Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
School Memorabilia of the Tri-Counties
1933-34 Mansfield School News
We now have a local history museum in Mansfield representing the area in and near Mansfield including Richmond, Sullivan, Rutland, Covington and more
Visit the History Center on Main Street at 83 North Main Street. We also have a locaton at 61 North Main Street.
Regular hours are noon to 3 T, W Th or by appointment.
Also visit us on Facebook
Tri-County Genealogy 
& History Sites Home Page
How to Use This Site
Warning & Disclaimer
Souvenir School Booklets
Richmond Township / Mansfield Borough Page
No Unauthorized Commercial Use
Say Hello to Joyce 

 

Joyce's Search Tip - November 2008
Do You Know that you can search just the 700 pages of School Records on the site  by using the Schools button in the Partitioned search engine at the bottom of the Current What's New Page?  You can narrow your search by entering a township name and a surname and using the Find All Words option

School News. - From a Chester P. Bailey Scrapbook

The Junior Prom- March 1933

Picture

Mansfield Junior High School’s junior class tonight will have its prom in the high school gymnasium. Miss Marjorie Larrison is president of the class. She is shown with committee chairmen as follows: Janet Alger, program; Mary Thompson, decorations; Laura Shaw refreshments; Arthur Redner, music; Evelyn Barnes, cleanup; Eleanor Johns, Advertising.

(From College Flashlight) 1933

Saturday, March 11.- This evening the Juniors put on one of the finest dances Mansfield has witnessed in years. Those in attendance are proclaiming its success with a universal satisfaction rarely seen; for rare indeed is the social function which does not provoke the malediction of a considerable portion of the students. Of what could one complain? The dance lasted until eleven-thirty, an hour which heretofore only the Senior Ball has reached. The floor was excellent, having been waxed; and the decorations and music, although not outstandingly unusual were perfectly satisfactory. The refreshments, which consisted of cake, punch and sandwiches, were served at card tables placed across the southern end of the gym. Another feature was the cloakroom. As the dancers entered, their wraps were taken and checked. In this way, the discomfort of sitting on coats, and the trouble of looking for them and picking them off the floor were eliminated. Toward the end of the dance a pleasant surprise fell from the heavens. The dancers were floating about blissfully under the shamrocks, to the pleasing music of Jerry Thomas’ orchestra. Suddenly someone pulled a string and a shower of multi-colored balloons fell from a canopy stretched across the skylight. The remained of the scene is left to the readers’ imagination. Eleven-thirty came and all must depart. But in South Hall the boys are still saying, "I was just getting all pepped up; I could have danced the rest of the night."

Jan 30, 1935

550 students have enrolled at the Mansfield State Teachers College for the second semester of the school year, according to Miss Margaret Bunn, registrar, who considers the enrollment practically complete. The registration parallels approximately that of the first semester, speaks well for the continued usefulness and popularity of the institution.

Wrestling Team is Selected at College.

The attention of wrestling enthusiasts at the Mansfield State Teachers College centered last week in the selection of the matmen who are representing the institution during the current season, which began on Wednesday evening, when the Mountaineers defeated the invading unit from the Williamsport Y.M.C.A. The varsity consists of the following men who are listed by class, L.W. Fahringer; 126 lbs., Warren 135 lbs., Berzito; 145 lbs., Colegrove; 155 lbs., Close; 165 lbs., Whitney (Capt.); 175 lbs., Lent; H.W., Brewer. Alternates include: 126 lbs., Merrick; 135 lbs., Fiester; 145 lbs., Braund, Kintner, Looney; H. W., Shoemaker. Mansfield residents mentioned above are Ivan C. Warren, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Warren, Merrill Philip Lent, son of Mrs. Lillian Lent and Kenneth Lyle Merrick son of Mrs. R. Mae Merrick.

Awarded First Prize- Jan. 1935

Miss Lena Lewis, a senior in the Senior High School, has been awarded first prize in the nation-wide cartoon contest sponsored by "Current Events", the national school paper. Miss Lewis will receive a check for $3.00. Pupils from all the states competed in this contest. Miss Lewis’ cartoon depicts the world dreaming of peace, while around him are buzzing mosquitoes representing Japan, Germany and other nations, and by the bed-chewing matches is a mouse labeled "The Balkans." The title of the cartoon is "How Long Will He Lie Dreaming?"

Feb. 6, 1935

College Has "Fix-it" Shop

When you need something done which you can’t do or don’t wish to do yourself, stop at Room W, North Hall"—thus reads a placard which has been posted on a bulletin board at the Mansfield State Teachers College. Upon inquiry we learned that it advertises the Fix-It Shop recently opened by a group of women students in an effort to defray the cost of their education. The "fix-its" specialize in typing, laundering, mending and erranding," and at depression prices. Of all the undergraduate money-making schemes which have come to our attention, this is the most original and candid. May it meet with success.

High School Honor and Credit Students

Juniors—1929-1930

Honor Students: Christine Cornwell, Mildred Kennedy.

Credit Students: Lewis Barden, Chester Bailey, Byron Benedict, Elvin Boyden, Howard Chamberlain, Hilda Day, Walter Doud, Howard Hendrick, Lucille Hegele, Barbara Jerald, Lorena Jerald, Eldridge Mudge, Perry Rieppel, Adolph Schlappi, Esther Shaw, Wilson Smith, William Straughn, Esten Tickner, Bertha Warters, Doris Whittaker.

Sophomores- 1929-1930

Honor Students: Barbara Ackley, Naomi Bates, Barbara Baylis, Jeannette Retan, Robert Straughn.

Credit Students: Keith Ayres, Marie Barden, Melvin Brace, Raymond Hall, Pauline Hegele, Christine James, Mary Knowlton, Sharlee Lockwood, Genevieve Mudge, William Neal, Willard Odell, Ruth Palmer, Grace Parker, Harold Ripley, Eloise Strait, Clinton Stroup, Glenn Tanner, Rosalind Van Norman.

Receives Degree

Harold French, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.J. French, of Galeton, received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the San Diego State College at San Diego, California, with the class of 1930. He is a graduate of Mansfield State Teachers College, and is well known here, having worked in Cunningham’s barbershop during part of the time he attended college.

Better Homes Week at Senior High School- April 27

A play, " This Modern Generation", will be presented Thursday at 1 p.m. in the high school auditorium by the junior home economics girls. The cast follows:

The Grandmother, who speaks her mind- Esther Earley.

Gertrude, the mother –Lillian Bowen.

Mary, the modern daughter—Gwendolyn Hendricks.

Friends of Mary:

Lucy—Josephine Smith

Agnes—LaVonne MacCrumb

Sara—Lorena Mudge.

Little Mascot:- Mary Lou Farrer.

The public is cordially invited to attend this play. The Sophomores have decorated Judge’s window to illustrate the old and new type of kitchens. What do you think of Model G? The Singer Sewing Machine Company sent a special notice that they will be unable to show their movie, "Modern Industrial Methods," this week. This film will be shown at a later date. Wait for it.

Aug. 16, 1933

School Opens September 4

The Mansfield Senior High School will open Monday, September 4. The faculty will remain the same with the exception of the supervisor of agriculture. The faculty:

Warren L. Miller, Supervising principal; L.E. Baird, Mrs. Harold G. Strait, Miss Ada Horton, Miss Gertrude Smiley; Mrs. Merrill Broderick, Miss Beatrice Geary, Tom W. Cruttenden.

Nov. 24, 1933 (picture)

Mansfield High School Seniors in Play Cast

Mansfield High School seniors who appeared in the play, " The Worm," Friday night. In the group, above: top row, Marion Constable, Herman Murdock, John Strange, Byron Clark, Donald Moore and Virginia Fleming; lower row, James Robbins, Maurice Rumsey, Ruth Feig, Viall Coveney, Budd Clark and James Every.

Commencement Honors Announced at College.

April 4, 1934

Commencement honors at the Mansfield State Teachers College have been announced as follows:

In the Secondary Education Group—Miss Leone J. Rose, Mansfield, Valedictorian. Miss Rose maintained practically a perfect mark throughout the four years of her college course. Honorable mention in this group—Robert P. Alger, Mansfield; Ruth O. Coon, Ransom, Lackawanna County; Carleton Hess, Hughesville, Lycoming county; Helene Hewitt, Sayre; Wilda Hubbard, Mansfield; Mary M. Sullivan, Towanda.

In the Elementary Education Group—Ruth Braund Bly, Mansfield. Valedictorian. Honorable mention in this group—Enola Corwin, Wellsboro; Sara Holley, Lawrenceville; Mary Milota, Forest City.

Music Supervisors Group—Helen Waltman, Sayre, Valedictorian. Honorable mention—Matilda Caswell, Taylor, Lackawanna County; Lillian M. Lipp, Enon Valley, Lawrence county.

Home Economics Group—Mabel G. Cooley and Dorothy M Lukens, both of North Wales, Montgomery County, were tied for Valedictorian.

The Valedictorians of the several groups will appear as commencement speakers on May 29.

Faculty Elects New National Honor Society Members Thursday

April 18, 1934

Last Thursday at the Assembly in the Senior High School gymnasium, Mr. Miller announced the names of the new members of the National Honor Society. Scholarship, leadership, character and service are the qualifications needed for membership. The students are elected by the vote of the faculty. During the Junior year 5 per cent of the class may be elected and during the Senior year 15 per cent. Of last year’s Junior class, Byron Clark and Budd Clark were the ones chosen. From the present Senior class, six more were elected: James Robbins, Nellie Williams, Marion Conable, Olive Cornwell, Ruth Feig, and Maurice Rumsey. The new members from the Junior class are Lorne McCrumb, Betty Neal, and Arthur Redner.

(Picture)

The National Honor Society included eight members of the class of 1934, Mansfield Senior High School. Members, shown above are: top row, Ruth Feig, Budd Clark, James Robbins, and Maurice Rumsey; lower row, Byron Clark, Marion Conable, Nellie Williams and Olive Cornwell.

Name on Honor Roll -Feb. 28, 1934

Winthrop Johns of Mansfield, formerly a student of Mansfield State Teachers College, who transferred to Massachusetts Institute of Technology last fall, in an engineering course, has had his name appear on the honor roll of the Institute. This consists of a list of very superior students, and the honor roll is known as the Dean’s List of Students with High Scholastic Standings.

Record Crowd Enjoyed Junior Prom Saturday -Mar. 17, 1934

The Junior Prom, class dance of the Juniors at Mansfield State Teachers College, was held in the college gym Saturday evening, March 17, from 7:30 till 11:30 p.m. Joe Vannucci and his orchestra from Williamsport furnished the music for the evening. The popularity of this orchestra at the college may be judged by the fact that this was a return engagement in less than three weeks. The gym was attractively decorated in green and white in compliance with "St Patrick’s Day." The decorations were strung low giving a widening effect to the dance floor and the lighting effect tinted everything with a verdant hue. The color scheme was carried even to the refreshments and programs. A record crowd enjoyed the dance.

The chairmen of the various committees are as follows: Program, Elwood Learn; Orchestra, Dallas Stevenson; Decorations, Alan Long; Refreshments, Clio Sharpe.

Possessor of Fifteenth Century Manuscript-July 4, 1934

Mrs. Grace Steadman, Director of Music at the Mansfield State Teachers College, is the possessor of a 15th Century music manuscript, the gift of Dr. Charles Lutton, of Chicago, whose collection of similar items is the largest in the United States. The manuscript, Spanish in origin, is on sheepskin and bears a square notation on the d"Arrezzio staff, inscribed with red and black. The text is in vulgate Latin. Mrs. Steadman received the manuscript as a gesture of friendship from Dr. Lutton, who sang the title role in Mendelssohn’s oratorio, "Elijah", as performed by the College Chorus under her direction recently. She plans to have the manuscript incased in glass and placed in the college library.

College Graduate Translates Letters That Baffled Linguists- July 4, 1934

John W. Basta, of Parsons, who graduated from Mansfield State Teachers College in June, is responsible for the translation of certain letters submitted in the case of Marie da Encarnacao Silveira Balacke, of Oporto, Portugal, versus the John Conlon Coal Company, of Wilkes-Barre, recently. Mr. Basta, who speaks seven tongues, has been commended for his work, in as much as the correspondance has baffled trained linguists for nearly eight years.

Melvin Brace Is First To Register Sept. 12, 1934

Melvin Brace of Mansfield, a Junior, was the first of 432 students to register at the Mansfield State Teachers College on Monday, Sept. 10, when the institution opened for the fall term. The enrollment is gratifying and may be attributed to the facts that the Mansfield State Teachers College, with 75 years of professional integrity to its credit, is recognized as one of the outstanding teacher-training centers in the east and that part-time employment enables students to meet the cost of attendance more easily than ever before.

Registration will continue until Saturday Sept. 15, when the enrollment should be complete.

559 Students Are Enrolled Sept. 19, 1934

Five hundred fifty-nine are attending the Mansfield State Teachers College this fall according to Margaret Bunn, registrar. The enrollment, which parallels approximately that of a year ago, speaks well for the usefulness and popularity of the institution. The enrollment, by course of study, follows: Elementary Education, 192; Secondary Education, 209;Music Education, 72; Home Economics, 78; Special, 8.

Few Changes In The College Faculty Sept 12, 1934

Few \changes in the administrative and teaching faculties of the Mansfield State Teachers College were noted on Monday, Sept. 10, when the institution opened for the 1935-35 school year. Miss Lillian Buckingham, of Washington, Pa., replaces Miss Jessie Manship in the Department of Home Economics, of which Mrs. Elizabeth Morales became director, succeeding Miss Lu Hartman, deceased. Mrs. Bertha Palmer, of Mansfield, replaces as library assistant. Miss Victoria Thiemann, who together with Charles Darrin of Wellsboro, joins the office force. Miss Helen Turner and R. Wilson Ross have not been replaced in the Department of Music Education.

The staff which numbers 77 is more than adequate for the institution it serves.

Miss Buckingham Joins Faculty Sept. 19, 1934

An addition to the teaching force of the Mansfield State Teachers College is Lillian Edna Buckingham, M.S,. who has assumed a position in the Department of Home Economics.

Miss Buckingham, a native of Washington, Pa., received undergraduate training at the University of Minnesota and Pennsylvania College. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees were earned at Cornell University. She has done graduate work there and at Vassar.

Miss Buckingham comes to Mansfield from Juniata College, where she taught for four years. Previously she taught in Clairton, Pa., and Manchester, England.

High School Notes- 1930-1931

Following is the calendar for Mansfield High School for 1930-31:

School opened September 1; Recess for Mansfield Fair begins, September 18; Classes resume, September 22; Recess for County Institute, October 6; Classes resume, October 13; Thanksgiving recess begins, November 27; Classes resume December 1; Christmas recess begins December 25; Classes resume January 5, 1931; Easter recess begins April 2; /classes resume April 7; Commencement June 3.

Vacation really begins at the end of the school day before the date listed. This calendar was accepted by the school board at its meeting September 8, 1930.

Dr. Retan Recognized By Noted Educator

Jan. 20, 1935

In an article by Prof. Raymond Wheeler of the University of Kansas, which appears in the current issue of "Educational Administration and Supervision," " Management and Teaching Technique" is listed among the "scientific works, which every educator should be reading." The recommended volume is the work of Dr. George Retan, Director of the Training School at the Mansfield State Teachers College.

Blossburg High School Burned –Feb. 20, 1935 (Picture)

Fire, thought to have started in the boiler room, destroyed the Blossburg High School Sunday evening with an estimated loss of $25,000 on the building and $3,000 on equipment.

There was a partial insurance. Before it was discovered the basement was doomed and the fire has begun to spread to the upper stories of the building, which was built in 1874.

Loss of the building further complicates Blossburg’s pressing school problem. Since the fall of 1933 agitation for a new building to relieve conditions has been under way.

With the "Brick School" in ruins. Arrangements must be made to house 400 grade and high school students. There are two other grade buildings in Blossburg, the Central and the Tannery Schools. In addition it is possible that the school gymnasium, a separate building in mid-town, will be used for classes.

The fire was discovered by Mrs. Bradford Connelly, who resides in the eastern part of Blossburg. The Brick School is located at the top of a hill in the western section. Firemen found the flames beyond control as the oiled floors and old timber quickly caught from the seething basement. In addition there was a stiff breeze.

On the first floor were four rooms for third and fourth grade pupils. The second floor was devoted to high school class rooms in addition to a large auditorium. In the basement besides the boiler room, were science laboratories and other equipment.

The Brick School had been repaired and renovated many times during its long service. This season it had 400 students and eight teachers.

What arrangements would be made to provide for the students were in complete Monday. The School Board was to meet during the day to study plans for classes.

Winthrop Johns Awarded Scholarship Sept. 26, 1934

Winthrop Johns, son of Mrs. Mary Johns, was one of fourteen Pennsylvania students who have been awarded scholarships at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The awards are given on a basis of high academic records and assist in tuition for the coming year. All recipients are members of the sophomore, Junior or senior class in Technology. Mr. Johns is a graduate of the Mansfield High School.

School News. Taken from Mansfield Advertiser Dec. 12, 1934

1914

Every one thinks that his class best ever graduated. We think perhaps this is very true of the class of 1914.

Grace Burton who is now Mrs. Robert Palmer, has acted as mentor of her class for this alumni issue.

Mildred Bailey, who married Franklin Bryant, lives outside of Mansfield. She now has a busy life as the wife of a farmer.

Alice Elliott graduated from the Arnot-Ogden Hospital and now lives in Middletown, NY. She assists a physician in making the toxin-antitoxin for New York City.

Loren Leonard is married has four children, and makes his home in Philadelphia. He was formerly connected with the banks of that city.

Ruth Leonard graduated from the Mansfield Normal School in 1916. After teaching for five years she went to Columbia University Summer School, and then to Elmira College, where she graduated in 1923. She taught Latin and Spanish in Oswego, NY, Where she is now. By attending summer school Miss Leonard has obtained an M.A. degree in Latin from Michigan University.

Preston Van Ness graduated from Pennsylvania State College in 1920. During that time he was in the Army and stationed at Camp Lee, Virginia. He established and taught an agriculture course in Townsville, Pennsylvania. Next he taught agriculture in the Towanda schools, where he acted as assistant principal for three years. Then he became County Supervisor of Agriculture in Lebanon County. While there, Mr. Van Ness was asked to come to Harrisburg to take the position that he now holds of: Senior School Business Advisor," Department of Public Instruction of Pennsylvania.

Class of 1915

Of the class of twenty-three, ten of the girls are married. Their maiden and married names and their residences are as follows:

Frances Blackwell Bailey, Blossburg, PA.

Florence Chilson Mudge, Mansfield, Pa.

Laura Cleveland Carson, Covington, PA.

Ruth Cleveland Uhl, Elmira, NY.

Mildred Davis Carpenter, Watkins Glen, NY.

Rose Hemmer Briggs, Clifton Springs, NY.

Margaret King Wright, Grand Rapids, Mich.

Elizabeth Littley Starkey, Mansfield, PA.

Mildred Warters Boyle, Endicott, NY.

Catherine Whittaker Miller, Williamsport, PA

The following are teachers:

Gertrude Carlson, Grade School, Long Island, NY

William Longstreet, Music, Oberlin, Ohio

Eleanor Schripbanker, Art, Hempstead, L. I., NY.

The remaining are in some type of business, chiefly in stores:

Welch Cleveland, hardware store, Mansfield, Pa

Asa Coveney, shoe store, Hazelton, Pa.

Charles Jupenlaz, Kinney Shoe Store manager, Elmira, NY

Winifred Jupenlaz, engineer, Pittsburg, Pa

Winifred Matteson, bookkeeper, Elmira, NY

Hiram Nickerson, a district superintendent of schools in Pennsylvania.

Ellis Plank, business in Florida

Harry Taylor, hardware store, in Mansfield, Pa

Ella Wolcott, settlement work in New York City

Mildred Wright, at home in Mansfield, Pa

Class of 1916

After graduating from M.R. H. S. John N. Hatfield attended State College from September 1916 to February 1918. He was then in Service with the Marines until August 11, 1919, and also participated in the Meuse-Argonne drive. Some of his occupations during the years of 1919 to 1934 period are as follow: Surveyor of State roads; superintendent of production at Tioga Washed Sand and Gravel plant at Tioga; store keeper at the State Sanitarium, Hamburg, Pa; steward of Reading Hospital; assistant superintendent and superintendent of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. He still holds the last named position. Mr. Hatfield also belongs to a great many committees connected with the hospital work of Pennsylvania. Some organizations to which he belongs are: The Delta Tau Delta College fraternity, American Academy of Political and Social Science and National conference of Social Work.

Dorothy Hoard graduated from Mansfield State Normal in Teacher’s course, 1918, and in Music and Art course in 1919. She taught music and art at Palmyra, NY, and afterwards at Mansfield State Teachers College. She married Thad C. Logan and they have two daughters.

Margaret Cummings after graduation from the Normal School married Myron Cullatt and lives on Race Street, Elmira. They have one daughter.

Kenneth Hart is a teacher in the N.Y.C. district. He married Ruth Husted also from Mansfield, and has four children. They live in West Englewood, NY.

Two ways in which Maryon Farrer has served in a professional capacity are: Chairman Nutrition Committee of the Child Emergency and Protection Committee for Tioga County, and as President of the State Home Economics Association, Central Convention District. She received training in several different colleges, and obtained a B.S. from Simmons College and M.A. from Columbia University. Her present position is Head of Foods and Nutrition Department at Mansfield State Teachers College.

Class of 1917

Warren Miller. Mr. Miller attended Mansfield Normal for two years, following, which he taught for one year near Wilkes-Barre. He then attended the University of Pennsylvania for two years and taught in New Jersey., also acting as principal of that school. Mr. Miller has been teaching in Mansfield High School for twelve years, this being his fourth year as principal of this school.

Fred Bedenk. After graduating from Mansfield High School, "Dutch" Bedenk attended Mansfield Normal where he made a name for himself in the field of athletics. He then completed a course of study at State College, where he is now coaching football.

Ruth Decker, having attended Mansfield Normal School for three years, Miss Decker completed her studies at the following schools: Lucy Webb Hayes’ Deaconess School, of Washington; George Washington University and National University of Washington from which she received her doctor of philosophy degree. She is now teaching in a deaconess training school, Kansas City, MO.

Wyllys Olver. After graduating from Mansfield High School, Mr. Olver went into business. He is now a merchant in Chester.

Helen Jupenlaz. Miss Jupenlaz attended Meeker’s Business College after High School. She is now one of the office secretaries at the Mansfield State Teachers College.

Class of 1918

Mrs. Roy Precit (Doris Warters) attended M.S.T.C., taking Domestic Science. Later she graduated in the short-hand and book-keeping course. She was employed by R.W. and M.F. Rose Co. as cashier. Later she was married to Mr. Roy Precit, Mansfield, PA. They now reside in Elmira, NY.

Prudence Bailey married Mr. Wade Goodall and is residing in Mansfield at present.

Mr. Lewis S. Dorsett entered the army soon after graduation and was in France and Belgium with the Medical Corps. He received his degree at the Mansfield State Teachers College. He also took work at the Penn State College. He has been teaching for the past ten years and has been principal of the Charleston and LeRaysville High Schools. He is now principal of the Millerton High School.

Class of 1919 Dec. 12, 1934

Eleanor Elliot married Mr. Edward C. Russell. She has two children.

Louise Goodall is Mrs. Wayne English. She teaches music in the Charleston High School. She has one child.

Ruthadele Williamson is on the stage in New York City under the name of Ruth Adams. She has visited India recently.

Grace Earley is married and is now Mrs. Theodore Bordon. She had three children.

Frederick Simmons is climbing the ladder in the London, England office of the G.M.P. Murchy Co., New York City. We think he is still single.

Warren Davis is married to Laura Howe. He is a teller in the First National Bank of Mansfield. They have no children.

Florence Stilwell is unmarried and is a nurse in the city of Washington, D.C.

Irene Harkness is Mrs. Jack Hufford of Philadelphia, Pa., and has one child.

Margaret Howe is Mrs. Fred Jupenlaz of Covington. Mr. Jupenlaz is principal of the Covington High School. They have three children.

Class of 1920- Dec. 12, 1934

Edson Strange is instructor of athletics in the Upper Darby High School.

Ted Borden, who has lived in Mansfield until recently, is now cashier of the bank at Ulysses.

Isora Fox lives just outside of Philadelphia. She is married and has four children.

Malcolm Strange is living in Mainesburg.

Dec. 19, 1934

Theodore S. Borden, for several years an employee of the First National Bank, has accepted the position of cashier of the First National Bank of Ulysses. Mr. Borden has taken an active interest in civic affairs of Mansfield. He is chief of the Mansfield Fire Department, Scoutmaster of Troop 1 Boy Scouts, Secretary of the Business Men’s Association, and Treasurer of the Community Nurse Association. Mr. Borden’s many friends in Mansfield and vicinity regret that he is leaving Mansfield and wish him success in his new position.

Mansfield Girl Accepts position in Philadelphia.

Dec. 19, 1934

Miss Elsie Wilson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.W. Wilson left Saturday for Philadelphia, where she has accepted a position in the Widener Memorial Hospital for Crippled Children. Miss Wilson is one of Mansfield’s highly esteemed young ladies. She is a graduate of the Senior High School and Mansfield State Teachers College and taught for several years in the Seashore Home for Crippled Children in Atlantic City, N.J. She goes to her new position highly recommended.

The Junior Prom- March 1933

Picture

Mansfield Junior High School’s junior class tonight will have its prom in the high school gymnasium. Miss Marjorie Larrison is president of the class. She is shown with committee chairmen as follows: Janet Alger, program; Mary Thompson, decorations; Laura Shaw refreshments; Arthur Redner, music; Evelyn Barnes, cleanup; Eleanor Johns, Advertising.
 
 

(From College Flashlight) 1933

Saturday, March 11.- This evening the Juniors put on one of the finest dances Mansfield has witnessed in years. Those in attendance are proclaiming its success with a universal satisfaction rarely seen; for rare indeed is the social function which does not provoke the malediction of a considerable portion of the students. Of what could one complain? The dance lasted until eleven-thirty, an hour which heretofore only the Senior Ball has reached. The floor was excellent, having been waxed; and the decorations and music, although not outstandingly unusual were perfectly satisfactory. The refreshments, which consisted of cake, punch and sandwiches, were served at card tables placed across the southern end of the gym. Another feature was the cloakroom. As the dancers entered, their wraps were taken and checked. In this way, the discomfort of sitting on coats, and the trouble of looking for them and picking them off the floor were eliminated. Toward the end of the dance a pleasant surprise fell from the heavens. The dancers were floating about blissfully under the shamrocks, to the pleasing music of Jerry Thomas’ orchestra. Suddenly someone pulled a string and a shower of multi-colored balloons fell from a canopy stretched across the skylight. The remained of the scene is left to the readers’ imagination. Eleven-thirty came and all must depart. But in South Hall the boys are still saying, "I was just getting all pepped up; I could have danced the rest of the night."

Jan 30, 1935

550 students have enrolled at the Mansfield State Teachers College for the second semester of the school year, according to Miss Margaret Bunn, registrar, who considers the enrollment practically complete. The registration parallels approximately that of the first semester, speaks well for the continued usefulness and popularity of the institution.

Wrestling Team is Selected at College.

The attention of wrestling enthusiasts at the Mansfield State Teachers College centered last week in the selection of the matmen who are representing the institution during the current season, which began on Wednesday evening, when the Mountaineers defeated the invading unit from the Williamsport Y.M.C.A. The varsity consists of the following men who are listed by class, L.W. Fahringer; 126 lbs., Warren 135 lbs., Berzito; 145 lbs., Colegrove; 155 lbs., Close; 165 lbs., Whitney (Capt.); 175 lbs., Lent; H.W., Brewer. Alternates include: 126 lbs., Merrick; 135 lbs., Fiester; 145 lbs., Braund, Kintner, Looney; H. W., Shoemaker. Mansfield residents mentioned above are Ivan C. Warren, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Warren, Merrill Philip Lent, son of Mrs. Lillian Lent and Kenneth Lyle Merrick son of Mrs. R. Mae Merrick.

Senior High School Notes 1933

Yearbook Goes to Press

Finally, after much hurrying and worrying, our yearbook, "The Manscript", has gone to press. The staff has worked arduously on the project for several months. Its completion permits the editors to breathe easily once again. We are in hopes to have it on sale by the last week in May (and then there will be more John Hancock’s in school than one could imagine!)

Graduation Dates Announced

No one realizes the fact that graduation is nearing more than we seniors.

The Baccalaureate Sermon will be Sunday, May 28.

The Class Day Exercises, Thursday, June 1.

The graduation Service, Friday, June 2.

Five Seniors Take Scholarship Exam

Friday, May 5, five seniors went to Wellsboro to take the county exams.

Those five were:

Roselyn Frost, LaVonne MacCrumb, Erdene Inscho, Dorothy Olinger and Monica Webster. The winner will not be known until mid-summer. Now, we can’t expect all of to be winners, because" the best man wins" after all.

Awarded First Prize- Jan. 1935

Miss Lena Lewis, a senior in the Senior High School, has been awarded first prize in the nation-wide cartoon contest sponsored by "Current Events", the national school paper. Miss Lewis will receive a check for $3.00. Pupils from all the states competed in this contest. Miss Lewis’ cartoon depicts the world dreaming of peace, while around him are buzzing mosquitoes representing Japan, Germany and other nations, and by the bed-chewing matches is a mouse labeled "The Balkans." The title of the cartoon is "How Long Will He Lie Dreaming?"

Feb. 6, 1935

College Has "Fix-it" Shop

When you need something done which you can’t do or don’t wish to do yourself, stop at Room W, North Hall"—thus reads a placard which has been posted on a bulletin board at the Mansfield State Teachers College. Upon inquiry we learned that it advertises the Fix-It Shop recently opened by a group of women students in an effort to defray the cost of their education. The "fix-its" specialize in typing, laundering, mending and erranding," and at depression prices. Of all the undergraduate money-making schemes which have come to our attention, this is the most original and candid. May it meet with success.

High School Honor and Credit Students

Juniors—1929-1930

Honor Students: Christine Cornwell, Mildred Kennedy.

Credit Students: Lewis Barden, Chester Bailey, Byron Benedict, Elvin Boyden, Howard Chamberlain, Hilda Day, Walter Doud, Howard Hendrick, Lucille Hegele, Barbara Jerald, Lorena Jerald, Eldridge Mudge, Perry Rieppel, Adolph Schlappi, Esther Shaw, Wilson Smith, William Straughn, Esten Tickner, Bertha Warters, Doris Whittaker.

Sophomores- 1929-1930

Honor Students: Barbara Ackley, Naomi Bates, Barbara Baylis, Jeannette Retan, Robert Straughn.

Credit Students: Keith Ayres, Marie Barden, Melvin Brace, Raymond Hall, Pauline Hegele, Christine James, Mary Knowlton, Sharlee Lockwood, Genevieve Mudge, William Neal, Willard Odell, Ruth Palmer, Grace Parker, Harold Ripley, Eloise Strait, Clinton Stroup, Glenn Tanner, Rosalind Van Norman.

Receives Degree

Harold French, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.J. French, of Galeton, received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the San Diego State College at San Diego, California, with the class of 1930. He is a graduate of Mansfield State Teachers College, and is well known here, having worked in Cunningham’s barbershop during part of the time he attended college.

Better Homes Week at Senior High School- April 27

A play, " This Modern Generation", will be presented Thursday at 1 p.m. in the high school auditorium by the junior home economics girls. The cast follows:

The Grandmother, who speaks her mind- Esther Earley.

Gertrude, the mother –Lillian Bowen.

Mary, the modern daughter—Gwendolyn Hendricks.

Friends of Mary:

Lucy—Josephine Smith

Agnes—LaVonne MacCrumb

Sara—Lorena Mudge.

Little Mascot:- Mary Lou Farrer.

The public is cordially invited to attend this play. The Sophomores have decorated Judge’s window to illustrate the old and new type of kitchens. What do you think of Model G? The Singer Sewing Machine Company sent a special notice that they will be unable to show their movie, "Modern Industrial Methods," this week. This film will be shown at a later date. Wait for it.

Aug. 16, 1933

School Opens September 4

The Mansfield Senior High School will open Monday, September 4. The faculty will remain the same with the exception of the supervisor of agriculture. The faculty:

Warren L. Miller, Supervising principal; L.E. Baird, Mrs. Harold G. Strait, Miss Ada Horton, Miss Gertrude Smiley; Mrs. Merrill Broderick, Miss Beatrice Geary, Tom W. Cruttenden.

Nov. 24, 1933 (picture)

Mansfield High School Seniors in Play Cast

Mansfield High School seniors who appeared in the play, " The Worm," Friday night. In the group, above: top row, Marion Constable, Herman Murdock, John Strange, Byron Clark, Donald Moore and Virginia Fleming; lower row, James Robbins, Maurice Rumsey, Ruth Feig, Viall Coveney, Budd Clark and James Every.

Commencement Honors Announced at College.

April 4, 1934

Commencement honors at the Mansfield State Teachers College have been announced as follows:

In the Secondary Education Group—Miss Leone J. Rose, Mansfield, Valedictorian. Miss Rose maintained practically a perfect mark throughout the four years of her college course. Honorable mention in this group—Robert P. Alger, Mansfield; Ruth O. Coon, Ransom, Lackawanna County; Carleton Hess, Hughesville, Lycoming county; Helene Hewitt, Sayre; Wilda Hubbard, Mansfield; Mary M. Sullivan, Towanda.

In the Elementary Education Group—Ruth Braund Bly, Mansfield. Valedictorian. Honorable mention in this group—Enola Corwin, Wellsboro; Sara Holley, Lawrenceville; Mary Milota, Forest City.

Music Supervisors Group—Helen Waltman, Sayre, Valedictorian. Honorable mention—Matilda Caswell, Taylor, Lackawanna County; Lillian M. Lipp, Enon Valley, Lawrence county.

Home Economics Group—Mabel G. Cooley and Dorothy M Lukens, both of North Wales, Montgomery County, were tied for Valedictorian.

The Valedictorians of the several groups will appear as commencement speakers on May 29.

Faculty Elects New National Honor Society Members Thursday

April 18, 1934

Last Thursday at the Assembly in the Senior High School gymnasium, Mr. Miller announced the names of the new members of the National Honor Society. Scholarship, leadership, character and service are the qualifications needed for membership. The students are elected by the vote of the faculty. During the Junior year 5 per cent of the class may be elected and during the Senior year 15 per cent. Of last year’s Junior class, Byron Clark and Budd Clark were the ones chosen. From the present Senior class, six more were elected: James Robbins, Nellie Williams, Marion Conable, Olive Cornwell, Ruth Feig, and Maurice Rumsey. The new members from the Junior class are Lorne McCrumb, Betty Neal, and Arthur Redner.

(Picture)

The National Honor Society included eight members of the class of 1934, Mansfield Senior High School. Members, shown above are: top row, Ruth Feig, Budd Clark, James Robbins, and Maurice Rumsey; lower row, Byron Clark, Marion Conable, Nellie Williams and Olive Cornwell.

Name on Honor Roll -Feb. 28, 1934

Winthrop Johns of Mansfield, formerly a student of Mansfield State Teachers College, who transferred to Massachusetts Institute of Technology last fall, in an engineering course, has had his name appear on the honor roll of the Institute. This consists of a list of very superior students, and the honor roll is known as the Dean’s List of Students with High Scholastic Standings.

Record Crowd Enjoyed Junior Prom Saturday -Mar. 17, 1934

The Junior Prom, class dance of the Juniors at Mansfield State Teachers College, was held in the college gym Saturday evening, March 17, from 7:30 till 11:30 p.m. Joe Vannucci and his orchestra from Williamsport furnished the music for the evening. The popularity of this orchestra at the college may be judged by the fact that this was a return engagement in less than three weeks. The gym was attractively decorated in green and white in compliance with "St Patrick’s Day." The decorations were strung low giving a widening effect to the dance floor and the lighting effect tinted everything with a verdant hue. The color scheme was carried even to the refreshments and programs. A record crowd enjoyed the dance.

The chairmen of the various committees are as follows: Program, Elwood Learn; Orchestra, Dallas Stevenson; Decorations, Alan Long; Refreshments, Clio Sharpe.

Senior Publish Extraordinary Yearbook June, 1934

The Manuscript this year is one of which the Seniors may be justly proud. We departed from the customary large book with its paper cover to publish a book for the book shelf with a fine black imitation leather cover. In the back of our book, we have over thirteen pages of ads due to the diligence of our business managers, Jack Larrison and James Avery. Florence Kennedy deserves much praise for the work she did as Art Editor.

Credit goes to Herman Murdock, Editor-in-Chief, and John Strange, Assistant Editor, for the fine arrangement of the material. These two hard working seniors, with the helpful advice of Miss Smiley and Mrs. Strait, and with the slight aid which I could give as Literary Editor, also did the executive work. I am not speaking idly when I say that the executive work, even for so small a yearbook, is not, for inexperienced hands, a pleasant pastime. Herman and John did the hardest work with the least to show for it of any of the "publishers". They deserve highest credit.

But the book wouldn’t be a book without some writing inside of it. It took a lot of people to attend to that part. Mr. Fred Allen, poet of our town, wrote for us a very fine poem with which we are well pleased. Let me give it:

The Crooked Man By Fred M. Allen

One time there was a crooked man

Who had a crooked mind,

An intellect more crooked

It would be hard to find.

His eyes were put on crooked,

And everything he saw

Was crooked as a crooked stick,

Save one, George Bernard Shaw.

The king was crooked on his throne,

The throne was crooked, too;

The premier and parliament,

The statesman through and through.

The colleges and theatres,

The judges and the law.

Oh, Everyone was crooked,

Save one, George Bernard Shaw.

He sneered at those who made mistakes,

On virtue turned his back.

The preacher was a gospel shark,

The lawyer just a quack.

Religion was a silly thing,

And hollow as a straw.

Oh, all the world was crooked,

Save one, George Bernard Shaw.

Now, if you ever meet that man,

Just whang him on the jaw.

So he will know theres some one else

Besides George Bernard Shaw.

The Senior Class Poem and Parody-June 6, 1934

Author Budd Clark Jr.

This is the Senior Class Poem written by Budd Clark, Jr. Below it is a parody on the poem written by the same changeable fellow. We don’t know which expresses the real feeling of its author, but we hope it is not the parody.

On the edge of town, by the fast flowing stream,

There’s a High School, which ever retains our esteem.

Its maples and elms and its wide rug of green

Make attractive the place where the Seniors convene.

Under the roof of the ruddy brick school,

Studies go on as a general rule.

There is the den of grim grammar and Math.

One must step lively to dodge their wrath.

But a happier part of the school there is too,

Where a boy or a girl must ring true,

through and through.

The basketball court and soccer field green,

With the baseball plot, makes the three that I mean.

Courses in farming and housekeeping try

To teach practical students some trade to ply.

Hi-Y and Tri-Y, and news reporting,

Broaden the mind and make learning, sporting.

But we cease in the praise of the school of our growth.

We are leaving the school, so we leave it this oath:

As much as within as there lies, we will be

The men and the women the school loves to see.

Parody

By the side of the creek, by the muddy cowyard,

There’s a High School quite ready for the discard.

The whispers in classrooms so lusty and strong

Make the home of the Seniors like a hencoop at dawn.

Under the roof of the ruddy brick school

Hard labor prevails as a general rule.

There is the den of grim test and exam.

They’ll flunk you out cold though you plan and you cram.

But the faults of the school we will cease to reveal.

It’s a heck of a dump, but we wouldn’t squeal.

In leaving the school, we ought to look sad,

But it’s hard to conceal the fact we’re glad.

Possessor of Fifteenth Century Manuscript-July 4, 1934

Mrs. Grace Steadman, Director of Music at the Mansfield State Teachers College, is the possessor of a 15th Century music manuscript, the gift of Dr. Charles Lutton, of Chicago, whose collection of similar items is the largest in the United States. The manuscript, Spanish in origin, is on sheepskin and bears a square notation on the d"Arrezzio staff, inscribed with red and black. The text is in vulgate Latin. Mrs. Steadman received the manuscript as a gesture of friendship from Dr. Lutton, who sang the title role in Mendelssohn’s oratorio, "Elijah", as performed by the College Chorus under her direction recently. She plans to have the manuscript incased in glass and placed in the college library.

College Graduate Translates Letters That Baffled Linguists- July 4, 1934

John W. Basta, of Parsons, who graduated from Mansfield State Teachers College in June, is responsible for the translation of certain letters submitted in the case of Marie da Encarnacao Silveira Balacke, of Oporto, Portugal, versus the John Conlon Coal Company, of Wilkes-Barre, recently. Mr. Basta, who speaks seven tongues, has been commended for his work, in as much as the correspondance has baffled trained linguists for nearly eight years.

Melvin Brace Is First To Register Sept. 12, 1934

Melvin Brace of Mansfield, a Junior, was the first of 432 students to register at the Mansfield State Teachers College on Monday, Sept. 10, when the institution opened for the fall term. The enrollment is gratifying and may be attributed to the facts that the Mansfield State Teachers College, with 75 years of professional integrity to its credit, is recognized as one of the outstanding teacher-training centers in the east and that part-time employment enables students to meet the cost of attendance more easily than ever before.

Registration will continue until Saturday Sept. 15, when the enrollment should be complete.

559 Students Are Enrolled Sept. 19, 1934

Five hundred fifty-nine are attending the Mansfield State Teachers College this fall according to Margaret Bunn, registrar. The enrollment, which parallels approximately that of a year ago, speaks well for the usefulness and popularity of the institution. The enrollment, by course of study, follows: Elementary Education, 192; Secondary Education, 209;Music Education, 72; Home Economics, 78; Special, 8.

Few Changes In The College Faculty Sept 12, 1934

Few \changes in the administrative and teaching faculties of the Mansfield State Teachers College were noted on Monday, Sept. 10, when the institution opened for the 1935-35 school year. Miss Lillian Buckingham, of Washington, Pa., replaces Miss Jessie Manship in the Department of Home Economics, of which Mrs. Elizabeth Morales became director, succeeding Miss Lu Hartman, deceased. Mrs. Bertha Palmer, of Mansfield, replaces as library assistant. Miss Victoria Thiemann, who together with Charles Darrin of Wellsboro, joins the office force. Miss Helen Turner and R. Wilson Ross have not been replaced in the Department of Music Education.

The staff which numbers 77 is more than adequate for the institution it serves.
 
 
 
 

High School Notes- 1930-1931

Following is the calendar for Mansfield High School for 1930-31:

School opened September 1; Recess for Mansfield Fair begins, September 18; Classes resume, September 22; Recess for County Institute, October 6; Classes resume, October 13; Thanksgiving recess begins, November 27; Classes resume December 1; Christmas recess begins December 25; Classes resume January 5, 1931; Easter recess begins April 2; /classes resume April 7; Commencement June 3.

Vacation really begins at the end of the school day before the date listed. This calendar was accepted by the school board at its meeting September 8, 1930.

The seniors decided to have a Manuscript again this year and on Wednesday morning, September 10, election was held. Connie Belknap was elected editor-in-chief and Chester Bailey, business manager.

--------------------

Footlight Club

The officers of the Footlight Club elected this year are as follows:

President, Connie Belknap,

Vice-President, Walter Doud.

Treasurer, William Straughn.

Corresponding Secretary, Barbara Jerald

Recording Secretary, Hilda Day.

The first meeting of the club was called to order Wednesday by the president, who appointed an entertainment committee, as follows: Barbara Baylis, Christine Cornwell, and Sherman Corey.

Then a brief discussion on the picnic, which was postponed last spring. A committee was appointed to make further plans concerning it: Walter Doud, chairman; Robert Straughn and Christine being appointed.

-----------------------------

Sophomores Entertain

Friday night in the gym, the sophomores entertained the seniors, Juniors and alumni at the request of the seniors. The sophomores before the evening was over, proved themselves excellent entertainers and a class of good sports.

First on the program was a faculty meeting, each member of the faculty being represented by a member of the sophomore class. Next was the kitchen band playing the school song, followed by Maggie and Jiggs; a dude, golfer, a pantomime by three girls, and last a wedding with all attendants.

The party was one of the largest in a long time and much enjoyed. The evening closed with dancing.

--------------

Election of Class Officers

Monday afternoon class elections were held. The returns are:

Seniors

PRESIDENT- Howard Hendricks

Vice President- William Straughn

Secretary-Treasurer- Lorena Jerald

Class Historian- Barbara Jerald

Assistant Business Manager- Walter Doud

Literary Editor- Christine Cornwell

Juniors

President- William Neal

Vice President- Donald Seeley

Secretary Treasurer- Ann Fleming

Historian- Helen Benedict

Sophomores

President- Charles Jerald

Vice President- Jack Isaacson

Treasurer- Raymond Vermilyea

Secretary- Erdene Inscho

The senior Class historian will act as historian for the senior class day.

In Senior English classes we arte writing lyrics. Here are some of the results:

There was once a Ford that kept on racing,

And all cars continually was chasing. One day, blowed its horn, Plowed out in the corn; Now its fate: a junk heap its gracing. - Margaret Smith

There was sure plenty of English in our high school

To be sure most generally happens to be rule; And to have lyrics be firstly,

It does make me feel thirty; So I give up and die as a fool.- Hilda Day.

There was an old man from Spain, Who arose one morning with a pain;

He called for the doctor, But he was out playing soccer

So he said, " I feel well again." – Paul Reippel

There was a young lady said "Nix"

To all the young men from the sticks, But now, as you see, And old maid is she;

Because she said "Nix" to the hicks.

There was an old lady from Sayre, She had no money to spare;

She found some choice honey, And caught a wild bunny;

So she won a premium at the Mansfield Fair.

School let out sometime Wednesday afternoon for the fair and all day Thursday and Friday.

H.S. Commencement June 3, 1931

Class Day

What? The class-day of the nineteen hundred thirty-one graduating class is over. Where? High School Auditorium. When? Eight o’clock, the third.

The setting was a star party at the "End of a Perfect Day," with the class arranged on the stage, which represented a garden. The color scheme was green and white, offset with flowers. Lattice work across the back of the stage, and colored lights and stars, added much to the effectiveness of the garden scene.

As the curtain was drawn, to further carry out the scheme, the class was heard singing the "End of a Perfect Day."

The stars played the greatest role in the program, since the past, present, and future of the class were revealed through them. The host, Howard Hendricks, and the usher to the planets, Hilda Day, introduced the various speakers of the evening according to the plan of the stars: Barbara Jerald, from the three stars of ‘29, ’30 and ’31, told the class history; William Straughn presented our torch of stars to Christine James, who represented the class of ’32; Walter Doud bequeathed our stars to various persons or classes; Margaret Smith revealed our future through the stars; Lorena Jerald and analyzing a falling meteor, found a gift for every member of the class. The chorus and Connie Belknap sang very splendidly. Our farewell was give by Christine Cornwell in her poem entitled "Vale".

The class seems lost now, in spirit particularly, as the majority of its talents and even some of the property of the school have been willed to others. Therefore, we sincerely wish that the following bequests be accepted thankfully:

The physics class of 1931 doth both will and bequeath the faithful fire escape to the future Physics classes to use on warm spring days.

We also will the use of the steel lockers in the shower rooms, to the class of 1951. May they get better use of them than we did.

To the Junior Class as a whole, we, the Seniors, bequeath that noble section of the school known as Room A, the Senior Home Room. Let them cherish and keep this sanctuary clean and spotless and in that silent period from 8:40 to 9:00 o’clock let silence reign even as it has in the past years.

The class prophecy also aroused a great deal of interest, for realizing that our school days will not have been in vain, if these prophecies come true, because there are surely some marvels-to-be. Notice!!

The Honorable Christine Cornwell, as we expected, is the first Congresswoman from Pennsylvania.

Lewis Barden is very much the "Country Gentleman" on his estate named "Fleming Gates".

In a quiet, studious atmosphere, Doctor Marian Hughes grinds out future music stars.

Yes! Certainly that brisk effective instructor at Meeker’s Business Institute is Mildred Kennedy.

"Pete" Mudge successfully heads that "We Never Sink" oil company.

Fortune has smiled on Elvin Boyden. "Dana" is to be a famous athletic coach.

We, too, know that Mary Van Dusen is to be a great musician. She has proved this by composing the farewell song, which was sung by the class. Beatrice Stickler showed ability as a poet, for she wrote the words for the song.

The delightful party was adjourned about ten o’clock and every one anxiously awaiting the day when these prophecies will be fulfilled.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Looking Forward By William R. Straughn

In view of the critical situation relative to state support for the Teachers Colleges, it is an opportune time to remind our friends of what Mansfield means to them and the territory, which it serves.

Mansfield State Teachers College is more than an accident, or even an historic event. It was not mere accident that the old classical seminary—opened in 1857---was established at Mansfield. It was the realization of the vision of a half dozen prominent citizens who wanted the boys and girls of the North Tier of Pennsylvania to have the same opportunities for an education that other sections of the state enjoyed. The families of the north counties were largely from New England and the New Englander came into being because his ancestors sought equal opportunities in all things that they held dear and fundamental.

The college is an historic event, and more. If only an historic event, it would have functioned as a classical seminary and as a normal school, content to rest on the achievements of thousands of men and women who graduated here and went forth good citizens, to success, wealth, and fame. Ad such, this institution would have been one of the most successful investments the community and the State ever made.

Mansfield is even more. It is the living embodiment of a glorious past. It lives today in the hearts of thousands who here found an opportunity to be something in the world. It reaches into the future and promises to thousands more the education which means equalization of opportunities. The College has become even more than a center where higher education is to be had; in the United States for the training of teachers.

It is no more accident that the college faculty is composed of some of the leading educators of the state and nation. It is a tradition, a policy, a faith solemnly kept by the trustees in selecting those who are to guide and instruct youth.

It is no more accident that leading educators annually come to Mansfield to inspect the plant and the equipment, and to discuss their problems with the faculty. It is no mere accident that Dr. Pasquale Contaldi, supervisor of education in Italy, is to visit Mansfield on March 6---the only teachers college in the United States so honored on this tour. These are but outward recognitions of the reputation, which this college has established and maintained.

It is no mere accident that Mansfield State Teachers College has one of the highest percentages of placement of its graduates of any college in the United States. Nor is it mere accident that forty-one counties of the sixty-seven in Pennsylvania are now represented by students, although naturally the north counties are most largely represented.

This is what our home counties think of the college and the service which it renders: There are only four students from Tioga County attending all other teacher training institutions, and these are for special courses not offered here. From Bradford county come all but ten, who have gone elsewhere for special courses. Potter county has sent us all but nine. Wyoming county all but two. Sullivan county all but five. Far off Susquehanna all but fifteen.

America has committed itself forever to public school education, and thereby to the training of public school teachers through agencies under state control and ownership. These purposes are clear. Our college has been, and now is, committed to improvement in educational facilities and opportunities, and to the important State vocational function of training teachers. That this aim has been true to the vision of its founders is evidenced by its continued success.

So (ang) and only so long, as it continues to be true to this sacred trust, will it prosper in its specialized field of teacher training, and in its larger field of education for worthy boys and girls.

It has always had the support of the best men and women of the North Tier. It is their college, the only one in this vast area. Its program is service. If Mansfield State Teachers College is to be restricted in its future plans for the young people of this district, it will be because our north tier people are indifferent to the careers of their children. "Where there is no vision the people parish."

Dr. Retan Recognized By Noted Educator

Jan. 20, 1935

In an article by Prof. Raymond Wheeler of the University of Kansas, which appears in the current issue of "Educational Administration and Supervision," " Management and Teaching Technique" is listed among the "scientific works, which every educator should be reading." The recommended volume is the work of Dr. George Retan, Director of the Training School at the Mansfield State Teachers College.

Blossburg High School Burned –Feb. 20, 1935 (Picture)

Fire, thought to have started in the boiler room, destroyed the Blossburg High School Sunday evening with an estimated loss of $25,000 on the building and $3,000 on equipment.

There was a partial insurance. Before it was discovered the basement was doomed and the fire has begun to spread to the upper stories of the building, which was built in 1874.

Loss of the building further complicates Blossburg’s pressing school problem. Since the fall of 1933 agitation for a new building to relieve conditions has been under way.

With the "Brick School" in ruins. Arrangements must be made to house 400 grade and high school students. There are two other grade buildings in Blossburg, the Central and the Tannery Schools. In addition it is possible that the school gymnasium, a separate building in mid-town, will be used for classes.

The fire was discovered by Mrs. Bradford Connelly, who resides in the eastern part of Blossburg. The Brick School is located at the top of a hill in the western section. Firemen found the flames beyond control as the oiled floors and old timber quickly caught from the seething basement. In addition there was a stiff breeze.

On the first floor were four rooms for third and fourth grade pupils. The second floor was devoted to high school class rooms in addition to a large auditorium. In the basement besides the boiler room, were science laboratories and other equipment.

The Brick School had been repaired and renovated many times during its long service. This season it had 400 students and eight teachers.

What arrangements would be made to provide for the students were in complete Monday. The School Board was to meet during the day to study plans for classes.

Graduates From Philadelphia College- June 13, 1934

Among the graduates of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science receiving degrees at the commencement exercises there, Wednesday evening, June 6, was Arland B. Cooke, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otis B.Cooke, Clinton Street, Mansfield. Mr. Cooke’s diploma was designated "Meritorious" because his general average throughout his college course was between 87 and 90%.

The Philadelphia College is one of the oldest collegiate institutions in the United States devoted to the teaching of the physical sciences. It was founded in 1921.

Maurice Rumsey wins Scholarship- Aug. 15, 1934

Maurice Rumsey won the State Scholarship in the examinations held in Tioga County recently. This is an award by the State to the highest in the test, of $100 a year toward a college career. In the four years that Mansfield High School students have entered the contest two from here have won. Two years ago Christine Cornwell won, and this year Maurice Rumsey. Byron Clark of Mansfield was second highest.

Historical Documents Added to Collection – Oct. 3, 1934

Through the generosity of Mr. Donald Hoard, of Mansfield, two documents of unusual interest have been added to the collection of historical materials, relating to the Mansfield State Teachers College, which is housed in the library of that institution. One indicates that Mr. Joseph Hoard, one time student and father of the donor, had made a payment of "five dollar and fifty cents for tuition, room rent, wood and incidentals, for half term or more, in full"; the other, that he had been given the use of certain text-books in his studies. The former was dated Sept. 21,1859; the later, while it bears no date, must have been issued in approximately the same year.

Announces Gift Of One Hundred Dollars- Oct. 10,1934

President Straughn, of the Mansfield State Teachers College, has just announced the gift of $100 from the Honorable George Williams, of Wellsboro, for the Student Loan Fund of the College. This is a part of salary, which Mr. Williams received at the special session of the legislature, all of which salary he is donating to charitable or worthy causes in Tioga County. Mr. Williams has represented the county in the state legislature for many years and is the oldest in the point of service in the Republican Party. He did not submit his name for renomination on the ticket. It has been his desire for several years to retire from active political life.

State College Athlete Placed on Mythical Eleven-Jan.16, 1935

Michael Leo Borden, Mansfield State Teachers College athlete, has been named quarterback of the Pennsylvania State Teachers College Eleven, a mythical football team, made up of men from several institutions whose work during the past season was worthy of recognition. News of Borden’s selection comes through H.B. Bevelacqua, managing editor of the "Maroon and Gold", Bloomsburg State Teachers College publication.

Borden, a junior, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Felix Borden of Luzerne, and a graduate of the Luzerne High School, where he made an enviable record in secondary athleties. During his three years at Mansfield, he has earned and filled competently varsity berths in three major sports, football, basketball and baseball.

Six Receive Degrees At End of Semester Jan. 1935

The Mansfield State Teachers College awarded degrees to six and certificates to four persons at the end of the first semester of the school year, last week. Elizabeth A. Osbourn, Howard L. Hendricks and William R. Straughn, Jr., of Mansfield, were among the number who received degrees. Hendricks and Straughn also received pins in recognition of their athletic services to the college.

Lipstick

Speaking on the part of the boys of this high school, I sincerely appreciate the efforts of the girls to make themselves beautiful (for us). If I might make a suggestion on this touching subject, it would be that of not using lipstick. Lipstick might improve the looks if the right color is used and applied properly. We believe, however, that this knack of applying is lost to the girls of the senior high.

The boys, of course, have their fad of wearing suspenders, which by the way, some girls have contracted. It was the rage for a week or two, but is now dying. If this lipsticking is just another fad, please, Oh please, girls, let it die an early death.

Your motto seems to be "the brighter the better". Am I nor right? The way the lips are covered reminds us of a white person made up as a Negro. Every time he opens his mouth he gives himself away. Why doesn’t someone manufacture black lipstick? It couldn’t look any worse than the vermilion some employ.

Your only plausible excuse appears to be that you are using a very tasty brand and hurriedly dab between classes so that you will have a good substitute for candy during the next class. Clever, if I may say. But, if this is the case, please get in touch with "Yours Truly", and I’ll do my best to persuade the teacher to permit you one lollypop per class.

I am closing now, hopefully wishing the lipstick program a gentle but sudden death.

Come on, girls, Let it die.

Sweaters

The masculine population of the Mansfield Senior High School seems very inclined to wear sweaters. Why is it we have no more, the gentlemen who wear coats and vests? Is it that they all buy two pants suits and that the coat and vest wear out with the first pair?

One sweatered friend informs me that you don’t have to button sweaters, but I must say you wouldn’t have to comb your hair so often if you weren’t forever pulling sweaters off and on.

Of Course, your suspenders wouldn’t show, but as they are declining in popular taste it would be all the better if you refrained from sweaters and return to coats and vests.

When you take your girl out and want to look nice, you don’t wear the detested pull-ons. Why not always be your own best exhibit? 

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Published On Tri-Counties Site On 25 JAN 200 
By Joyce M. Tice
Email: Joyce M. Tice

You are the  visitor since the counter was installed on 25 JAN 2007