle of the day went up to the Centre, called at the post office and got the Chronicle and also a letter from Luman C. Andrus of Huron N. Y., called into Mr. Bruce’s and read my letter, which announced his intention of coming here. After this went into the Meeting House and attended the funeral of Mr. William Morrison. Br. Greenlaw was the officiating minister. As soon as the services in the house were concluded left immediately and came home and resumed again the copying of my letter to Mr. Bailey and having finished it commenced a letter to Luman Andrus giving directions for his journey here, and finished it and copyied in the evening, & delivered, with the other, at the P.O.

Thursday, 28

Third day after Full Moon.

The past night was very windy and cold. The morning was fair and pleasant and calm, but was very cold. At seven o’clock the mercury was 1 degree below zero. The forenoon and middle of the day were fair, the latter part was cloudy. The evening remains cloudy at five o’clock, and the mercury has come up to 10 degrees above zero.

Arose rather late and attended to the first business of the morning and took my breakfast, and then went out and chopped some wood to burn in the library and brought it into the closet. After this I wrote a spell, and then read a spell, and then Mr. Gilman coming in, I spent some time in chat with him. After mail time went up to the post office and got the The Tribune and a letter from Delos Rockwell inclosing to me a commission from the Court, authorizing and requiring me to hold an Inquisition on the case of Ziba Morse, in regard to his lunacy. &c. Came home and prepared some more wood for the library and for the kitchen; and read the paper some. Luman came & staid.

Friday, 29

Fourth day after Full Moon.

The morning was cloudy and a snow storm had commenced and had whitened the ground the ground some at seven o’clock. The mercury was resting then at 18 degrees, having risen eight in the course of the night. The snow continued to fall till some time afternoon, getting to be three or four inches deep. Latter part of the day was partially fair. Evening is cloudy again & at five o’clock the mercury was up to the mark of 22°.

Went to the barn in the morning and fed Luman’s mare, her remaining unwell. After breakfast went out and split a considerable quantity of wood for the kitchen, and chopped and brought in some for the use of the library. Percival came in some time before noon, and soon after him Elon called. They staid till noon. Soon after they departed, went up to the post office, but finding my box empty; returned immediately home without making any other calls. Chopped a little more wood in the afternoon and spent some time reading. In the evening commenced another or additional letter to Lettie, but did not finish it.

Saturday, 30

Fifth day of Full Moon.

The morning was cloudy and the weather moderate. At seven o’clock the temperature was 22 degrees the same as last evening. The day has continued cloudy all the way through and the weather has been quite moderate. The evening too is cloudy and mild. At five o’clock the temperature, as indicated by the thermometer, is 31 degrees.

Went down to the barn in the morning and took care of Luman’s mare. After breakfast completed another letter to Letter to Lettie, the first having been returned by the Post Master. Inclosed the first with this and took them up to the post office to be mailed and got the Courier. Paid Taylor $2.50 to be sent for the Tribune & $1.50 for the Reporter, & paid all arrearages of postage, and also advance postage for the Tribune & the Chronicle, & the Courier for one year. Luman paid me $25. on account. He is not very well yet but started away this afternoon, to buy some more cattle. Spent some time this afternoon reading the Courier, and chopped some more wood for the library.

Sunday, 31

Sixth day of Full Moon. Thawed through the night and rained some. The morning was cloudy and a little rainy. At seven o’clock the temperature appeared to be 34 degrees. The weather continued cloudy and mild through the day, raining some in the course of the afternoon. The evening too was rainy most of the time, and at the beginning there was a spell of lightning and thunder remarkably heavy.

Attended to the first business of the morning and then read a little while till breakfast was ready. After breakfast spent some time more in the library reading, and then got ready for my attendence at meeting, and also to go from the meeting to Troy. Attended at the meeting house and heard a discourse by Br. Greenlaw who was present to fill his appointment. Immediately after the conclusion of the meeting started off on foot towards Troy, intending to stop over night at Benjamin’s but changing my mind before I arrived there, I continued my walk until I arrived at Azor’s where I arrived in about two hours and twenty minutes from the Centre. Staid over.

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Published On Tri-Counties Site On 03 December 2010
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M. Tice