Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
G.A.R. Post No. 48, Mansfield PA
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

G.A.R. Post No. 48 in 1910
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J.W. Adams

JOHN W. ADAMS was born 8th day of Feb. in 1843 in Tioga Twp., Tioga County, PA. He enlisted July 2, 1863 as a Private in Co. E, 35th Pa. Vol. Inf., and was discharged in Sept. 1863 on account of physical disability. He was a Hospital Steward. His regiment was raised on the call of the war Governor of Pennsylvania, Andrew G. Curtin prior to the battle of Gettysburg on Lee’s invasion of Pennsylvania. This regiment was known as an “Emergency Regiment”. They were not concentrated in time to take part in the battle however. Its Lt. Colonel was E. G. Schieffin of Tioga County. His Company “E” had as its Captain, Morgan L. Bacon; John S. Murdough First Lt.; and Abram A. Dewitt, Second Lt., all of Tioga County. With the close of Morgan’s raid after the battle of Gettysburg ended the rebel invasion of the North in 1863. Further service for which the militia had been called was no longer needed and during the months of August and September the majority of the men were mustered out. With few exceptions they were not brought to mortal combat, yet they nevertheless rendered most important service when there was a pressing need. Their presence gave the Union Army at Gettysburg and if they had been defeated they would have taken their place and fought with valor. – GAR#48, p.108

Irving Agney
IRVING AGNEY was born in Ulysses, New York. He enlisted Sept. 1862 (age 27), as a Private in Co. A, 89th NY Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged Sept. 24, 1864. His regiment was organized under Colonel Harrison S. Fairchild and Lt. Col. J.E. Robie at Elmira, NY in Nov. 26, 1861 and there mustered into the service for three years on Dec. 4-5-6, 1861. The Lt. Colonel were Nathan Coryell, Theophilus L. England, Wellington M. Lewis and Henry C. Roome; Majors, Daniel T. Everts, Wellington M. Lewis, Frank W. Tremain. The officers of Company “A” were Capts. Henry Pratt, Robert P. Cormack, Charles H. Amsbury; 1st Lts., William A Cahill, Michael Doler, Gilbert McCune; 2nd Lt. John C. Kirkland. They participated in the following battles and engagements; Crumps Cross Roads, Siege of Battery Huger, Bombardment of Fort Sumter, Operations Charleston Harbor, Petersburg, Swift Creek, Demsey’s Bluff, Bermuda Hundred, Cold Harbor, Chaffin’s Farm, Fair Oaks, Rices Station, Burkes Station, Appomattox Court House. The regiment lost seven officers and 259 enlisted men, a total of 266 men. They were honorably discharged and mustered out Aug. 3, 1865 commended by Capt. Henry P. Eppes at Richmond, VA. Those not entitled to discharge in the regiment were retained and the regiment was retained in the service. – GAR#48, p.125

WILLIAM B. ALBERT was born in Monroe County, New York. He enlisted August 9, 1861 as a Private in Battery A, 5th Artillery and was honorably discharged Nov. 1964. His regiment was recruited under Colonel Samuel Graham and mustered in the service April 1862 being composed of the 2nd Regiment Jackson Artillery and the Jackson Heavy Artillery. Edward Murray also acted as Colonel; Lt. Cols. Were Henry B. Medevaine; Majors, Casper Urban, Gustave F. Merriman, Eugene McGrath, William H. Boyle, Henry B. Wilder, Frederick C. Widkie. The company officers were Captains: John H. Graham, William H. Boyle, Edward G. Knoske; 1st Lts: Henry A. Urban, Robert Justeson Jr., George F. Leek, Edgar J. Mott, William DeMott, Charles Bonner; 2nd Lts.: Frederick Helting, Thomas W. Johnson. They participated in the following battles and engagements: Point of Rocks, Berlin, Knoxville, Harpers Ferry, Lynchburg, Liberty, Salem, Snickers Ferry, Winchester, Martinsburg, Cedar Creek, Charleston, Hulltown, Berryville, Opequin Creek, and Fishers Hill. They lost in the service: 1 officer and 391 enlisted men. They were honorably discharged and mustered out at Harpers Ferry, VA. – GAR#48, p.227

NATHAN M. ALLEN was born in Wyoming County, PA. He enlisted August 7, 1862 as a Private in Co. A, 141st Pa. Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged Aug. 27, 1865. His company was composed of men from Bradford County and were enlisted for a three-year term. Seven full companies came from this county and if they had been given more time a full regiment would have been raised. They took part in thirty-three battles and two-thirds of the men in this regiment perished on the field. It went immediately to Washington after its organization when it was detailed to the defense of this city. It was prominent in the following battles and engagements: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, in which the regiment showed great bravery, in which battles the subject of this sketch was wounded. Gettysburg after which battle the regiments’ loss was hound to be nearly 70% of the total; Kellys Ford, Locust Grove, Mine Run, North Anna Creek Harbor, Petersburg, Wilden Railroad, Sailor Creek. When General Lee surrendered the 141st was first in line across his way ready to strike as needed. After Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House it retired to Cloven Hill and there commenced to march to Washington DC, and upon its arrival went into Camp. Their Colonel Henry J. Madill of Towanda, PA was made Brig. Major General for gallantry in action. – GAR#48, p.216

A.M. ANDRUS was born in Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Sept. 1864 as a Private in Co. A, 207th Pa. Vol., and was honorably discharged May 31, 1865, on account of close of war. His company was recruited in Tioga County and the regiment was raised by Major Robert C. Cox of the same county, who afterwards was Colonel of the Regiment and finally commissioned Brig. General. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County than any other single organization in the service and belonged to a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania Soldiers. It took a prominent part in the closing scenes of the war including Hatchers Run, Fort Stedman, the assault and capture of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. At Fort Stedman it distinguished itself taking a prominent part in the recapture and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s Division who had surprised the Fort the night before. The division with the greatest gallantry stormed these formidable works at the face of Petersburg after most desperate fighting. In March 1865 this regiment presented its Colonel Robert C. Cox with a horse and equipment valued at $550.00 in token of its esteem. It took part in the Grand Review at Washington DC in May 1865 and was mustered out May 31, 1865. – GAR#48, p.197
 

FLOYD ASHLEY was born in Bradford County, PA. He enlisted Sept. 9, 1861 as a Private in Co. C, 50th NY Engineers and was honorably discharged Sept. 20, 1864. In the work of constructing bridges, roads, railroads and entrenchment’s for their own Army and in destroying like works of the enemy they were often exposed to the fire from both armies, as they were in the following engagements: City Point, Tree Creek, and at Hatchers Run. They participated in the “Warren Raid” in which the raiders started out with one day’s rations and were gone 13 days. Following the Cavalry who had first pickings they foraged for supplies. They destroyed about 25 or 30 miles of railroad during this time. They were constantly wet to the skin from a 5-day rain. They built a pontoon bridge across the James River at Wind Mill Point, which was nearly 1500 feet long using 13 boats in the construction. While in winter quarters at Poplar Grove during 1864-65 his company built a church of split logs to replace one destroyed by the Union Troops and used in breast works. The spire was of whole logs standing on end and the front was ornamented with the Corps Badge made of saplings and twigs. The church was presented to the M. E. Society who used it for many years after. – GAR#48, p.176

Photo by Brady, Washington DC

ELMER R. BACKER was born the 6th day of January 1840 in Rutland, Tioga County Pennsylvania. Early in the war he raised a Company of Union Volunteers. Company D, 16th PA Cavalry and he himself enlisted for three years service. After his discharge he raised Company A, 207th PA Volunteers of which he was Captain until the close of the war. This regiment had a larger number of Tioga men enrolled than any other single organization in the service and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the re-capture of Fort Stedman and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s Division, which had surprised the Fort during the night. The division, with the greatest gallantry stormed these formidable works at the fall of Petersburg, after the most desperate fighting. Major Robert C. Cox of Liberty was commissioned to raise this regiment by war Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania and was afterwards its Colonel.  General Hartranft called Colonel Cox the “Hero of Fort Stedman” when he led his men, sword in hand, to assault the works. For his signal bravery President Lincoln made him Brevet Brig. General April 9, 1865. This regiment presents Colonel Cox, in March 1865, with a horse and complete equipment valued at $550.00 in honor of its esteem for him. – GAR#48, p.98

B.R. Bailey

BURR R. BAILEY was born in Richmond Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Oct. 5, 1861 as a Private in Co. B, 101st PA Vol. Infantry and was promoted to Corporal. He was discharged in 1863 on account of physical disability. His regiment participated in the Peninsula Campaign, and the battles of Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington, and Plymouth. At the last place on Apr. 20, 1864 the entire regiment save those on furloughs and detached service were captured and were sent to Andersonville and other prisons. They were finally exchanged at Wilmington, NC in March 1865. Capt. Melvin L. Clark of Mansfield was afterwards commissioned Lt. Colonel of this regiment, and Victor A. Elliott, and Joseph S. Hoard later promoted to Major, were Captains of his company. His regiment was organized at Camp Curtin in October 1861 with Joseph H. Wilson of Beaver County as Colonel and David B. Morris of Pittsburgh as Lt. Colonel, Capt. Hoard soon being promoted to the office of Regimental Major. His Company also took part in the engagements – Siege of Yorktown, battles of Williamsburg, Seven Pines, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill and Blackwater, VA. Before the actual date for the exchange of the men of the regiment who had been captured at Plymouth, NC more than half of the men had died from disease and hardship and privations. – GAR#48, p.107

H.C. Bailey in First Bucktail Engagement (both the Mansfield Advertiser verson and the original Butts book version follow)

Harrison C. Bailey, born in Athens, Vermont in 1832 enlisted April 22, 1861 at Tioga, Pa., in Co. G First Rifles or the 13th Reg’t. Pa. Reserves, known as the Bucktails. He was discharged from service at Harrisburg, Pa., July 21st, 1862 on account, the loss of his arm. In July 1861 while encamped at Cumberland, Md., he was detailed with a scouting party of 34 men under Lieut. Col. Kane to go 50 miles to a point near Ronney, at which place were encamped about 6000 rebels. The later learning of the approach of the scouts sent 400 cavalrymen to intercept them. The scouts entrenched in brick and stone houses, repulsed the enemy killing seven losing but one. That night Bailey was placed on picket by Col. Kane one mile out on the Ronney Road, with orders to shoot, without previously halting, any armed men who might attempt to pass alone, in darkness in woods infested with rattle and black snakes. He watched until one o’clock, then hearing horsemen in the road he was about to shout when he was arrested by the voice of his comrade John F. Daily, who was accompanying Col. Kane on a tour of inspection.

On July 16th he was one of a party of 200, who were surrounded in a stone house by 800-rebel cavalry. After a sharp skirmish, the latter retreated leaving their dead. In Sept., while at Harpers Ferry he was one of six pickets sent to guard a railroad terminal two miles above the town. Bailey and three others concluded to stand above instead of inside the tunnel and when the rebels came to capture the pickets as was their custom, four of them were killed and the rest driven off by the pickets above the tunnel. Dec. 20th, at the battle of Drainsville Bailey’s bayonet scabbard was shot off. After the battle he took an overcoat off a dead rebel and sold the next day for $17.00. June 2nd, 1862, he was engaged in the raid on Stransburg when 69 men, who had been taken prisoners from Gen. Bank’s Division were recaptured. On June 6, at Harrisonburg, 104 union men were engaged with over 3000 rebels. The loss of the former killed and wounded was 52, while the later lost 559. Bailey was wounded four times resulting in the loss of his left arm. The fourth night after the amputation of his arm while being taken to the hospital at Mt. Jackson, he lay all night beside a stone wall in a heavy rain without shelter.

Bailey’s great-great grandfather, Sylvester Bailey, served in the Revolutionary War. His grandfathers, Capt. Joseph Wright and Cyrus Bailey, in the War of 1812. His brother, Capt. R.C. Bailey and himself in the War of the Rebellion. H.C. Bailey joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR May 20, 1878. He held the office of Commander six years, was adjutant 9 years, served also as Officer of Day and Officer of Guard. His sons, Ralph J. and Jos. W.O. Bailey, both enlisted for the Spanish American War.

HARRISON C. BAILEY, born 4th of October 1837 in Athens, Vermont enlisted April 22, 1861 at Tioga, Pa., in Co. G First Rifles or the 13th Reg’t. Pa. Reserves, known as the Bucktails. He was discharged from service at Harrisburg, Pa., July 21st, 1862 on account, the loss of his arm. In July 1861 while encamped at Cumberland, Md., he was detailed with a scouting party of 34 men under Lieut. Col. Kane to go 50 miles to a point near Romney at which place were encamped about 6000 rebels. The later, learning of the approach of the scouts, sent 400 cavalrymen to intercept them. The scouts, entrenched in brick and stone houses, repulsed the enemy killing seven and losing but one. That night Bailey was placed on picket by Col. Kane one mile out on the Romney Road, with orders to shoot, without previously halting, any armed men who might attempt to pass. Alone, in darkness, in woods infested with rattle and black snakes, he watched until one o’clock; then hearing horsemen in the road he was about to shoot when he was arrested by the voice of his comrade John F. Daily, who was accompanying Col. Kane on a tour of inspection. On July 16th he was one of a party of 200 who were surrounded in a stone house by 800-rebel cavalry. After a sharp skirmish, the latter retreated leaving their dead. In Sept., while at Harpers Ferry he was one of six pickets sent to guard a railroad terminal two miles above the town. Bailey and three others concluded to stand above instead of inside the tunnel and when the rebels came to capture the pickets, as was their custom, four of them were killed and the rest driven off by the pickets above the tunnel. Dec. 20th, at the battle of Drainsville Bailey’s bayonet scabbard was shot off. After the battle he took an overcoat off a dead rebel and sold the next day for $17.00. June 2nd, 1862 he was engaged in the raid on Strausburg when 69 men, who had been taken prisoners from Gen. Bank’s Division were recaptured. On June 6, at Harrisonburg, 104 Union men were engaged with over 3000 rebels. The loss of the former, in killed and wounded, was 52, while the later lost 559. Bailey was wounded four times resulting in the loss of his left arm. The fourth night after the amputation of his arm, while being taken to the hospital at Mt. Jackson, he lay all night beside a stone wall in a heavy rain without shelter. Bailey’s great-great grandfather, Sylvester Bailey, served in the Revolutionary War; his grandfathers, Capt. Joseph Wright and Cyrus Bailey, in the War of 1812; his brother, Capt. R.C. Bailey and himself in the War of the Rebellion; and his sons, Sergeant Ralph J. and Joseph O.W. enlisted for the American Spanish War.  H.C. Bailey joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR May 20, 1878. He held the office of Commander six years, was adjutant 9 years, served also as Officer of Day and Officer of Guard. – GAR#48, pp.17 & 18

MORRIS D. BAILEY – name is in the index but there is no bio for him. - Note from Joyce - He went to Kansas, may have returned. Any informatin about him will be welcome.

R.C. Bailey

R.C. Bailey served with Co. F, 6th Mass. Vol., whose march through Baltimore was one of the memorable events of the first month of the war. He also served at 1st Lt., in the 136th Pa. Vol., as Captain of Co. A 8th United States troops and as 1st Lt., of Co. E 35th Penna. Militia. As 1st Lt., of Co. A, which was raised in Tioga County and after organization, the regiment was sent to Washington for defense of that city, then to Sharpsburg and from there into Virginia. They took part in the battle of Fredericksburg and was in the forefront of that battle. They took part in Hooker’s Campaign from 28th of April to May 5, 1863, being almost continuously engaged. It was mustered out at Harrisburg, Pa., on May 29, 1863 at end of their term of service. The 136th was organized at Harrisburg July 4th, 1863 and was mustered out Aug. 7, 1863. This regiment was known as Emergency men. They were raised on a call by Gov. Curtin just prior to Lee’s invasion of Penna. They were not concentrated in time to take part in the battle of Gettysburg.

ROMANZO C. BAILEY served in Co. F, 6th Mass. Volunteers whose march through Baltimore was one of the memorable events of the first month of the war. He also served as 1st Lt., in the 136th Pa. Volunteer Troops and as 1st Lt., of Co. E, 35th Pa. Militia. The last regiment was organized at Harrisburg, PA, July 4, 1863 and was mustered out Aug. 7, 1863. Its Lt. Colonel was E. G. Schieffelin of Tioga Co. This regiment was known as “Emergency Men”. This regiment was raised on the call of the War Governor of Pennsylvania, Andrew G. Curtin just prior to Lee’s invasion of Pennsylvania. They were not concentrated in time to take part in the battle of Gettysburg. He was 1st Lieutenant of Co. A of the 136th Pa. Volunteers which Company was raised in Tioga County. Its captains were John J. Hammond and John J. Mitchell; and H.L. Prutzman was the 2nd Lieutenant of the Company; Charles Ryan of Tioga County was the Major of the Company. After organization the regiment was sent to Washington for the defenses of that city, then to Sharpsburg and from there into Virginia. They took part in the battles of Fredericksburg and was in the forefront of the attack. They took part in Hooker’s Campaign from the 28th of April to May 5th, 1863 being almost continuously engaged. It was mustered out at Harrisburg, PA on May 29, 1863 at the end of its term of service. – GAR#48, p.97

EDSON BAITY was born in Tioga County PA. He enlisted March 28, 1864, as a Private in 2nd Pa. Heavy Artillery Company and was discharged March 24, 1865 on account of gunshot wound. The command was intended to be a siege or field regiment to conform to the regulations of the United States Army and on June 25, 1862 it numbered 3300 men drilled to a condition of great efficiency. The government issued an order April 18, 1864 organizing from the surplus men, the “Second Provisional Heavy Artillery”. It participated in the battle of Mine Run, Spotsylvania, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Hatcher’s Run, Mine Explosion and Dinwiddie (CourtHouse). With the exception of the 1st Maine Artillery, this regiment lost more men killed than any other in the course of the war. In the constant fighting around Petersburg and Richmond the regiment lost more than half of its effective strength. The original term of service ended in January 1865, the men however, very generally re-enlisted and while upon the James River the regiment was recruited to over 2000 men. Two detachments of the regiment serviced in Light Batteries B and D, United States Horse Batteries. Those in Battery “B” fired the last guns at Appomattox. It was finally discharged at Philadelphia, Feb. 16, 1866. It was the largest regiment in the service. Its losses were, killed and died from wounds – 163, disease or other causes- 585, and captured 863. – GAR#48, p.179

H.G. Bardwell

H.G. Bradwell, born in Covington, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Aug. 8, 1862 as a private in Co. A 149th Pa. Vol. Infantry and was honorably discharged Aug. 8, 1865. This regiment was a part of the "Bucktail Brigade" and wore the bucktails on their hats. The Brigade became famous in the magnificent fight it made at Gettysburg and held its ground from early in the morning against large superb numbers until late in the afternoon repulsing with heavy loss a number of charges on their position. They were the last to retire, but in good order, after the enemy had passed both their flanks, but gave them a wide berth not desiring to come to any closer quarters on that day. His Co. A was recruited in Tioga Co. After its desperate fight at the battle of Gettysburg on July 4th its losses were checked and found that out of the regiment, 34 were killed, 171 missing and 131 wounded.

HIRAM G. BARDWELL was born in Covington, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted August 8, 1862 as a Private in Co. A, 149th PA Vol. Infantry and was honorably discharged August 8, 1865. This regiment was led by Colonel Roy Stone, afterward Brig. General. It took part in the following battles: - Chancellorsville, Bethesda Church, Weldon Railroad, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Hatcher’s Run, North Anna and Petersburg. They belonged to the “Bucktail Brigade” and wore bucktails in their caps. This brigade became famous in the magnificent fight it made near Seminary Ridge on the first day at Gettysburg. It held its ground from early in the morning against largely superior numbers until 4 o’clock in the afternoon, repulsing with heavy loss a number of charges on their position. They were the last to retire, but in good order, after the enemy had passed both their flanks, but gave them a wide birth, not desiring to come to any closer quarters in that day. His Company “A” was recruited in Tioga County and had as its Captains, A. J. Sofield, Dudley A. Fish, Lewis Bodine and Benjamin Warriner. After its desperate fight at the battle of Gettysburg on July 4th, its horses were checked and found that out of the regiment, 34 were killed, 171 missing and 131 missing (probably one of these should be injured). – GAR#48, p.101

CHANCELLER BARRENGER was born in New York. He enlisted Dec. 3, 1863 as a Private in Co. D, 1st NY Rifles, was promoted to Corp. and was honorably discharged, June 21, 1865. - GAR#48, p.220

LEWIS BARRET was born in Troy (Bradford County), PA. He enlisted Sept. 3, 1864 as a Private in Co. H, 207th Pa. Volunteers and was honorably discharged June 25, 1865. His Company was recruited in Tioga County and the regiment was raised by Major Robert C. Cox of Tioga County, later Colonel and finally commissioned Brig. General. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County in its ranks than any single organization in service and was part of a Division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the re-capture of Fort Stedman, and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s Division, which had surprised the fort during the night. The division with the greatest gallantry stormed these fortifications at the face of Petersburg, after the most desperate fighting. This Company “H” had as its captain Robert J. Wood, who was promoted to Major and mustered out with the regiment with rank of Lt. Colonel. In March 1865 the regiment presented Col. Robert C. Cox with a horse and outfit valued at $550.00 in token of their great esteem. It participated in the closing scenes of the war including Hatcher’s Run, Fort Stedman, the assault and capture of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox.  – GAR#48, p.194

O.E. BARTLETT was born in Bradford County, PA. He enlisted August 28, 1861, as a Private in Co. D, 106th PA Cavalry and was honorably discharged June 1865. The Captain of his Company was John Irvin of Tioga County who later was promoted to Major for bravery in action. At the battle of Gettysburg he was in command of the advance picket line of this regiment on the third day in front of the center of the Union lines. They were three times ordered to retire but as the word did not reach them, they remained and opened so hot a fire on the Confederate Division of General Picket, that they thinking they had reached the main Union lines halted and opened fire. He was transferred to the Co. I, 43rd Regiment PA Volunteers on Nov. 20, 1862. This Company was sent to join Gen. Banks’ command in Maryland soon after organization and was never afterwards connected with the regiment. They took part in the following engagements and battles: - Hancock Dam No.5, Bunker Hill, Newtown, Rappahannock Station, Front Royal, Cedar Mountain, Thoroughfare Gap, Chantilly, Pope’s Virginia Campaign, Antietam, Falmouth, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, at which battle they repulsed a charge of the famous “Louisiana Tigers”, St. James College, Bristoe Station, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Jerusalem Plank Road. After the fall of Petersburg it went into camp near City Point, proceeding hence to Washington on June 10, 1865; it was mustered out. – GAR#48, p.228
J.T. Baynes

 JOHN T. BAYNES was born the 3rd day of Dec. 1833 in Rochester, Monroe County, NY. He enlisted May 15, 1861 as a Private in Co. K, 5th PA Reserves. He was promoted to Sergt. and was honorably discharged from 2nd PA Cav., June 26, 1862. He received a gunshot wound at Trevilian Station, VA, and another a Mechanicsville, VA. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Mar. 5, 1863 and to 1st Lieutenant Sept. 22, 1863. John D. Gregg was Regimental Colonel of the 5th and saw lots of action. They were first sent to help General Lew Wallace, with the Bucktail Rifle Regiment to Cumberland, MD. They were also sent to the defense of Washington soon after the battle of Bull Run. They were assigned to the first Brigade in reorganization. They were at Dranesville but did not fight but were in the battles of Fredericksburg, Gaines Mills, Mechanicsville, Charles City Cross Roads, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Wilderness. He was mustered out June 11, 1865. During his service he was wounded twice and was captures and confined to Libby Prison. He died at Mansfield, Tioga County PA, Jan. 1891 and is buried in Prospect (Hope) Cemetery. The regiment was organized June 20, 1861 with the following officers; John I. Gregg, Colonel, Joseph W. Fisher, Lt. Colonel, and George Dare, Major. Colonel Gregg on the next day was assigned to the 6th US Cavalry and Captain Seneca G. Simmons of the 7th US Infantry was chosen to succeed him as Colonel. – GAR#48, p.102

EDWIN D. BENEDICT was born in Cortland, NY. He enlisted June 15, 1861 as a Private in Co. C, 12th PA Cav. And was honorably discharged June 11, 1864. The regiment was organized with J.H. Taggart of Philadelphia as Colonel and the Captain of Company “C” was Richard Gustin afterwards promoted to the rank of Colonel and it was at first enlisted for three months of service. It fought at the battle of Dranesville, Mechanicsville, Charles City Cross Roads, Popes Campaign in VA, Antietam, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna and Bethesda Church. The regiment was mustered out June 11, 1865 after very active service and in addition to the battles above mentioned it saw service on the following fields; Maryland Campaign, Fishers Hill, Winchester, Kernstown, Harper’s Ferry at which place they were guarding the railroad from there to Winchester for some time. After being ordered from that place they fought the battle of Harmony and then returned to their former station. They then marched to Winchester and were incorporated with the cavalry division of the Army of the Shenandoah. After a skirmish with the rebels at Edinboro they learned of Lee’s surrender and they were place in camp at Mount Jackson and were charged with stopping and paroling all soldiers of Lee’s Army returning through that section. – GAR#48, p.122

ORSON A. BENEDICT was born in 1840 in Richmond Twp., Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Oct. 6, 1861 as a Private in Co. G, 45th PA Volunteers and was honorably discharged April 14, 1863 on account of Surgeon’s certificate. He took part in battles of Antietam, S. Mountain, and other including Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., Antietam, Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and surrender of Lee at Appomattox. It was also at James Island and the Siege of Vicksburg. The regiment was noted for its fine discipline and splendid bravery of its men. His company was recruited in Tioga County and had as its Captains, Nelson Whitney and Reese G. Richards; the Colonel of the regiment was Thomas Welch of Lancaster County. After Lee’s surrender it took part in the grand review at Washington DC on May 22-23, 1865 and were mustered out of service July 17, 1865. Francis M. Hills of Tioga County was promoted from Captain to Lt. Colonel of this regiment. John F. Trout from Captain to Major and Decatur Dickinson from Sergeant Major to 1st Lt., and Adjutant. His Company “G” was originally known as “The Charleston Rangers” and was organized in Wellsboro Sept. 18, 1861. On Sept. 20th they proceeded to Troy and on Sept. 21st arrived at Harrisburg and were sent to Camp Curtin for training. There were 95 Officers and men in the Company. On Oct. 21st they were ordered to the front and on the 27th reached Camp Casey near Bladensburg, MD. – GAR#48, p.214

WATSON K. BENJAMIN was born in Dodge, Wisconsin. He enlisted Feb. 6, 1864 as a Private in Co. A, 50th NY Engineers and was honorably discharged June 13, 1865. In the work of constructing bridges, railroads and entrenchments his company was actually engaged at City Point, Tree Creek and Hatcher’s Run. They participated in “Warren’s Raid” in Dec. 1864, when the raiders started with one day’s rations and were gone 13 days. Following the Cavalry who took the pickings, they foraged for supplies and destroyed 25 to 30 miles of railroad. During this time they were continually wet from a five days rain. They built pontoon bridges across the James River at Wind Mill Point in which 113 boats were used, the distance being nearly 1600 feet. They were in winter quarters at Poplar Grove in the winter of 1864-65. Besides the above they were at Siege of Yorktown, Seven Days Battles, Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Appomattox Court House. During the service the regiment lost 2 officers and 229 enlisted men. They were honorably discharged and mustered out at Fort Berry, VA, under Colonel William H. Pitts, June13 & 14, 1865. – GAR#48, p.120

SYLVANUS S. BIXBY was born in Sullivan Twp., PA. He enlisted August 31, 1861 as a Private in Co. C, 50th NY Engineers and was discharged Oct. 8, 1962 on account of physical disability. In the construction of bridges and railroads and roads they were often under fire, sometimes under the troops and artillery of both armies. They were in the engagements at City Point, Tree Creek and Hatcher’s Rune and participated in the Warren raid of Dec. 1864. The raiders started with one day’s rations and were gone 13 days. Following the Cavalry who took first pickings, they foraged for supplies. They destroyed between 25 or 30 miles of railroad and during this time they constantly were wet from a five days rain. They built a pontoon bridge across the James River at Wind Mill Point in which 113 boats were used, the distance being nearly 1600 feet. While in winter quarters at Poplar Grove in the year 1864-65 the Company built a church of split logs to replace one that the Union Troops had torn down to put into breast works. The spire was of whole logs, standing on end and the front was ornamented with the Corps Badge, made of saplings and twigs. The church was presented to the M.E. Society, who used it as a place of worship for many years. The regiment was discharged June 13, 1865 at Fort Berry at the close of the War. – GAR#48, p.99

Solomon Blanchard

Solomon Blanchard was born in Lycoming County, Pa.; he enlisted as a private in Co. e 207th Pa. Vol. Inf, and was honorably discharged May 31, 1865. His Colonel was Robert C. Cox of Liberty, Pa. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County in its ranks than any other single organization in service and was a part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the recapture of Fort Steadman and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s division. It also stormed these formidable works at the Fall of Petersburg.

was born in Lycoming County, PA. He enlisted as a Private in Co. E, 207th PA Vol. Inf., and was honorable discharged May 31, 1865. He participated in the following battles: Hatcher’s Run, Fort Stedman, Petersburg and the surrender of General Less at Appomattox. His colonel was Robert C. Cox of Liberty, PA, who afterward was brevet Brig. General Apr. 9, 1865. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County in its ranks than any other single organization in service, and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the re-capture of Fort Stedman and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s Division. It also stormed three formidable works at the fall of Petersburg. In March 1865 while in front of Petersburg the regiment presented its Colonel Robert C. Cox, called the “The Hero of Fort Stedman” with a horse and equipment valued at $550.00 in token of their esteem. It took part in the Grand Review held at Washington, DC on May 22-23, 1865 and was mustered out at Alexandria, VA on May 31, 1865. His company was composed largely of privates and officers from Tioga County and had as its 2nd Lieutenant, William L. Keagle, Victor A. Elliott of Tioga County was Major of the regiment. – GAR#48, p.137

Nathaniel Bloom.

NATHANIEL BLOOM was born 4th of Dec. 1830 in Sussex County, NJ. He enlisted Aug. 20, 1861 at Little Marsh, PA as a Private in Co. F, 45th PA Vol. Inf., being promoted to Corp., and then Sergt. In Nov. 1863 he was detailed at Greenville, NC to hunt and arrest rebel deserters about two weeks. After the surrender of Gen. Lee he was detailed to serve as nurse at Columbia College Hospital, Washington, DC about two months. He was honorably discharged Dec. 1863 at Blaines Cross Roads, Tenn., and re-enlisted same day in old command. July 1, 1864, in front of Petersburg he was wounded by a ball entering the nose at nostril, carrying away a part of the upper jaw bone, also a portion of tongue, and lodging in neck just above the right shoulder and under main artery. He was also wounded by a severe gunshot in forehead over left eye. He was taken Brig. Hospital in front of Petersburg, where he remained ten days and was then removed to Columbia College Hospital, Washington, DC, remaining about three months. While in hospital, in Oct. 1864, he was granted a thirty days furlough, returning to hospital at its expiration. He was captures at Mine Explosion, in front of Petersburg and made his escape the same day. He took part in the following engagements: - James Island, South Mr., Jackson, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Knoxville, Four Days Battle of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Anna River, and Petersburg. He was honorably discharged, June 25, 1865 at Washington, DC. – GAR#48, pp.81, 82

Charles Boyce- On Forced March Following Harpers Ferry

CHARLES BOYCE was born 10th of August 1835 in Troy, Bradford County, PA. He enlisted Aug. 8, 1862 at Troy, PA, as a Private in Co. D, 132nd PA Vol. Infantry. He was discharged May 8, 1863 on account of expiration of term. He was engaged in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. At Antietam a bullet went through his shirt collar and blistered his neck. After the battle he was detailed with his Regt., to help bury the dead, being thus employed for two days. At Fredericksburg five balls went through his cap and his knapsack was shot away. Eight of his Co., were killed by a bursting shell and he was spattered with blood and brains. He took par in a charge on a tunnel of breastworks where many were killed and wounded. He marched with his Co., from Chancellorsville to Harper’s Ferry, where they found that the rebels had fired the bridge and also the town, which was still burning. The soldiers forded the river, loosing most of their guns and equipment. They camped on the heights in a heavy rain and slept on rails. They then made a force march from Harper’s Ferry to Falmouth, having no rations excepting what they obtained by foraging; they arrived at Falmouth at night, when hard tack was issued to them, of which they ate heartily. Day light showed what was left to be full of worms. Then they marched twenty miles to Chancellorsville, and their feet being blistered, they threw away their shoes. They arrived at Smokey Camp, all sick. The Regt. was reduced in nine months, from 1000 to 400 men. Among Boyce’s intimate comrades were: Alvah Cooper, Richard Kennedy and William Cobb. He joined the Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on July 17, 1893. – GAR#48, pp.41, 42

Leonard J. Bradford

Leonard J. Bradford was born Oct. 12, 1833 in Rutland, PA. He enlisted Oct. 16, 1862 as a private in Co. A 171st Pa. Vol. Inf. On Jan. 1863 he was detailed at Little Washington, NC as an attendant in general hospital, and remained about six months. He was employed during his enlistment, except when on detailed service, in scouting, skirmishing and general guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged Aug. 8, 1863 at Harrisburg, Pa.

LEONARD J. BRADFORD was born 12th of October 1833 in Rutland Twp., Tioga County PA. He enlisted Oct. 16, 1862 as a Private in Co. A, 171st PA Vol. Inf. In Jan. 1863 he was detailed at Little Washington, NC as an attendant in general hospital, remaining about six months. He was employed during his enlistment, except when on detailed service, in scouting, skirmishing and general guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged, Aug. 8, 1863 at Harrisburg, PA. This regiment was composed of men drafted in October 1862 for nine months service. Its Colonel was Everard Bierer of Fayette County, Theophilus Humphrey of Bradford County, Lt. Colonel and Robert C. Cox of Tioga County as Major. His Company “A” has as its Captain Ansen A. Amsbury and was recruited from Tioga County. Its service was principally in North Carolina. The regiment’s first engagement was at “Deserted House” near Blackwater, VA, and also engaged in the skirmishes at Hills Point and Blounts Creek. It was in the terrible march from Suffolk, VA to New Bern, NC and the first day forded a river 1/8 of a mile wide and breast high. That night they encamped on a plantation of 1500 acres, 100 acres of standing corn, which served as food for the mules and horses. The corn stalks were used with fence rails for fires, In the morning not a rail or cornstalk was left. – GAR#48, p.79

JOHN W. BRADLEY was born in Delaware County NY. He enlisted Aug. 11, 1862 (age 21), as a Private in Co. K, 144th NY Vol., and was discharged May 23, 1863 on account of Surgeon’s Certificate. His regiment was recruited under Colonel Robert S. Hughston and was organized at Delhi, NY on Sept. 27, 1862 for a term of three years. The other Colonels were David E. Gregory, William J. Slidell, and James Lewis;  Lt. Colonels, Calvin A. Rice; Majors, Robert J. Johnson, William Plaskett. The company officers were Captains, George W. Reynolds, Eldridge G. Radeker, John Rich; 1st Lts. John J. Odwell, Edgar A. Vermilyea, Charles Rollins; 2nd Lt. William E. Holmes. They participated in the following battles and engagements: Siege of Suffolk, Providence Church Road, Siege of Battery Wagner, Fort Sumter, Charleston, Sea Brook, John’s Island, Honey Hill, Deveaux Neck, St. Augustine, James Island, Monks Corners. In the service they lost 6 officers and 212 enlisted men being a total of 218 men. They were honorably discharged and mustered out under Colonel James Lewis at Hilton Head, Department of the South, June 25, 1865. – GAR#48, p.201

JAMES F. BROOKS was born in Clearfield County, PA. He enlisted Oct. 31, 1861 as a Private in Co. A, 90th NY Vol. Inf., and was discharged March 8, 1864 on account of gunshot wound. His regiment was recruited by Colonel Lewis W. Tinelli, Col. J.S. DeAgreda, Col. R.E.A. Hampson, who were head of the “Hancock Guard”, “McClellan Chasseurs”, and “McClellan Rifles” respectively and were combined. Colonel J.S. Morgan also recruited the “McClellan Chasseurs” although Lt. Col. Robert B. Clark of the 13th Militia was first appointed. Col. R.E.A. Hampson recruited the “British Volunteers” which were taken into this regiment. The regiment was organized and mustered into the service for three years between September and December 1861. Colonel Joseph S. Morgan and Nelson Shaurman were Colonels; Majors, John C. Swart and Honore De La Paturelle. The Company officers were Captains, John C. Swart, Edwin A. Stoutenborough; 1st Lts., George H. Stewart, Augustus H. Ward, Thaddeus C. Ferris, Henry Kellett, Frederick J. Jones; 2nd Lts., Greig H. Mulligan, Harvey J. Merchant, John McGrane. They participated in the following battles and engagements: - Franklin, Siege of Port Hudson (LA), Bayou La Fourche (LA), Red River Campaign, Mansura, Obequon, Fisher’s Hill, Cedar Creek. They lost in the service 10 officers and 241 enlisted men and were honorably discharged and mustered out under Col. Nelson Shaurman, Feb. 9, 1866 at Savannah, GA. – GAR#48, pp.208, 209

Sgt. Andrew J. Brown

Andrew J. Brown was born on the 4th of November 1842 in Nelson, NY. He enlisted Aug. 24, 1861 as a private in Co. F, 11th Pa. Vol Cavalry. In July 1862 he was wounded in right knee joint by a gunshot at Diaston Bridge, Va., and was in the hospital at Fortress Munroe, Va., four months. In the winter of 1862-63, he was detailed as Sergt. of provost guard about four months at Norfolk, Va. He took active part in engagements at Yorktown, Williamsburg, Dalgrun Raid, Hanover Junction, Milan, Capture of Norfolk, Siege of Suffolk, Weldon RR, Reams Station, Malvern Hill (both engagements) and Deserted House. He was honorably discharged Aug. 24, 1864 at Jones Neck, Va.

ANDREW J. BROWN was born the 4th of November 1842 in Nelson, Madison County, NY. He enlisted Aug. 24, 1861 as a Private in Co. F. 11th PA Vol. Cav. In July 1862 he was wounded in right knee joint by a gunshot at Deaston Bridge, VA and was in hospital at Fortress Monroe, VA four months. In the winter of 1862-63 he was detailed as Sergt. Of provost guard about four months at Norfolk, VA. He took active part in the engagements at Yorktown, Williamsburg, West Point, Seven Days, fight before Richmond, Dalgreen Raid, Hanover Junction, Milan, Capture of Norfolk, Siege of Suffolk, Weldon RR, Reams Station, Malvern Hill (both engagements) and Deserted House. He was honorably discharged Aug. 24, 1864 at Jones Neck, VA. His Company “F” was recruited in Tioga and Bradford County and had as its Captain, B.B. Mitchell of Tioga County. Its regiment Colonel was Josiah Harlan of Philadelphia and the regiment was originally known as “Harlan’s Light Cavalry” having been raised by Colonel Harlan as an independent regiment, under special authority from the Secretary of War. It was finally mustered in as the 11th Cavalry and served with distinction in the various battles of Virginia and was frequently used in scouting service. It was mustered out of service Aug. 13, 1865. – GAR#48, p.78

CHAMPLAIN BROWN was born in Providence, Rhode Island. He enlisted (16 Sept.) 1861 as a Private in Co. F, 10th Wisconsin and was discharged (17 June) 1862 on account of physical disability. – GAR#48, p.207 (Source of additional information – The Union Army, Vol. 4; name usually spelled Champlin)

ROBERT J. BROWN was born in Tioga County, NY. He enlisted June 29, 1863 as a Private in Co. E, 35th PA Militia and was honorable discharged Aug. 7, 1863. His regiment was raised on the call of the War Governor of Pennsylvania, Andrew G. Curtin just prior to the battle of Gettysburg. They were not concentrated in time to take part in this battle, but many of them reached the Army of the Potomac about the time that Lee’s Army crossed the Potomac in its retreat to Virginia. They were known as an “Emergency Regiment” and its Lt. Colonel was Edward G. Scheiffelin of Tioga County. His Company had as its Captain, Morgan L. Bacon; Lieutenants, John S. Murdough and Abram Dewitt of Tioga County; Hugh Young, Quartermaster; and Dr. W. W. Webb, Surgeon were also from Tioga County, as were many of the privates. As soon as the chase after the Rebel General Morgan was ended after the battle of Gettysburg the militia was not needed for any further services and during the months of August and September the majority of the men were ordered out. With few exceptions they were not brought into mortal conflict, but they nevertheless rendered important service. They came forward when there was pressing need and their presence gave great moral support to the Union Army, and it is had been defeated, they would have taken the places of the fallen, and fought with valor and desperation worthy of veterans. – GAR#48, p.202

William W. Brown

W.W. Brown was born at Penn Yan, NY and enlisted November 1861 as a private in Co. G, 53rd Pa. Vol. Inf. He was promoted to 1st Lieut. and resigned Dec. 29, 1864 on account of gun shot wound received at Spottsylvania, Va.

WILLIAM W. BROWN was born in Penn Yan, New York. He enlisted Nov. 1861 as a Private in Co. G, 53rd PA Vol. Inf. He was promoted to 1st Lieut. and resigned Dec. 29, 1864 on account of gunshot would received at Spotsylvania, VA. His Colonel was John R. Brooke and his Captain of Company “G” was Archie F. Jones. It took part in the battle from the Chickahominy to the James River, Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Five Forks, and following up the retreating enemy the regiment participated in the capture of Lee’s wagon trains at Deep Creek on the 6th of April 1865, and was at the front on the day of the surrender. Encamping for a short time near Burkeville, it proceeded through Richmond and Fredericksburg to Alexandria, participated in the Grand Review of the Armies at Washington, DC on May 23rd and were finally mustered out of service June 30, 1865. It rendered distinguished service at the battle of Antietam, charging and capturing important defended position. At Fredericksburg it was into hottest of the fight and suffered heavily, going into the battle with 283 effective men. Of these 158 were either killed or wounded. At Gettysburg their companies being on detached duty only 124 men were available and of these only 45 escaped uninjured. – GAR#48, p.127

HAWLEY BUNCE enlisted May 22, 1861 (age 21), as a Private in Co. G, 95th NY Vol., and was honorably discharged May 18, 1864. His Regiment was organized by Colonel George H. Biddle at New York City, Mar. 6, 1862 by forming light companies of the men enlisted under Colonel Biddle, for the “Warren Rifles”; and two Companies of those enlisted under Col. J. P. Jenkins for the 3rd Regiment, “Eagle Brigade”. The men were mustered into the service between Nov. 1861 and March 1862. Edward Pye also served as Colonel; Lt. Cols. being James B. Post and James Creney; Majors, Robert W. Bard. The officers of Company “C” were Captains, James R. Quick, Henry M. Jennings; 2nd Lts., Dominick Kennedy, James Matthews, William L. Sherwood. They participated in the following battles,  Gen. Pope’s Campaign, Gainesville, Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna, Cold Harbor, White Oak Swamp, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Hatcher’s Run, Five Forks, Appomattox Court House. In the service they lost 4 officers and 251 enlisted men, a total of 255. They were honorably discharged and mustered out, under Colonel James Creney on July 16, 1865, near Washington, DC. – GAR#48, p.155

Dennis Burley

Dennis Burley born in 1828 in Richmond Twp. enlisted at Montello, Wis. On July 24, 1861 and served in Co. E 7th Wisconsin Infantry. He was engaged first in skirmishes preceding the battle of Chancellorsville next to Gettysburg. In May 1864 he took part in the terrible battles in the wilderness and at Spottsylvania Court House where he was wounded. He was in a hospital at Chester in 1862, at Washington in 1863 and at Philadelphia in 1864. He was discharged at Madison, Wisconsin Sept. 5, 1864 on account of expiration of term of enlistment. He joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 August. 1887.

DENNIS BURLEY was born 11th day of June 1828 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted at Montello, Wisconsin, July 24, 1861 and served in Co. E, 7th Wisconsin Infantry. He was engaged first in skirmishes preceding the battle of Chancellorsville; next at Gettysburg. In May 1864 he took part in the terrible battles in the Wilderness and at Spotsylvania Court House, where he was wounded. He was in a hospital at Chester in 1862, at Washington in 1863 and at Philadelphia in 1864. He was discharged at Madison, Wisconsin, Sept. 5, 1864 on account of expiration of term of enlistment. Dennis Burley joined the Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Aug. 15, 1887. – GAR#48, p.35

Thomas J. Butler

Another member of the 45th Penna., was Thomas J. Butler. He was born in Delmar and enlisted Sept. 1861 as a private in Co. F, 45th Pa. Vol. In., and was finally discharged from Co. G, 45th Pa., on account of a loss of arm, Jan. 9, 1864. The 45th was recruited in Tioga Co., and had Tioga Co., officers.

THOMAS J. BUTLER was born in Delmar Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Sept. (23) 1861 as a Private in Co. F, 45th PA Vol. Inf., and was finally discharged from Co. G, 45th PA on account of loss of arm, Jan. 9, 1864. This regiment saw service both in the eastern and western armies and was engaged in the battles of James Island, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Jackson, Blue Springs, Campbell Station, Knoxville, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Anna, Mine Explosion, Weldon RR and Poplar Spring Church, Hatcher’s Run, Petersburg and was at Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. It was noted for its fine disciple and the splendid bravery of its men. After Lee’s surrender it took part in the Grand Review held at Washington, DC, May 22-23, 1865 and on July 17, 1865 it was mustered out of the service. Francis M. Hill of Tioga County was promoted to Lt. Colonel Mar. 1, 1863. Its original regimental officers were Thomas Walsh of Lancaster County, Colonel; James A. Beaver of Center County, Lt. Colonel; and J. M. Kilbourne of Potter County, Major. His Company “F” was recruited in Wayne and Tioga Counties and had the following men from Tioga County as officers: - 1st Lt. George P.J. Scudder; 2nd Lts., J.E. Woodmanser and Adolph D. Campbell. (Cont’d. on p.240) Its Colonel was Thomas Walsh and its Captain Francis M. Hill of Co., “I” of Tioga County, was promoted to Lieut. Colonel on Mar. 1, 1863. The Company Captains were Nelson Whitney and Reese G. Richards. His company being recruited from Tioga County. The subject of this sketch lost his arm as the result of a wound received in the battle of the Wilderness May 6, 1864 and was discharged Sept. 19, 1864. He died at Mansfield, Tioga County, PA, Nov. 26, 1905. His enlistment is given as Feb. 27, 1864 in History of 45th Regt. PA Vol. Inf. 1861-1865. – GAR#48, pp.130, 240

Capt. Dyer J. Butts

Capt. Dyer J. Butts, son of Lorin and Harriet Hyde Butts was born in Norwich, Conn. Aug. 22, 1829. He came with his parents to what is now Mansfield, Pa. When the Civil War broke our he was enrolled at Harrisburg, Pa. Oct. 14, 1861 in Co. B 101st Pa. Vol. Inf., as a private but was promoted to Corporal, Sergeant and to Captain. In May 1862, he was detailed at Yorktown, Va., as clerk in the Commissary Dept., for a time. He was also engaged in many battles during the war. Among them were the Seven Days Battle before Richmond, Kinston, Little Washington and Plymouth. He was honorably discharged Jan. 1, 1864 to reenlist as a veteran at Plymouth, NC in old command. On April 20, 1864 he was captured in Plymouth, NC and held at Anderson, Ga., Charleston, SC and Florence, SC for about 11 months, where two thirds of his company died. Then he was paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md. He was under hospital care for about four months on account of these prison exposures. He never fully recovered from this during his life. He was granted a final honorable discharge July 6, 1865 at Philadelphia.

Capt. Butts was united in marriage to Miss Frances A. Cochran, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Wesley Cochran Dec. 17, 1877 at Horseheads, NY. They had two children, Alice M., for many years a missionary in Korea under the Presbyterian Church, and Mary B., who married Dillon A. Cady. Both of them were teachers in the Free Academy in Elmira, NY for many years.

DYER J. BUTTS was born the 22nd day of August 1829 in Norwich, Connecticut. He enlisted Oct. 14, 1861 at Harrisburg, PA in Co. B, 101st PA Vol. Inf. He was enrolled as a Private, promoted to Corp., Sergt. and to Capt. In May 1862 he was detailed at Yorktown, VA, as clerk in Commissary Dept., one month. He was honorably discharged Jan. 1, 1864 to re-enlist as a veteran at Plymouth, NC in old command. Apr. 20, 1864 he was captured at Plymouth, NC and held a Andersonville, GA, Charleston, SC and Florence, SC about eleven months, then was paroled and sent to Annapolis, MD. He was in hospitals from March 1865 about four months at Annapolis, MD, Baltimore, MD and Philadelphia, PA, on account of prison exposures. He fought in the Seven Days Battle before Richmond, Kinston, Little Washington and Plymouth. He was honorably discharged, July 6, 1865 at Philadelphia, PA. His company had as its Captains, Joseph S.  Hoard, later promoted to Major of the regiment: Victor A. Elliott and Melvin L. Clark, later Lt. Colonel, are of Tioga County. When the regiment was organized in Oct. 1861 his company was recruited from Tioga County but the regimental Colonel was Joseph H. Nelson of Beaver County. -–GAR#48, p.77


THOMAS DALLMAN was born in Syracuse, NY. He enlisted (14th Aug.- age 19) 1862 as a Private in Co. I, 122nd NY Vols. was promoted to Sergt and was discharged (13 May) 1865 on account of gunshot wound. This regiment was raised and organized by Colonel Silas Titus and was mustered into the service for three years at Syracuse, NY, Aug. 28, 1862 being known as the “Onondagas”. The Lt. Colonels were Augustus W. Dwight and  (Alonzo H. Clapp), Horace H. Walpole; Majors were Joshua B. Davis, Jabez M. Brown, and Alonzo H. Clapp. The Company officers were Captains, John M. Dwight, Osgood Tracey and Andrew W. Wilkins; 1st Lts. Morris H. Church, Lucius Dillingham, Theodore L. Poole, Francis M. Potter, Hiram A. Britton. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Antietam, Williamsport, Mannerson Gap, Fredericksburg, Marye’s Heights, Salem Church, Deep Run Crossing, Gettysburg, Boonsboro, Funkstown, Rappahannock, Mine Run Campaign, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Totopotomay, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Washington, Charleston, Opequon, Fishers Hill, Cedar Creek, Sailors Creek, Appomattox Campaign and Appomattox Court House. They lost in the service 9 officers and 171 enlisted men (a total of 180). They were honorably discharged and mustered out commanded by Colonel Horace H. Walpole on June 23, 1865 near Washington, DC. – GAR48 p. 187

W.L. Dan

W.L. Dan was born in Rutland, Pa. He enlisted Feb. 2, 1865 as a private in Co. B 101st Pa. Vol. Infantry and was honorably discharged June 25, 1865. Co. B was recruited in Mansfield by Capt. Joseph S. Hoard and Melvin L. Clark. W.L. Dan is buried in Hope Cemetery, Mansfield. He was captured with the regiment at Plymouth, NC and sent to Andersonville Prison. They were exchanged March 1865. Before the date of March 1865, set for the exchange of prisoners, this company had been confined in various Rebel prisons after their capture at the battle of Plymouth, NC, more than half of them died due to the terrible hardship and exposure they sustained. The men who returned were hardly recognizable by the members of their own families.


WILLIAM L. DANN was born in Rutland, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Feb. 2nd 1865 as a Private in Co. B 101 PA Vol. Infantry and was honorably discharged June 25th 1865. He participated in the battles of the Peninsula Campaign, and Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington and Plymouth. At this last battle the entire regiment except those away on furloughs and detached service were captured and sent to Andersonville and other prisons. They were exchanged at Wilmington, NC in March 1865. His Company “B” was enlisted in Tioga County and had as Captains, Joseph S. Hoard later promoted to Major of the Regiment, Victor A. Elliott, and Melvin L. Clark later Lt. Colonel, all of Tioga County. When this regiment was organized in October 1861 at Camp Curtain it had as its regimental Colonel, Joseph H. Wilson of Beaver County, David B. Morris of Pittsburgh, Lt. Colonel. He is buried in Hope Cemetery at Mansfield, Tioga County, PA. Before the date in March 1865 set for the exchange of the prisoners of this Company who had been confined in various Rebel prisons after their capture at the Battle of Plymouth, NC, more than half of them died due to the terrible hardships and exposures they sustained. The men who returned were hardly recognizable by the members of their own families. – GAR48 p.103

A.B. Dann

Born in Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Feb. 20, 1864 as a private in the Co. D, 50 NY Engineers and was discharged June 13, 1865 on account of disability


AMOS B. DANN was born in Tioga County PA. He enlisted Feb. 20th 1864 as a Private in Co. D 50 NY Engineers and was discharged June 13th 1865 on account of disability. In the work of constructing roads, railroads and bridges and destroying those of the Rebels his Company was prominent, and in this work were often exposed to the fire of both Armies, as they were at City Point, Tree Creek and Hatcher’s Run. They participated in the “Warren Raid” in December 1864 in which the raiders started with one day’s rations and were gone thirteen days. They foraged in rear of the Cavalry who had “first pickings” and destroyed from 25 to 30 miles of railroad, being constantly wet to the skin from a five-day rain. They built a pontoon bridge at Wind Mill Point across the James River in which 113 boats were used and the distance being nearly 1600 feet. They were in winter quarters in 1864-1865 at Poplar Springs. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Siege of Yorktown, Seven Days Battles, Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Appomattox Court House. During term of service the regiment lost 2 officers and 229 enlisted men – making a total of 231. They were mustered out June 13th & 13th 1865. – GAR48 p.131
ALONZO DAY was born in Otsego County, NY. He enlisted August 18, 1862 (age 30) as a Private in Co. D 141st NY Vols. and was honorably discharged June 9, 1865. This regiment was recruited by Colonel Samuel G. Hathaway Jr., and was organized at Elmira, NY, and there mustered into the service for three years, September 11th 1862. The other Colonels serving were John W. Dininy, William K. Logie; Lt. Colonels were James C. Beecher, Edward L. Patrick, Andrew J. McNett; major, Charles W. Clanharty. The officers of his Company were Captains – Charles R. Fuller, William Merrell; 1st Lts. Clemmen Osborn; 2nd Lts. Joseph G. Townsend and Charles H. Freemen. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Siege of Suffolk, Diascund Bridge, Crumps Crossroads, Wauhatchie, Chattanooga, and Rossville Campaign, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta Campaign, Resaca, Dallas, Ackworth, Kennesaw Mountain, Golgotha, Nose’s Creek, Culp’s Farm, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Savannah Campaign, Campaign of the Carolinas, Chesterfield, Averasboro, Bentonville, Aikers Creek, Smithfield, Raleigh, Bennett House. They lost in the service 6 officers and 243 enlisted men- total 249, and were honorably discharged and mustered out of the service under Colonel Andrew G. McNett on June 8th 1865 near Washington, DC. – GAR48 p.193
CHARLES DAY was born in 1844 in West Lawrence, Otsego County, NY. He enlisted Sept. 25th 1864, as a Private in Co. K, 210 PA Vol., and was honorably discharged May 30th 1865. He was in the battle of Hatcher’s Run and was complimented by General Meade for bravery on the 6th of Feb. in capturing from the enemy the colors of the 3rd Delaware and carrying them through the fight. The Color Bearer was shot and Day rushed thru the fire and carried them until the end of the battle. He was awarded a 25-day furlough for this act of bravery by General Meade. He was later awarded a Medal of Honor by President William A. McKinley. His Company was also in the three day battle at Gravelly Run in which they displayed their wonted courage being fearfully exposed and sent away heavy losses, having thirty-five killed, one hundred and fifteen wounded and one hundred and fifty missing. In the fierce fighting of April 1865 they displayed their usual courage and with the Corps followed the retreating Rebels to Appomattox Court House where the flag of truce proclaiming the surrender of Lee passed thru the lines of the brigade in which they stood. After the surrender they participated in the Grand Review held at Washington DC and were shortly mustered out of the service. He died July 29th 1901. – GAR48 p.156

E.Z. Decker

E.Z. Decker born in New York State enlisted Nov. 26, 1861 as a private in Co. C 7th Pa. Cavalry and was honorably discharged on Dec. 6, 1864. His regiment known as the Saber Regiment fought from Kentucky to Atlanta, Georgia.


E.Z. DECKER was born in New York. He enlisted Nov. 26th 1861 as a Private in Co. L, 7th Cavalry, and was honorably discharged Dec. 6th 1864. His regiment was commanded by the accomplished soldier, George C. Wynkoop who held the rank of Colonel and had raised the regiment to a high state of discipline and efficiency. It served in Tennessee and with the Western armies until the end of the war and fought so much at close quarters that it was known as the “Saber Regiment”. It participated in a number of sharp engagements in 1862 and was also in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. At Shelbyville they achieved fame when they charged and captured fortifications built to resist infantry, capturing and killing half of the Rebel Cavalry under General Wheeler, and driving half of the remainder into Duck Creek. This was the first time during the war that mounted cavalry charged and captured defended entrenchments. His Company had as First Lt. Otis G. Gerould of Tioga County and a large number of the men were from this county. The pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis at Irwinsville, GA, on May 11th 1865 was one of this regiment’s outstanding exploits of the war. Davis leaving Richmond before the evacuation on April 2nd 1865 made a desperate dash for liberty. – GAR48 p.133

Edward Doane

(Information from 1890 Veterans Census of Mansfield, Tioga County, PA; Edward Doane enlisted as private in Co. K 187th Pa. Inf., May 13, 1864; discharged July 3, 1865; served 1yr 3mo 20da; shot through left hand)

Fragment of article on ? Doane

…at Washington, DC and at York, PA. He was discharged at Philadelphia, PA July 3, 1865 on account of disability. Following his enlistment he went to Cold Harbor and remained in camp there until June 12, when the Army of the Potomac made their famous movement. Moving rapidly down to the James River, crossing and went up to in Front of Petersburg, Va. At one time while overcome by heat and smoke in burning woods, General Grant gave him medicine from his private can, and had him placed in ambulance for the day. He was with his Regiment as Guard of Honor at Philadelphia, Independence Hall, honoring Lincoln. Doane’s Regiment was led by Major Merrick of Wellsboro and it distinguished itself in front of Petersburg. After the battle of Cold Harbor his regiment was brigaded with the Bucktails.

In the assault on the works of Petersburg, the regiment lost 220 men killed and wounded in this most gallant action. The campaign against Petersburg, the largest sustained operation of the war, began in the summer of 1864 and lasted for 10 months, until the spring of 1865. The fighting covered an area of more than 170 square miles, with 35 miles of trenches and fortifications stretching from Richmond to the southwest of Petersburg. During September 1864, nearly 175 field and siege guns poured forth a daily average of 27.8 tons of iron on the confederate works.


EDWARD DOANE was born the 25th day of December 1840 in Oswego County, New York. He enlisted at Williamsport, PA in Feb. 1864 as a Private in Co. K, 187th Regt., PA Vol. Infantry. He was engaged in the battle before Petersburg, VA June 18th 1864, at which time he was wounded. He was in the hospital at Washington, DC and at York, PA. He was discharged at Philadelphia, PA July 3rd 1865 on account of disability. He was in the battle of Cold Harbor and remained in camp there until June 12th when the Army of Potomac made the famous flank movement, moving rapidly down to the James River, crossed, and went up to front before Petersburg, VA. At one time while overcome by heat and smoke in burning woods, Gen. Grant gave him medicine from his private can, and had him placed in ambulance for the day. He was with his regiment’s guard of honor at Lincoln’s funeral obsequies at Philadelphia in Independence Hall. He had two brothers in the war; also father-in-law and brother-in-law. His regiment especially distinguished itself at the assault on the works at Petersburg. They were led by Major Merrick of Wellsboro, Tioga County, who was severely wounded in the attack. After the battle of Cold Harbor, his regiment was brigaded with the Bucktails, whose Colonel was Joshua L. Chamberlain and after Petersburg they took part in the desperate fighting of Weldon Railroad and Hatcher’s Run. In the assault on the works at Petersburg the regiment lost two hundred and twenty men killed and wounded in this most gallant action. – GAR48 p.84