Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
G.A.R. Post No. 48, Mansfield PA
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

G.A.R. Post No. 48 in 1910
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CHARLES H. RAMSDELL was born in Swanzey, New Hampshire. He enlisted July 5th 1861 as a private in Co. H, 35th NY Vol., and was discharged May 11th 1862 on account of wound. His regiment was recruited by Col. William C. Brown, was organized at Elmira, NY, and there mustered into the service on June 11th 1861 for a term of two years. On May 18th 1863 the three-year men of the regiment were transferred to the 80th Infantry. The others who served as Colonels of the regiment were Newton B. Lord and John G. Todd. The Lt. Colonels were Steven L. Potter, Bradley Winslow, and David M. Evans. The Majors were Newton B. Lord and Sidney J. Mendall. The officers of Company “H” were Captains, John G. Todd, James R. Barnetts, William W. Beckwith; 1st Lts., Edwin D. Messinger; 2nd Lts. Were George C. Brown and Edwin C. Frink. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Halls Hill, Gen. Popes Campaign, Rappahannock River, Sulphur Springs, Gainesville, Grouton, Bull Run, Fairfax Court House, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. The regiment lost in service, one officer and 99 enlisted men, a total of 100. They were honorably discharged and mustered out, under Col. John C. Todd on June 5th 1863 at Elmira, NY. They were also known as the Jefferson County Regiment. – GAR48 p.146

JOSEPH E. RAMSDELL was born in Swanzey, New Hampshire. He enlisted April 23rd 1861 as a private in Co. H, 6th PA R. C. He afterwards served as Bugler in Co. A, 1st PA Artillery and was honorably discharged July 25th 1865. The “Tioga Invincibles” as it was called in which he enlisted became Co. H. of the 35th Regiment, 6th Reserves. Its initial engagement was fought at Dranesville, Dec. 20th 1861 and resulted in a victory. It afterwards participated in the following engagements, Malvern Hill, Gaines Mills, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, Spotsylvania and Bethesda Church. In its last engagement although but 150 strong it captured 102 and buried 72 dead Rebels on its front. The Company officers were Julius Sherwood and James Carle, Captains; Capt. Carle later being promoted to Colonel. The Lts. Were John W. Rose, Reuben Pratt, John Hinman, S.S. Rockwell, James B. Goodman and Frank A. Foster all of Tioga County. He is buried in Hope Cemetery, at Mansfield, Tioga County, PA. Company “A”, 1st Artillery was the first to be engaged at Dranesville, Dec. 29th 1861. It subsequently accompanied the Reserves to Fredericksburg, where it remained on duty until the battle of Fair Oaks, when it rejoined the Army of the Potomac. It was at Mechanicsville, Gaines Mills, Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Deep Bottom, Fort Darling and Petersburg. Upon the fall of Richmond and after the surrender, they marched into the fallen city and demolished Rebel defenses and arsenals. – GAR48 p.147

ABIJAH S. REYNOLDS was born the 3rd day of May 1842 in Sullivan Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Aug. 20th 1862, as a private in Co. A, 14th U.S. Infantry, was promoted to Corporal and honorably discharged August 20th 1865 on account of expiration of term of service. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville, VA, Gettysburg, PA, Mine Run, VA, Bristoe and Rappahannock Stations and battle of the Wilderness. He was taken prisoner May 5th 1864 at the battle of the Wilderness by troops of the Rebel Gen. Gordon. He was confined in the prisons of Lynchburg and Danville, VA, Andersonville, GA, and Florence, SC. The Rebels tried to delay the capture of Wilmington by making it a point for the exchange of prisoners. Reynolds and his fellow prisoners were run over the road between Wilmington and Goldsboro three times before being paroled. He was discharged from the prison at Florence, on parole, Feb. 25th 1865. At the battle of Gettysburg he was one of nine men composing the color guard, seven of whom were killed or wounded. Himself and one other escaped whole but with nine ball marks on their persons and clothing. In front of Little Round Top, on July 2nd, nearly half his regiment was lost in the space of twenty-five minutes, Reynolds again escaping by a miracle, as his canteen was blown to fragments on his left hip. – GAR48 p.185

SEYMOUR G. RHINEVAULT was born the 1st day of Sept. 1815 in Dutchess County, New York. He enlisted Nov. 22nd 1861, as a Major in 86th NY Vol. He resigned Jan. 23rd 1863. He first entered the service at Woodhull, NY as a Captain in the above regiment and was later promoted to the rank of Major. He served eighteen months, was then injured and had to resign his commission. Some of his intimates in the service were 1st Lt. C. H. Womburgh, 2nd Lt. John N. Warner, 1st Sergt. J. L. Wildrick, 1st Corporal G. E. Meering. His regiment under Colonel Benajah P. Bailey was organized at Elmira, NY, Nov. 23rd 1861 and there mustered into the service for three years Nov. 20th-23rd 1861. The officers of his regiment were Benjamin L. Higgins as Colonel; Barna J. Chapin, Jacob H. Lansing, Michael B. Stafford and Nathan H. Vincent at Lt. Colonels. The other Major besides the author were Luzerne Todd. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Bull Run, Manassas Gap, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Brandy Station, Gettysburg, Locust Grove, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, North Anna, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Hatcher’s Run, Appomattox Campaign. They lost in the service 17 officers and 310 enlisted men, a total of 327. They were known as the “Steuben Rangers” and were honorably discharged and mustered out, commanded by Colonel Nathan H. Vincent, June 27th 1865 near Washington, DC. – GAR48 p.186

OBEDIAH RICHMOND was born in Sullivan Township, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Sept. 28th 1861 as a private in Co. A, 5th U.S. Cavalry, and was discharged Nov. 5th 1862, on account of physical disability. – GAR48 p.175

L.A. Ridgeway

L.A. Ridgeway was born in Rome, PA and he enlisted July 3, 1863 as a Hospital Steward in 35th Pa. Militia and was discharged on account of physical disability, August 2, 1863. This Regiment was known as "Emergency Men" and was raised on the call of War Governor or Penna., Andrew G. Curtin, prior to the battle of Gettysburg on Lee’s invasion of Pennsylvania. The reg’t was not concentrated in time to take part in the battle.


L. A. RIDGEWAY was born in Rome, Pennsylvania. He enlisted July 3rd 1863 as Hospital Steward in 35th PA Militia and was discharged on account of physical disability, August 2nd 1863. This regiment was known as “Emergency Men” and was raised on the call of the War Governor of Pennsylvania, Andrew G. Curtin, prior to the battle of Gettysburg, on Lee’s invasion of Pennsylvania. The regiment was not concentrated in time to take part in the battle. The Lt. Colonel was E. G. Schiefflin of Tioga County. His Company “E” was raised at Wellsboro, Tioga County, PA and had the following officers on July 21st 1863. Captain Morgan L. Bacon; 1st Lt. John S. Murdough; 2nd Lt. Abram B. Dewitt. With the close of Morgan's raid after the battle of Gettysburg ended the Rebel invasion of the north of 1863. Further service for which the militia had been called was no longer required and during the months of August and September the majority of the men were mustered out. With few exceptions they were not brought to mortal combat, but they nevertheless rendered most important service and they came forward at a moment of pressing need and their presence gave great moral support to the Union Army at Gettysburg. If they had been defeated they would have taken their places as needed.  – GAR48 p.106

ALFRED RIPLEY was born in Sullivan Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Sept. 5th 1864 as a private in Co. H. 15th (NY) Engineers and was honorably discharged July 7th 1865. – GAR48 p.230

Homer J. Ripley

Homer J. Ripley was born in 1839 in Richmond Township and enlisted Aug. 27, 1862 at Mainesburg, Pa., as a private in Co. F 2nd Bat. 14 U.S. Infantry. He was successively promoted to Sgt. Com., Sgt. Lt., and Captain. He was in hospitals at Washington, DC and Philadelphia, Pa., two months during 1863, with malarial fever, and was furloughed for ten days in Sept., from the latter city. He fought at Chancellorsville, but the balance of his service consisted of scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was transferred March 21, 1866 to Co. D 32nd U.S. Inf., in Arizona territory. He was adjutant of 3rd Bat. 14 u>s> Inf., from promotion to Lt., in 1865 to date of Capt.’s Comm., in Sept. 1867. He resigned from the service in Indian Territory Jan. 1, 1871. Homer Ripley joined GAR Post No. 48, April 5, 1876.



HOMER J. RIPLEY was born the 8th day of Dec. 1839 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Aug. 27th 1862 at Mainesburg, PA, as a private in Co. F, 2nd Bat. 14th U.S. Inf. He was successively promoted to Sergt., Com. Sergt., Lt., and Capt. He was in the hospitals at Washington DC and Philadelphia, PA, two months during 1863 with malarial fever, and was furloughed for ten days in Sept. from the latter city. He fought at Chancellorsville, but the balance of his service consisted of scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was transferred, Mar. 21st 1866 to Co. D, 32nd U.S. Inf., in Arizona Territory. He was Adjutant of 3rd Bat., 14th U. S. Inf., and 32nd U. S. Inf., from promotion to Lt., in 1865 to date of Capt. Commission in Sept. 1867. He resigned from the service in Indian Territory Jan. 1st 1871. HOMER J. RIPLEY joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on April 5th 1876. SIGNED BY  H.C. Bailey, Commander. – GAR48 p.54

JOSEPH F. RIPLEY was born in Richmond Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Sept. 12th 1864 as a private in Co. K, 210th PA Vol., was promoted to Corporal and was honorably discharged June 3rd 1865. He was wounded at Gravelly Run, VA Mar. 31st 1865. In their first engagement at Hatcher’s Run they suffered only a small loss and after this battle they participated in the Bellefield Raid which lasted for a week during which time they destroyed the Weldon RR as they went together with Station Houses and stores of the Rebel Government. They then saw action at Dabney’s Mills, in which they displayed great gallantry, sustaining considerable losses in killed, wounded and missing. After this action they took part in the three-day action at Gravelly Run taking the advance in this fiery struggle, sustaining heavy losses. The entire loss in this action was thirty-five killed, one hundred and fifteen wounded and one hundred and fifty missing. In the fierce fighting of April 1865 they took a part and in a charge up on the enemies works displayed their wonted courage. With the Corps they followed closely the retreating enemy and at Appomattox Court House, was upon the front line to the last, the flag of truce passing thru their lines. After the surrender of Lee they took part in the Grand Review at Washington, DC, and were then shortly after mustered out. -–GAR48 p.152

Volney Ripley

Volney Ripley was born in October 1843 in Richmond Township. He enlisted as a private in Co. K 210th Pa. Vol. Infantry. He was captured March 31, 1865 at White Oak Road, Va., was robbed, paroled and sent to Annapolis, Md., where on April 1865 he was furloughed for 30 days. He took part in the Weldon Raid, White Oak Road, Va., and considerable scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged from service at Annapolis, Md., May 29, 1865. Volney Ripley joined General Mansfield Post No. 48 April 21, 1884, was Junior Vice Commander six years and Officer of the Guard.

Soon after its organization the 210th Regt., was ordered to join the Army of the Potomac before Petersburg. It was engaged for the first time at Hatchers Run but suffered only a small loss. It took part in the Bluefield Raid which lasted a week and during which they destroyed the Weldon Railroad. They were in action at Dabney’s Mills. The regiment displayed great gallantry, also at Gravelly Run action of three days duration they were at the forefront of the action and sustained great loss from the fiery struggle through which it was called to pass. The entire loss was 35 killed, 115 wounded and 150 missing. With the Corps, it followed closely the retreating army and at Appomatox Court House was upon the first line to the last.



VOLNEY RIPLEY was born the 5th day of October 1843 in Richmond Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted at Mansfield, PA Sept. 12th 1864 as a private in Co. K, 210th PA Vol. Infantry. He was captured Mar. 31st 1865 at White Oak Road, VA, was robbed, paroled and sent to Annapolis, MD, where on April 10th 1865 he was furloughed for thirty days. He took part in the Weldon Raid White Oak Road, VA and considerable scouting, skirmishing, guard and garrison duty. He was honorably discharged from service at Annapolis, MD May 29th 1865. Soon after its organization, 210th regiment, it was ordered to join the Army of the Potomac before Petersburg. It was engaged for the first time at Hatcher’s Run but suffered only a small loss. It took part in the Bellefield Raid which lasted a week and during which they destroyed the Weldon RR. They were in action at Dabney’s Mills, the regiment displaying great gallantry, also at Gravelly Run action of three days duration being at the forefront of the action and sustaining great loss from this fiery struggle thru which it was called to pass. The entire loss was thirty-five killed, one hundred and fifteen wounded and one hundred and fifty missing. With the Corps, it followed closely the retreating army and at Appomattox Court House was upon the front line to the last.  I certify that the sketch of my War Service as above written is true as I verily believe, Aug. 1914. SIGNED BY Volney Ripley.   VOLNEY RIPLEY joined Gen. Mansfield Post No. 48 on Apr. 21st 1884 and held offices of Junior Vice Commander for six years and Officer of the Guard. SIGNED BY H.C. Bailey, Adjutant; W.H. Colony, Commander. – GAR48 p.53

CHARLES M. RUMSEY was born the 30th day of July 1837 in Sullivan Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Oct. 14th 1861 as a private in Co. C, 7th PA Cavalry and was honorably discharged Nov. 1st 1864 at Columbia, Tenn., at expiration of term of service. Was wounded May 5th 1862 at Lebanon, Tenn.; was captured May 18th by Lt. Myers Company of Morgan’s Cavalry while sick near Sparta, Tenn., and paroled there; was in parole camp at Annapolis, MD nearly a year before being exchanged; was three day in Battle of Chickamauga, Hills Cove, Woodberry, Pulaski, Tenn., and other skirmishes; was Clerk in Division Commissary at Huntsville, Alabama the last 6 months of my enlistment. Some of my comrades were, Noah J. Wheeler, Morrison D. Rose, Fordyce S. Morgan, Adam Cleveland, William H. Colony, Uri Verbeck, Lyman Reynolds, etc. At the battle of Lebanon his horse was shot from under him and he was severely injured. While recovering from his injuries in a house nearby he was captured by the Rebels and sent to Annapolis, MD. He was finally paroled. During his Army Service he acted as a clerk in the Commissary Department in Alabama for one year. He died in Mansfield, Tioga County, PA. His Company was recruited in Bradford and Tioga Counties and had as its first Lts. A.J.B. Dartt and Charles C. Hermans; and 2nd Lt. Henry D. Calkins. His regiment was highly trained and was known as “The Saber Regiment” because it fought so much at close quarters. At. Shelbyville it captured defended entrenchments, the first time in the war that this was done. – GAR48 p.149

Charles Rundell

Charles Rundell was born in Canton, PA. He enlisted Oct. 8, 1861 as a private in Co. G 7th Pa. Cavalry and was honorably discharged Nov. 1, 1864. He was a member of the famed "Saber Regiment" assigned to service in Tennessee.


CHARLES RUNDELL was born in Canton, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Oct. 8th 1861 as a private in Co. G, 7th PA Cavalry and was honorably discharged, Nov. 1st 1864. His regiment was assigned to service in Tennessee, participating in a number of sharp engagements during 1862, also in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. It fought so much at close quarters that it was known as “The Saber Regiment” and at Shelbyville made and captured fortifications in a charge that were built to resist infantry. This was the first time during the war that defended entrenchments were captured by mounted cavalry. This regiment was commanded by that fine soldier Colonel George C. Wynkoop who brought it to a high state of discipline and efficiency. His Company “G” was recruited in Tioga, Chester and Lycoming Counties and its 1st Lt., was James W. Childs. Their outstanding exploit in the closing days of the war was the pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis at Irwinsville, GA, on May 11th 1865. After Davis had made a desperate attempt to get out of the country leaving Richmond before Lee’s surrender and evacuation of the capital on April 2nd 1865. At Selma, Ala., they also distinguished themselves by dismounting and charging in single line without support works, which they captured and drove out the enemy. – GAR48 p.117

ROBERT G. SHELTON was born in Buckingham, England. He enlisted March 31st 1864, as a private in Co. I, 187th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged Aug. 3rd 1865. His regiment was formed by the re-enlistment and completion of the 1st Battalion of six months volunteers. It was brigaded after the battle of Cold Harbor with the “Bucktails Brigade”. Colonel Joshua L. Chamberlain commanding. Its next engagement was at Petersburg where it engaged in an assault upon the enemy’s right, the regiment being led by Major Merrick of Wellsboro, who received two wounds. It took part in the funeral obsequies of President Lincoln and was assigned to the head of the procession on its way from the Baltimore Depot to Independence Hall at Philadelphia. It was left as a guard of honor while the remains lay in state. With the First City Troop it was detailed to escort the remains from Independence Hall to the New York depot. Company “I” was made up principally of men from Tioga and Bradford Counties. Its Captain was Ransford B. Webb and Monroe P. Crosby, 1st Lt., of Tioga County. This regiment was originally organized at Camp Curtin in March 1864 with Joseph F. Ramsey, Lt. Colonel and George W. Merrick of Tioga County as Major. Merrick especially distinguishing himself at the assault on Ft. Hill, at Petersburg, VA, June 18th 1864. – GAR48 p.177

CHARLES N. SHEPARD was born in Newark, New Jersey. He enlisted Feb. 1864 as a private in Co. C, 11th PA Cavalry and was discharged May 20th 1865 on account of disability, resulting from a gunshot wound in the left ankle received at Petersburg, VA. This regiment was originally known as “Harlan’s Light Cavalry” and was raised during August and September 1861 as an independent regiment by Col. Josiah Harlan of Philadelphia under special authority from the Secretary of War. It served with distinction in the battles in Virginia and was frequently used in scouting service. It was mustered out of service Aug. 13th 1865. The regimental officers were Colonel Josiah Harlan, Samuel P. Spear, Lt. Colonel, George Stetzel, Samuel Witherell and Noah M. Runyan, Majors. It was finally mustered into the service as the 11th Cavalry as Congress only authorized the raising of regiments by states. It achieved a high reputation as an active and efficient scouting regiment and it re-enlisted in November 1864 and was conspicuous among the Cavalry, which under Gen. Sheridan pursued the Rebels at Appomattox. They took part in the following battles and engagements, Beaver Dam, Franklin, Siege of Suffolk, South Anna River, Ashland, Stony Creek, Weldon RR, Jerusalem Plank Road, Petersburg, Staunton River, Reams Station, Richmond, Five Forks, White Oak Road, Deep Creek, Amelia Court House, Appomattox and many minor affairs. – GAR48 p.119

HARLIN D. SHEPARD was born in Newark, New Jersey. He enlisted Jan. 26th 1864 as a private in Co. C, 11th PA Cavalry, and was honorably discharged Aug. 13th 1865. This regiment was originally known as “Harlan’s Light Cavalry” and was raised by Josiah Harlan of Philadelphia as an independent command under special authority of the Secretary of War during the months of August and September 1864. It was assigned to the Army of the Potomac and participated in numerous engagements and skirmishes and was engaged in a lot of scouting duty. It was finally mustered in with the following regimental officers, Josiah Harlan, Colonel, Samuel P. Spear, Lt. Colonel, George Stetzel, Samuel Witherell and Noah M. Runyan as Majors. The Company “C” and also the entire regiments was largely recruited from Pennsylvania. He (Harlin Shepard) is buried in Hope Cemetery at Mansfield, Tioga County, PA. His regiment took part in the following battles and engagements, “Deserted House”, Franklin and Suffolk, Cassville and Beaver Dams, South Anna, Blackwater, Petersburg, Fair Oaks, Reams Station, James River, Richmond, New Market Heights, Five Forks, Hanover Court House and Red Oak Church. When the regiment’s term of enlistment expired in 1863, more than 400 men re-enlisted thus preserving the organization. – GAR48 p.140

BENJAMIN P. SHERMAN was born the 28th day of March 1845 in Rutland Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted August 25th 1864 as a Corporal in Co. A, 207th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged May 31st 1865 at Alexandria, VA. This company was recruited in Tioga County and had as its Lt. Colonel William W.S. Snoddy, and the Captain, Victor A. Elliott. The regiment was organized by Major Robert C. Cox, afterward Colonel of the regiment and later Brig. General. He was commissioned by Governor Curtin to do this and the organization was completed at Harrisburg. It was composed of a larger number of Tioga County men than any other single organization in the army and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the recapture of Fort Stedman and the capture of a large part of General Gordon’s Division, which had captured it during the night. It stormed these works with the greatest gallantry. It took part in the closing scenes of the war at Hatcher’s Run and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. On March 1865 it presented to its Colonel Robert C. Cox a horse and equipment valued at $550.00 in token of their esteem. B.P. Sherman’s intimate comrades were Wesley Reynolds, Charles Hulslander, Charles Stage, George Van Ness, David Stone and Stephen Androus. – GAR48 p.211

IRA SMITH was born the 29th day of Aug. 1842 in Rutland Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted on Aug. 29th 1862 for three years, as a private in the 14th U.S. Vol. Infantry. He was sent to camp at New London. At camp he was injured in the shoulder by a fall from a horse and was discharged on a Surgeon’s Certificate of disability on Nov. 1st 1862. He died at Mansfield, Tioga County, PA on Mar. 28th 1932. This regiment was formed at Camp Curtin of companies from all part of the state. The regimental officers were John W. Johnson, Colonel of Youngstown, Richard M. Michael of Reading, Lt. Colonel, Charles N. Watts of Carlisle, Major, and Joseph A. McLean of Reading, Adj. It was organized at Camp Curtin, proceeded from there to Camp Johnson and from there to Chambersburg. On the 16th of June 1861 they advanced to Sharptown and from there to Sharpsburg doing guard and picket duty there until July 2nd when they crossed the Potomac. They encamped near Martinsburg and marched from there to Bunker Hill in search of the Rebels. On the Thursday following they marched to Charleston and on Sunday to Harpers Ferry where the first news of the battle of Bull Run was received. Their term of enlistment having expired they were ordered to Harrisburg and from there to Carlisle remaining about two weeks. Here they were mustered out of service. – GAR48 p.243

Ira SMITH - Ira was the last Civil War soldier to die in Mansfield. He received medical discharge after only three months of service. He was injured when he fell from a horse while on duty. Ira was a wagon maker and had a shop in Mansfield at the Corey Creek bridge on North Main Street. [NOTE: Jonathan Lownsbury did not die until 1937, but he died in Jersey Shore]
Newspaper account: The residence of Ira SMITH, at Elk Run, burned on Tuesday the 20th inst. Most of the contents were burned. There was no insurance and the loss falls heavily on Mr. Smith. It was reported he had $1,800 insurance, but it was a mistake. The friends of Mr. Smith are trying to help him in putting up a new house, by donating money, lumber, shingles or anything that will go towards building a house.

GEORGE A. SPRING was born the 24th day of Sept. 1839 in Bloomfield, New York. He enlisted May 21st 1861 as a private in Co. G, 27th NY Vol. And was honorably discharged May 21st 1863. He was commissioned as Corporal on June 21st 1862 and was first discharged on May 31st 1863 on account of disability having been wounded in battle. The lobe of his right lung having been shot away. He was afterwards employed by the Government as an Ambulance and Commissary train driver until the end of the war. Some of his intimate soldiers in arms were David Willys, Thomas Willboughy and Thomas E. Service. This regiment was organized at Elmira, NY by Colonel Henry W. Slocum and was there mustered into the service for two years July 9th & 10th, to date from May 21st 1861. It was known as the “Union Regiment”. Joseph J. Bartlett and Alexander D. Adams also served as Colonels, Joseph J. Chambers and Joseph H. Bodine as Lt. Colonels, Majors were, Curtis G. Gardiner and George W. Wanzer. His company officers were, Captains, James Perkins, Phil D. Phillips, H.S. Hall, 1st Lts., Seymour Pierce and Charles Rock, 2nd Lts. John R. Briggs and Edward H. Brady. They took part in the following battles and engagements, Bull Run, Pohick Church, Westpoint, Mechanicsville, Seven Days Battles, Gaines Mills, Garnett’s and Golding’s Farms, Glendale, Malvern Hill, Crampton’s Pass, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Franklin Crossing, Marye’s Heights and Salem Church. – GAR48 p.161

LUTHER S. TOWNSEND was born in Steuben County, New York. He enlisted as a Corporal in Co. I, 23rd NY Infantry and was honorably discharged May 22nd, 1863. His regiment with its Colonel Henry C. Hoffman was mustered into the service for two years on July 2nd 1861 at Elmira, NY, where it was organized. The Lt. Colonel was Nirom M. Crane and Major William M. Gregg. The officer of his Company “I” were James M. Chapman, Captain; Albert O. Durland, 1st Lt.; and Samuel W. Cass, 2nd Lt. They took part in the following battles and engagements, Falls Church, Ball’s Cross Roads, Munson’s Hill, Bowling Green Road, Orange Court House, Gen. Pope’s Campaign, Rappahannock River, Sulphur Springs, Gainesville, Graveton, Bull Run, Fairfax Court House, South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. During its service they lost 2 officers and 70 enlisted men making a total of 72. They were honorably discharged and mustered out on May 22nd 1863 at Elmira NY under Colonel Henry C. Hoffman. The three-year men of the regiment, a few in Company “B” were transferred to the 80th NY Volunteer, May 29th 1863. – GAR48 p.135

HENRY HARVEY Van NOCKEN enlisted August 29th 1862 as a private in Co. H, 14th U.S. Infantry and was honorably discharged Aug. 29th 1865. His regiment was in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Bristoe and Rappahannock Stations, also battle of the Wilderness. In the battle of Gettysburg in front of Little Round Top, on July 2nd nearly half of the regiment were lost in the space of twenty-five minutes. – GAR48 p.198

CHARLES H. VEIL was born the 4th day of February 1842 in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted June 13th 1861 as a private in Co. G, 9th PA R.V. He was promoted Major of 1 U.S. Cavalry and was finally honorably discharged Feb. 1871. He was in the battle of Gettysburg and helped bear the body of Gen. John F. Reynolds from the field after he was shot. He was orderly to Gen. Reynolds at the age of 18 years. He was a private until July 1863. He took part in the battles before Richmond, Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg where he prevented General Reynolds’ body from falling into the hands of the Rebels. He was presented a gold watch by General Meade, sent to him by the sisters of General Reynolds, and also was appointed 2nd Lieutenant thru their intercessory for him to Pres. Lincoln. He was in Sheridan’s command after Gettysburg and was in the battles of Todd Tavern, Spotsylvania Court House, and was brevetted 1st Lt. For bravery at Todd Tavern, his first cavalry battle as an officer. He was in the race to Richmond and the James River and was in the battles of Yellow Tavern and the crossing of the Chickahominy, Cold Harbor, Trevilian Station, Shenandoah Valley Campaign, Winchester, Fishers Hill, Cedar Creek, Woodstock Races, Petersburg, Five Forks, Sailor’s Creek and Appomattox Court House. He was brevetted Captain for gallantry at Five Forks and later on Major. After Appomattox he operated against Gen. Kirby in Texas. He then was sent to San Francisco, from there he went to Arizona in the Apache Campaign. He was mustered out of service at Camp McDowell in 1871. – GAR48 p.235

GEORGE WATSON was born in Green, Chenango County, New York. He enlisted Dec. 2nd 1861(Civil War record, enlisted at age 23) as a private in Co. K, 64th NY Volunteers and was honorably discharged June 1865. His regiment was recruited and organized at Elmira, NY on Nov. 13th 1861 for a term of three years. The 64th State Militia formed the nucleus of the regiment, which was called the “First Cattaraugus”. The Colonels were Thomas J. Parker, Daniel G. Bingham, William Glenny; Major, Theodore Tyrer.  The Company officers were, Captains, William Fancher, Horatio N. Hunt; 1st Lts., Charles Sovle, James B. Morrow; 2nd Lts., Nathaniel F. Cooper, William W. Henry. This Company was recruited principally at Leon, NY. They participated in the following battles and engagements, Siege of Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Seven Day Battles, Gaines Mills, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp Bridge, Glendale, Malvern Hill, Centerville, Antietam, Charleston, Manassas Gap, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Williamsport (MD), Snickers Gap, Auburn, Bristoe Station, Mine Run, Robertson Tavern, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Po River, Salient,  Landron House, North Anna, Totopotomay, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon RR, Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Reams Station, Hatcher’s Run, Appomattox Campaign, White Oak Ridge, Deatonsville Road, Farmville, Appomattox Court House. They lost in the service 18 officers and 283 enlisted men and were discharged under Col. William Glenny on July 14th 1865. – GAR48 p.200

GILBERT N. WELCH was born in Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Sept. 9th 1864 as a private in Co. G, 207th PA Vol., and was honorably discharged May 31st 1865. His regiment was raised by Colonel Robert C. Cox of Tioga County, afterwards Brig. General. He was commissioned to do this by Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania, This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County in its ranks than any single organization in service and was part of a division completed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the recapture of Fort Stedman, and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s division, which had surprised the fort during the night. The division with the greatest gallantry stormed these formidable works at the fall of Petersburg after the most desperate fighting. It took part in the closing scenes of war at Hatcher’s Run and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. In March 1865 they presented their Colonel Robert C. Cox with a horse and equipment valued at $550.00 in token of their great esteem. This company “G” was composed principally of men from Tioga County and had P.H. Blanchard; as 1st Lt.; and Henry G. Stephen as 2nd Lieutenant. Colonel Robert C. Cox was called “The Hero of Ft. Stedman” and was greatly praised for his and the splendid courage of his men in the assault. – GAR48 p.204

CHARLES L. WHITMAN was born in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted July 1861 (Civil War record – age 25) as a private in Co. C, 50 NY Engineers and was honorably discharged by Surgeon’s Certificate Dec. 1861. In constructing bridges, railroads and entrenchments for their own troops and destroying like works of the enemy they were often exposed to the fire of both armies and they were doubly exposed at the following engagements, viz: City Point, Tree Creek and Hatcher’s Run. They also participated in “Warren’s Raid” in which the raiders started out with one-day ‘s rations and were gone 13 days. They followed in the rear of the cavalry and foraging and destroyed from 25 to 30 miles of railroad being wet to the skin from a 5-day rain. At the James River at Wind Mill Point, which was nearly 1600 feet wide they built a pontoon bridge in which they used 13 boats. At Poplar Grove where they winter quartered in 1864-65 his company built a church of split logs to replace a church destroyed by the Union troops for use in entrenchments. The spire was built of whole logs standing on end and the front was ornamented with the Corps Badge, made of saplings and twigs. The church was presented to the M. E. Society who used it for many years after. – GAR48 p.191

GEORGE W. WILSON was born in Sullivan Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted August 30th 1862 as a private in Co. B, 14th U.S. Infantry and was honorably discharged August 30th 1865. He is buried in Hope Cemetery at Mansfield, Tioga County, PA. – GAR48 p.157

GEORGE N. WOOD was born in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted March 25th 1864 as a private in Co. C, 7th PA Cavalry and was honorably discharged Aug. 23rd 1865. His company was recruited in Tioga and Bradford Counties and had as its 1st Lts., A.J.B. Dartt and Charles C. Hermans. The regiment was commanded by that sterling soldier, Colonel George C. Wynkoop, who brought it to a high state of discipline and efficiency. It fought so much at close quarters with the saber that it was known as “The Saber Regiment” It participated in the Peninsula Campaign and the battles of Fair Oaks, Kingston, Goldsboro, Little Washington. It was assigned to service in Tennessee participating in a number of sharp engagements in 1862 and also in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Shelbyville, Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign, Lovejoy Station, Rome and Plantersville. At Shelbyville in a saber charge it captured fortifications built to resist infantry. This was the first time during the war that defended entrenchments were captured by mounted cavalry. His regiment achieved the distinction of capturing Jefferson Davis at Irwinsville, GA after a chase which started after he left Richmond before Lee’s evacuation of the city. Davis made a desperate effort to flee the county but was relentlessly pursued day and night by this great cavalry command. – GAR48 p.229

ISAAC S. WOODBURN was born in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted Oct. 25th 1862 as a private in Co. C, 171st PA Volunteer Infantry and was honorably discharged Aug. 8th 1863. His regiment was known as a nine month regiment composed of drafted militia and was organized at Camp Curtin November 1862 and its Major was Robert C. Cox of Tioga County, afterwards promoted to Brig. General. Its service was principally in North Carolina doing garrison duty and was mustered out Aug. 8th 1863. His company Captain was William B. Hall of Mansfield, Tioga County PA, and was largely recruited from this county. The regimental officers besides Major Cox of Tioga County were, Everard Bierer of Fayette County, Colonel and Theophilus Humphrey of Bradford county, Lt. Colonel. It took part in the operations against Hills Point Battery, Blounts Creek, the demonstration against Richmond for a diversion in favor of the Army at Gettysburg. It marched to Boonsboro after the battle of Gettysburg and then to a pass in the South Mountain where it remained until after the enemy had escaped into Virginia. It then proceeded to Frederick and on the 3rd of August was ordered to Harrisburg, where from the 6th to the 8th, it was mustered out of service. The troops originally recruited for this regiment failed to effect a regimental organization and were assigned to other commands. – GAR48 p.174

WILLIAM WORDEN was born in Rutland Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He enlisted August 29th 1864 as a private in Co. A, 207th PA Volunteers and was honorably discharged Aug. 2nd 1865. Major Robert C. Cox of Wellsboro afterwards Brig. General was commissioned to raise this regiment. Company “A” being recruited in Tioga County. Cox was later Colonel of this regiment. This regiment had a larger number of soldiers from Tioga County in its ranks than any single organization in service and was part of a division composed entirely of Pennsylvania soldiers. It took a prominent part in the re-capture of Fort Stedman and with it the capture of a good part of General Gordon’s division. It participated in the closing scenes of the war including Hatcher’s Run, the assault and capture of Petersburg and the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. In March 1865 the regiment while in front of Petersburg presented Col. Cox with a horse and complete outfit valued at $550.00 as a token of their appreciation of his soldiery qualities. It took part in the grand review held at Washington DC in May 1865 and was mustered out at Alexandria VA on May 31st 1865. Its Colonel Robert C. Cox was commissioned Brev. Brigadier General April 9th 1865 on account of his heroic conduct at the recapture of Fort Stedman in which this regiment excelled in bravery. – GAR48 p.171