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Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
G.A.R. Post No. 48, Mansfield PA
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

G.A.R. Post No. 48 in 1910
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Samuel Early

Samuel Early was born in Orange county, NJ, enlisted Oct. 4, 1861 as a private in Co. H 10th NY Cavalry and was honorably discharged Dec. 22, 1864. His company known as the "Porter Guard" was recruited at Elmira, NY.

Isaac G. Estes

Isaac G. Estes born 29 January 1843 in Cayuga, NY. He enlisted Dec. 29, 1861 at Elmira, NY as a private in Co. H 50th NY Engineers. June 1862 he was in the hospital at Harrison’s Landing and at Philadelphia with typhoid fever being confined about three months. Feb. 1864, he received a furlough for thirty days from Rappahannock Station from whence he was honorably discharged from his first enlistment to reenlist as a veteran in his old command. His battle record includes Yorktown, Fair Oaks, McClellan’s retreat down the Peninsula, Va., Seven days fight before Richmond, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, 2nd and 3rd engagements, Bank’s Ford, Mine Run, Rappahannock Station, Wilderness Campaign and Siege of Petersburg. He was honorably discharged June 30, 1865 at Elmira, NY. They were in "Warren’s Raid" in which the Raiders started out with one day’s rations and were gone 13 days. They destroyed from 25 to 30 miles of railroad, being constantly wet from a five-day rain. Isaac G. Estes joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48, June 18, 1898.

H.M. Foote

H.M. Foote born in 1846 in Chemung Co., NY. Enlisted Jan. 1, 1864 in Co. A 187th Pa. Vol. Infantry as a private and was promoted to corporal. He was honorably discharged Aug. 5, 1865. His regt. joined the Army during its fight at Cold Harbor and served under Major Merrick. (See the bio about George W. Merrick)

Foster Garrison

Foster Garrison was born on Nov. 13, 1835 in Jackson Township, Tioga Co., Pa. He enlisted Sept. 10, 1862 at Troy, Pa., as a private in Co. D 16th Penna. Vol. Cav., being promoted to Sergt. In 1863, he was in the hospital at Alexandria, Va., about two weeks with injuries caused by the falling of a horse. March 1864 at Warrenton Junction, Va., he was detailed as clerk in the Commissary Dept., about eighteen months. In March 1865 he was furloughed for thirty days in front of Petersburg, Va. He took part in the battles of White House Landing, Sulpher Springs, Reams Station, and considerable scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged June 17, 1865 at Lynchburg, Va. His Regiment was organized at Camp Curtin, Sept. 1862 and they remained there until Jan. 3, 1863, when they joined the Army of the Potomac. Their first engagement was Kelly’s Ford. They fought at Gettysburg, Culpepper, Bristol Station, Malvin Hill, Dinwiddie Court House and others. Foster Garrison joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48, Nov. 21, 1892.

Henry Gaylord

Henry Gaylord was born on the 8th of November 1844 at Mansfield. PA and enlisted as a private in Company B, 101st Pa. Vol. Inf., at Mansfield when the Regiment was organized. He was first discharged on February 14, 1864 and then reenlisted in the same Company. He took part in Sherman’s March to the sea and was captured and sent to Libby Prison where he was kept three weeks. He was then transferred to Andersonville making a total of 7 months and nineteen days, which he was held. He was discharged June 25, 1865 at the end of the war. Before being captured with his entire Regiment at Plymouth, NC on April 20, 1864, he was in the Peninsula Campaign, the battles of Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington, and Plymouth. According to the Mansfield Advertiser of September 1891, Henry Gaylord was granted a Pension of eight ($8) dollars a month dating from September 8, 1891. During Sherman’s Campaign, in which Henry Gaylord took part, from Chattanooga to Atlanta, the U.S. Army of Tennessee in a period of five months constructed over 300 miles of rifle pits, fired 149,670 artillery rounds and 22,137,132 rounds of small arms ammunition

William Gilbert

William Gilbert was born 1st of March 1845 in Barton, NY. He enlisted Oct. 4, 1864 at Williamsport, Pa., as a private in Co. M 7th Pa. Vol. Cavalry. He took active part in the battle of Selma, Ala. His regiment was the "Saber Regiment". He was honorably discharged Aug. 23, 1865 at Macon, Ga. He joined General Mansfield Post, No. 48 July 20, 1891.

First Mansfield Advertiser Editor a Civil War Veteran

O.D. Goodenough

The first Mansfield Advertiser was published January 21, 1873, a Tuesday. Mr. O.D. Goodenough was its editor. He came to Mansfield from Towanda, where he had worked on the "Towanda Item". Mr. Goodenough was well known as an "itemixer" columnist. The first issue of the Advertiser received very good comments from neighboring and distant papers. The Advertiser took over the "Valley Enterprize" which apparently had folded. Its editor had been Major V.A. Elliott, who went to Denver, Colo. Mr. Goodenough was a Civil War veteran as had been Major Elliott. J.S. Hoard, who had been the editor of the older Mansfield Express published in 1855, also took part in the Civil War.

O.D. Goodenough enlisted as a musician in the Regimental Band of the 6th Pennsylvania reserves. This regiment was composed of men who had responded to the call of President Lincoln, issued immediately after the fall of Fort Sumter. They participated in the following battles: Drainesville, Malvern Hill, Gaines Mills, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania and Bethesda Church. In this last engagement, although but 150 strong it captured 102 and buried 72 rebels in its front. It was mustered out of service June 14, 1864, after three years service in the camp and on the march in which it shared the privations and hardships as were the glory of the Army of the Potomac. When the General Mansfield Post, No. 48 of Mansfield, Tioga County, Pa., was organized with eighteen members on August 18, 1875, the subject of this sketch was elected as its first commander. This post is the oldest in Tioga County and had a large membership at one time nearly two hundred veterans being enrolled.

J.A. Hadley

J.A. Hadley born at Millport, NY enlisted in Co. E 107th NY Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged from Co. F 14th V. R. Inf., Nov. 14, 1865. His date of enlistment was June 17, 1862. This Regiment was recruited and organized at Elmira, NY and entered service Aug. 13, 1862 for a term of 3 years. The regiment participated in the following battles: Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Atlanta Campaign, Kenesaw Mountain, General Sherman’s Savannah’s Campaign and the Campaign of the Carolinas.

Haight Brothers in Closing Scenes of War

Orlando T. Haight and Allen M. Haight

Orando T. Haight was born the 14th day of July, A.D. 1841 in Burlington, County of Bradford, State of Pennsylvania. He enlisted September 6, 1864 as a private in Co. B 207th Pa. Vol., and was honorably discharged May 31, 1865. This Regiment was raised by Major Robert C. Cox under commission of Governor Curtin. Major Cox was afterwards made Colonel of the Regiment and finally commissioned Brig. General. It participated in the closing scenes of the war including Hatchers Run, Fort Steadman, the assault on and capture of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee at Appomatox. In March 1865 the regiment presented Col. Robert C. Cox with a horse and complete outfit valued at $550 in token of its esteem. It took a prominent part in the recapture of Fort Steadman, and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s Division, which had surprised the Fort during the night. The division with the greatest gallantry stormed these formidable works at the fall of Petersburg after most severe fighting. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County in its ranks than any single organization in the service and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. His Company "B" was made up principally of men from Tioga County and its (Captain). First Lieutenant was J. H. Schanbacher. The Regimental officers were Col. Robert C. Cox; Lt. Col. William W.S. Snoddy and Major A. Elliott. O.T. Haight was one of the first Ten Commanders of General Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR. Orlando Taylor Haight was the father of Mrs. Charles Baldwin. For many years he rode at the head of the Decoration Day Parade in Mansfield. His horse would dance to the music of the bands.

Allen M. Haight was a brother to Orlando and lived at Mainesburg. He died several years before Orlando. Allen M. Haight was born in Bradford County, Pa. He enlisted September 14, 1861 as a musician in Co. E 52nd Pennsylvania Volunteers and was honorably discharged, November 7, 1864. Upon the 8th of November 1861 the Regiment left Camp Curtin and proceeded to Washington, DC and on January 2, 1862 went into winter quarters. On the 28th of March they were ordered to take the field and proceeded to Alexandria and from there to Lee’s Mills and then took part in the siege of Yorktown. They then resumed their march toward Richmond and participated in the battle of Fair Oaks on the 30th of May and the division was mentioned in the reports for gallantry. They were in the battles at the Chickahominy, at Mechanicsville and Gaines Mills. They engaged in the expeditions against Wilmington, NC and Port Royal, NC and Charleston, also Morris Island and Fort Wagner and Sumter. In December a large part of the regiment re-enlisted and were given a veteran furlough. Upon their return to regiment was recruited up to 1000 men and were sent to Bermuda Hundred and were soon engaged in the reduction of Fort Jackson, but through lack of support the assaulting parties were all taken prisoners. The Regiment remained in Morris Island during the summer and autumn of 1864 and on the 18th of February 1865 they captured Fort Sumter and then took Charleston. Later as Sherman’s men marched through S. Carolina the 52nd joined them but their march terminated with Johnson’s surrender. They were mustered out at Harrisburg, Pa., July 12, 1865. A. M. Haight was a member of the General Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR.

Allen M. and Orlando T. (Haight) were children of George R. and Elizabeth Haight. Another brother Myron B. was injured in the war. He was the grandfather of Mrs. Janice Kennedy of Troy, Pa., formerly of Mansfield. There are 11 children in the George R. Haight family. There were also 11 in the Orlando Haight family.

Simon L. Hakes – Captured in Mine Blast

Simon L. Hakes, born on the 11th of May 1831 in Columbia, Bradford Co., Pa. He enlisted Feb. 29, 1864 at Mansfield, Pa., as a private in Co. G 45th Pa. Vol. Inf. On July 20, 1864 at the Mine Explosion, Petersburg, Va., he was taken prisoner. He was confined in Danville and Libby Prisons about seven months and was then paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md. March 1, 1865, he was furloughed for thirty days, this was extended sixty days more, when he returned to his command. He fought at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg and Mine Explosion. He was honorably discharged July 15, 1865 at Harrisburg, Pa. His regiment was formed in October 1861 on the second call by the Governor, for volunteers immediately after the first battle of Bull Run. Co. G was recruited in Tioga Co., and had as its Captains, Nelson Whitney and Reese G. Richards. It saw service in both the eastern and western armies and was noted for its splendid discipline and bravery of its men. After Lee’s surrender it took part in the grave review held at Washington, DC on May 22-23, 1865. Simon L. Hakes died Jan. 7, 1912. He was a prominent area farmer and was the father of the late Fred Hakes of Mansfield. He joined Gen. Mansfield Post, No. 48 Dec. 17, 1899.

The Mine Explosion occurred when a Pa. Company of Vol. Dug a mine under the entrenchments at Petersburg to a point under the Rebel lines and set off a heavy charge of powder. Poorly organized Union troops went into the crater and were captured or killed by the Rebel troops, who recoiled from their surprise before the Union troops could break through their lines.

Adam Hart

Adam Hart born in 1823 at Lawrenceville enlisted at Harrisburg, PA, Oct. 16, 1862 as a private in Co. A, 171st Regt., Pa. Volunteer Infantry. His regiment being part of the Keystone Brigade was sent to N. Carolina and while there he was engaged in the battle of Hills Point and in various skirmishes. He was also employed in guard duty at different places. He was discharged at Harrisburg Aug. 8, 1863 by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. He was a member of Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48. . He was part of a recruiting program in Tioga County of men drafted for nine months service. The Captain of Hart’s Company was William B. Hall of Mansfield. Robert C. Cox was the regiment’s major, also from Mansfield. The Brigade of which Hart belonged was engaged mainly in N. Carolina.

Jacob Hartman

Jacob Hartman was born in Williamsport and enlisted on Nov. 26, 1861 as a private in Co. L 7th Cavalry. He was discharged Dec. 6, 1864. The 7th "Saber Regiment" was assigned to the Western Army and distinguished itself in service.

Alvin H. Ingalls – Wounded and taken Prisoner at Petersburg

Alvin Harrison Ingalls (better known as A.H. Ingalls) was born Sept. 11, 1840 in Williamson, NY. His parents moved to Covington when he was a boy. He enlisted Aug. 24, 1861 from Troy, Pa., as a private in Co. F 11th Pa. Vol. Cal. In February 1862 he was detailed as hospital nurse at Fortress Munroe, Va., remaining about five months. In April and May 1862 he was in hospital at Fortress Munroe with fever and in June 1862 he was in Stone General Hospital, Washington, DC about one month with malaria. In spring of 1864 he was detailed as orderly on Staff of Col. S.P. Spier. He took part in the battles of Blackwater, Deserted House, So. Anna Bridge (where his Co. captured Gen. W.H.F. Lee), Hanover Junction, Jackson, Bolton Bridge, Woods Cross Roads, Barnamsville and several skirmishes with rebel guerrillas while searching for escaped prisoners from Libby. In June 9, 1864 during a charge on works near Petersburg, Va., he had his horse killed under him and he received gunshot wounds in right hip, shattering the bone, also wounds in knee and neck. He was captured the same day and held at Petersburg one month, at Libby prison nearly three months, in hospital at Richmond six weeks, when he was released on parole, arriving at Annapolis, Md. Aug. 24, 1864. While a prisoner at Libby he hewed out of wood with his jackknife, a spoon and dish, which he used when given his rations. He was promoted to 1st Corporal soon after enlistment, which office he held during his term of service. He was honorably discharged Oct. 8, 1864 at Philadelphia, Pa. He joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR Oct. 16, 1882. He also had three brothers who fought in the Civil War and all returned home alive. His brother, Joshua, was also a member of Post No. 48 and an old Advertiser account will be published at a later date. Other brothers mentioned in the above were Elihue and Electrus.

George W.Johnson

G.W. Johnson was born November 1845 in Blossburg. He enlisted at Williamsport, Sept. 3, 1864 as a private in Co. K 207th Pa. Vol. Inf. He participated in the engagements at Fort Stedman, March 25, 1865, Petersburg, April 2, 1865, Fort Mahone and several skirmishes. He was honorably discharged May 31, 1865 at Alexandria, Va. His Regimental Commander was Col. R.C. Cox of Tioga Co., and Co. K was raised in the County. He joined General Mansfield Post No. 48 April 19th 1886.

E.T. Keen

E.T. Keen born in Sussex County, NJ. He enlisted March 16, 1864 as a private in Co. J 141st Pa. Vol. Inf. He received a gunshot wound in the left shoulder at Petersburg, VA July 30, 1864. He was discharged from the 2nd Pa. Heavy Artillery Feb. 5, 1866. His regiment was stationed as Washington, DC for its defense at the time of the battle of Bull Run and remained there until the finish of the campaign in Maryland.

Charles E. Kelsey

Charles E. Kelsey, born in 1838 in Charleston Two. enlisted August 25, 1864. He enlisted at Covington, Tioga County, Pa., as a private in Co. K 207th Regiment, Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was engaged in battle at Fort Steadman, Bermuda Front, Hatcher’s Run. He was also in Warren’s Raid and in battles about Petersburg and Richmond. He was discharged at Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, Pa., on May 21, 1865 on account of the close of the war. His company was recruited mostly in Delmar and Charleston Townships and has as its Captain John J. Reese. Major Robert C. Cox later Col., and Brig. General was commissioned by Gov. Curtin to raise the regiment. Victor A. Elliot was major. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga Co., in its ranks than any single organization in service and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. He joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR February 15, 1886.

John Kiley

John Kiley was born the 27th day of May 1821 in Richmond Township and enlisted October 19, 1861 as a private in Co. B 101st, Pa. Vol. Inf. He was promoted to Corporal. He received a gunshot wound in the right leg at Fair Oaks, on June 6, 1862 by reason of which he was discharged June 23, 1862 on Surgeon’s Certificate. Co. B was made up of Mansfield and Richmond men and he was taken prisoner with its entire regiment at Plymouth, NC in 1864. Corp. Kiley also participated in the Peninsula Campaign and the battle of Williamsburg.

C.S. Kingsley- Saw Duty in Virginia

Charles S. Kingsley, born in 1844 at Pittsford, Vermont. He enlisted in 1863 at Harrisburg as a corporal in Co. C. 30th Pa. State Militia and served until July 26, 1863, when he was honorably discharged at Harrisburg following the expulsion of the rebels from Pennsylvania. He reenlisted at Williamsport in Co. L 3rd Pa. Heavy Artillery. He was detailed May 1864 to a Navy Brig., on the James River, Virginia, patrolling the navigable streams in Virginia for about four months. On July 16, 1865, he was granted a furlough of twenty days at Richmond, Va. The 3rd Pa. Heavy Artillery was called upon to do varied service and at the close of the war it was their lot to guard the late President of the Confederacy, Jefferson C. Davis at Fort Monroe. They fought at Richmond, Fort Fisher and Petersburg and at Appomatox at the surrender of General Lee. He was honorably discharged Nov. 9, 1865 at Fort Munroe. His services consisted principally of scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. Charles S. Kingsley joined General Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR Aug. 18, 1875. He was a charter member and held the offices of Commander, Senior Vice Commander, Quartermaster, Adjutant and Officer of the Day.

Lewis Kohler

Lewis Kohler born 27th of February 1842 in Tioga, Pa. He enlisted as a private at Dartt Settlement in Co. K 207th Pa. Vol. Inf., and was later made Corporal. April 2, 1865 in front of Petersburg, Va., he was wounded in the left hand by a gunshot and was in the hospital at City Point, Va., about two weeks. He took active part in the following engagements, viz: Bermuda Hundred, Hatchers Run, Charge of Fort Stedman and final assault on the line in front of Petersburg, Va. He was honorably discharged from service May 31, 1865, at Alexandria, Va. His Company raised by Major Cox was for the most part from Charleston and Delmar Townships. It won great renown at Fort Stedman where it took part in the capture of the Fort with great gallantry and assisted in the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s Division. Lewis Kohler joined General Mansfield Post No. 48, March 8, 1887.

Horatio Lamb with New York Volunteers

Horatio H. Lamb born in 1820 at Lambs Creek, Pa., enlisted as a private August 1862 at Brooklyn, Kings County, NY in Co. B 170th NY Volunteer Infantry. In September 1862, he became a Corporal and continued to hold that rank during the remainder of his military service. In the spring of 1863, he was with his Regiment in Virginia and was engaged in several skirmishes in the vicinity of Suffolk, one of them being at Edenton Road. About the middle of July 1863, he was sent to Hart Island, NY where he was engaged in guard duty in a Conscript Camp. July 22, 1864 he returned to his regiment near Petersburg, Va. On the 25th of August 1864, he was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Richmond and kept in a Prison Hospital several days. He was then paroled and returned to the Union lines. He entered a hospital at Annapolis, Md. And remained there until Nov. 1864. In February 1865, he rejoined his regiment at Hatchers Run and while with it he was engaged in the battles and skirmishes, which terminated in the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond and the surrender of General Lee. He was discharged July 25, 1865 at Hart’s Island, NY by reason of the close of the War. Corp. Lamb joined General Mansfield Post No. 48, GAR on August 18th, 1875.

George C. Lee

G.C. Lee was born in Nova Scotia. He enlisted as a private in Co. D 8th Pa. Cavalry Sept. 11, 1861 and was honorably discharged. His outfit participated in one hundred thirty-five battles, engagements and skirmishes, a magnificent record.

D. W. Lewis

D. W. Lewis, born in Oneida, NY. He enlisted April 18, 1861 as a Corporal in Co. E 81st Ill., and was discharged Jan. 6, 1863 from Co. A 94th Ill., on account of disability.

George W. Merrick

G.W. Merrick was born on 27th of March 1838 at Wellsboro. He enlisted as a private April 21, 1861 Co. H. 6th Pa. R. C. and was promoted to Sergt. He lost his right leg above the knee at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1861. He was discharged because of physical disability. He reenlisted June 1863 in Co. A as Capt., of 187th Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was made Major before the close of the war. He was in the battle of Drainsville, Peninsular Campaign, Second Bull Run, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.

W.H. Mott

W.H. Mott enlisted May 6, 1861 as a private in Co. D, 23rd NY Vol. Inf., and honorably discharged from Co. F, 186th NY Vol. Inf., on Jan 21, 1863 by surgeon’s certificate. The 23rd NY regiment participated in the following battles: Gen. Pope Campaign in Virginia, Bull Run, Fairfax, South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredricksburg. They lost during their term of service 2 officers and 70 enlisted men.

A note on Bull Run – at the first battle of Bull Run or Manasses, it has been estimated that between 8,000 and 10,000 bullets were fired for every man killed and wounded.

H.H. O’Dell (Correct Name is Odell)

H.H. O’Dell was born Oct. 31, 1933 at Spencer, NY. He enlisted as a private in Co. A 171st Pa. Militia and was honorably discharged Aug. 8, 1863. Date of enlistment was Oct. 15, 1862. His regiment was a nine-month regiment and saw service principally in N. Carolina. This regiment was draftees and organized at Camp Curtin, Pa. His Regiment was first in action at "Deserted House" near Blackwater, Va., and also in engagements at Hills Point and Blounts Creek, Va. On Dec. 28, 1862, they were ordered from Suffolk, Va., to Newburn, NC. They marched to the Chowan River in three days and from there took transports to Newburn. The first day out they forded a stream 1/8 of a mile wide and breast high and camped on a plantation of 1000 acres, 100 acres was in standing corn. The next morning not a stalk of corn remained, being used as food for horses and mules and for campfires.

William R. Packard

William R. Packard born on the 4th day of August 1841 in Schuyler County, NY. He enlisted Feb. 24, 1864 as a private in Co. E 13th NY Heavy Artillery, afterward consolidated with 6th NY Heavy Artillery and called Co. K. July 20, 1864 he was taken to a hospital at Fort Ringgold, Va., where he was treated a short time for rheumatism and diarrhea. Oct. 1864, he was detailed at Scott Creek, Va., on special duty and was again detailed at same place during presidential election in Nov. 1864, again in the spring of 1865, and again at Norfolk, Va., July 4, 1865. He took part in the battle of Plymouth, NC. He was honorably discharged Aug. 24, 1865 at Fort Keainey, near Washington, DC. Other battles and engagements that the regiment took part in were: operations before Petersburg and Richmond, Va., Assault on Petersburg, Swift Creek, Day Point, Fort Fisher, Fall of Petersburg. The Regiment lost in their service 4 officers and 148 enlisted men and were enlisted for a term of three years as a body. William R. Packard joined Gen. Mansfield Post, No. 48, March 6, 1876.

James S. Palmer

James S. Palmer, born in 1815 at Brooklyn, Pa. He enlisted at Danube, NY Oct. 4, 1862 as a private in Co. E 152nd NY Vol. Inf. Soon after entering the service he was prostrated by the hardships and disease incident to camp life and was confined in a hospital at Suffolk, Va., and later at Hampton Hospital. He did not, however, recover his health sufficiently to enable him to perform a soldier’s duty in the ranks, and he was therefore detailed for duties about the camp. While in Hampton Hospital he was appointed Ward Master. But being too feeble to perform the duties of the office he was discharged for disability at Hampton, Va., on Aug. 23, 1863. He served 10 months. Comrade Palmer joined the Gen. Mansfield GAR No. 48 on Dec. 20, 1875.

John Paulman

John Paulman was born at Wellsville, NY, and he enlisted Nov. 1861 as a private in Co. G 6th NY Vol. Inf., and was discharged July 15, 1865 on account of close of War. During the service this regiment lost 18 officers and 283 enlisted men.

William E. Peck

William E. Peck was born May 1, 1843 in Middlebury, Pa. He enlisted Feb. 22, 1864 at Wellsboro, Pa., in Co. G 45th Pa. Vol. Infantry as a private, and was promoted to Corporal July 20, 1864 in front of Petersburg, Va., where he received a gunshot wound in the left ear. In the fall of 1864 he was confined in the hospital at City Point, Va., Washington, DC, and Philadelphia, Pa., two months. He was furloughed in Nov. from the latter place for 30 days. In the winter of 1865 in front of Petersburg, Va., he was detailed on guard at 1st Brigade Headquarters about 3 months. He fought at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, C. H., North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg Mine Explosion and Weldon RR He was honorably discharged July 17, 1865 at Alexandria, Va. His Company was recruited in Tioga County and had as its Captain, Nelson Whitney and Russ G. Richards. The regiment saw service in widely separated parts of the country and was noted for its fine discipline and the splendid bravery of its men. After Lee’s surrender it took part in the guard review of Washington, DC on May 22-23, 1865.

Orrin C. Perry

Orrin C. Perry, born in Newark, NJ enlisted April 27, 1861 as a private in Co. H, 4th N.J. Vol. Reg., and was honorably discharged May 21, 1865. He was a member of General Mansfield Post, No. 48, GAR.

A.M. Pitts

A. M. Pitts was born in 1834 in Richmond Township, Tioga County. He enlisted in August 1861 as a private in Co. A 7th Kansas Vol. Cavalry. He gained the rank of Captain before he was discharged in 1865. He saw action in Western Missouri, Pittsburg Landing, Miss., and served under Col. Sheridan in the south, taking part in the Battle of Corinth, Miss., Florence, Ala., and many other engagements in Tennessee. In 1864 he was given a 30-day furlough from Leavenworth, Kan. His first time off duty since enlisting. During this furlough he visited friends in Mansfield. On returning to duty his regiment was sent to Memphis to guard the work crews on the railroad. He saw action against Gen. Forrest at Hurricane Creek. Again ordered to Kansas his regiment took part in all the principal engagements, particularly distinguished itself at Independence, Mo., where it charged a superior force, routed it and took two pieces of artillery. Following this campaign it was sent to St. Louis District to fight guerrilla. Following his discharge he subsequently made his home in Mansfield where he died in 1891. He was the first commander of the General Mansfield Post GAR.

L.A. Ridgeway

L.A. Ridgeway was born in Rome, PA and he enlisted July 3, 1863 as a Hospital Steward in 35th Pa. Militia and was discharged on account of physical disability, August 2, 1863. This Regiment was known as "Emergency Men" and was raised on the call of War Governor or Penna., Andrew G. Curtin, prior to the battle of Gettysburg on Lee’s invasion of Pennsylvania. The reg’t was not concentrated in time to take part in the battle.

Homer J. Ripley

Homer J. Ripley was born in 1839 in Richmond Township and enlisted Aug. 27, 1862 at Mainesburg, Pa., as a private in Co. F 2nd Bat. 14 U.S. Infantry. He was successively promoted to Sgt. Com., Sgt. Lt., and Captain. He was in hospitals at Washington, DC and Philadelphia, Pa., two months during 1863, with malarial fever, and was furloughed for ten days in Sept., from the latter city. He fought at Chancellorsville, but the balance of his service consisted of scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was transferred March 21, 1866 to Co. D 32nd U.S. Inf., in Arizona territory. He was adjutant of 3rd Bat. 14 u>s> Inf., from promotion to Lt., in 1865 to date of Capt.’s Comm., in Sept. 1867. He resigned from the service in Indian Territory Jan. 1, 1871. Homer Ripley joined GAR Post No. 48, April 5, 1876.

Volney Ripley

Volney Ripley was born in October 1843 in Richmond Township. He enlisted as a private in Co. K 210th Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was captured March 31, 1865 at White Oak Road, Va., was robbed, paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md., where on April 1865 he was furloughed for 30 days. He took part in the Weldon Raid, White Oak Road, Va., and considerable scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged from service at Annapolis, Md., May 29, 1865. Volney Ripley joined General Mansfield Post No. 48 April 21, 1884, was Junior Vice Commander six years and Officer of the Guard.

Soon after its organization the 210th Regt., was ordered to join the Army of the Potomac before Petersburg. It was engaged for the first time at Hatchers Run but suffered only a small loss. It took part in the Bluefield Raid which lasted a week and during which they destroyed the Weldon Railroad. They were in action at Dabney’s Mills. The regiment displayed great gallantry, also at Gravelly Run action of three days duration they were at the forefront of the action and sustained great loss from the fiery struggle through which it was called to pass. The entire loss was 35 killed, 115 wounded and 150 missing. With the Corps, it followed closely the retreating army and at Appomatox Court House was upon the first line to the last.

Charles Rundell

Charles Rundell was born in Canton, PA. He enlisted Oct. 8, 1861 as a private in Co. G 7th Pa. Cavalry and was honorably discharged Nov. 1, 1864. He was a member of the famed "Saber Regiment" assigned to service in Tennessee.

C.N. Shepard

C.N. Shepard was born in Newark, NJ. He enlisted Feb. 1864 as a private in Co. C 11th Pa. Cav., and was discharged May 20, 1865 on account of disability, resulting from a gunshot wound in the left ankle, received at Petersburg, Va. His Regiment entered the war as "Harlan’s Light Cavalry".

Three Shaw Boys served with Tioga County Vols.

Francis M. Shaw

Harry B. Shaw (Should be Horry B. Shaw)

Orin Shaw

Francis Marion Shaw and Harry B. Shaw enlisted October 14, 1861 at Harrisburg with the Tioga County Company which had as its Captain Joseph S. Hoard and Lt. Victor A. Elliott and Melvin L. Clark all from Mansfield. Most of the men enlisting in 1861 went with Company B 101st Volunteer Infantry. On February 22, 1864 Orin Shaw enlisted as a private in Co. B. 101st Regiment and joined the Regiment at New Bern, NC. Orin Shaw took smallpox in the fall of 1864 and was confined in the smallpox hospital at Roanoke Island and after his recovery he cared for others sick with the same disease. He was first in Battle at Foster’s Mills, NC in Feb. 1865. He was discharged on June 25, 1865 at New Bern, NC. The entire 101st Regiment was captured at Plymouth, NC, except those men who were away on furlough or detached duty. In Orin’s war record no mention of this battle is made and being a new recruit at the time must have missed the battle, being first in action in February 1865, following his discharge from the hospital. He was a member of Gen. Mansfield Post 48 GAR, joining Aug. 20, 1888.

Harry B. Shaw leaving with the 101st Regiment also missed being captured in 1863. He took sick at Portsmouth, Va., for two months with chronic diarrhea and typhoid fever and was detailed on a hospital boat two weeks caring for the sick and wounded. He took active part with his regiment in the battle of Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Blackwater and New Bern. He was honorably discharged March 27, 1863 at New Bern, NC. On the 29th of June 1863 he reenlisted in Company E 35th Pa. Volunteer Militia in the Gettysburg emergency call as Sergt. And served until Aug. 9, 1863. He joined the Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR on June 16, 1888 and held the offices of Senior and Junior Vice commander, Commander, Chaplain, Officer of the Day and Officer of the Guard.

Francis Marion Shaw entered the service as a Sergt. With the Mansfield Company and reenlisted at the close of his term in the same company. He was taken prisoner with the 101st Volunteers at the four-day battle of Plymouth, NC on April 20, 1864 by General Hakes Division of the Army of Northern Virginia, and was confined at Andersonville, Ga., for about 10 months. He was moved to Florence and Charleston, SC about a month each and then taken to Wilmington, NC where he was paroled. He took part in the following engagements: Seige of Yorktown, Va., Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Harrison’s Landing and other engagements on the Peninsula, Blackwater, Kinston, Goldboro and Plymouth, NC. He was honorably discharged June 26, 1865 at Harrisburg, PA. He was a member of Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR.

Shaw Veterans

At the time of the Civil War Rodney Shaw and wife, Mary Ann Seeley lived in the house that John Marvin bought at 473 North Main St. It was originally built in 1828. They had five sons and five daughters. The sons were Francis M., James H., Horry B., Orin and Thomas C. the daughters were Ann Melinda Bly, Harriet M. Dorsett, Eliza Jane Bates, Mary and Ella. At Rodney Shaw’s death, his property on Pickel Hill and North Main Street was divided among his children. Orin and Ella had the old homestead; Horry, the home now occupied by Leda and Lester Shaw; Francis, the home now owned and occupied by Ben Husted; a piece of land between to Harriet Dorsett.

All five of the Shaw sons went to the Civil War. Francis suffered untold hardships in Andersonville Prison. Thomas died of typhoid fever in the service. All served the duration of the war.

John P. Shipman

Mr. Shipman was born in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada July 29, 1845 where he spent his youth until he was fourteen years of age, when he and his parents, three brother and two sisters moved to Farmington, Tioga County, Penna. He was the son of the Rev. Jacob and Lydia Shipman. He was educated in the rural schools of Farmington and continued to work on the farms until at the age of 18 he went to Groton, NY and enlisted in the army September 1864. He was placed in company B, 9th Regiment, New York Volunteers, Heavy Artillery. The commanding Officers were Colonel Ricketts, and Mr. Shipman’s Captain was a man named Fish. He was all through Sherman’s celebrated campaign, and was present at Lee’s surrender to General Grant at Appomatox Court House in April 1865. Mr. Shipman was in four battles: Cedar Creek, Fishers Hill, New Market and Petersburg. He also did much picket duty while he was in the South and was honorably discharged in September 1865. On March 18, 1874 Mr. Shipman married Miss Delphene Merritt, daughter of William and Eliza Haslett Merritt of Nelson, Pa. Two children were born to them, one dying in infancy and the other Carrie Shipman Knapp deceased. At the time of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, Mr. Shipman was home on furlough so that he missed that most exciting time in Washington, but he often saw the President during his stay in the Capitol.

April 9th Mr. & Mrs. Shipman entertained the Local Civil War Veterans at their home on Elmira Street, Mansfield, where they had lived since 1913, in honor of the 60th Anniversary of Lee’s Surrender. The house was decorated with the National Colors in keeping with the occasion. Mr. Shipman was the uncle of Mrs. L.B. Shaw of 56 Sherwood St., Mansfield, PA.

F.M. Spencer

F.M. Spencer was born in Richmond Township, and enlisted Aug. 24, 1861 as a private in Co. F, 11th Pa. Vol. Cav. He was honorably discharged Aug 19, 1865. He served in the Army of the Potomac during the war and participated in numerous engagements and skirmishes doing a large amount of scouting duty. Co. F’s first engagement was at "Deserted House", and it also took part in the following battles: Suffolk and Franklin, Va., Carrsville, South Anna, Blackwater, Petersburg, Fair Oaks, Reams Station, James River, Richmond, New Market Heights, Five Forks, Hanover Court House and Red Oak Church. When the regiment’s term of enlistment expired in the fall of 1863 more than 400 men re-enlisted thus preserving the organization.

William A. Stone

William A. Stone was born 18th day of April 1846 in Delmar Twp. He enlisted Feb. 1864 as a private in Co. A. 187th Pa. Vol. Inf. And was promoter to Lieut. He was honorably discharged Aug. 30, 1865. He enlisted at the age of 17 years. He served with men from the Wellsboro area of Tioga Co., and was in its most severe battle at Fort Hill, Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864. He graduated from Mansfield State Normal School in 1868. He was elected Governor of Pennsylvania and served several terms in Congress. A historical marker near Wellsboro marks the site of his home. A half brother, Eugene H. Stone was possibly the last survivor of the famous Penna. Bucktail Regiment of the Civil War. At 94 he was still active in current affairs at Wellsboro.

Richard Stout - Reenlists as Veteran after Illness

Richard C. Stout born in 1828 in Rutland Township enlisted on the 28th of September 1861 at Troy, Pa., and becoming a member of Co. C of the Pa. Cavalry went with his regiment to Tennessee. The exposure and hardships to which he was subjected, affected his health so seriously that after remaining a long time in a hospital in Nashville, Tenn., he was discharged from the service on a surgeon’s certificate of physical disability. He returned to his home and after nearly a year and a half he had so recovered his health that he again entered the service, this time a member of the 11th Pa. Veteran Infantry. He was engaged at Spottsylvania Court House, Battle of the Wilderness, Hatchers Run and other battles and skirmishes, being wounded several times. He was for a long time in a hospital at Washington, DC. He was discharged at Washington, DE on Sept. 1, 1865 by general orders on account of the close of the war. In an account of the 7th Pa. Cavalry by Capt. Joseph Vale, he said that the 7th moved from Harrisburg as soon as it was formed to Chambersburg to a camp. However, before any vigorous training could take place they were ordered to Jeffersonville, Indiana where they set up camp in early spring. With the freezing and thawing both men and horses became sick and lame from the knee deep mud and while in this state were ordered to Nashville where they were able to set up their really first training and truly profitable camp life. Many of the men were in the hospital or too sick for duty for several weeks. But after this baptism of the rigors of the outdoors, became seasoned veterans, to cut their way from Nashville to Atlanta as the "Saber Regiment".

T. B. Sturdivant

T.B. Sturdivant was born in Tompkins County, New York. He enlisted as a private in Co., D, 16th Pa. Cavalry Aug. 22, 1862 and was discharged on account of physical disability May 29, 1863. Among the battles the 16th Cavalry took part in were Chancellorsville and Brandy Station, Va. The greatest cavalry battle in the history of the Western Hemisphere was fought at Brandy Station, VA on June 9, 1863. Nearly 20,000 cavalrymen were engaged for more than 12 hours. At the height of the battle along Fleetwood Hill, charges and counter charges were made continuously for almost three hours.
 

R.W. Sumner in Great Mud March of 1862

Randall Wyatt Sumner enlisted in Company L 7th Penna. Cavalry as a private at Harrisburg, PA on November 29, 1861. He took part in engagements in Murfreesboro, Tenn., Stone River and Sparksville; also skirmishes in middle Tennessee. He war sketch indicates that he got the fever soon after the mud march and then rheumatism. The mud march occurred when Gen. Burnside attempted to take his army across the Potomac above Fredricksburg and turn Lee’s left. An unusual storm made an advance impossible, the army actually stalled, the movement became known as the mud march. He was discharged later at Huntsville, Ala. and reenlisted Nov. 27, 1863 and was transferred to the 20th Cavalry Brigade in 1864. He was discharged at the close of hostilities on Aug. 23, 1865. The 7th Cavalry was known as "The Saber Regiment" because it fought, at close quarters with the saber so much. Randall Sumner joined General Mansfield Post No. 48, June 18, 1888. His GAR chair is in the possession of his granddaughter, Mrs. Clarence Hakes; Lambs Creek, Mansfield, Pa., RD. R.W. Sumner was born in Richmond Township, Sept. 1, 1841.

R. W. Sumner

Randall Wyatt Sumner born in 1841 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, Pa., enlisted in Co. C 7th Pa. Cavalry as a private at Harrisburg, Pa. Nov. 20, 1861. He was discharged the first time at Huntsville, Ala., as private for re-enlistment Nov. 27, 1863, and after that was transferred to the 20th Cavalry in 1864. His second discharge was Aug. 23, 1865. He was in the following engagements: Murfreesboro, Tenn., Stone River and Sparksville, also in skirmishes in middle Tennessee. He joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR in June 1888.

Stephen Warters – Born in England fights for Union

Stephen Warters, born in 1830 in England, enlisted in 1862 as a private in Co. C of 171st Pa. Volunteer Infantry. He was in the terrible march from Suffolk, Va., to New Bern, NC. The remaining time of his service consisted of scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was discharged August 8, 1863 at Harrisburg, Pa. William B. Hall of Mansfield was his Captain and his Major was Robert C. Cox, also from Tioga County. The Regiment was made up of draftees of 1862 for nine months service. Most of their time was in the battles of N. Carolina. They marched for three days from Suffolk, Va. To the Chowan River where they took transports to New Bern, North Carolina. Stephen Warters joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48, April 25, 1896.

J.H. Washburn

J.H. Washburn born in Tompkins County, NY. Enlisted Aug. 8, 1864 as a private in 143rd NY Vol. Infantry and was honorably discharged Aug. 8, 1865. The regiment took part in the siege of Suffolk, Providence Church Road, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Kenesaw Mt., Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Sherman’s Savannah Campaign, March to the Sea, and others.

D.C. Waters

D.C. Waters, born the 26th day of April 1842 at Truxton, NY. He enlisted Aug. 1, 1862 as a private in Co. H 12th NY Vol., and on Dec 9 of the same year was transferred to Mt. Pleasant Hospital, Washington, DC, where he filled the position of Hospital Steward until Aug. 1, 1862 when he joined Co. E 157th NY Vol. The following December he again transferred to Mt. Pleasant Hospital where he filled the position of acting assistant surgeon until discharged on Aug. 28, 1865. The 12th Regt. was recruited at Elmira, NY and participated in the following engagements: Bull Run, Hanover Court House, Antietam, Gaines Mills, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Gettysburg, and Spottsylvania.

Danforth H. Watkins

Danforth H. Watkins, born the 15th of October 1846 in Sullivan Township, enlisted at Elmira, NY on the 5th of September 1864 as a private in Co. K 15th NY Engineers. He served until the fall of the same year, when he was taken to City Point Hospital, Va., with camp fever and a severe cold, where he remained three weeks. His services consisted of such as pertains to an engineer corps, building fortifications, laying pontoons, etc. He was discharged June 29, 1865 at Elmira, NY owing to the close of the war. The reorganization of his regiment took place in Nov. 1864 and was completed by the addition of seven new comp0anies of which his Co. "K" was one and it was mustered in for one year. It took part in the Petersburg campaign in the Carolinas engagement at Wise Forks, NC, Bennett House, Va., the fall of Petersburg and was at Appomatox. The regiment, during its service, lost 3 officers and 129 enlisted men. The Colonels were: John M. Murphy, Clinton G. Colgate, and Wesley Brainerd. Company Captains were James Flood, Hanry Lapradle, Servell Sargeant, Michael J. Hogan, and Theodore W. Ryding. Danforth H. Watkins joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Nov. 18, 1889.

Solomon L. Wood

Solomon L. Wood born in 1838 in Sullivan Township enlisted Oct. 16, 1862 as a private in Co. C. 171st Pa. Volunteer Infantry. In April 1863 he was detailed at Little Washington, NC as an attendant and wardmaster in the general hospital. His services consisted of scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged Aug. 8, 1863 at Harrisburg after nine months of service. He was part of a recruiting program in Tioga County of men drafted for nine months service. The Captain of Wood’s Company was William B. Hall of Mansfield. Robert C. Cox was the regiment’s major, also from Mansfield. The Brigade of which Wood belonged was engaged mainly in N. Carolina. S.L. Wood joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48, GAR in 1885. He served as its chaplain for 10 years.

William Woodhouse

William Woodhouse was born in Chemung Co., NY. He enlisted May 16, 1861 as a private in Co. F. 23rd NY and was honorably discharged May 16, 1863. This regiment was known as the Southern Tier Regiment or Southern Tier Rifles.

A Note on Stones River

At the Battle of Stones River, Tennessee, in January 1863, The Federal infantry in three days exhausted over 2,000,000 rounds of ammunition, and the artillery fired 20,307 rounds. The total weights of the projectiles was in excess of 375,000 pounds.