Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
G.A.R. Post No. 48, Mansfield PA
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

1907 Civil War Veterans march to Hope (Prospect Cemetery), 
Main St., Mansfield PA. where many of them are now permanently located
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Joyce's Search Tip - January 2008
Do You Know that you can search just the 700 pages of Military Records on the site by using the Military button in the Partitioned search engine at the bottom of the Current What's New Page
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H.W. Calkins

H.W. Calkins was born in Charleston, Pa., and enlisted October 3, 1861 as a private in Co. C 7th Pa. Vol. Cal., and was promoted to Lieutenant. He was honorably discharged January 25, 1864. The 7th Regiment was assigned to service in Tennessee, participating in a number of sharp engagements during 1862. Calkins took part in the Tennessee Campaign, Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Cickamagua, the Atlantic Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Remel, Planterville and others. This Regiment is the famous "Saber Regiment". His Company "C" recruited in Bradford and Tioga Counties. Its Captains were A.J.B. Dartt and Charles C. Hermans. H.W. Calkins was a Lieutenant.

H. W. CALKINS was born in Charleston Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Oct. 3, 1861, as a Private in Co. C, 7th PA Vol. Cav., and was promoted to Lieut. He was honorably discharged Jan. 25, 1864. This regiment was assigned to service in Tennessee, participating in a number of sharp engagements during 1862, also in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Remer (sp.?) and Plantersville. Its Colonel was George C. Wynkoop of Pottsville, PA. This regiment fought so much at close quarters that it was known as the “Saber Regiment”. It charged and captured Shelbyville, Tenn., in a saber charge over fortification built to resist infantry. This was the first time during the war that defended entrenchments were captured by mounted cavalry. It killed and captured nearly half of the Rebel Cavalry under General Wheeler and drove half of the remainder into the Duck River in this engagement. His Company “C” was recruited in Bradford and Tioga Counties and had as its Captains, B. Dartt and Charles C. Hermans and Henry D. Calkins as Lieutenant, the subject of this sketch. At Selma, Ala., after dismounting, the regiment charged and captured works being exposed in the charge of 600 yards, to the enemy fire of musketry and artillery. The men charged in a single line without support and suffered heavily. – GAR#48, p.93

Henry D. Calkins

Lt. Henry D. Calkins entered service as a private in Co. C 7th Pa. Cavalry Vols. on November 1, 1861. He was promoted to Sgt., then Quartermaster Sgt., and 1st Sgt., of the Co. He was made 2nd Lt. March 1, 1863 by order of Governor Andrew Curtin of Pennsylvania. He retired and was mustered out July 24, 1864 because of ill health. He lived in Elmira, NY following his was experience and did not belong to the Mansfield GAR. His daughter Mrs. Margaret Webster lives at Mainesburg.

Newbury E. Calkins - was born in Bradford County, PA. He enlisted August 24, 1861 as a Capt., in Co. F, 11th PA Cavalry and was honorably discharged March 4, 1862 on account of disability. His regiment was originally known as “Harlan’s Light Cavalry” and was raised by Colonel Josiah Harlan in August and September 1861, as an independent regiment under special authority from the Secretary of War. It was finally mustered in as the 11th Cavalry Company F, being composed of men from Tioga and Bradford counties, its Captain being B. B. Mitchell. It was assigned to duty in the Army of the Potomac and served with distinction in the various battles in Virginia and was frequently used in scouting service. It was mustered out of the service Aug. 13, 1865. As organized its regimental officers were: - Josiah Harlan, Colonel; Samuel P. Spear, Lt. Colonel; George Stetzel, Samuel Witherill and Noah M. Runyan, Majors. His Company took part in the following battles and engagements:- Yorktown, Williamsburg, West Point, Richmond, Dalgren Raid, Hanover Junction, Milan, Capture of Norfolk, Siege of Suffolk, Weldon RR, Reams Station and Malvern Hill and Deserted House. They were discharged on Aug. 13, 1865 at Jones Neck, Virginia. – GAR#48, p.178

Isaac Campbell

Isaac Campbell was born in Ulysses, NY. He enlisted Sept. 14, 1864 as a private in Co. F, 4th NY Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged July 7, 1865. This regiment with its Colonel, Alfred W. Taylor was known originally as "First Scott’s Life Guard" and was accepted by the State April 25, 1861. It was organized at New York City and was mustered in for two years service. They participated in the following battles: Antietam, Snicker Gap, Fredricksburg and Chancellorsville.



ISAAC CAMPBELL was born in Ulysses NY. He enlisted Sept. 14, 1864, as a Private in Co. F, 4th NY Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged July 7, 1865.This regiment with its Colonel Alfred W. Taylor was known originally as “First Scott’s Life Guard” and was accepted by the State Apr. 25, 1861. It was organized at New York City except Company “E” which was recruited in Brooklyn. It was mustered in for two years service. John D. McGregor also served as Colonel, and William Jamesen as Lt. Colonel; Charles W. Kruger was its Major. The officers of Company “F” were, Captain, John H. Camp, 1st Lts., James McDonald, William Wheeler; 2nd Lts., Nathaniel P. Bosworth, William E. Scriber, Hiram Perry Jr., John H. Sayers, Tompkins C. Gray, and William Daley. They participated in the following battles: - Antietam, Snickers Gap, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. The loss of the regiment during its service was 3 officers and 90 enlisted men. They were mustered out honorably discharged on May 25, 1863 at New York City. – GAR#48, p.109
Joyce,

Some biographical information on Isaac Campbell:

Isaac  spent fours year at sea working on a whaling ship in the South Atlantic out of New Bedford, Mass. (1858-1862). In September of 1862 he joined the 4th NY Cavalry and is assigned to Company F. Isaac is described in the Company muster as being 5 ft. 6 inches tall with dark hair and blue eyes and weighing 173 pounds. He takes part in the Battles of Kelly's Ford, Stoneman's Raid, Chancellorsville, Brandy Station and the Battle of Aldie, all in Virginia. He suffers saber wounds at Kelly's Ford and his shot in the chest at Aldie (June 17, 1863). After recuperating at Hallowell Hospital in Alexandria, Va., he is transferred to the 116 Co. of the 2nd Battalion of the 18th Volunteer Reserve Corps stationed in the Washington D.C. area.

In early July 1864 he is on picket duty with five other soldiers at Beltsville, Maryland when General Jubal Early and his army attack Washington D.C. He is captured with his comrades and sent to the Confederate Prison at Danville Va. He is confined in a crowded tobacco warehouse that has no heat. He just barely survives the cold winter of 1864-65. Two the five soldiers he was captured with die from disease and the elements. He himself  was so sick that he was given up for dead and dragged off to be buried. Fortunately, he was able to show some signs of life and was saved. An estimated 1,400 soldiers died at Danville during the winter of 1864-65.

In Isaac's words "I had the scurvy and was about starved. I was in bad shape. I had no coat or shoes and no blankets to lie under". He became deaf in one ear as result of "laying on the damp floor and suffering with the cold for want of clothing and covering and taking severe colds, apparently settling in my head". While in prison he had one shirt that he was never able to wash. Isaac would take it off and pick the lice from it. In the spring of 1865 he was exchanged for a rifle and was returned to the Union Army in an invalid sate. When he was released from prison he weighed 78 pounds. Isaac's weight when he entered the army was 173 pounds. He was discharged from the army on July 7th, 1865.

My sources of information are Isaac's muster and pension records that I have researched in the National Archives, some recorded family conversations, and James Robertson's excellent article "Houses of Horror" - Danville's Civil War Prisons" from the Virginia Magazine.

 Isaac's information on the GAR site is incorrect [I believe he means this page of Tri-Counties site as I am not aware of another site with this information}

So long for now. Thanks for all your help and interest.

Robert Moran (October 2006)

William Campbell was born in Dutchess County NY. He enlisted as a Private in Co. K, 68th Illinois Inf., April 18, 1862 and was afterward a Private in Co. B, 17th Illinois Inf. He was honorably discharged April 30, 1865. – GAR#48, p.163

Martin A. Cass took part in Siege of Petersburg

Martin A. Cass enlisted at Mansfield February 29, 1864 and served as a private in Company K 3rd Heavy Artillery. He was transferred to the Medical Department in April 1864. He was in the battles and skirmishes in front of Petersburg in May 1864. On the 1st of June he was made Quartermaster Sergeant. He was with General Butler’s command and was engaged in various battles and skirmishes on the Appomatox. His regiment was constantly sent out upon special service, as occasion demanded, serving as light and heavy artillery and infantry. They served in Grahans Naval Brigade upon the Virginia Rivers in defense of Smithfield, NC 1864, siege of Plymouth, NC 1864, in forts around Richmond and Petersburg from May 1864 to end of war. They were present at the surrender of Appomatox. After the close of hostilities in the field it was the lot of this regiment to guard Jefferson Davis at Fortress Monroe for sometime. M.A. Cass was discharged at Fortress Monroe, November 9, 1865. He joined General Mansfield Post No. 48 in August 1875 and was its first Quartermaster Sergeant. Martin Cass came to Mansfield from New England. He was born in Richmond County of Cheshire, New Hampshire, 1835.

MARTIN A. CASS was born the 25th day of October 1835 in Richmond, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. He enlisted at Mansfield, PA, Feb. 29, 1864 and served as a Private in Company K, 3rd Heavy Artillery. In April 1864 he was transferred to the Medical Department. He was in the battles and skirmishes in front of Petersburg in May ’64. On the 1st of June he was made Quartermaster Sergt. He was with Gen. Butler’s Command and was engaged in various battles and skirmishes on the Appomattox. He was never wounded but was in a hospital on account of sickness in August ’64 and also in July ’65. He was discharged at Fortress Monroe, Nov. 9, 1865 on account of the close of the war. His regiment was constantly sent out upon special service, as occasion demanded, servicing as light and heavy artillery and infantry. They served in Graham’s Naval Brigade upon the Virginia Rivers; in defense of Suffolk, Apr. and May 1863; Smithfield, NC, 1864; siege of Plymouth NC, 1864; in forts around Richmond and Petersburg, from May 1864 to end of war; guard duty Fortress Monroe, Sept. 1863 to end of war; in “Army of the James” and present at the surrender at Appomattox; fought at Fort Fisher, 1865; and was on duty at Gettysburg. After the close of hostilities in the field it was the lot of this regiment to guard Jefferson Davis at Fortress Monroe for some time. He joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 Aug. 16th, 1875. – GAR#48, p.29

V.R. Champney

V.R. Champney was born at Canton, PA. He enlisted August 1862 as a private in Co. A, 149th Pa. Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged July 3, 1865. Co. A was raised in Tioga County.

VAN RENSSELAER CHAMPNEY was born in Canton, PA. He enlisted Aug. 1862, as a Private in Co. A, 149th PA Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged July 3, 1865. He took part in the battles of Chancellorsville, Bethesda Church, Weldon RR, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Hatcher’s Run, North Anna, and Petersburg. This regiment was commended by Col. Roy Stone afterward Brig. General. The regiment belonged to the “Bucktail Brigade” and wore bucktails on their caps. This brigade became famous in the magnificent fight it made near Seminary Ridge on the first day at Gettysburg. It was mustered out June 24, 1865. His Company “A” was raised in Tioga County and its Captains were A.J. Sofield, Dudley A. Fish, Lewis Bodine and Benjamin H. Warriner; its 1st Lts., George Blackwell, John Walbridge, John Rexford and George D. Brooks. The men of this Company were formed of hardy habits, skilled in the use of the rifle and used to any kind of hardship or privation. They made a gallant record on many a hard fought field and so marked was their bravery that they became the pride of our own soldiers and the terror of the enemy. They were in the forefront of every fight and also served as sharpshooters and skirmishers. – GAR#48, p.126

Justus B. Clark -  was born the 4th day of June 1832 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Sept. 1861 at Harrisburg, PA as a Private in Co. B, 101st PA Vol. Inf., being later promoted to Sergt. May 31, 1862 at the battle of Fair Oaks, VA. He received a gunshot wound in left shoulder and was taken to hospital at Annapolis, MD, where he remained three months. In Nov. 1862 he was detailed at New Bern, NC as Sergt. in Ambulance Corps, serving about seventeen months. He was honorably discharged Dec. 31, 1863 at Plymouth, NC and re-enlisted the following day as a veteran in old command. At the battle of Plymouth, NC Apr. 20, 1984 he was captured by Gen. Hoke and was taken to Andersonville, GA and Florence, SC, where he was held nine months, then paroled and sent to parole camp at Annapolis, MD, where in Jan. 1865 he was furloughed for thirty days. He participated in the Siege of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, New Bern and Plymouth. He was honorably discharged June 1865 at Harrisburg, PA. His Company “B” was raised in Tioga County and had as its captains, Joseph S. Hoard, Victor A. Elliott and Melvin L. Clark. Joseph S. Hoard was promoted to Major later on and Capt. Clark was commissioned Lt. Colonel of the regiment on May 18, 1865. Joseph H. Wilson of Beaver County was the regimental Colonel when the regiment was organized, Oct. 1861. – GAR#48, p.76

M. L. Clark Honor Guard at Lincoln’s Funeral

Melvin Lewis Clark entered the service Sept. 26, 1861 at Mansfield. Pa., as 1st Sergeant in Co. B 101st Reg’t Pa. Vol. Inf. He was promoted to Liet. Col. May 18th, 1865. He was discharged from the service July 26, 1865 at Harrisburg, Pa., at the close of the war.

He was engaged in the siege of Yorktown, the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill and Blackwater, Va., also Kingston, Whitehall, Goldboro, Little Washington and Plymouth, NC. During four years of service he was in a hospital but four days at White House Landing.

He was taken prisoner with his company at the four days battle at Plymouth, NC on April 20th 1864 by General Hakes’ Division of the Army of Northern Va. He was confined at Macon, Ga., about three months; at Savannah, Ga., three weeks; at Charleston, S.C., three weeks, during which he with 600 other officers were kept under fire of the guns of the Union batteries at Columbia, S.C., between four and five months and a few days each at Charlotte, Raleigh and Goldsboro.

He escaped from Columbia prison the last of November 1864. After traveling ten nights and hiding during the day, tracked by blood hounds and fed by slaves, he was recaptured near Belton, Anderson County, S.C., 150 miles from Columbia and was returned to Columbia prison. He was exchanged March 1st, 1865 at Wilmington, NC.

In Dec. 1862, during the Goldboro raid, he was detached with his company before the battle of Kingston and after a march of twenty miles, held the picket line twelve hours. During the battle, which lasted six hours, they supported a battery and when the Rebels retreated Co. B pursued with the Regiment, having been thirty-six hours without sleep or rest. In the spring of 1863 they were detached from the regiment and sent to Rose Bay, Hyde County, NC to guard a bridge. While there, they captured a large quantity of supplies from the guerrillas. In April 1864, he was selected by Gen. Wessles and sent in command of fifty picked men to destroy the salt works at Keretuck Sound 100 miles distance. They returned in eight days having destroyed the works without the loss of a man.

During the winters of 1863 and 1864, he was detailed as a member of the Board of Court-Martial by which a large number of officers and men were tried for various offenses.

After his exchange he attended the funeral of Lincoln as one of the 600 men constituting the guard of honor. He then joined his regiment at Ranoke Island, NC, where 800 recruits were received making a total of 1100 men. The regiment was then ordered to Newburn, NC, where he took command and brought to Harrisburg, where all were discharged.

Sgt. Clark was 21 years of age when he enlisted Oct. 5, 1861. He was promoted to 2nd Lt., Aug. 9, 1862 and to Captain on Oct. 1, 1862. Captured at Plymouth, NC April 20, 1864. Commissioned a Lt. Col. May 18, 1865. He was not mustered out at the time but given the additional honor of being placed in command and discharged with his company later at Harrisburg.

He was a charter member of General Mansfield Post No. 48, GAR and served as its commander. His GAR chair with this inscription on the back, "M.L. Clark, Lt. Co. 101st Pa. Vol. Reg.", Ga

AT Badge, Black Rosette arm band worn in Washington and other momentos are in the possession of his grandson, Budd M. Clark of Wysox. They will be displayed during the 1961 4th of July Celebration in Mansfield.


MELVIN LEWIS CLARK was born the 10th day of April 1840 in Mansfield, Tioga County, PA. And entered the service Sept. 26th 1861 at Mansfield, PA as 1st Sergt. in Co. B, 101st Regt. PA Vol. Inf. He was promoted to 2nd Lieut. Aug. 9th 1862; to Captain Sept. 23rd 1862 and to Lieut. Col. May 18th 1865. He was discharged from the service July 26th 1865, at Harrisburg, PA on account of close of the war. He was engaged in the siege of Yorktown, the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks. Seven Pines, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill and Blackwater, VA; and Kingston, Whitehall, Goldsboro, Little Washington and Plymouth, NC. During four years of service he was in hospital but four days; at White House Landing. He was taken prisoner with his company at the close of the four days battle at Plymouth, NC on April 20th 1864 by General Hoke’s Division of the Army of Northern VA. He was confined at Macon, GA about three months, at Savannah, GA, three weeks, at Charleston, SC, three weeks; during which he with 600 other officers was kept under fire of the guns of the Union batteries at Columbia, SC between four and five months, and a few days each at Charlotte, Raleigh, and Goldsboro. He escaped from Columbia prison the last of Nov. 1864. After traveling ten nights and hiding during the day; tracked by blood hounds and fed by slaves he was recaptured near Belton, Anderson Co., SC, 150 miles from Columbia and returned to Columbia prison. He was exchanged March 1st 1865 at Wilmington, NC. In Dec. 1862 during the Goldsboro raid, he was detached with his company before the battle of Kingston, and after a march of twenty miles, held the picket line twelve hours. During the battle which lasted six hours, they supported a battery and when the Rebels retreated Co. B pursued with the regiment having been thirty-six hours without sleep or rest. In the spring of 1863 they were detached from the regiment and sent to Rose Bay, Hyde Co., NC to guard a bridge. While there they captured a large quantity of supplies from the guerrillas. In April 1864 he was selected by Gen. Wessler and sent in command of fifty picked men to destroy the salt works at Keretuck Sound, 100 miles distant. They returned in eight days having destroyed the works without the loss of a man. During the winter of 1863 and 1864 he was detailed as a member of the board of court-martial by which a large number of officers and men were tried for various offenses. After his exchange he attended the funeral of Lincoln as one of the 600 officers constituting the guard of honor. He then joined his regiment at Roanoke Island, NC where 800 recruits were received making a total of 1100 men. The regiment was then ordered to New Berne, NC where he took command and brought it to Harrisburg, where all were discharged. – GAR#48, pp. 13, 14
 

P.V. Clark

P.V. Clark was born in Richmond Township in 1838. He enlisted Oct. 14, 1861 as a private in Co. B. 101st Pa. Vol. Inf., and was promoted to corporal. He was honorably discharged June 10, 1862 owing to physical disability. He participated in the battle of Williamsburg and took part in the Peninsula campaign. The company was raised in Mansfield and had as its commanding officer M.L. Clark.

PHINEAS V. CLARK was born 1838 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Oct. 14, 1861 as a Private in Co. B, 101st PA Vol. Inf., and was promoted to Corp. He was honorably discharged June 10, 1862 owing to physical disability. He participated in the battle of Williamsburg. His regiment took part in the Peninsula Campaign, battles of Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington and Plymouth, NC, where on April. 20, 1864 the entire regiment except those away on furlough and detached service were captured. They were confined in Andersonville and other prisons and were finally exchanged at Wilmington, NC in March 1865. His Company was enlisted in Tioga and had as its Captains, Joseph S. Hoard, later regimental major; Melvin L. Clark, later Lt. Colonel of the regiment and Victor A. Elliott, all of Tioga Co., PA. When the regiment was organized at Camp Curtin in October 1861 the regimental colonel was Joseph H. Wilson of Beaver County. It put up a hard fight of four days at Plymouth, NC before it was captured by General Hoke’s Division of the Army of Northern, VA. Before the actual date of the exchange of the prisoners at Wilmington, NC, in March 1865 more than half had died from the terrible hardships that they had been exposed to in Rebel prisons. – GAR#48, p.89

William H. Clark

William H. Clark was born in Richmond Township, Tioga County on October 19, 1844. He enlisted September 13, 1864 at Mansfield, Pa. In Co. K 210th Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was wounded near Five Forks, Va., by a bayonet cut in back, right ear and neck and was sent to the hospitals at Washington, DC and Philadelphia, PA. Remaining about two months. He fought at Danville RR, Hatcher’s Run and Five Forks. He was honorably discharged at Chestnut Hill Hospital, Phila. Pa., June 3, 1865.

WILLIAM H. CLARK was born 19th day of October 1844 in Richmond Twp., Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Sept. 13, 1864, at Mansfield, PA in Co. K, 210th PA Vol. Inf. He was wounded near Five Forks, VA by a bayonet cut in back of right ear and neck and was sent to the hospital at Washington, DC and Philadelphia, PA, remaining about two months. He fought at Danville RR, Hatcher’s Run and Five Forks. He was honorably discharged at Chestnut Hill hospital, Philadelphia, PA, June 3, 1865. In addition to the battles and engagements above it took part in the Belleville Raid in which it destroyed the Weldon RR as it went, Dabney’s Mills, Gravelly Run which action lasted three days in which it was at the forefront sustaining heavy losses, the entire loss being thirty-five killed, one hundred fifteen wounded and one hundred fifty missing. It also participated in the 1st of April taking flags, arms and prisoners and in a charge on the enemy works, it displayed its wanted courage, sustaining heavy losses in killed and wounded. With the Corps it followed closely the retreating army and at Appomattox Court House, was upon the front line to the last, the flag of truce proclaiming the surrender, passing through the lines of the brigade in which it stood. After the Rebel army laid down its arms, it returned to Washington, DC, and participated in the Grand Review, and was mustered out of the service on the 30th of May (1865). – GAR#48, p.75

Charles Clemons

Charles Clemons was born in Trenton, N.J. He enlisted in May 1861 as a private in Co. G, 45th Penna. Vol. Inf. Men of the 45th saw service in both the Eastern and Western armies.

CHARLES CLEMONS was born in Trenton, NJ. He enlisted May 1861, as a Private in Co. G, 45th PA Vol. Inf. This regiment was mustered out of service July 17, 1865 after a splendid record and was noted for its fine discipline and splendid bravery of its men. It saw service both in the eastern and western armies and was engaged in the battles of James Island, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Blue Springs, Campbell’s Station, Siege of Knoxville, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Anna, Mine Explosion, Weldon RR, Poplar Spring Church, Hatcher’s Run and capture of Petersburg. The Colonel of this regiment was Thomas Welch. After Lee’s surrender this regiment took part in the Grand Review at Washington, DC in May 22-33, 1865. Francis M. Hill of Tioga County of this regiment was promoted from Captain to Lieut. Colonel on March 1, 1863. Company “G” was recruited in Tioga County and had as its Captains, Nelson Whitney and Reese G. Richards; 1st Lts., A. L. Ensworth, William T. Fitzgerald, Samuel Haynes, and John J. Rogers; 2nd Lts, John J. Reese, Ephriam Jeffers and Thomas J. Davis. Its original regimental officers were, Thomas Welch, Colonel of Lancaster County; James A. Beaver of Center County, Lt. Colonel; and J. M. Kilbourne of Potter County, Major. – GAR#48, p.128

William Clemons

William Clemons was born Sept. 5, 1836 in Philadelphia, PA. He enlisted Aug. 17, 1863 at East Charleston as a private in Co. D, 149th Pa. Vol. Inf. At the Wilderness May 3, 1864 he received a gunshot wound in the right thumb, for which he was in a hospital in Philadelphia, two months, receiving a ten-day furlough in July. He fought at the Wilderness, Hatcher’s Run, Bellfield and 2 Hatcher’s Run. He was honorably discharged at Elmira, NY June 24, 1865. He also served five years from Oct. 12, 1872 to Oct. 12, 1877 as Sergt. In Co. F, 12th Pa. State Militia and aided in suppressing the labor strike at Pittsburgh and Altoona, Pa. The 149th was known as the "Bucktail Brigade".

WILLIAM CLEMENS was born 5th day of September 1836 in Philadelphia, PA. He enlisted Aug. 17, 1863 at East Charleston, PA as a Private in Co. I, 149th PA Vol. Inf. At the Wilderness, May 3, 1864 he received a gunshot wound in right thumb, for which he was in hospital at Philadelphia, two months, receiving a ten-day furlough in July. He fought at the Wilderness, Hatcher’s Run, Bellfield, and Second Hatcher’s Run. He was honorably discharged at Elmira, NY, June 2,4 1865. He also served five years from Oct. 12, 1872 to Oct. 12, 1877 as Sergt. in Co. F, 12th PA S.M., and aided in suppressing the labor strike at Pittsburgh and Altoona, PA. His regiment was raised (by) Roy Stone, formerly Major of the Bucktails and he became its Colonel. It belonged to the “Bucktail Brigade” and the men wore bucktails on their caps. This brigade became famous for its magnificent fight it made near Seminary Ridge on the first day at Gettysburg. It held its ground from early in the day until four o’clock against largely superior numbers and repulsed repeated charges. They were the last to retire but in good order after the enemy had passed both their flanks, but gave them a wide berth, not desiring to come to any closer quarters. – GAR#48, p.74

Malon S. Cleveland

Malon S. Cleveland, born in 1841 in Richmond Twp., Tioga County, enlisted on Sept. 2, 1864. He entered at Troy, Pa., as a private in Co. A 207th Reg’t. Pa. Vol. Inf. commanded by Col. R.C. Cox of Mansfield. Capt. E.R. Backer was Company commander. Cleveland was stationed at Bermuda Hundred for about six weeks, after which following the fortunes of his Regiment, he was in the battle of Hatchers Run and 3 battles and skirmishes at Fort Steadman and about Petersburg, Va. He was wounded in his left arm at Fort Steadman and was in a hospital at Point of Rocks and later at City Point. He was discharged from the service by order of the War Dept., at Alexandria, Va., on May 31, 1865 on account of the close of war. His company was in the assault and capture of Fort Steadman, which gave the regiment a great reputation for bravery. He was a member of Gen. Mansfield Post GAR No. 48 joining on Nov. 27, 1887.

MAHLON S. CLEVELAND was born the 13th day of January 1841 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, PA. On September 2, 1864 he enlisted at Troy, Bradford County, PA as a Private in Co. A – Capt. E.R. Backer – 207th Regiment, PA Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Col. R.C. Cox. He was stationed at Bermuda Hundred for about six weeks, after which following the fortunes of his Regiment, he was in the battle of Hatcher’s Run and battles and skirmishes at Fort Stedman and about Petersburg. He was wounded in his left arm at Fort Stedman, and was in a hospital at Point of Rocks, and later City Point. He was discharged from the service by order of the War Department at Alexandria, VA, May 31, 1865, on account of the close of the War. His Company was recruited in Tioga County and Major Robert C. Cox later Colonel and Brig. General, was commissioned by Governor Curtin to raise the regiment. William W. S. Snoddy was the Lt. Colonel and Victor A. Elliott, Major. This regiment had a larger number of Tioga County soldiers than any single organization in the service and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. In March 1865 the regiment presented Colonel Robert C. Cox with a horse and equipment, valued at $550.00 in token of their esteem. His Company was in the assault and capture of Fort Stedman, which gave the regiment a great reputation for bravery. He joined the Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Nov. 27, 1887. – GAR#48, p.28

SILAS T. CLEVELAND was born in Tioga County, PA. He enlisted (Sept. 1) 1861 (age 18) in Co. L, 2nd Ohio Cavalry and honorably discharged Feb. 24, 1864. (Source of inserted information - 1890 Veterans Census for Covington, Tioga County PA) – GAR#48, p. 208 first sentence (rest of page should be on page 209)

Albert S. Cobb

Albert S. Cobb was born Dec. 12, 1839 at Columbia, Bradford County, Pa. He enlisted Aug. 8, 1862 at Troy, PA as a private in Co. D, 132nd Pa. Vol. Inf., being promoted to Serg. Dec. 13, 1862. At the battle of Fredricksburg, Va., he was wounded by a fragment of shell in the left hip. On Dec. 20 following, he was taken with typhoid fever and was sick about 20 days. He was honorably discharged at expiration of first term of enlistment, May 29, 1863 at Harrisburg, PA. and reenlisted Feb. 22, 1864 at Troy, PA in Co. c 7th Pa. Vol. Cav. He fought at South Mt., Antietam, Fredricksburg, Chancellorsville, all the engagements of Atlanta Campaign and Selma. He was honorably discharged Sept. 5, 1865 at Harrisburg, PA. Albert S. Cobb served in two theatres of the Civil War and in two distinctive Regiments. The 132nd Pa. was reduced from 1000 to 400 men in nine months of almost continuous fighting and skirmishes. The second outfit, the 7th Pa. Cavalry was known as the "Saber Regiment" and distinguished themselves in the western army. He was a member of the General Mansfield Post No. 48.

ALBERT S. COBB was born the 12th day of December 1839 in Columbia Township, Bradford County, PA. He enlisted Aug. 8, 1862 at Troy, Bradford Co., PA as a Private in Co. D, 132nd PA Vol. Inf., being promoted to Sergt. Dec. 13, 1862 at the battle of Fredericksburg, VA. He was wounded by a fragment of shell in left hip. On Dec. 20th following he was taken with typhoid fever and sick about twenty days. He was honorably discharged at expiration of first term of enlistment, May 29, 1863, at Harrisburg, PA, and re-enlisted Feb. 22, 1864 at Troy, PA, in Co. C, 7th PA Vol. Cav. He fought at South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, all the engagements of the Atlanta Campaign and Selma. He was honorably discharged, Sept. 5, 1865 at Harrisburg, PA. Company “D”, 132nd PA was engaged in the battle of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. After the last battle they marched to Harpers Ferry and from there a forced march to Falmouth without any rations except what they got by foraging. From there they marched back to Chancellorsville where they all threw away their shoes, their feet being blistered. They arrived at Smokey Camp all sick. The regiment in nine months being reduced from 1000 to 400 men. The 7th PA Cavalry was known as the “Saber Regiment” because they fought so much at close quarters with the saber. At Shelbyville they especially distinguished themselves by charging and capturing defended entrenchments built to resist infantry. This was the first time this was done in the War. – GAR#48, p.73

GEORGE H. COE was born in Covington, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Sept. 4, 1862 as a Private in Co. K, 144th NY and was honorably discharged June 25, 1865. His regiment was organized at Delhi, NY and there mustered into the service for three years on Sept. 27, 1862. In October 1864 it received a large number of recruits, of whom the surplus, 159 men were transferred to the 1st Engineers. The Colonels of the regiment were: - Robert S. Houghton, David E. Gregory, William J. Slidell, and James Lewis; Lt. Colonel, Calvin A. Rice; Majors, Robert J. Johnson, William Plaskett. The company officers were, Captains, George W, Reynolds, Eldridge G. Radeker and John Rich; 1st Lts., John J. Ordwell, Charles M. Hathaway; 2nd Lts., William E. Holmes, Edgar A. Vermilyea and Charles Rollins. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Siege of Suffolk, Providence Church Road, Siege of Battery Wagner, Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, Sea Brook and John’s Island, Camp Finnigan, Hanover Cut, Honey Hill, Deveaux Neck, St. Augustine, James Island, Monk’s Corner. They lost in the service 6 officers and 212 enlisted men, making a total of 218 men. They were honorably discharged and mustered out under the command of Col. James Lewis at Hilton Head, SC on June 25, 1865. – GAR#48, p180

A.J. Cole

A.J. Cole was born in 1824 and enlisted as a surgeon March 5, 1863 in the 11th Pa. Reserves and was honorably discharged June 13, 1865. He was promoted to Brevet Major on May 13, 1865 and at one time was surgeon at Finley Hospital, Washington, DC. His regiment was in the battle of Gaines Mills and it was here that most of the regiment was captured. It also fought at Charles City Cross Roads and was attached to General McDowell’s division.

ALSTON J. COLE was born in 1824 in Wysox, PA. He enlisted as a Surgeon, March 5, 1863 in 11th PA Reserves (also Co. S, 40th PA Inf.) and was honorably discharged June 13, 1865. He was promoted to Brevet Major on Mar. 13, 1865 and at one time was Surgeon at Finley Hospital, Washington, DC. His regiment when organized had as its Colonel, Thomas F. Gallagher, of Westmoreland County. The regiment was composed of hardy farmers and lumbermen used to labor and hardships. It took part in the battles of Gaines Mills when most of the regiment was captured and sent to Berle Isle and Libby prisons. It also fought at Charles City Cross Roads and was attached to General McDowell’s division. It was at the battles of Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna and Bethesda Church and was mustered out of the service on June 13, 1865. After the campaign in Maryland the regiment was reduced to less than two hundred effective men, yet moved promptly with their division to the field of Antietam and bore an important part in that battle. At Gettysburg on the second day they were in the thickest of the fight making a magnificent charge. They were at Bristol Station and after the Bethesda Church battle the regiment was ordered from the front to Washington and from there to Harrisburg, PA. – GAR#48, p.116

Amos Colegrove

Amos Colegrove was born on the 24th day of March 1843 in Middlebury Township. He enlisted Feb. 26, 1864 at Troy, Pa., as a private in Co. C 7th Pa. Vol. Cavalry. Jan. 1, 1865 he was sent to hospital at Nashville and Gallatin, Tenn., where he remained five months with lung trouble and acute inflammation of the liver. He was detailed at Gallatin Hospital as cook in the post hospital about one month. He participated in the engagements of Big Shanty, McAffee’s Cross Rds., Noon Day Creek, Flat Rocks, Front of Atlanta and Kilpatricks Raid through Georgia. He received an honorable mention for conspicuous gallantry and bravery at the battle of Lovejoy Station, Ga., on Aug. 20, 1864. He was honorably discharged, May 27, 1865 at Gallatin, Tenn. He was a member of Gen. Mansfield GAR Post No. 48.

AMOS D. COLEGROVE was born the 24th day of March 1843 in Middlebury Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Feb. 26, 1864, at Troy, Bradford Co., PA, as a Private in Co. C, 7th PA Vol. Cav. Jan. 1, 1865 he was sent to hospitals at Nashville and Gallatin, Tenn., where he remained five months with lung troubles and acute inflammation of the liver. He was detailed at Gallatin hospital as cook in the post hospital about one month. He participated in the engagements of Big Shanty, McAfees Cross Roads, Noon Day Creek, Flat Rock, Front of Atlanta and Kilpatrick’s Raid through Georgia. He received honorable mention for conspicuous gallantry and bravery at the battle of Lovejoy Station, GA, Aug. 20, 1864. He was honorably discharged May 27, 1865 at Gallatin, Tenn. His company was recruited in Bradford and Tioga Counties and had as 1st Lts., A.J.B. Dartt and Charles C. Hermans. Its Colonel was George N. Wynkoop, an accomplished soldier who brought the regiment to a high state of efficiency. It fought so much at close quarters that it was known as “The Saber Regiment” and especially was distinguished at Shelbyville where it in a saber charge captured entrenchments built to resist infantry, killing and dispersing most of the Rebel Cavalry under General Wheeler. This was the first time in the war that any mounted Cavalry had captured defended entrenchments. – GAR#48, p.72

WILLIAM H. COLONY was born the 1st of March 1840 in Wells Township, Bradford County, PA. He enlisted Oct. 5, 1861 at Columbia Cross Roads, as a Private in Co. C, 7th Regt. PA Cav. In Aug. 1864 he was detailed to Gen. Thomas’ Headquarters as driver of a supply wagon. In Dec. he was transferred to Gen. Wilson’s Headquarters as assistant forage master. In March 1865 he was detailed as Quartermaster Clerk at Gen. Wilson’s Headquarters and was in charge of camp equipment. At close of war he was wagon master of Headquarters supply train. He was first discharged in Jan. 1863 at Nashville for re-enlistment. He was finally discharged at Harrisburg Sept. 4, 1865 on account of close of the war. He was engaged in the following battles and skirmishes: - Stone River, Sparta, Shelbyville Pike, Town of Shelbyville, Noon Day Creek, Chattanooga, Rasaca, Snake Creek Gap, Kenesaw Mt. and Big Shanty. He was wounded on the head by the accidental discharge of a gun, while in Camp Rosecrans, Nashville. He was eleven weeks in hospitals in Nashville. Three times, during the third day of the battle of Stone River, Dec. 31st, he narrowly escaped being killed or captured. He went out of camp in charge of the Co.’s supple wagon as the enemy came in. A mile in rear of the Co. he passed a battery of four guns with horses hitched waiting orders. After going half a mile farther he rode back and found that the battery had been captured except one piece which was overturned and the six horses attached to it had been shot. He turned back and came up with his wagon. The wagon train ordered to Stewart’s Creek but through mistake went toward Nashville and was captured at Lavergne. When firing began he rode to the ridge and finding a line of Rebel infantry a short distance in front, rode back to warn his wagon driver to get out of the way. Just afterward the driver was stunned and his horse was killed by a cannon ball. In Feb. 1863 his Co., with others was ordered to Harper’s Shoals, on the Tennessee River with three days rations. The fourth day they rode through rain which turned to snow, and lay down at night without food, in snow six inches deep. At 2 o’clock AM they received orders to march at 4 AM, as the enemy under Gen. Wheeler was coming. They marched 30 miles through the snow to Nashville without food for man or beast. Here rations were issued with a gill of whiskey for each man. The only time whiskey was issued to the regiment. That night they camped on a side hill covered with snow and ice. While the Union forces were pursuing Hood, the latter being hard pressed fired (set on firs) his ammunition train and Colony with Wilson’s Headquarters train, passed it while it was burning and exploding. Among Colony’s intimate comrades were W.R. Sims, U.N. Verbeck, Lewis Eighmey, Henry Calkins, Dewitt Backer, J.L. Moore and Chas. Rumsey. – GAR#48, pp.15, 16

William H. Colony relates experiences as Wagon Master in Civil War

William H. Colony enlisted at Columbia Cross Roads as a private in Co. C 7th Regt. Pa. Cavalry, October 5, 1861.

In August of 1864 he was detailed to Gen. Thomas Headquarters as a driver of a supply wagon. In Dec. he was transferred to Gen. Wilson’s Headquarters as assistant forage master. In March 1865 he was detailed as quartermaster’s clerk at Gen. Wilson’s Headquarters and was in charge of camp equipage. At the close of the war, he was wagon master of Headquarters supply train. He was engaged in the following battles and skirmishes – Stone River, Sparta, Tenn.; Shelbyville Pike; Town of Shelbyville; Moon Day Creek; Chattanooga; Racara; Snake Creek Gap; Kinesaw Mountain and Big Shanty. Three times during the third day of the battle of Stone River, Dec. 31, Mr. Colony narrowly escaped being killed or captures. He went out of camp in charge of the Co.’s. supply wagon as the enemy came in. A mile in the rear of his Company, he passed a battery of four guns with horses hitched. After going on a half mile Colony returned to the battery, only to find it had been captured. He turned back to catch up with his wagons. His wagon train was ordered to Stewart’s Creek but took a wrong turn and went toward Nashville where they ran into rebel troops at Lavagne. When firing began he rode to a ridge only to find a line of Rebel infantry a short distance in front. He rode back, warned his wagon driver to ge6t out of the way. Shortly afterward the driver was stunned and his horses killed by a cannon ball.

In February 1863 his company with others were ordered to Harpers Shoals on the Tennessee River with three days rations. The fourth day, they rode thru rain, which turned to snow. They lay down that night in six inches of snow. They were ordered out at 4 a.m. as the enemy under Gen. Wheeler was coming. They marched 30 miles through snow to Nashville without food for man or beast. Here rations were issued with a gill of whiskey for each man. The only time whiskey was issued to the Regiment. They camped that night on a side hill covered with snow and ice. While the Union force were pursuing Hood, the latter being hard pressed, fired his ammunition train and Colony, with Wilson’s Headquarters train passed while it was still burning and exploding.

Charles Rumsey, already reviewed in this column, was one of William Colony’s friends and both served in Co. C until Rumsey was captured near Lebanon, Tenn. W.H. Colony served as Commander of General Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR.

ISAAC M. COMFORT was born in Sullivan Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Aug. 28, 1861, as a Private in Co. C, 106th PA Vol., and was discharged June 6, 1862 on account of physical disability. His regiment soon after organization was sent to Maryland where it became part of a brigade commanded by E. D. Baker. They took part in the following battle and engagements: - Balls Bluff, Siege of Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Charles City Cross Roads, Peach Orchard, Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Jerusalem Plank Road, Reams Station, Bayden Plank Road and in the spring campaign which closed the rebellion. It was mustered out of the service on June 30, 1865. It especially distinguished itself at Fair Oaks, Peach Orchard, Antietam in which one third of the entire regiment were stricken down; Gettysburg when they sustained charges fighting in the open field without defensive works saving General Sickles’ command; at Cold Harbor they made a magnificent charge over open ground upon entrenchments, under a terrible fire. T.G. Moorehead was Colonel, promoted to Brev. Brig. General; William L. Curry, Lt. Col.; John H. Stover, Major, promoted to Colonel; Ralph W. P. Allen, Capt. Of Company “C”; and John W. Lynch, Benjamin F. Slonaker, 1st Lts.; and John A. Steel and Harry Neville, 2nd Lts. – GAR#48, p.231

JOSEPH B. COMFORT was born in Sullivan Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Feb. 26, 1864 as a Private in Co. H, 7th PA Cav., and was honorably discharged Aug. 23, 1865. His regiment was organized Dec. 1861 with Colonel George C. Wynkoop as Colonel, who brought it to a high state of discipline and efficiency. It participated in a number of sharp engagements in 1862; also in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. It fought so much at close quarters that it was known as “The Saber Regiment: and at Shelbyville captured fortifications built to resist infantry, the first time that this had been done in the war, They charged over a double line of entrenchments with dry ditches, abates and other obstructions, drove the Rebel Cavalry out of the town, killing and capturing half of their number and driving half of their number into the Duck River. When first organized the regiment had the following officers: - Colonel George C. Wynkoop of Pottsville, PA; Lt. Colonel William P. Sipes of Philadelphia; Majors, James J. Seibert of Philadelphia, James Given of West Chester and John E. Wynkoop of Pottsville. At Selma, Ala., it distinguished itself in dismounting and capturing armed works, charging 600 yards in a single line without supports. _GAR#48, p.196

CONTINE CONNELLY was born in Tioga County, PA (June 8, 1835). He enlisted Oct. 6, 1861 as a Private in Co. B, 101st PA Vol. Infantry. He re-enlisted on June 1, 1864 as a veteran volunteer with rank of Captain. His regiment was organized at Camp Curtin about 1861 with Joseph H. Wilson of Beaver County as Colonel and Joseph S. Hoard of Mansfield, Tioga County as Major. It participated in the Peninsula Campaign and took part in the battles of Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington and Plymouth. On Apr. 20, 1864 at the Battle of Plymouth the entire regiment was captures except for men away on furlough and detached duty. They were sent to Andersonville and other prisons and he was finally discharged on Mar. 1, 1865 as paroled prisoner of war. M. L. Clark of Mansfield, Tioga County was commissioned Lt. Colonel of this regiment on May 18, 1865. Joseph S. Hoard, Captain of Company “B” was promoted to regimental Major and its other Captain was Victor A. Elliott, all of Tioga County. This Company being recruited in this (Tioga) County. The terrible treatment given the men of this regiment in the Southern prisons after their capture at Plymouth, NC reduced their number more than half and of those remaining who were finally exchanged in most instances wrecked their health for the rest of their life. – GAR#48, p.143

GEORGE W. CONNELLY was born in Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Aug. 31, 1864, as a Private in Co. A, 207th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged May 31, 1865. This company was recruited in Tioga County and the regiment was raised by Major Robert C. Cox, afterwards Colonel and finally commissioned Brig. General. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County in its ranks than any single organization in service and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the re-capture of Fort Stedman and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s Division, which had surprised the fort during the night. This division with the greatest gallantry stormed these formidable works at the fall of Petersburg after most desperate fighting. It also participated in Hatcher’s Run, and surrender of Lee at Appomattox. In March 1865 it presented its Colonel Robert C. Cox with a horse and equipment valued at $550.00 in token of their great esteem. The regimental officers were: - Colonel, Robert C. Cox; Lt. Colonel, William W.S. Snoddy and Major, Victor A. Elliott of Tioga County. His Company “A” were recruited in Tioga County and had as its Captain, Elmer Backer; 1st Lt. Joseph M. Young; 2nd Lt., Thomas O. Doud; all from Tioga County. – GAR#48, p.190

D.C. Copp

D.C. Copp was born at Covington, Pa, and enlisted Feb. 29, 1864 as a private in Co. B. 7th Pa. Vol. Cavalry. He was honorably discharged Aug. 26, 1865. D.C. Copp was another area member of the "Saber Regiment" which fought in the western campaign. The 7th became most famous for its fighting in Tennessee and in its drive to Atlanta and it assisted in the capture of Jefferson Davis.

DAVID L. COPP was born (April 16, 1847) in Covington Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Feb. 29, 1864 as a Private in Co. B, 7th PA Vol. Cav., and was honorably discharged Aug. 23, 1865. The Colonel of this regiment was George C. Wynkoop of Pottsville, PA and it was known as the “Saber Regiment” because it fought so much at close quarters with the saber. It was assigned to service in Tennessee, participating in a number of sharp engagements during 1862, also in the Battles of Perryville, Stone, River, Shelbyville, also Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. At Shelbyville it captured fortifications built to resist infantry in a saber charge, the first time during the was that defended entrenchments were captures by mounted cavalry. They attacked over twice their number of Rebel Cavalry under General Wheeler, killing and capturing half of their number and driving half of the remainder into Duck Creek. They was one of the most gallant feats of the war. They were also engaged at Selma, Ala., but one of their outstanding exploits of the war was the pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis and his followers after Lee's surrender, when Davis made a desperate attempt to get out of the country, but were relentlessly pursued and finally taken at Irwinville, Georgia on May 11, 1865 after a pursuit that started at Richmond, VA, after Lee’s evacuation of Richmond on April 2, 1865. – GAR#48, p.105

Charles Coveney in Well Disciplined "Saber Reg’t."

Charles Coveney, born in Richmond Township on 1st September 1841, enlisted on Nov. 20, 1861 at Harrisburg, Pa., as a private in Co. L. 7th Pa. Cavalry. He reenlisted with his company, Nov. 27th, 1863 at Huntsville, Alabama. His Regiment was transferred to the 2nd Cavalry Brigade, Gen. Wilson’s Division of Thomas’ Army in Feb. 1864. He was discharged Aug. 23, 1865 at the close of the war. He was engaged in the battles of Murfreesboro, Tenn., Stone River, Sparksville and Atlanta, Ga. Also in many skirmishes in middle Tenn. Coveney was taken prisoner on July 13, 1862 at Murfreesboro by Gen. Forrest and released on parole at McMinnsville, Tenn. His company had as its Captain, Otis G. Geroud of Covington, Pa., and its Colonel, George C. Wynkoop. The 7th Pa. Regiment was known as "The Saber Regiment" because of its close quarter fighting. It gained its place in history at Shelbyville by taking a fortification built to resist infantry. They drove out twice their number of rebel cavalry, under General Wheeler, killing and capturing one half their number and driving the other half into Duck Creek. He was a member of General Mansfield Post No. 48 GAR. Several other members of this "Saber Regiment" belonged to the Mansfield Post.

CHARLES COVENEY was born the 1st day of September 1841 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted Nov. 20, 1861 at Harrisburg, Pa as a Private in Co. L, 7th PA Cavalry. He re-enlisted with his Company, Nov. 27th, 1863 at Huntsville, Alabama. His Regt., was transferred to the 2nd Cavalry Brigade, Gen. Wilson’s Division of Thomas’ Army, in Feb. 1864. He was finally discharged Aug. 23, 1865 on account of close of the war. He was engaged in the battles of Murfreesboro, Tenn., Stone River, Sparksville and Atlanta, GA, also in many skirmishes in middle Tennessee. He was taken prisoner July 13, 1862 at Murfreesboro by Gen. Forrest and released on parole at McMinnville, Tenn. His most intimate comrades were F.W. Reed, H.H. Snyder, John Graves and Jesse Robbins. His company had as its Captain Otis G. Geroud of Covington, PA, and its Regt. Colonel was that sterling soldier George C. Wynkoop, who brought this regiment to a high state of discipline and efficiency. It fought so much at close quarters with the saber that it was known as “The Saber Regiment” and at Shelbyville in a saber charge captures fortifications built to resist infantry. They drove out twice there number of Rebel Cavalry under General Wheeler. Killing and capturing half their number and driving half of the remainder into Duck Creek. This was the first time in the war that defended entrenchments were captured by mounted Cavalry. – GAR#48, p.9

Robert C. Cox raised six Companies, Honored in Va.

Robert C. Cox was brigade inspector of militia in Tioga County with the rank of Major from 1854 up to the beginning of the war. On April 21, 1861 he along with General Josiah Harding, Col. Levi Landon, Major J. G. Albeck, and other militia officers went to Wellsboro where they raised a company of 100 men beginning at 2:00 on Monday morning. News of Fort Sumter having been received in the County. Major Cox organized a company at Tioga, with Hugh McDonald as Capt., on Tuesday and that evening raised one in Lawrenceville, with Philip Holland as the Captain.

On Wednesday he organized a company at Covington, A.L. Johnson was elected Captain. That same afternoon he organized another company of 100 men at Mainesburg who elected Henry B. Card as their Captain. Thus making six companies raised by him in all in the space of three days.

On Monday the two Wellsboro Companies, started their march to Troy and at Covington were joined by Capt. Johnson’s, McDonald’s and Holland’s Companies and were joined on the march by Capt. Card’s company. These Companies were compelled to wait at Troy for about eight days for want of transportation, but finally they were all taken to Harrisburg where they reported to the Commanding Officer of Camp Curtin, Col. Edward Bruce. Here they remained about two weeks and finding that the quota of troops was full and only about half of the number were accepted, the remainder, about three hundred returned home.

In August 1862, Robert Cox went to Harrisburg with the drafted men from Tioga County and in the organization of the 171st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, he was elected Major of the Regiment, his commission dating November 18, 1862. This Regiment served about one year principally in N.C. and was mustered out at Harrisburg in August 1863. In the summer of 1864 Major Cox was authorized by Adjutant Gen. Russell to raise a regiment and the result of his efforts was the gallant 207th Pennsylvania Volunteers of which Regiment he was commissioned Colonel on September 22, 1864. His Regiment participated in the closing scenes of the war including Hatchers Run, Fort Steadman, the assault and capture of Petersburg and the surrender of Gen. Lee at Appomatox.

In March 1865 in front of Petersburg the Regiment presented him with a horse and full equipment valued at $550. in token of their appreciation of his soldiery qualities and the warm place he had in their affection.

ROBERT C. COX was born the 18th day of Nov. 1823 in Lycoming County, PA. He enlisted April 22, 1861 as a Private in Co. H, 6th PA R. C. and was honorably discharged May 20, 1861. He was brigade inspector of Militia in Tioga County with rank of Major form 1854 up to the beginning of the war. On April 21, 1861 he with General Josiah Harding, Colonel Levi Landon, Major J. S. Albeck, militia officers, went to Wellsboro, Tioga County, PA and reached there about two o’clock on Monday morning Apr. 22, 1861. They immediately organized a company of 100 men, who elected Julius Sherwood their Captain. Then another company was immediately formed who elected Alanson E. Niles their Captain. On the following day, Tuesday, he organized a Company at Tioga who elected Hugh McDonald their Captain. The same evening he organized a Company at Lawrenceville who chose Philip Holland as their Captain. On Wednesday he organized a Company at Covington who chose, A. L. Johnson as Captain. The same afternoon he organized a Company of 100 men at Mainesburg, who elected Henry B. Card as their Captain, thus making six Companies raised by him in all in the space of three days. On Monday the two Wellsboro Companies started their march to Troy and at Covington were joined by Captain Johnson’s, McDonald’s and Holland’s Companies, and were joined on the march by Captain Card’s Company. These Companies were compelled to wait at Troy for about eight days for want of transportation but finally they were all taken to Harrisburg where they reported to Colonel Edward Bruer, the commanding officer of Camp Curtin. Here they remained about two weeks, but finding that the quota of troops were full and only about half of the number were accepted, the remainder, about 300, returned home. In August 1862 he went to Harrisburg with the drafted men from Tioga County, and in the organization of the 171st Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers he was elected Major of the Regiment, his commission dating Nov. 18, 1862. This Regiment served about one year principally in North Carolina and was mustered out at Harrisburg in August 1863. In the summer of 1864 Major Cox was authorized by Adjutant General Russell to raise a regiment and the result of his efforts was the gallant 207th Pennsylvania Volunteers, of which regiment he was commissioned Colonel on September 22, 1864. His regiment participated in the closing scenes of the war including Hatcher’s Run, Fort Stedman, the assault and capture of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. In March 1865 in front of Petersburg the regiment presented him with a horse and full equipment. Valued at $550.00 in token of their appreciation of his soldiery qualities and the warm place he had in their affections. He especially distinguished himself at the recapture of Fort Stedman and General Hartranft proudly called him “The Hero of Fort Stedman”. He formed his regiment in front of Fort Sedgwick for an assault on Fort Mahone, which bore the title of Fort Damnation. When the signal for the assault was given Colonel Cox stationed himself at the head of the regiment, sword in hand, saying, “Boys, let us do or die”. In the assault, which followed which ended in victory, bullets cut his hair from his neck and his coat was riddled, men falling dead around him at every step, yet he escaped (without) a wound. Upon President Abraham Lincoln hearing of his bravery he was commissioned Brevet Brigadier General. His commission being dated April 9, 1865, he being the only man from Tioga County elevated to this rank during the war. He participated with his regiment at the Grand Review at Washington, DC, on Mary 22-23, 1865, and was mustered out with his command at Alexandria, VA, May 31, 1865 and was discharged at Harrisburg, June 5, 1865. – GAR#48, pp.112, 244, 245

HENRY COYLE was born in Ireland. He enlisted Jan. 2, 1864 as a Private in Co. F, 24th NY Cavalry and was honorably discharged July 19, 1865. He died at Corning, NY on July 7, 1887 and had two scars on his body received in fights from the Rebel Cavalry sabers. His regiment was raised by Colonel J. H. Mix, but only tow companies were recruited when they were mustered into the service for three years between January and May 1863. They were known as the Mix Cavalry, 2nd Regiment. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Hallville, Warsaw, Swift Creek, Tarboro, and Street’s Ferry, Anslow Country, New Berne, Gale’s Creek, Cedar Point, Croatan Station, Elizabeth City, Campaign of the Carolinas, Wise’s Fork, Bear Creek, Snow Hill and Bennett Home. They lost in the service 14 enlisted men. They were honorably discharged and mustered out on July 22, 1865, at Raleigh, NC. The companies that were recruited, served in the Department of North Carolina (18th Corps), mostly attached to the 12th NY Volunteer Cavalry. – GAR#48, p.166

WILLIAM L. CRITTENDEN enlisted Sept. 5th, 1864 as a Private in Co. K, 210th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged June 21, 1865. He was wounded at Gravelly Run, VA, March 31st, 1865 and was engaged with his Company in the following battles and engagements: - Hatcher’s Run, Bellefield Raid which lasted for a week. The troops destroying the Weldon RR as they went with station houses and the stores of the Rebel government. It participated in the action at Dabney’s Mills, Gravelly Run which lasted for three days. It was at the forefront displaying a stubborn bravery which was unsurpassed and sustained heavy losses. The entire loss was 35 killed, 115 wounded and 150 missing. It was in the fierce fighting of April 1, 1865 taking flags, small arms and prisoners and in a charge upon the enemy’s works it displayed its vented courage sustaining heavy losses in killed and wounded. With the Corps it followed closely the retreating Rebel army and at Appomattox Court House, was upon the front line to the last, the flag of truce proclaiming the surrender passing through its lines. After the surrender of the Rebels it returned to Washington and participated in the Grand Review of the Union Armies held there May 22-23, 1865 and was shortly thereafter mustered out of the service. -–GAR#48, p.223

Thomas Cruttenden

Thomas Cruttenden was born on February 20, 1843 in Richmond Township. He enlisted June 29, 1863 at Tioga, Pa., in Co. K 35th Pa. State Militia in the emergency call to repel Lee’s invasion of Pennsylvania, and he was discharged Aug. 9, 1863. He reenlisted Aug. 27, 1864 in Tioga as a private in Co. K 207th Pa. Vol. Inf., being promoted to Sergt. He was captured April 2, 1865 in front of Petersburg, Va., being held on the field 20 minutes, when he escaped. He fought at Blackwater, Charge on Ft. Steadman and final assault on the lines at Petersburg. The remainder of his service he was employed in scouting, skirmishes, guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged May 31, 1865 at Alexandria, Va. The 35th Pa. Vol. was an emergency regiment just prior to the battle of Gettysburg but were not concentrated in time to take part in the battle. The 207th Regt. was raised in Tioga County and more men from this section of the state than any other was. Co. K was originally raised in Charleston and Delmar Townships.

THOMAS CRUTTENDEN was born the 20th day of February 1843 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, PA. He enlisted June 29, 1863 at Tioga, PA in Co. K, 35th PA State Militia in the emergency call to repeal Lee’s invasion of PA, and was discharged Aug. 9, 1863. He re-enlisted Aug. 27, 1864 in Tioga, PA as a Private in Co. K, 207th PA Vol. Inf., being promoted to Sergt. He was captured April 2, 1865 in front of Petersburg, VA, being held on the field about twenty minutes, when he escaped. He fought at Blackwater, Charge on Fort Stedman and final assault on the lines at Petersburg. The remainder of his service he was employed in scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged May 31, 1865, at Alexandria, VA. The 35th PA Volunteers was an emergency regiment just prior to the battle of Gettysburg. They were not concentrated in time to take part in the battle. Its Lt. Colonel was E. G. Scheiffelin of Tioga County and the Captain of Company “K” was Horace C. Johnson, also of Tioga County. The 207th Regiment had more soldiers from Tioga County than any other single organization in the service and belonged to a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania men. Its Colonel was Robert C. Cox, Major Victor A. Elliott and Captain of Company “K” was John J. Reese, all of Tioga County. This Company was recruited largely from Charleston and Delmar Townships. – GAR#48, p.71