Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
G.A.R. Post No. 48, Mansfield PA
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

G.A.R. Post No. 48 in 1910
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DANA S. LaFRANCE was born in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted August 30th 1864 as a private in Co. C, 203rd PA Vol., and was honorably discharged June 22nd 1865. The troops composing his command were originally recruited at the suggestion of General Birney to serve as sharp shooters in his division, but the general dying soon after their reaching the field they were treated as an ordinary regiment. Their first engagement was before Petersburg at Chapin Farm and New Market Road. They fought in the following battles and engagements, Malvern Hill, Fort Fisher, Wilmington, Bentonville, Raleigh. They especially distinguished themselves at the attack on Fort Fisher in which they took a prominent part, they were in the advance on the Fort, which they carried after desperate fighting both Colonels Pennypacker and Moore being killed before the sixth traverse was taken. At this point Lt. Col. Lyman, the only officer left led on his men from 3:30 in the afternoon until far into the night. The desperate struggle was maintained, Colonel Lyman being killed in a charge on the seventh traverse. Nearly half of the regiment went down in the fight; forty-six were killed and on hundred and forty-five wounded, four officers killed and six wounded. Their flag had 8 shots made in it by bullets and grapeshot. Fort Fisher was one of the strongest works ever erected. – GAR48 p.199

Horatio Lamb with New York Volunteers

Horatio H. Lamb born in 1820 at Lambs Creek, Pa., enlisted as a private August 1862 at Brooklyn, Kings County, NY in Co. B 170th NY Volunteer Infantry. In September 1862, he became a Corporal and continued to hold that rank during the remainder of his military service. In the spring of 1863, he was with his Regiment in Virginia and was engaged in several skirmishes in the vicinity of Suffolk, one of them being at Edenton Road. About the middle of July 1863, he was sent to Hart Island, NY where he was engaged in guard duty in a Conscript Camp. July 22, 1864 he returned to his regiment near Petersburg, Va. On the 25th of August 1864, he was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Richmond and kept in a Prison Hospital several days. He was then paroled and returned to the Union lines. He entered a hospital at Annapolis, Md. And remained there until Nov. 1864. In February 1865, he rejoined his regiment at Hatchers Run and while with it he was engaged in the battles and skirmishes, which terminated in the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond and the surrender of General Lee. He was discharged July 25, 1865 at Hart’s Island, NY by reason of the close of the War. Corp. Lamb joined General Mansfield Post No. 48, GAR on August 18th, 1875.


HORATIO H. LAMB was born the 18th day of February 1820 in Lambs Creek, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted as a private August 25th 1862 at Brooklyn, Kings County NY, in Co. B, 170th NY Volunteer Infantry. In Sept. 1862 he became a Corporal and continued to hold that rank during the remainder of his military service. In the spring of 1863, he was with his regiments in Virginia and was engaged in several skirmishes in the vicinity of Suffolk, one of them being at Edenton Road. About the middle of July 1863 he was sent to Hart Island, NY where he was engaged in guard duty in a Conscript Camp. July 22nd 1864 he returned to his regiment near Petersburg, VA. On the 25th of August 1864 he was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Ream’s Station. He was taken to Richmond and kept in Prison Hospital seven days. He was then paroled and returning to the Union lines, he entered a hospital at Annapolis, MD and remained there until Nov. 1864. In February 1865 he joined his regiment at Hatcher’s Run and while with it he was engaged in the battles and skirmishes which terminated in the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond, and the surrender of Gen. Lee. He was discharged July 25th at Hart’s Island NY by reason of the close of the war. HORATIO H. LAMB joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Aug. 18th 1875. SIGNED BY C.M. Rumsey, Adjutant & H.C. Bailey, Commander. – GAR48 p.37

B. T. LAMBERSON was born in Tioga, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Feb. 15th 1865 as a private in Co. K, 8th PA Cavalry and was honorably discharged Aug. 11th 1865. This regiment 8th PA Cavalry was originally planned as a command of mounted rifles. In Jan. 1862 Capt. David McM. Gregg was commissioned Colonel and under this officer the command became thoroughly efficient. They were ordered to Hampton, VA, and after the capture of Yorktown they were sent up the Peninsula. They took part in the campaign against Richmond and was involved in constant skirmishes between Seven Pines and Fair Oaks through to Malvern Hill and Harrison's Landing. In the campaign which included Antietam the 8th reached that field the day after the battle and rode thru to Gettysburg then endangered by raiders upon its southward march in 18 days the command fought thirteen actions and skirmishes. One squadron was present at the battle of Fredericksburg. They were in the action at Ranks Ford, and severe engagements at Hagerstown, Williamsport (MD), Boonsboro, St. James College and Jones Cross Roads and a midnight battle at Monterey Pass. In 1864 they were with Sheridan thru the Wilderness up to battles before Richmond also raid to Gordonsville and rode and fought through the south of Petersburg and a disastrous engagement at Farmville. They made the final charge of the war at Appomattox. They took part in one hundred thirty-five battles, engagements and skirmishes. – GAR48 p.169

WILLIAM LAMPHEAR was born in Covington, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Nov. 1st 1861 as a private in Co. H, 106th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged Nov. 1st 1864. This company’s Captain was John Irvin of Tioga County, afterwards promoted to Major for bravery in action. The regiment was in the battle of Gettysburg and port of it was in the advance picket line on the third day and although three times ordered to retreat but kept up such a hot fire that the Confederate division of General Pickett thought they had reached the main Union line and halted and opened fire. They also participated in the Siege of Yorktown, battles of Fair Oaks, Charles City Cross Roads, Malvern Hill, Bull Run, Antietam, at which battle in less than ten minutes time one-third of the regiment was stricken down. They were at the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Reams Station, and action at Boydton Plank Road and in the spring campaign, which closed the rebellion. Few regiments participated in so many battles and actions as this company, and had so good a record for bravery in action. Probably its outstanding exploits were at Gettysburg and Antietam although at Fredericksburg it stood from mid-day until nightfall, under a ceaseless fire from two lines of battle with unflinching courage. – GAR48 p.172

ORMUS H. LANGDON was born the 4th day of Nov. 1844 in Gates, Monroe County, New York. He enlisted Jan. 4th 1864 as a private in Co. M, 50th NY Engineers, and was honorably discharged June 9th 1865. In the work of building bridges, railroads, roads and entrenchments the engineers were in the range of fire both from their soldiers and the enemy. They were subjected to this in the following engagements, City Point, Tree Creek and Hatcher’s Run. They participated in the “Warren Raid” in Dec. 1864 when the Raiders started out with one day’s rations and were gone thirteen days. Following the cavalry who got the pickings, they foraged for supplies. They destroyed twenty-five or thirty miles of railroad and were constantly wet from a rain of five days duration. They built a pontoon bridge across the James River at Wind Mill Point in which 113 boats were used, this distance being nearly 1600 feet. They were in winter quarters at Poplar Springs during the winter of 1864-65. His regiment was in the following battles, Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Peninsula Campaign, Richmond, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Banks Ford, Mine Run, Rappahannock Station, Wilderness and Siege of Petersburg. – GAR48 p.139

George C. Lee

G.C. Lee was born in Nova Scotia. He enlisted as a private in Co. D 8th Pa. Cavalry Sept. 11, 1861 and was honorably discharged. His outfit participated in one hundred thirty-five battles, engagements and skirmishes, a magnificent record.


GEORGE C. LEE was born in Richton, Nova Scotia. He enlisted as a private in Co. D, 8th PA Cavalry, Sept. 11th 1861 and was honorably discharged. This regiment was recruited in July, August & September 1861 and was originally tended as a command of mounted rifles. In January 1862 Capt. David McM. Gregg became the regimental Colonel and under him the command became thoroughly efficient. Upon leaving Philadelphia they were first ordered to Hampton, VA but after the capture of Yorktown the regiment was sent up the Peninsula. They were in the battles of Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill and Harrison Landing in the Campaign against Richmond. In the campaign, which included the battle of Antietam, they rode thru Maryland and on to Gettysburg. They reached Antietam the day after the battle but in eighteen days fought thirteen actions and skirmishes. One squadron was at the battle of Fredericksburg and they led the extreme advance to Chancellorsville. They had engagements at Banks Ford, Monterey Pass, Hagerstown, Williamsport (MD), Boonsboro, St. James College and Jones Cross Roads, all incidents to the Confederate retreat from Gettysburg. They were at the Siege of Petersburg and the battles of the Wilderness and made the final charge of the war at Appomattox. They participated in one hundred thirty-five battles, engagements and skirmishers and had a magnificent record. – GAR48 p.114

HENRY G. LEVALLEY was born in Covington, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Feb. 1st 1864 as a private in Co. L, 7th PA Cavalry and was honorably discharged, August 23rd 1865. His regiment was organized in Dec. 1861 with George C. Wynkoop as Colonel. It was assigned to service in Tennessee and participated in a number of sharp engagements in 1862 and also took part in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. It fought so much at close quarters that it was known as “The Saber Regiment” and at Shelbyville it captured fortifications built to resist infantry. This was the first time during the war that defended entrenchments were captured by mounted cavalry. His company had as its Captain Otis G. Gerould of Tioga County and was recruited largely from this county. At Selma, Ala., they gained great renown when they were dismounted and without support in a single line charged defended works over a distance of 600 yards. The regiment was fearfully exposed and lost heavily in killed and wounded. After this battle they participated in the engagement at Columbus on the 16th of April 1865 and on the 20th they arrived at Macon, GA when the war having substantially closed, they remained until they were mustered out of the service. – GAR48 p.153

VOLNEY M. LEVALLEY was born in Covington, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted June 17th 1861 as a private in Co. C, 12th PA Vol. R(eserve) C(ompany). Later he joined Co. 190th PA Vol. He was honorably discharged June 5th 1865. The 12th Reserve took part in the following battles and engagements, Dranesville, Ellerson’s Mill, Gaines Mills, Malvern Hill, Peninsula Campaign, Antietam, Gettysburg, Bristoe Station, Wilderness, North Anna, Bethesda Church, Mechanicsville. Company “C” was recruited in Bradford County and its Capt. Richard Gustin was commissioned Lt. Col.; on Apr. 6th 1863 having a great record for bravery. The subject of this sketch was transferred to the 190th Regiment PA Volunteers on May 31st 1864. – GAR48 p.184

D. W. Lewis

D. W. Lewis, born in Oneida, NY. He enlisted April 18, 1861 as a Corporal in Co. E 81st Ill., and was discharged Jan. 6, 1863 from Co. A 94th Ill., on account of disability.



D.W. LEWIS (possibly Wesley D. Lewis) was born in Oneida County, New York. He enlisted April 18th 1861 as a Corporal in Co. E, 81st Illinois Vol., and was discharged Jan. 6th 1863 from Co. A, 94th Illinois Vol., on account of disability. – GAR48 p.132

S.T. LEWIS was born in Greenfield, New York. He enlisted Oct. 16th 1862 as a private in Co. C, 171st PA Vol., and was honorably discharged August 8th 1863. His regiment was a nine-month regiment composed of drafter Militia and was organized at Camp Curtin in November 1862. Robert C. Cox of Tioga County afterwards Brig. General was its Major. Its service was principally in North Carolina and was mustered out at Harrisburg Aug. 1863. Its principal activities were garrison duty. Besides Major Cox its regimental officers were Colonel Everard Bierer of Fayette County; Lt. Colonel Theophilus Humphrey of Bradford County. His company had as its Captain William B. Hall of Mansfield, PA, and was largely recruited from Tioga County. It was stationed at New Berne, NC and participated in its defense and engagements in that section. It was soon after ordered to Fortress Monroe and upon its arrival was to White House on the Pamunky River, to join General Dix in a demonstration on Richmond for a division in favor of the Army at Gettysburg. It proceeded to Harpers Ferry and from there to Boonsboro and thence to a position in the South Mountain. It then proceeded to Frederick and on the 3rd of August was ordered to Harrisburg where it was ordered out of service. – GAR48 p.170

SCOTT McKINNEY was born in Steuben County, New York. He enlisted March (April 4th) 1864 as a private in Co. G, 53rd PA Vol., and was honorably discharged June (2nd) 1865. This company was recruited in Potter County and of Potter County men enlisted for three years service. During its organization it occupied Camp Curtin and while there did guard duty at Harrisburg, PA. It was then ordered to Washington and from there to Alexandria where it remained during the winter of 1861-61. It participated in the affair at Manassas Junction and Warrenton Junction and then was transferred with McClellan's Army to the Peninsula, and formed part of the Reserve Division at the Siege of Yorktown. It tool part in the following battles and engagements, Fair Oaks, Gaines Mills, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, Charleston, Snickers Gap, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Bristoe, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Five Forks, Deep Creek and was in the forefront of the advance the day of the surrender of the Rebel army at Appomattox Court House. They camped for a short time at Burkeville after the surrender, then marched to Washington DC, where on May 23rd 1865 they participated in the Grand Review of the Union Armies. They had a splendid war record having an especially heavy loss at Fredericksburg where they left on the field one hundred fifty-eight out of a total of two hundred and eighty-three. – GAR48 p.217

EDSON R. MEEKER (Edwin R. Meeker) was born in Montgomery County, New York. He enlisted Sept. 13th 1861 as a private in Co. K, 11th PA Cavalry, was promoted to Sergt. and honorably discharged August 13th 1865. His regiment was originally known as “Harlan’s Light Cavalry” and was organized by Colonel Josiah Harlan of Philadelphia as an independent regiment, under special authority of the Secretary of War. It was finally mustered in as the 11th Cavalry Company “L” and was composed of men from PA. It was assigned to duty in the Army of the Potomac and served with distinction in the various battles of Virginia, being very frequently used in scouting duty. It was mustered out of the service Aug. 13th 1865. As musters in as the 11th Cavalry it had the following regimental officers; Colonel Josiah Harlan; Lt. Colonel, Samuel P. Spear, George Stetzell, Samuel Wetherill and Noah M. Runyan Majors. His regiment took part in the following battles and engagements, Yorktown, Williamsburg, West Point, Richmond, Dalgren Raid, Hanover Junction, Milan, Capture of Norfolk, Siege of Suffolk, Weldon RR, Reams Station, Malvern Hill and Deserted House. It was rated very highly as an active and efficient scouting regiment and was among the cavalry under Gen. Sheridan, which pursued the Rebels to Appomattox. – GAR48 p.182

George W. Merrick

G.W. Merrick was born on 27th of March 1838 at Wellsboro. He enlisted as a private April 21, 1861 Co. H. 6th Pa. R. C. and was promoted to Sergt. He lost his right leg above the knee at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1861. He was discharged because of physical disability. He reenlisted June 1863 in Co. A as Capt., of 187th Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was made Major before the close of the war. He was in the battle of Drainsville, Peninsular Campaign, Second Bull Run, Cold Harbor and Petersburg.


GEORGE W. MERRICK was born the 27th day of March 1838 in Wellsboro, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted as a private April 21st 1861 in Co. H, 6th PA R. C. and was promoted to Sergt. He lost his right leg above the knee at Petersburg, VA June 18th 1864. He was first discharged Dec. 1862 on account of physical disability. He re-enlisted June ’63 in Co. A as Capt., for six months; re-enlisted March 18th 1864 in Co. A, 187th PA Vol. Infantry. He was in the battles of Drainsville, Peninsula Campaign, Second Bull Run, Cold Harbor and Petersburg. He recruited two companies, one “Six Months Men” for the First Battalion PA Vol., and was chosen Captain. At the expiration of his term he recruited a company for the three years service, which was mustered in as Company “A” of the 187th PA Volunteers. He was subsequently commissions Major and joined the army at Cold Harbor. At the funeral of President Lincoln this regiment was assigned the head of the procession on its way from the Baltimore depot to Independence Hall and was left as a guard of honor while the remains lay in state. With the First City Troop it was detailed to escort the remains from Independence Hall to the New York depot as they were borne away. He had the rank of Major when discharged. His regiment after Cold Harbor took part in the desperate fighting of Weldon RR and Hatcher’s Run. – GAR48 p.111

STEPHEN M. MILES was born in Richmond Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Oct. 14th 1861 as a private in Co. B, 101st PA Vol., and was discharged July 28th 1862 on account of physical disability. He afterwards served in the 7th PA Cavalry from Dec. 21st 1863 to August 25th 1865. Company “B” 101st PA Vol., were recruited in Tioga County with Captains Joseph S. Hoard, Victor A. Elliott and Melvin L. Clark, afterwards promoted to Lt. Colonel. The regiment served in the Peninsula Campaign, Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington and Plymouth in North Carolina where on Apr. 20th 1864 the entire regiment was captured except for the men on furlough and detached service. They were finally exchanged March 1865. The 7th PA Cavalry was commended by that splendid soldier Col. George C. Wynkoop who brought it to a high state of discipline and efficiency. It fought so much at close quarters that it was known as “The Saber Regiment” and at Shelbyville charged and captured fortifications built to resist infantry. This was the first time during the war this had been done. It also saw sharp fighting in 1862 in Tennessee and was later in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, The Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. Its regimental officers besides Col. George C. Wynkoop, were William P. Sipes, Lt. Colonel; James J. Seibert, James Given and John E. Wynkoop, Majors. – GAR48 p.224

MILLER C. MOORE was born the 17th day of April 1830 in Delaware County, New York. He enlisted May 15th 1861 at Towanda, Bradford County, PA, as a private in Co. I, 6th PA Reserve Vol. Cavalry. May 9th 1864 at the battle of the Wilderness, VA, he was wounded by a fragment of shell, on the left foot. The same month he was injured at North Anna River by a concussion of shell, which knocked him senseless. His battle record is:- Dransville, Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Fredericksburg, Antietam, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House and North Anna River. He was honorably discharged from service June 15th 1864 at Harrisburg, PA. His regiment was composed of men who responded to the call of Volunteers issued by President Lincoln after the capture of Fort Sumter. Upon their arrival at Camp Curtin finding it to be impossible to be accepted for a three months enlistment, the quota being full, they enlisted for three years. The regimental Colonel was W. Wallace Ricketts of Columbia County, and it was assigned to the Third Brigade of General McCall’s Division. It served three years in the field as part of the Army of the Potomac and in its last engagement at Bethesda Church although but 150 strong it captured 102 and buried 72 Rebels on its immediate front. MILLER C. MOORE joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Nov. 19th 1888. SIGNED BY  H.C. Bailey, Commander. – GAR48 p.59

FORDYCE S. MORGAN was born in Sullivan Township, (Tioga County), Pennsylvania. He enlisted Oct. 4th 1861 as a private in Co. C, 7th PA Cavalry and was discharged Sept. 29th 1862 on account of physical disability. This regiment had as its Colonel the sterling soldier Colonel George C. Wynkoop who brought it to a high state of discipline and efficiency.  It participated in several sharp engagements in 1862 and took part in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Chickamauga, The Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. It fought so much at close quarters with the saber that it was known as “The Saber Regiment” and at Shelbyville it captured fortifications built to resist infantry, the first time in the war that this had been accomplished. It served in Tennessee with the western army until the close of the war. His Company had as its Captain A.J.B. Dartt and Charles C. Hermans and Lt. Henry D. Calkins of Tioga County. One of the outstanding exploits of his regiment was the pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis, which extended from Richmond, VA to Irwinsville, GA on May 11th 1865. Davis leaving Richmond before General Lee’s evacuation on Apr. 2nd 1865. at Selma, Ala. They dismounted and charged in a single line without support, 600 yards and captured entrenched works showing great bravery. – GAR48 p.164

W.H. Mott

W.H. Mott enlisted May 6, 1861 as a private in Co. D, 23rd NY Vol. Inf., and honorably discharged from Co. F, 186th NY Vol. Inf., on Jan 21, 1863 by surgeon’s certificate. The 23rd NY regiment participated in the following battles: Gen. Pope Campaign in Virginia, Bull Run, Fairfax, South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredricksburg. They lost during their term of service 2 officers and 70 enlisted men.

A note on Bull Run – at the first battle of Bull Run or Manasses, it has been estimated that between 8,000 and 10,000 bullets were fired for every man killed and wounded.


WILLIAM H. MOTT was born in Waverly, New York. He enlisted May 6th 1861 (war records state 24 years of age), as a private in Co. D, 23rd NY Vol. Inf., and was honorably discharged from Co. F, 186th NY Vol. Inf., Jan 21st 1863 by surgeon’s certificate. The 23rd NY Volunteers had as its Colonel Henry C. Hoffman; Lt. Col. Nirom M. Crane, and was organized at Elmira, NY, and mustered in for two years service. Company “D” had the following officers, Capt. Luzerne Todd; 1st Lt., Newton T. Colby, William H. Jones; 2nd Lts. Cyrus Kellogg. This regiment participated in the following battles, Gen. Popes Campaign in VA, Bull Run, Fairfax Court House, South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg.  They lost during their term of service 2 officers and 70 enlisted men. The 186th NY Regiment with its Colonel Bradley Winslow, and Lt. Col. E. Jay Marsh were mustered in Sept. 1865. Company “F” had the following officers, Capt. Charles D. Squire; 1st Lt., Charles N. Phillips; 2nd Lt. Henry C. Grunet(?). The regiment lost in the service 1 officer and 57 enlisted men. They participated in the following battles, The Petersburg Campaign, Hatcher’s Run, Fort Stedman, Appomattox Campaign. They were honorably discharged and mustered out June 2, 1865 near Alexandria, VA. – GAR48 p.92

Martin V. Mudge

M. V. Mudge, born 23 April 1838 in Tioga County, PA. Enlisted April 30, 1861 for three months as a private but was never assigned and at the end of the term was honorably discharged. He reenlisted Oct. 16, 1862 in Co. A. 171 Pa. Vol. Infantry. He enlisted for a third term in the summer of 1863 at Tioga, Pa. In Co. M, 2 Pa. Heavy Artillery and served in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church, the engagements around Richmond and the final assault on the lines in front of Petersburg. He was detailed to carry mail from Petersburg to Richmond. He served in this way for one month. He was also detailed to pick up and arrest disloyal persons in and around Petersburg and Richmond. He was honorably discharged at Camp Cadawaller, Philadelphia, Pa. Feb. 5, 1866. With the exception of the First Maine Heavy Artillery, his regiment lost more men killed than any other in the course of the war. In the constant fighting around Petersburg and Richmond, the regiment lost more than half of their effective strength. Part of Battery “M” manned the guns at Fort Stevens and Fort DeRusse when Early made his attack on Washington. After the surrender at Appomatox, the regiment was retained at Petersburg and in the lower counties of Virginia, upon Provost Duty until its discharge. It was the largest regiment in the Union Army. M. V. Mudge joined General Mansfield Post No. 48, Aug. 6th, 1880.


MARTIN V. MUDGE was born the 23rd day of April 1838 in Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Apr. 30th 1861, for three months, as a private but was never assigned and at the end of the term was honorably discharged. He re-enlisted Oct. 16th 1862 in Co. A, 171st PA Vol. Inf. He enlisted for a third term in the summer of 1863 at Tioga, PA in Co. M, 2nd PA Heavy Artillery and served in the battles of Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Bethesda Church, the engagements around Richmond and the final assault on the lines in front of Petersburg. He was detailed to carry mail from Petersburg to Richmond and served in this way for one month. He was also detailed to pick up and arrest disloyal persons in and around Petersburg and Richmond. He was honorably discharged at Camp Cadwalader, Philadelphia, PA, on Feb. 5th 1866. With the exception of the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, his regiment lost more men killed than any other in the course of the war. In the constant fighting around Petersburg and Richmond the regiment lost more than half of their effective strength. Part of Battery "“"”manned the guns at Fort Stevens and Fort DeRusse(?) when Early made his attack on Washington. After the surrender at Appomattox, the regiment was retained at Petersburg and in the lower counties of Virginia upon Provost Duty until its discharge. It was the largest regiment in the Union Army.  MARTIN V. MUDGE joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Aug. 6th 1900. SIGNED BY H.C. Bailey, Commander. – GAR48 p.58

STEPHEN MUDGE was born the 20th day of June 1844 in Sullivan, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted as a Corporal in Co. B, 101st Vol. Inf. Oct 14th 1861, and was honorably discharged June 25th 1865. He enlisted for three years in this regiment, which had as its Colonel Joseph H. Wilson of Beaver County and Joseph S. Hoard of Tioga County as its Major. His company Captains were Victor A. Elliott and Melvin L. Clark, afterwards Lt. Colonel. It participated in the Peninsula Campaign, Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington, and Plymouth, NC, where on Apr. 20th 1864 the entire regiment was captured except for men on furlough and detached services. They were sent to Andersonville and other prisons and were not exchanged until March 1865. His company was raised in Tioga County and had as its Company officers, 1st Lt. Abram Young and Franklin P. Wylie; 2nd Lts., George G. Gaylord and Harvey S. Horton. His regiment participated in several severe battles, at Fair Oaks every third man was killed or wounded; at Plymouth, NC a desperate three day fight, Company “B” took a prominent part although finally captured with all their officers. Before the date for the release of the prisoners more than half had died from the hardships and privations they were exposed to in the Rebel prisons, and those that returned home were often not recognized by their own families. – GAR48 p.226

Stephen Godfrey Mudge - Note from Terry Mudge -- Thought you might be able to use this picture of Stephen Mudge.  I will also scan a copy of his war record.  Of particular interest, he bribed his way out of Andersonville Prison by offering a guard his pocket watch if the guard would get him on the prisoner exchange list. Also, early in the war as he was stationed near Washington, D.C., he toured the White House and had the good fortune to meet President Lincoln.  The president commented that Stephen was one of the few people that he ever met that he didn't have to look down to; Stephen was 6' 2".

Ferdinand Newell

Ferdinand Newell was born Jan. 1, 1841 in Covington Township. He enlisted Sept 10, 1861 at Elmira, N.Y. as a private in Co. H, First N.Y. Artillery and was promoted to Corporal. He was honorably discharged from this enlistment Nov. 17, 1863 at Fort Berry, Washington, D.C. by reason of reenlistment as veteran in old command. In January, 1864, he was granted furlough of sixty days at Washington, D.C. He was confined in hospital at Washington, D.C. in 1865 for three months suffering with rheumatism, during which time he was detailed as an attendant in hospital. He took part in the battle of White House Landing. The remainder of his term he was on picket guard and garrison duty in and about Washington, D.C. He was honorably discharged June 20, 1865 at Elmira, N.Y. He was in the following battles, Winchester, Mechanicsville, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Gainesville, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Brandy Station, Chattanooga, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldden RR, Hatchers Run, Fort Stedman, Five Oaks, Appomatox. Ferdinand Newell joined General Mansfield Post No. 48 Sept. 2, 1889.


FERDINAND NEWELL was born the 1st day of January 1841 in Covington Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Sept. 10th 1861 at Elmira, NY as a private in Co. F, 1st NY Light Artillery and was promoted to Corporal. He was honorably discharged from this enlistment, Nov. 17th 1863 at Fort Berry, Washington, DC by reason of re-enlistment as veteran in old command. In January 1864 he was granted a furlough of sixty days at Washington, DC. He was confined in hospital at Washington, DC in 1865 for three months, suffering with rheumatism, during which time he was detailed as an attendant in hospital. He took part in the battle of White House Landing. The remainder of his term he was on picket, guard and garrison duty in and about Washington, DC. He was finally honorably discharged June 20th 1865 at Elmira, NY.  The Colonel of the regiment was Guilford D. Bailey and Charles S. Wainwright; Lt. Col. Henry E. Turner and Edward R. Warner. The officer of his company were, Captains, William R. Wilson; 1st Lts., Robert H. Fitzhugh, Addison L. Scott, Solon W. Stocking, Edward L. Bailey, William J. Anderson and George H. Talbott; 2nd Lts., Anton Becker, Sylvester Chapin, Volney M. Babcock, Andrew Lather and James E. Decker. They were in the following battles, Winchester, Mechanicsville, Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Gainesville, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Brandy Station, Chattanooga, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Hatcher’s Run, Fort Stedman, Five Forks and Appomattox. FERDINAND NEWELL joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Sept. 2nd 1889. SIGNED BY H.C. Bailey, Commander. – GAR48 p.57

JOHN H. PACKARD was born in Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Oct. 6th 1861 as a private in Co. G, 45th PA Vol., and was discharged Apr. 2nd 1863 on account of physical disability. His company was recruited in Tioga County and its Colonel was Thomas Welch of Lancaster County. It saw service both in the eastern and western armies and was engaged in the battles of James Island, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Blue Springs, Campbell Station, Siege of Knoxville, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Anna, Mine Explosion, Weldon RR, Poplar Springs Church, Hatcher’s Run and capture of Petersburg. His regiment was noted for its fine discipline and splendid bravery of its men. After Lee'’ surrender it took part in the Grand Review at Washington Dc, May 22nd & 23rd 1865 and on July 17th 1865 was mustered out of service. His Company “G” was first known as the “Charleston Rangers” being organized on the village green at Wellsboro, PA, Sept. 18th 1861. They had as officers, Captain Nelson Whitney; 1st Lt. W. T, Fitzgerald and 2nd Lt. John J. Reese. There were 95 officers and men in the company. The next day after organization they met at Whitneyville, where Capt. Whitney lived and rode from their 25 miles to Troy, PA, where they took the train to Harrisburg. They were then stationed at Camp Curtin for training until Oct. 21st 1861. – GAR48 p.192

NEHEMIAH R. PACKARD was born in Mainesburg, Pennsylvania. He enlisted August 30th 1862 as a private in Co. M, 2nd Col. Cavalry and was honorably discharged June 15th 1865. – GAR48 p.212

DAVID PALMER was born in Union County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted April 8th 1865 as a private in Co. H, 33rd U.S. Infantry and was honorably discharged April 8th 1868. – GAR48 p. 168

DAVID PARKER (Col.) was born in Virginia. He enlisted Sept 8th 1862 as a private in Co. H, U.S. Col. Inf., and was honorably discharged Oct. 12th 1865. – GAR48 p.237

WILLIAM P. PARKER was born in Steuben County, New York. He enlisted July 18th 1863 as a private in Co. A, 76th NY Inf., and was honorably discharged July 6th 1865. His regiment was recruited under Colonel Nelson W. Green being consolidated with the Cortland Regiment, Cherry Valley Regiment, Otsego County Regiment and Cromwellian Regiment. It also received in May 1863 the three years men of the 24th & 30th Regiment of infantry. Other Colonels were William P. Wainwright and Charles E. Livingstone; Lt. Colonels, John D. Shaul, John E. Cook; Majors, Andrew J. Grover, John W. Young. The officers of Company “A” were Captains, Andrew J. Grover, Herschell W. Pierce; 1st Lts. Charles H. George, Norman G. Harmon, John M. Waterman, John Atkins; 2nd Lts., Samuel M. Byram, William H. Ripley, George W. Feet, Homer D. Call and William Stringham. They participated in the following battles and engagements:- Locust Grove, Falmouth, Gen. Pope’s Campaign, Rappahannock River, Sulphur Springs, Gainesville, Grouton(?), Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Philoment, Union, Upperville, Fredericksburg, Pollock’s Mill Creek, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run Campaign, Raccoon Ford, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Piney Branch Church. Laurel Hill, The Salient, North Anna, Totopotomay, Cold Harbor, White Oak Swamp, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Poplar Grove Church, Hatcher’s Run. Hicksford Raid. – GAR48 p.232

JOHN PATTERSON was born in Ireland. He enlisted August 19th 1863 as a private in Co. F, 149th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged June 24th 1865. His regiment was raised by Roy Stone, formerly Major of the Bucktails and he became its Colonel. The regiment belonged to the Bucktails and wore Bucktails on their caps. It took part in the battles of Chancellorsville, Bethesda Church, Weldon RR, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Hatcher’s Run, North Anna and Petersburg. This brigade became famous in the magnificent fight it made near Seminary Ridge on the first day at Gettysburg. It held its ground from early in the day until four o’clock against largely superior numbers, in front and on either flank, and it had to charge front to the rear several times under fire. This movement is rarely successful even with old tried and seasoned troops. They were the last to retire from the field, the enemy passing both their flanks but gave them a wide berth, not caring to come to any closer quarters. This Company “F” has as officers, Dennis McGee and John A. Wolfe Captains; Hugh Mulligan, Henry D. Patton and Ernest Wright, 1st Lts.; Charles Bitterling and Daniel Blert(?), 2nd Lt. The subject of this sketch and one other Alonzo B. Eastman were the only men from Tioga County enlisted in this Company. They were mustered out of the U.S. Service June 13th 1865; despite the fact that they were never mustered in. – GAR48 p.183

ALMIRON H. PERRY was born in Madison County, New York. He enlisted Feb. 23rd 1864 as a private in Co. G, 53rd PA Vol., and was honorably discharged June 16th 1865. His Company was recruited in Potter County and had Arch F. Hones and Jason W. Stevens as Captains; Reuben Z. Roberts, William W. Brown, Benjamin W. Cushing and George W. Stevens, 1st Lts.; Matthew O. Crosby, Harry Baker and Arthur B. Mann as 2nd Lts. The regiment was a three-year enlistment and during organization they did provost duty in Harrisburg. It went into camp at Alexandria VA, where it remained during the winter of 1861-62. It participated in the following battles and skirmishes following the advance of the Army of the Potomac in March 1862, Manassas Junction, Warrenton Junction. On the 3rd of April it was transferred to McClellan’s Army and formed part of the reserve division during the Siege of Yorktown. It was at Fair Oaks taking a prominent part, Gaines Mills, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Boonsboro, Reedysville, Charleston, Snickers Gap, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Jones Cross Roads, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Boydton Plank Road, Five Forks, Deep Creek and was at the front on the day of the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Court House. It participated in the Grand Review held at Washington after the war on the 23rd of May 1865 and was soon after mustered out of the service. – GAR48 p.203

HARVEY C. PETERS was born in Canton, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted August 30th 1862 as a private in Co. A, 14th U.S. Infantry and was honorably discharged Aug. 30th 1865. – GAR48 p.138

A.M. Pitts

A. M. Pitts was born in 1834 in Richmond Township, Tioga County. He enlisted in August 1861 as a private in Co. A 7th Kansas Vol. Cavalry. He gained the rank of Captain before he was discharged in 1865. He saw action in Western Missouri, Pittsburg Landing, Miss., and served under Col. Sheridan in the south, taking part in the Battle of Corinth, Miss., Florence, Ala., and many other engagements in Tennessee. In 1864 he was given a 30-day furlough from Leavenworth, Kan. His first time off duty since enlisting. During this furlough he visited friends in Mansfield. On returning to duty his regiment was sent to Memphis to guard the work crews on the railroad. He saw action against Gen. Forrest at Hurricane Creek. Again ordered to Kansas his regiment took part in all the principal engagements, particularly distinguished itself at Independence, Mo., where it charged a superior force, routed it and took two pieces of artillery. Following this campaign it was sent to St. Louis District to fight guerrilla. Following his discharge he subsequently made his home in Mansfield where he died in 1891. He was the first commander of the General Mansfield Post GAR.


AARON MUDGE PITTS was born the 27th day of October 1834 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Aug. 31st 1861 as a private in Co. A, 7th Kansas Vol. Cavalry. He was promoted to Captain of Co. D, same regiment and honorably discharged Sept. 29th 1865. Aaron Mudge Pitts was a resident of Highland, Doniphan Co., Kansas, when he enlisted. Was mustered into service Aug. 31st, and made a Sergeant. He was promoted to be 1st Lt., Oct. 28th 1861, and was in command of Co. “A” many months during the absence of the Captain. He was promoted to the Captaincy of Co. “D” Oct. 3rd 1862, not much to his pleasure. By request of Commander of this Post (48) – I have compiled from official records a condensed account of the services of the 7th Kansas Vol. Cavalry, where Captain Pitts was always at his post of duty. The Regiment, on organization, Oct. 28th 1861, was at once ordered into the field, serving during the fall and winter in western Missouri, taking part in many severe actions. On Nov. 11th, Cos. “A” “B” & “H”, under Lt. Col. Anthony fought with a Rebel force outnumbering their own, four to one, destroyed its camp and captured all its horses. The 3 Companies lost 9 men killed and 32 wounded. In the spring of 1862 the regiment was embarked on transport, ordered to Pittsburg Landing, to report to Gen. Halleck, operating against Corinth, Miss. The order was changed, and the troops landed at Columbus, Ky., and employed in guarding working parties repairing Ohio and Mobile RR. Regiment did not arrive at Corinth till July 10th ’62 was then sent to Rienzi, Miss., the extreme outpost of the Army of Miss., and assigned to 1st Cav. Brigade, under command of Col. Philip H. Sheridan. From July 23rd to Sept. 30th, when the post was finally evacuated, the men were constantly in the saddle and engaged in severe skirmishes. This summer, in Miss. Scorching climate, was one of the most trying in Capt. Pitts’ military experience. He had formed a warm admiration for “gallant little Phil. Sheridan”. Sent to harass Van Dorn during his march to Corinth, the 7th hung on his flanks till Oct. 3rd, when it passed round his force into Corinth, in time to take part in the terrible battle of Oct. 4th. During the entire pursuit of the fleeing army the 7th held the advance, and killed and captured a large number of the enemy. From Ripley, Miss. The regiment returned to Corinth, whence it was sent into Alabama, on an expedition under Col. A. L. Lee, again having the advance. The enemy was driven from Buzzard Road Station with great loss of its force. Returning to Corinth the Regt. was sent immediately to Grand Junction, Tenn. to join Gen. Grant’s army. In a reconnaissance made Nov. 8th ’62 under Col. Lee, the 7th led the advance, and near LaMar, Tenn., met a column of Rebel cavalry, 6000 strong; after a spirited skirmish the entire Rebel force fled in confusion, leaving 20 dead and 300 wounded and prisoners. This defeat caused the retreat of the entire Rebel command beyond Holly Springs. In a subsequent raid by Col. Lee, the 7th leading the garrison, Holly Springs was completely routed. The Regt. occupied the extreme advance a greater portion of the time during the campaign performing signal service at the crossing of the Tallahatchie, and being the first to cross after the Rebels evacuated their stronghold. It led the advance into Oxford, Miss., which was gained after severe fighting. It was the first into Water Valley; also had the advance into Coffeyville, Dec. 5th, where 4000 cavalry, 30 miles in advance of the infantry, engaged 10,000 Rebel infantry, and only fell back from the field when nearly surrounded. Moving back to Water Valley, the cavalry command remained there till Dec. 15th, when ordered in pursuit of Van Dorn, moving against Holly Springs.  Though marching night and day the town was captured and government stores destroyed before arrival of cavalry. Pursuit continued into Tenn. and Van Dorn’s forces driven to Pontotoc, Miss., with a loss to him of many prisoners. Dec. 31st the regiment moved to Moscow, Tenn., and guarded the Memphis & Charleston RR till April 14th 1863. Returning to Corinth the regiment took part in the movement upon Tuscumbia, Ala., which resulted in driving Gen. Rodney from the town, and overtaking and thoroughly whipping his army at Leighton. At Tripelo on May 5th the brigade drove the Rebels from town and occupied the place. In the afternoon a force of Rebel cavalry was reported advancing, and a portion of the 7th including Co. “D”, dismounted, was sent to meet it. Creeping through the timber they came suddenly upon the Rebels, opened a heavy fire, sending them flying in confusion, leaving a large number dead and wounded. From May 9th ’63 till Jan. 18th ’64 the regiment was stationed at Corinth, almost lived in the saddle, took part in many actions. Time and space fail to more than mentions the names of Florence, Ala., Iuka, Byhalia, Wyatt and Ripley, Miss. Jan. 1st 1864, while bivouacked at La Grange, Tenn., without shelter to protect the men from the sleet and cold, many suffering severely from frozen feet, four fifths of the 7th Kansas re-enlisted as Veteran Volunteers; first to re-enlist in the District of West Tenn. On Jan. 18th Camp at Corinth was broken up and the regiment ordered to Memphis, where the veterans were re-mustered, thence proceeded to Leavenworth, Kansas, where they were furloughed for 30 days. This was Capt. Pitts first furlough, and he had never been off duty but ten days, when confined to his tent, by very painful attack of neuralgia of the scalp. He visited his Mansfield friends during this furlough. Re-assembling at Leavenworth, the regiment was sent to St. Louis to be re-equipped, then to Memphis to the old work of guarding railroads. Sent to help retard Forrest’s advance on Gen. Smith, on July 13th the regiment was constantly engaged from 5 a.m. till 8 p.m., at times holding in check the entire force of the enemy; it occupied a position on the right flank during the 14th & 15th when the battle of Tupelo was fought. August 1st Gen. Smith again moved against Forrest, and the 7th took a conspicuous part, being engaged in all the principal actions of the campaign, including the severe battle of Hurricane Creek, Aug. 16th. Ordered to report to Gen. Roscerans it arrived in St. Louis in Sept. ’64, took an active part in the campaign in Mo. Against Gen. Price. At the end of this campaign was set to fighting guerrillas in the St. Louis district. Early in ’65 Capt. Pitts was ordered upon a Court Martial Board in St. Louis, and spent all that long, hot summer in studying military law and administering justice. When his regiment was ordered west to fight Indians he begged and received permission to re-join it. But two days after its or his arrival at Ft. Kearney it received orders to return to Ft. Leavenworth to be mustered out of service. On Sept. 29th Capt. Pitts received his honorable discharge. He subsequently made his home in Mansfield, where he died Oct. 2nd 1891.
I certify that the sketch of his war service as above written is true as I verily believe, being compiled from official sources and original documents. DATED Dec. 15th 1913. SIGNED BY Fannie Bixby Pitts, his widow. – GAR48 pp.90, 290, 291

DANIEL H. PITTS was born the 11th day of May 1839 in Mansfield, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted April 1861 in Co. K, 5th PA Reserves and served with his regiment until June 1864. Among other battles he participated in the Seven Days fight before Richmond and the battles of the Wilderness where he was wounded in the right arm. After his discharge from the service he became Sutler of the 7th Kansas Cavalry and continued as such until the close of the war. This regiment was organized at Camp Curtin June 20th ’61 with the following officers, John I, Gregg, Colonel; Joseph W. Fisher Lt. Col; and George Dare, Major; Capt. Seneca O. Simmons was soon appointed in place of Colonel Gregg who was transferred. In addition to the battles mentioned above the regiment took part in the following battles and engagements, Seven Days Battles, Gaines Mills, Charles City Cross Roads, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, Brentzville. After the battle of the Wilderness the regiment took part in the series of engagements which lasted until the end of May 1865 when the term of service of the men having expires. They proceeded to Harrisburg where they were mustered out. They served for three years with great gallantry and were always in the thickest of the fray. – GAR48 p.242

WILLIAM L. PITTS was born in Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted April 22nd 1861 as a private in Co. E, 1st PA R. C. and later served as a private in Co E., 190th PA Veterans. He was honorably discharged June 28th 1865. Company “E” was originally known as the “Tioga Rifles” and were composed mostly of lumbermen and mountaineers. The men were hardy and good shots and were later known as the Bucktails, each man wearing a Bucktail on his cap. It could be relied upon no matter how desperate the situation but it especially distinguished itself in the battles of Drainsville, upon the Peninsula, Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Bethesda Church where the killed and captured of the enemy exceeded the total strength of the regiment in action. Alansen E. Niles of Wellsboro, became Colonel of the regiment and those who re-enlisted for the balance of the war composed the 190th & 191st Regiments PA Volunteers, the 190th being commanded by Colonel Hartshorn of the Bucktails. The 190th regiment was organized in the field in Virginia in March and April 1864 and took part in engagements in Petersburg, Weldon RR, Chapel House and Hatcher’s Run. ALMOND PITTS of Whitneyville, father of the above William L. Pitts, enlisted and served in the war in Co. G, 45th PA Vol. In June 1904 they both attended the Tioga County Centennial together at the ages of 86 and 60 years, respectively. - GAR48 p.159

HENRY POST was born in Schoharie County, New York. He enlisted (Civil war records state age as 22) August 4th 1862 as a private in Co. D, 7th NY Artillery. He was discharged June 16th 1865 on account of close of war. This regiment was recruited by Col. Lewis O. Morris and was organized at Albany, NY, and there mustered into the service on Aug. 18th 1862 for a term of three years. It was known as the Albany County Regiment of Seymour Guard. Richard C. Duryea also served as Colonel and John Hastings and Joseph M. Murphy were Lt. Colonels. The Majors were, Edward A. Springsteed, E. Willard Smith, Francis Pruyn, Samuel L. Anable, Abram Sickles, John F. Mount and Charles W. Hobbs. The officers of Company “D” were Captains, Charles McCulloch, Charles W. Hobbs and Christian Schurr; 1st Lts., were Frederick E. Scripture, William J. Storey and James Flanigan; 2nd Lts. Were Henry C. Coulson, George B. Smeatlie, Peter B. Mochrie, Stephen Treadwell, George W. Weed and George Beattie. They took part in the following battles and engagements, Spotsylvania, Harris House, Milford Station, North Anna, Totopotomay, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Reams Station and Hatcher’s Run. They lost in the service 18 officers and 659 enlisted men, a total of 677. They were honorably discharged and mustered out at F. Federal Hill, Baltimore, MD, on August 1st 1865. – GAR48 p.150

OSMAN A. PRATT was born in Addison, Vermont. He enlisted August 26th 1861 as a private in Co. D, 11th PA Inf., and was discharged Nov. 20th 1862 on account of gunshot wound received in lungs, knee and cheek, at Antietam. He died at Mansfield, PA, April 16th 1880 and is buried in Prospect Cemetery. He took part in seven battles during his Army Service. Early in April 1861 the 11th Regiment was organized as a three months regiment under the first call for troops by the President. The part it played in the most sanguinary national tragedy of the century was both important and conspicuous. Entering the service at the beginning, and continuing to the end participating in the first and last battles of the war, its very name became the synonym of patriotism and bravery. It took part in the battle of Falling Waters, VA, which was the first infantry fight of the war and it was the first Pennsylvania regiment to reorganize for three years service. On July 25th 1861 by official order of the Secretary of War, its services as a regimental organization were formally accepted. At Gettysburg it took part in the three days fight and especially distinguished itself, it was also in both battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Petersburg, taking part in the first and last battles of the war it had a glorious record and was one of the most faithful of the military organizations in the field. – GAR48 p.123

CARL PRESIT was born in Germany. He enlisted Sept. 29th 1861 as a private in Co. G, 45th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged Aug. 23rd 1865. His company was recruited in Tioga County and its Captains were Nelson Whitney and Reese C. Richards. The regiment was formed in October 1861 on the second call by the Government for volunteers after the first battle of Bull Run. Thomas J. Welch of Lancaster County was its Colonel. It saw service both in the eastern and western armies and was engaged in the battles of James Island, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson Blue Springs, Campbell Station, Siege of Knoxville, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Anna, Mine Explosion, Weldon RR, Poplar Spring Church, Hatcher’s Run and capture of Petersburg, and Appomattox. The regiment was noted for its splendid discipline and bravery of its men. After Lee’s surrender it took part in the Grand Review held at Washington, DC, May 22nd & 23rd 1865 and on July 17th 1865 was mustered out of service. The subject of this sketch re-enlisted Jan. 1st 1864, was wounded at Spotsylvania May 14th 1864; was transferred to Veteran