Mansfield PA and Richmond Township in Tioga County PA
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
School Memorabilia of the Tri-Counties
Mansfield State College, Mansfield Borough

The Arts Building - Built in 1939, this is a modern structure housing the latest equipment for the specialized fields of Home Economics and Music, together with facilities for the Art Department. 

These postcards show Mansfield State College as it was in the 1960s when I was a student there. These were in my collection from that time, long before I became a collector of postcards. I probably bought these at the college book store. 
School: Mansfield State College
Township: Mansfield Borough, Tioga County PA
Postcards - Mansfield State College
Year: 1960s
Photo Source:Collection of Joyce M. Tice
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Mansfield Normal School Became Mansfield State Teachers College. MSTC became Mansfield State College. MSC became Mansfield University.
ALUMNI HALL & LIBRARY - The building at left is South Hall. 
Many an hour I spent here. JMT
STRAUGHN AUDITORIUM - Built in 1930 and named for De. William R. Straughn, then president of M.S.T.C.. This artistic structure has a seating capacity of 1,250, is extensively used for movies, assemblies, and dramatic productions, and contains a three-manual Austin Organ.
The postcard at left is from the Joan NASH O'Dell collection and is later than the other three. This is from the probably late 1970s when all the new dormitory structures had been added to the campus.  This 1960s street scene of Mansfield's business district will bring a pang of nostalgia to MSC students of this era. This postcard I had to pay through the nose for on ebay.
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Mansfield Advertiser, June 1959
Alumni Hall Clock and Tower [picture, ma1959 014]
An Era Ends at M.S.T.C.
The end of an era has taken place at Mansfield State Teachers College. Its passing was as inconspicuous as was its beginning.

In the lazy sunshine of a breezy late spring day, last week, college maintenance crews went about their work unnoticed, as students and teachers hurried to their pre-session courses, and townspeople went about their work as usual

Just seventy-two years ago, come June 23, dedication ceremonies were held in front of the new "Alumni Hall", a three-story brick building containing classrooms, offices and covered hall.

[first part unreadable]... by the Alumni of Mansfield Normal School, as the college was then known, of a huge bronze bell to be placed in the building's tower. The bell, which weighed two tons, was cast by the McShane Foundry Company of Baltimore, Maryland, in 1886. Its peal, striking each hour, became commonplace.

In the tower just below the bell, a huge clock with two faced was placed, cased in iron and glass. The Roman numerals measured one foot each, and the faces of the clock, more than seven feet in diameter, weighed approximately 1000 pounds each. The weights which moved the hands of the clock totaled one ton.

As the years passed, the popularity of the tower grew. Graduates, sweethearts.............proud parents.......... all had pictures taken with the tower as a background. "Meet you at the tower" became a well-used phrase. Soon it became the most distinguished building on campus.

Through the snows of winter to the colorful splendor of autumn, the beauty and magnificence of the tower prevailed.

[first part unreadable]...... little of drills, shouts of men and the sound of straining rope, the clock and bell were dismantled and gradually eased from their long-time resting places and stored, in order that the tower and Alumni Hall could be demolished. In its place will be a new four-story building which will house administrative offices and the college library.

Subject: Alumni Hall Clock and Tower= MA
Date: Fri, 29 May 2009 21:39:40 -0400

Mansfield Advertiser, June 1959
Alumni Hall Clock and Tower [picture, ma1959 014]
An Era Ends at M.S.T.C.
The end of an era has taken place at Mansfield State Teachers College. Its passing was as inconspicuous as was its beginning.

In the lazy sunshine of a breezy late spring day, last week, college maintenance crews went about their work unnoticed, as students and teachers hurried to their pre-session courses, and townspeople went about their work as usual

Just seventy-two years ago, come June 23, dedication ceremonies were held in front of the new "Alumni Hall", a three-story brick building containing classrooms, offices and covered hall.

[first part unreadable]... by the Alumni of Mansfield Normal School, as the college was then known, of a huge bronze bell to be placed in the building's tower. The bell, which weighed two tons, was cast by the McShane Foundry Company of Baltimore, Maryland, in 1886. Its peal, striking each hour, became commonplace.

In the tower just below the bell, a huge clock with two faced was placed, cased in iron and glass. The Roman numerals measured one foot each, and the faces of the clock, more than seven feet in diameter, weighed approximately 1000 pounds each. The weights which moved the hands of the clock totaled one ton.

As the years passed, the popularity of the tower grew. Graduates, sweethearts.............proud parents.......... all had pictures taken with the tower as a background. "Meet you at the tower" became a well-used phrase. Soon it became the most distinguished building on campus.

Through the snows of winter to the colorful splendor of autumn, the beauty and magnificence of the tower prevailed.

[first part unreadable]...... little of drills, shouts of men and the sound of straining rope, the clock and bell were dismantled and gradually eased from their long-time resting places and stored, in order that the tower and Alumni Hall could be demolished. In its place will be a new four-story building which will house administrative offices and the college library.

Wellsboro Gazette, February 15, 1973, p.3
A Movement to Save North Hall

There is a movement about to save North Hall on the Mansfield State College campus as a Landmark from past generations. It is too bad that this movement did not come at the time that Alumni Hall was being considered, because it was a much more nostalgic and also architecturally pleasing building. Be that as it may the argument goes as to whether North Hall is worth saving. The Feb. 8 issue of the FLASHLIGHT had several articles giving the pros and cons of the issue. Mr. Good, director of Campus Development, seems to feel it is a fire hazard, not to the occupants, but to the surrounding buildings. The following statement is part of an editorial from the Flashlight and gives some of the student thinking. The many Alumni in the Tioga County area may also wish to express their views.

"Already some groups have stated their opinions. The Arts and Sciences Faculty Council last December voted unanimously to go on record stating their desire to save North Hall....... The Board of Trustees, according to the December 11, 1972 Star Gazette, stated basically the same thing. Elsewhere in this paper, President Park stated "considering the special needs, we may be able to justify a renovation program which will preserve a landmark."

And IF the students and the many campus organizations want to save North, then we must make our votes heard and it has to be quite loud because it's a long way to Harrisburg.

We feel that there are some strong practical reasons for keeping North Hall. There being a shortage of space on campus, some suggestions are:
Office space for the administration or faculty; a permanent section for art majors to do their creative work; a section for the Computer Service, instead of possibly moving off campus; classroom space giving a different and innovative atmosphere than the dull rooms at Retan and Belknap; an extension for the Library; apartments for married couples; quiet study lounges or "talking" lounges; a Memorial Hall extension - with lounges, pool tables, ping pong and maybe an entire pinball arcade.

We hope that any of these ideas or a combination thereof are considered seriously by Secretary of Education John C. Pittenger and the other officials involved. Instead of using the money to tear down, and build something in its stead, use it to renovate and repair the building conforming it to the above ideas.

Besides the practical reasons, North Hall is the most aesthetically pleasing building on campus. It is Mansfield's mark of individuality as set apart from the other dormitories, and many other colleges. How many colleges have a distinctive a building as North Hall?

North Hall is more human and cozy than the long, cold halls of the other dormitories so why destroy it in the name of Progress? Think, what would Mansfield be without it?
M.A.C. & M.L.R.



Wellsboro Gazette, May 26, 1966, p.12

Warren L. Miller Re-elected MSC Alumni Head; Bell Dedicated

The 98th meeting of the Mansfield State College General Alumni Association on Saturday, May 14, was highlighted by the presence of three graduates of 1896, observing the 70th anniversary of their commencement exercises. On hand to enjoy the day with alumni were Mrs. Edna Day Harper, Corning, NY; Mrs. Minnie Stearns Titus, Lansdowne, and William D. Bradway, Mansfield.

Greeting from Mrs. Frank M. Leonard, believed to be the oldest living Mansfield State College alumna, were read. Mrs. Leonard, of Wellsville, NY, graduated in 1886 and is 101 years of age.

Twenty-four of the 125 who graduated in 1916 returned to celebrate their Golden Anniversary. Mrs. Ruth Hall Peabody of Forty Fort acted as spokesman for the group.

Attendance honors went to the Class of 1931 as more than 70 persons, including 50 classmates attended a special Thirty-Fifth Reunion Dinner. Fred A. Jupenlaz of Mansfield represented his class in extending greetings.

Spokesmen for other reunion classes who extended greetings during the general meeting were James Bennett of Buffalo, 1901; Joseph E. Dayton of Moorefield, W. Va., 1906; Ernest F. Miller of Pike County, 1911; Paul Jones of Moorestown, NJ, 1926; Kenneth Whitney of Abington, 1936; John Frenchko of Binghamton, NY, 1941; Merle Stilwell of Huntington Station, NY, 1956; and Mrs. Ellen Harris Gilbride of Mansfield, 1961.

Warren L. Miller of Mansfield, 1919, was re-elected as Alumni President for  1966-67. Elected as fellow officers were Theodore R. Aylesworth of Mansfield, 1936 first vice president; John Muto of Blossburg, 1958, second vice president; and Leon E. Lunn of Mansfield, 1936, secretary-treasurer.

Four alumni members were chosen as directors: H. Austin Snyder, 1932, Sayre, 1966-69; Mrs. Ruth Hughes Marsh, 1941, Mansfield, 1966-69; Alfred E. Kjelgaard, 1950, Mansfield, 1966-69; and Richard Lowe, 1922, Wilmington, Delaware, 1966-68.

Initial preparations were made for Alumni Day in 1967 by the election of Officers of the Day: Chairman, William Norman, Indiana, PA, 1917; Vice-Chairman, Glen Whittaker, Covington, 1932; Second Vice-Chairman, Allen Lewis, Wellsboro, 1937; and Secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth Doughton Schanbacher, Liberty, 1932.

The dedication of the Alumni Bell Shrine was an impressive ceremony, conducted in perfect weather before a throng of over three hundred persons. Edwin S. Coles of Mansfield, 1900 read the Bellís history during the dedication. Dr. Fred E. Bryan, President of Mansfield State College, delivered the dedicatory address to climax the ceremony.
 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Published On Tri-Counties Site On 11/09/2000
By Joyce M. Tice
Email: JoyceTice@aol.com

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