J A S P E R.

This page is part of the Tri-County Genealogy Sites by Joyce M. Tice

No Unauthorized Commercial Use May Be Made of This Material

Typed for Tri-County Site by Wilma JOHNS Sakowsky


Clayton, W. Woodford, History of Steuben County, New York: with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers, (Philadelphia: Lewis, Peck & Co., 1879 (Philadelphia: Press of J.B. Lippincott)), pp. 342-348.


GENERAL DESCRIPTION.

The town of Jasper was erected from that part of Canisteo comprised in township number two, in the fifth range of the Phelps and Gorham purchase, and a part of Troupsburgh, included in the same township, Jan. 24, 1827. The name was given in honor of Sergeant Jasper, the hero of Fort Moultrie and Savannah Spring. A half a mile was annexed to Greenwood from the west side, in 1848. It has Canisteo and Cameron on the north, Rathbone on the east, Woodhull and Troupsburgh on the south, and Greenwood on the west. The surface is very hilly and broken, the highest summits being over 2000 feet above tide. The streams are small, and for the most part run through deep and narrow valleys. Col. Bill's Creek rises near the residence of P. Ostrander, and runs north to the Canisteo; the head-waters of Tuscarora Creek rise near the residence of J. S. Whiteman, and run south into Woodhull. The soil of this town is chiefly a slaty, gravelly, and clayey loam.

EARLY SETTLEMENT.

In the fall of 1807 a person standing upon the highland in the northern part of Jasper, and looking to the south and east, would have been greeted with a sight which, once seen, is never to be forgotton. Far off down the valley, the bright green tops of the tall pines floated lazily in the light breeze, their giant trunks revealed in the lowlands nearer by, then blending in the distance like the green of growing grain, covered the entire valley, extending in groups part way up the hill-sides where the yellow of the beech and maple fringed the higher land, while dark-blue strips of hemlock extended up the narrow valleys on either side and became finally lost in the golden glow of autumn, far out over the hills. Away off to the south, beyond a fringe of pines higher than the rest, rises a thin blue smoke, perhaps the camp-fire of some roving hunter.

Let us descend into the valley in our course towards it. On either side of the narrow ridge the ground, covered with a soft brown carpet of pine leaves, descends into the swampy level of the higher lands where the waters from numerous hill-side springs gather to form the little brook which flows down through the valley. The woods are alive with birds and squirrels. A breaking twig startles a herd of deer, and, with a snort of alarm, they rapidly disappear among the tall pines, their clattering hoofs breaking the stillness of the forest with a startling sound. Following the course of the little brook the sound of the woodman's axe breaks the stillness, and leads us over a slight hill to the south. As we reach the ascent, light shines through the open trees and reveals a short distance ahead a small clearing in which a man is busily trimming the limbs from a tall pine upon whose fallen trunk he stands. A few rods beyond is the little cabin. The smoke which led us here rises in lazy wreaths from a burning log, beside which stands the large old-fashioned bake-kettle perched high upon its iron legs and its lid covered with smouldering ashes. Near by stands a pail with one large stave extending upward for a handle, and over the fire swing a blackened copper kettle. As we enter the opening the chopper, a large muscular man with bare arms and open collar thrown away from his breast, descends from his high perch, and, bidding us welcome with a strong German accent, leads the way to his cabin. This man is Nicholas Prutsman,* and the little blackened acre, half filled with stumps and surrounded with a rude fence of logs and poles, is the first cleared land in the town of Jasper.

Nicholas Prutsman, Sr., a native of Germany, left the Tioga Valley, with his family and household effects in a wagon, in the spring of 1807, and moving down the valley and up the Canisteo to Addison, followed the course of the Tuscarora Creek, up past the Caleb Smith settlement of the year before, in Woodhull, still farther up the north branch of that stream clearing a road with his axe as he progressed. At a distance of nine miles above the last settlement he turned to the west, and following a small tributary a mile towards its source, unhitched his team, turned them loose in the woods, and made his camp for the night under a giant oak, seven miles from the nearest habitation. Here, accompanied by his wife and children, he camped while building the little cabin which in after-years was replaced by the old homestead near Marlett's Corners, the public highway passing under the old "camp oak," directly in front of the house. Mr. Prutsman built the first saw-mill near the Toogood place. His daughter, Sally Prutsman, who was the wife of the late Orrin Kittle, was the first white child born in Jasper, her birth occurring April 28, 1808. Adam Brotzman, his brother, came the next year and located at the "five corners," his place being a mile distant, towards the east.

Andrew Craig, Sr., one of the most prominent men in the town during his life, left Ireland during the great rebellion, at the age of eighteen, and in 1810 let his home near Philadelphia for the new Western country, and was appointed a sub-land-agent for the proprietors in that city. The first night after his arrival was spent by Mr. Craig in an Indian wigwam, near the present village. His farm joined Andrew Simpson's, south, these two farms occupying what is now a beautiful village. Mr. Craig made the first butter for market, his wife going with him to Philadelphia to work it over into rolls. Andrew Murphy, Sr., brother-in-law of Mr. Craig, father of Andrew Murphy, of Jasper, and John and Robert Murphy, of Canisteo, came soon after and located a short distance north.

Occasional settlements were made during the next decade, including Andrew Moore, who came in 1816, and his brother, John Moore, now one of the most prosperous and respected farmers of the town, who is still living on the place he selected south of Marlatt's Corners. When he came there, a young man, with nothing but his vigorous manhood to rely upon, his neighbors suggested placing him under bonds that he should not become a public charge. Many of those neighbors lived to see him achieve that success which commands respect and adds to the reputation of his surroundings.

A few months after the arrival of Mr. Brotzman, Andrew Simpson, father of Alexander, John, and Herman Simpson, came from Scipio, Cayuga Co., and built his cabin where the Drake Hotel now stands, in the village of Jasper. Mr. Simpson's eldest daughter, Polly, was married to Samuel Gregg, of Elmira, soon after, that being the first marriage ceremony performed in the town. Two other sisters, Minerva and Jane, were subsequently married to Col. Jeffrey and Ira Smith, pioneer settlers of Woodhull. Ebenezer Spencer came in 1808, and located a mile and a half north of Mr. Simpson, applying himself so vigorously to the task of clearing that in 1823 he had the largest improvement in the town.

In 1811, John G. Marlatt settled on the hill between Mr. Simpson's and Nicholas Prutsman's, and afterwards the place became known as Marlatt's Corners. His brothers, Abram, Gideon, and Matthias, came afterwards, and with their father, Gideon Marlatt, Sr., who died in August, 1823, and two brothers-in-law, Uzal McMinds and Thomas Fenton. John G. Marlatt occupied the same farm, from his purchase in 1811 to his death in 1873, at the age of eighty-seven years.

Oliver Pease made the first settlement in 1816, where Wyckoff's tavern became a favorite resort, in the west part of the town, near the deep, dark ravine known as the "Gully." The old tavern has long since disappeared, and near its place rises the tall spire of the Wesleyan church.

In 1823, Robert Sharp, a soldier of 1812, moved on to the farm where he still lives, at the ripe age of ninety-four years. At the loggings and rail-splittings of fifty years ago, he was known as "the man who could out-chop any man in the county." Mrs. Sharp, who is ninety-three years old, is also living where, for nearly three-quarters of a century, this aged couple have seen the progress, in rapid strides, from the unbroken wilderness to the highest civilization.

The first settlement in the northwestern part of the town was made by Guy Wardwell, in 1822. William F. Gardner, Henry Whiteman, and Richard Winship came in 1821, and with him his brother Sylvester, father of Dr. D. C. Winship, a prominent physician of Jasper, located in the southern part of the town. Sylvester Winship, grandfather of the doctor, accompanied his sons.

Here, among the pines, were the favorite hunting-grounds of a quiet race of Indians, who remained in small numbers some years after the white men had begun to clear the valleys. Stone hatchets, arrow-heads, and curiously-wrought stones, whose use was unknown, were picked up in great numbers by the early settlers. "Nicholas," an old Indian, who used to frequent the Craig settlement long after the rest were gone, playing for hours with the children, is said to have brought lead and run it into bullets and fanciful forms for their amusement. It was believed he obtained it about the N. Prutsman farm, but he would only say, in answer to questions, "Plenty; not far off!"

The settlements were few, and far apart. The first school, taught by Amanda Smith, was attended by children whose long walk consumed nearly the entire day; the barefooted tow-clad boys starting early that they might complete their tasks and return before nightfall; their homes were scattered over a distance farther than the bounds of the present town.

Mills were scarce and distant at first, and the ingeniously constructed "dandy rarer" cracked the corn and wheat of the early settler, in a hollowed stump. A spring-pole made fast at the roots of a neighboring tree, swung from a fork set securely in the ground, from the end of which hunt the huge pestle, with a pin run through crosswise for handles. The operator, pouring in his grain, stood upon the stump, and grasping the pin with both hands, brought down the pounder with the force of his weight. The unskilled operator, who caught the pin under his chin, or in his clothing, as it recoiled from the blow, and was hurled from the stump in astonishment, will remembers how it worked.

School moneys were voted each year "to the full extent of what the law allowed," and $250 a year voted for highways and bridges from 1827 to 1839. In the year 1846 a special town-meeting held for that purpose voted 108 to 113 against license to sell liquors. The war of 1861-65 called for special town-meetings in rapid succession towards its close. Feb. 26, 1864, a special call voted a tax of $300 for each recruit, to fill quota, 159 votes being cast for tax, and 15 against. Aug. 6, 1864, a vote of 102 to 84 increased the amount to $500 each. Aug. 26, 1864, a unanimous vote of 64 added another hundred dollars. September 23, the same year, the fifth special town-meeting, by a vote of 144 to 84, again declared in favor of a $600 bounty to recruits for the army.

The first settlement in that part of Jasper comprising most of the southern part of the town, and known as the "Hampshire Settlement," was made by Samuel Dennis, a surveyor from New Hampshire, in the spring of 1824, three miles northeast of the village, on the divide between the Tuscarora and Col. Bill's Creek. Here he remained alone for nearly two years, clearing four acres of land, raising a crop of wheat, and building a house, with, to use his own words, "the howling of the wolves for company." In 1826 he brought his family, and was soon followed by his brother, Moses Dennis, several other families coming the next season.

Ephraim Woodward made a settlement in the town two miles farther west than Mr. Dennis the same fall. He was a man of great muscular power, and an almost constant hunter, whose recklessness led him into many fierce encounters. On one occasion he narrowly escaped death in a fierce encounter with a black bear, which he succeeded in killing, after being lacerated in a horrible manner. His son, Alden Woodward, occupies with him the old homestead.

Deacon Joshua Sargent, Thomas Whiting, Enoch Ordway, David and Putnam Woodward, Jonathan R. and William Prentice, and his father, Henry Prentice, were among the earliest settlers from New Hampshire.

Deacon Thomas Whiting came to Jasper in 1827, bought a farm, and after a year and a half returned to new Hampshire, where he married Sarah Cram, and returned accompanied by Lewis Cram, who settled near him. Deacon Whiting, whose Christian worth endeared him to the community in which he lived, died in 1878, leaving one son, Oliver M. Whiting.

Numerous other families from the same State joined them during the next ten years. The descendants of these hardy New Englanders are prosperous and energetic farmers. Their settlement includes the best-watered body of land in the county, and though somewhat broken, is highly productive. The first church in the town was built by them, and they have always done their full share in promoting the moral welfare of the town. The first five ballots cast in the town of Jasper for the abolition of slavery were written and voted by New Hampshire men of this community, among whom were Alfred Hadley, Thomas Whiting, I. K. Robinson, and Jonathan Whiting. A cheese-factory established by Samuel Dennis, son of the old surveyor, in 1874, is doing a successful business, and adds to the prosperity of the settlement. In 1877 the Hampshire post-office was established at the cheese-factory, with Mr. Dennis, postmaster. Mails are received by the Jasper and Canisteo stage, Wednesdays and Fridays.

* Nicholas spells his name Prutsman, while his brothers Abram and Philip spell theirs Brotzman, their children following their example.

ORGANIZATION.

The first town-meeting was held at the house of Andrew Simpson, the first Tuesday in March, 1827. Stephen Tosley was chosen "moderator" of the meeting, and the following officers were elected: Andrew Craig, Supervisor; William Hunter, Town Clerk; Uzal McMinds, Oliver Pear, Sr., Samuel Dennis, Assessors; Jonathan Schanck, Collector; John G. Marlatt, Elijah Peak, and Benjamin Hilliker, Commissioners of Highways; Stephen Towsley and Ira Smith, Overseers of the Poor; Henry Phoenix, Enoch Ordway, and Joseph Dutton, Commissioners of Schools; Ira Simpson, Jonathan R. Prentice, and William Hunter, Inspectors of Schools; Lewis Fenton, Philip Brotzman, and Jonathan Schanck were chosen Constables, by the uplifted hand; Pathmasters, J. G. Marlatt, Ira Smith, Barnabas Kinney, Joseph Dutton, Isaac Wardwell, Israel S. Osgood, Alvah June, Benjamin Hilliker, Jehial Wood, Ebenezer Spencer, Jedediah Talbot, Benjamin Woodward; Fence-Viewers, John G. Marlatt, Stephen Towsley, and Philip Failing. Two hundred and fifty dollars were voted for roads and bridges. In the general election held in November, 1827, there were 67 votes cast, and Oliver Peas, Stephen Towsley, Ira Smith, and Samuel Dennis were elected Justices of the Peace. Samuel Dennis, William Hunter, Andrew Craig, Uzal McMinds, and Oliver Pease were Inspectors of Election.

LIST OF TOWN OFFICERS.

 

Supervisors.

Town Clerks.

Collectors.

1827.

Andrew Craig.

William Hunter.

Jonathan Schanck.

1828.

" "

" "

" "

1829.

" "

" "

Hinckley Spencer.

1830.

" "

" "

" "

1831.

" "

" "

Darius Simpson.

1832.

" "

" "

" "

 

 

H. Spencer (v.).

 

1833.

Stephen Towsley.

" "

Allen Drake.

1834.

" "

" "

Jonathan Whiting.

1835.

" "

" "

" "

1836.

" "

Charles Hunter.

" "

1837.

William Hunter.

" "

" "

1838.

" "

" "

Arnold Phelps.

1839.

" "

J. D. Mandeville.

" "

1840.

J. R. Prentice.

John McMinds.

" "

1841.

John G. Marlatt.

" "

Joseph Fenton.

1842.

J. R. Prentice.

" "

" "

1843.

William Hunter.

Robert Boyd.

" "

1844.

Andrew Craig.

" "

" "

1845.

" "

Joseph Fenton.

John McMinds.

1846.

William Hunter.

Peter S. S. McNeal.

H. C. Simpson.

1847.

Alvah June.

" "

" "

1848.

" "

" "

Milo Chilson.

1849.

" "

" "

Asa B. Mudge.

1850.

" "

H. C. Simpson.

Jedediah Stephens.

1851.

" "

Darius Simpson.

Wm. M. Waight.

1852.

Darius simpson.

Uri W. Metcalf.

Lorenzo S. Wolcott.

1853.

J. R. Prentice.

" "

" "

1854.

Jesse L. Bartow.

" "

Elias Whittemore.

1855.

J. R. Prentice.

" "

" "

1856.

Jonathan Schanck.

" "

" "

1857.

" "

Ira D. Hotchkiss.

John McMinds.

1858.

Ira D. Hotchkiss.

Nich. B. Hilbone.

" "

1859.

" "

Milton Timerman.

Wm. T. Woodward.

1860.

Henry C. Prentice.

James Outman.

Henry Van Orsdale.

1861.

" "

James S. Outman.

Amos R. Hilbourn.

1862.

" "

W. E. Craig.

Josiah S. Craig.

1863.

Amos T. Woodbury.

James S. Outman.

Burnham Sargeant.

1864.

" "

Henry Van Orsdale.

" "

1865.

" "

Uri W. Metcalf.

C. G. Hutchinson.

1866.

Willis E. Craig.

J. S. Outman.

Orrin Swan.

1867.

Samuel F. Dennis.

" "

Andrew Murphy.

1868.

" "

" "

M. E. Timerman.

1869.

" "

" "

H. C. Mulhollen.

1870.

Geo. D. Woodward.

" "

M. E. Timerman.

1871.

" "

" "

H. C. Mulhollen.

1872.

Samuel Dennis, Jr.

" "

M. E. Timerman.

1873.

Willis E. Craig.

" "

J. B. Sargent.

1874.

James S. Outman.

Henry B. Andrews.

Charles Whiting.

1875.

W. E. Craig.

" "

Charles B. Hillbourn.

1876.

" "

" "

Hosea P. Barnard.

1877.

Asa Spencer.

Willard J. Guinipp.

" "

1878.

" "

" "

Andrew Hardy.

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

1827.

Oliver Peas.

1854.

Morgan Benaway.

 

Stephen Towsley.

1855.

my copy unreadable

 

Ira Smith.

 

John T. Plato.*

 

Samuel Dennis.

1856.

Roswell B. Griffin.

1831.

Jonathan R. Prentice.

1857.

Jonathan K. Ketchum.

 

Joseph Henshaw.

1858.

Solomon Countryman

1832.

John J. Rowley.

 

Oliver B. Countryman*

1833.

Samuel Hudson.

1859.

Jonas Timerman.

 

Peter Drake.

 

Moses F. Whittmore.

1834.

Darius Simpson.

1860.

Amara Merithew.

1835.

Jonas Clark.

1861.

Allen A. Van Orsdale.

1836.

Samuel Hudson.

 

Moses F. Whittemore.

1837.

John Wyckoff.

1862.

Robert Murphy.

1838.

Darius Simpson.

1863.

Jonas Timerman.

 

Abram Butts.

1864.

Jonathan K. Ketchum.

1839.

Richard Sheffield.

1865.

Asa Spencer.

1840.

Harvey Andrews.

1866.

S. Countryman.

1841.

Amara Merithew.

1867.

Alfred Williams.

 

John More.

 

Augustus Van Orsdale.

1842.

Darius Simpson.

 

J. M. Simpson.

1843.

Richard Sheffield.

1868.

Moses F. Whittemore.

 

Herman C. Simpson.

1869.

Adam Hardy (2d).

1844.

John R. Towsley.

1870.

Solomon Countryman.

1845.

Amara Merithew.

1871.

Andrew Murphy.

1846.

Harvey Andrews.

1872.

Jerome M. Simpson.

1847.

Dennis Knapp.

1873.

Adrian Hardy, Jr.

1848.

John A. Parker.

1874.

Edwin P. Spencer.

1849.

Amara Merithew.

1875.

Allen A. Van Orsdale.

1850.

Harvey Andrews.

1876.

J. M. Simpson.

1851.

R. H. Sheffield.

1877.

Peter Drake.

1852.

Alvah June.

1878.

De Witt C. Amey.

1853.

William McLane.

 

 

* Vacancy.

VILLAGE OF JASPER.

The old business portion of Jasper, known as the Five Corners, was centered around Adam Brotzman's tavern, and had grown to contain besides the tavern a saw-mill, two stores, or places where goods were sold, and a post-office, the first in the town. William Gardner was postmaster. The post-office became an object of contention between the rival corners, and was changed to Marlatt's Corners, where John G. Marlatt became postmaster. Previous to this Harvey Phoenix came from Painted Post, bought five acres of land, and opened the first store between Bath and Knoxville, Pa., near Marlatt's. In 1826, Edward Craig began clerking for Mr. Phoenix, and in 1834 bought him out, and moved the store to the old Craig farm at the Five Corners. Nelson Johnson went to Washington, and secured the appointment of Andrew Craig, Sr., postmaster, and the removal of the post-office to the new store. At this time there were only the Craig house, the store, and two other houses,-one a log house near the creek, where Andrew Simpson lived, and a little plank house where his son, Carter Simpson, sold candies and notions.

Nelson Johnson built the first steam flouring-mill, in 1848, and the only flouring-mill in the town.

The present village of Jasper contains 260 inhabitants, and is a place of some business importance. There are nine stores here, the proprietors of which are generally descendants of the first settlers. There are also the ordinary trades-shops, a saw-mill, two hotels, and three churches. A beautiful cemetery is located just above the village. The buildings are neat and modern in appearance. Mails are received daily by stage from Canisteo. A post-office has also been established at Talbott's Creek, under the name of North Jasper, and the West Jasper post-office closed.

The abandoned Five Corners is now a little cluster of farm-houses surrounding a large hotel recently completed, on the site of the old Swan tavern, and just across the creek from the pioneer tavern of Abram Brotzman. The old cemetery at the Five Corners contains the remains of many of the old settlers of the town, among whom are those of Barnabas Kinney, David Cook, Stephen Towsley, Uri Merriam, and Mrs. Sally Kittle, the first child born in Jasper.

CHURCHES.

JASPER BAPTIST CHURCH.

On the 9th of February, 1817, there assembled in what was then the town of Troupsburgh, Nathaniel Seelye, Bedford George, Charles Card, William and John George, Rebecca Seelye, Lurena Herrington, and Phoebe Card; Charles Card was appointed clerk. Agreeing upon articles of faith, they united in forming the Troupsburgh Baptist Church. Such as had not been, were baptized. During the month of June, 1817, Rev. Samuel Bigelow baptized and received into the church 14 persons. At a meeting held at Charles Card's, July 12, 1817, which was presided over by Rev. Andrew Sherfarne, of the Massachusetts Missionary Society, the name was changed to the Jasper Baptist Church. In 1823, the order of Freemasons became a source of much trouble in the church. The present house of worship in Jasper village was raised June 7, 1834, and occupied, as soon as inclosed, for meetings, but was not finished until 1840. The trustees were Ebenezer Spencer and H. C. Simpson. There have belonged to this society since its organization 275 members. In August, 1849, the membership was 67; July, 1856, it was 32.

Pastors, 1818, Rev. David Smith; 1819, Charles Card; 1826; William Moore; 1832, John B. Chase; 1837, E. Murdock; 1839, Thomas W. Colby; 1841, David Smith, P. Colgrove; 1842, Asa Griffin; 1844, Warren Rice; 1846, William Raymond; 1847, Warren Rice; 1848, Levi Stone; 1854, Calvin Thomas; 1861, G. Crocker; 1863, W. Capron; 1866, Roswell Corbett; 1868, E. T. Mallory; 1872, A. H. Todd; 1875, E. L. Garrett, the present pastor.

There have been licensed to preach from this church: 1817, David Smith; 1818, C. Card; 1835, E. Kittell; 1841, Asa Griffin; Ordained: 1820, David Smith; 1862, Thomas Dunham.

Deacons: 1820, Jesse Rowley; 1829, John Kent; 1830, E. Kittell; 1837, Hinckley Spencer, Darius Simpson; 1844, Adrian Hardy; 1859, Benjamin Thomas; 1860, E. C. June. Present Clerk, A. J. Spencer. Trustees, A. J. Spencer, E. C. June. The present membership is 43.

FIRST PREBYTERIAN CHURCH OF JASPER.

During the summer of 1825, Enoch Ordway organized the first Sunday-school in Jasper. This school met for two years in Mr. Ordway's house, then in a vacant building, and in 1828, in a log school-house on the present farm of S. T. Dennis. In 1828 a Sunday-school society was formed for the purpose of organizing Sunday-schools throughout the town. Oct. 29, 1828, the First Presbyterian Church of Jasper was formed with 25 members. Deacon Joshua Sargent, who has taught a class of men in this Sunday-school for forty-two years, was one of the first elders. Enoch Ordway was one of the first deacons. Mrs. Thomas whiting and Mrs. S. Fry Dennis are the only original members of the church now living. Samuel Dennis and wife, Earl Stone and wife, Samuel Butler and wife, Joshua Sargent and wife, Jedediah Talbot, Cloe Lawson, Parmelia Whittemore, and Putnam Woodward were of the first members. Wm. H. Prentice and wife added their names two days afterwards. The first pastor as Rev. Mr. Pomeroy. In 1830 meetings were held at Adam Failing's house, boards were brought in for seats. The women sat in the house, and the men on the piazza and the stumps about the yard, while the minister stood in the door. The women came with sun-bonnets, while the little girls, clad in checked-tow frocks, wore white cotton handkerchiefs around their heads, and all carried their well-cleaned shoes in their hands until near the meeting. They generally brought their dinners, and attended the forenoon sermon and Sunday-school before dinner, and had another meeting after, when they dispersed for their homes, following paths through the woods, by marks cut upon the trees with an axe. This church received the 100-acre gospel lot from the Pulteneys, their organization being first in accordance with the incorporate law of the State.

The first church, 24 by 36 feet in size, was built on the State road, near Earl Stone's, by William H. Prentice, Earl Stone and David Ward, committee, who commenced their work in 1844, and finished in 1846. Meetings were held in it while building. The first Sunday after its completion it caught fire in the morning and was burned before service. The second building was immediately erected in the Hampshire settlement, near the Denin's place, and was dedicated in December, 1847, by Rev. G. T. Everest. Rev. G. T. Everest, Jonathan Whiting, Earl Stone, Thomas Whiting, and Sylvester Lamson were trustees and builders. This building was abandoned on the completion of a larger church in Jasper village, in 1872, at a cost of $6000, exclusive of the site, which was donated by W. E. Craig. The church was dedicated Feb. 15, 1872, by Rev. W. A. Miles. The trustees were G. D. Woodward, S. F. Dennis, O. M. Whiting.

Pastors: 1829, Rev. David Higgins; 1830, Rev. Mr. Pomeroy; 1835, Orrin Johnson; 1837-38, Robert Hubbard; 1839-42, Noah Cressey; 1843-44, T. W. Duncan; 1847-48, G. T. Everest; 1852, Geo. Spaulding; 1854, Harvey Hyde; 1856-58, Geo. Van Deurs; 1858-67, S. A. Rawson; 1868, Alexander Gulick; 1869-73, Samuel A. Rawson; 1874-75, John Beecher; 1876, J. H. Brown; 1877-78, Arthur Bruen, present pastor.

Officers: Joshua Sargent, Jonathan R. Prentice, J. L. Ordway, J. Sumner Sargent, Deacons; Samuel Dennis, Clerk; Asa Spencer, Burnham Sargent, O. M. Whiting, Trustees. Two members of this church are now laboring as foreign missionaries: Rev. Joseph Whiting, in China, and Miss Olive Whiting, in Japan.

THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF JASPER.

The first meetings of this society, held in the town of Jasper, were under the auspices of Mrs. S. A. Grinolds and Mrs. Smith, in 1818, who are said to have been the only Methodists in the town at that date. Rev. ----- Buel was the first preacher. As a result of his labors there was a revival, and a class was formed under his preaching, of which Uzal McMinds was made class-leader. Mrs. McMinds, Louis Hayes and wife, Samuel Cady, who became a local preacher; Mrs. Cady, Hollis Cady and wife, Jonathan Cady and wife, Hon. Samuel Griggs, afterwards of Troupsburgh, and his wife, a Mr. Marlatt and wife, and some others, uniting in forming the first class. Meetings were held in the school-house at Marlatt's Corners, and as late as 1834 were held at the present village, and at the old corners below, in the school-houses, until the erection of the present church. Revs. James Bronson, ----- Magee, ----- Peck, Micah Sager, and Asa Orcutt were early preachers, traveling a long circuit and meeting their appointments once in four weeks. Rev. Mr. Atchison, who preached here in 1830, is well remembered as a man of peculiarly regular habits, who allowed nothing to interfere with his fixed hours for eating, sleep, or study, no matter what the surroundings might be.

Nicholas Prutsman and Miles Kinney were trustees building the church, which was repaired, and a large basement constructed beneath. The church is at present a fine building, standing upon a hill-side street overlooking the village and the valley to the north. The block upon which it stands belongs to the society, and contains also a fine parsonage. During the pastorate of Rev. G. W. Coolbaugh, a splendid new bell, weighing over 2000 pounds, was purchased, and on New Year's day, 1879, it first rang, in proclamation of the advent of a Happy New Year. This bell is toned to the key of G, and wears the inscription, "Jasper Methodist Episcopal Church, Rev. G. J. Du Bois, 1878." The total cost of the church has been $7000. The rededication, which occurred after the repairs, took place in 1871, Rev. B. I. Ives preaching the dedicatory sermon. During the pastorate of Rev. G. J. Du Bois, in 1856, Rev. Michael Coyle, then a school-teacher at Troupsburgh, was converted. He is now a prominent member of the Central New York Methodist Episcopal Conference. At that time there were upwards of 150 persons added to the church.

The following pastors have officiated at this charge, and preached before its organization: 1830-35, Revs. Mr. Achison, ----- Anderson, ----- Ashworth; 1836, I. J. B. McKinney; 1837, ----- Waller and ----- St. John; 1838-53, Luther Northway, M. Rogers, ----- Huntley, C. Gould, M. H. Davis; 1854-55, C. J. Bradbury; 1856, G. J. Du Bois; 1857, Chandler Wheeler, D. Rittenhouse; 1858, Carlos Gould; 1859, C. J. Bradbury; 1860-61, Merritt M. Davis; 1864, J. Powell; 1865-66, J. J. Turton; 1867-68, L. T. Hawkins; 1869, C. Dillenbeck; 1870-72, Francis M. Smith; 1873-75, C. G. Curtis; 1876-77, J. R. Catlin; 1878-79, G. J. Du Bois.

The present officers of the society are Milton Timerman, Class-Leader; Edwin Whiting, Recording Steward; C. B. Hilburn, J. M. Taft, Robert Hilburn, Abram Walrath, De Witt C. Amey, Stewards; Jonathan Whiting, Andrew Savage, John N. Duncle, R. Johnson, Trustees. The present membership is 190. It is impossible to obtain a full history of this church, as all their old books of record have been destroyed.

WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH.

The First Westleyan Methodist Church of Jasper was organized in March, 1871, at the "Gully school-house," in the west part of the town, under the preaching of Rev. Mr. Sinsabaugh. Rev. P. D. Rathbone had preached there a short time previous. The first members were Geo. W. Sibley and wife, Thurlow Woodward and wife, William Drake and wife, Joseph Banks and wife. Geo. Sibley, who afterwards became a minister, was made class-leader, and Thurlow Woodward, clerk. A building was immediately commenced under the supervision of Geo. W. Sibley, Martin Campbell, and Thomas Woodward, trustees, and was dedicated Feb. 14, 1875, by Rev. Adam Crooks, general agent of the Wesleyan connection. Pastors: 1872, P. D. Rathbun; 1872, Rev. Mr. Sinsabaugh, Rev. Mr. Sniffin; 1873, Geo. W. Sibley; 1874-75, S. D. Prentice; 1876-77, G. W. Scudder; 1878, S. W. Jennings. Membership, 27.

Present officers, William Drake, Clerk; William Root, Class-Leader; Otis Potter, William Drake, Stewards; Peter Drake, George Wentworth, Trustees. The church building, a neat-edifice costing $1800, is located on Jasper Hill, on the east side of the deep, dark gorge called "the gully," near the highest point of land in the town.

MILITARY RECORD OF JASPER.

Cooper, Wm. H. H., private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Barnes, Nelson, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Sept. 5, 1861, one year; must. out Aug. 17, 1865, at Elmira.

Waight, George Wolcott, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 21, 1884, one year; disch. for disability and must. out at Philadelphia, Pa.

Waight, Franklin, corp., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H.; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; wounded at the battle of Cox's Plantation, La.; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

De Witt, Lafayette Alonzo, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Sept.14, 1861, three years; wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; re-enl. Dec. 20, 1863; in service three years and ten months.

Doty, Stephen Oliver, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 30, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Timerman, Montgomery Albert, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 26, 1864, one year.

Beneway, James Horatio, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. F; enl. Sep 3, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Beneway, George Washington, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Heckman, Sylvester, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., private, Co. H; enl. Aug. 30, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Williams, Dennis, private, 85th N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1864, one year; disch. June 27, 1865.

Dennis, Moses, 2d sergt., 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. H; died at Washington, D.C., April 6, 1862, of typhoid fever.

Johnson, Edgar Wallace, private, 50th N.Y. Eng., Co. F; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years; died at Washington, May 8, 1864.

Banks, Ezra (2d), private, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. G; enl. Dec. 24, 1861, three years.

Countryman, Alfred, private, 141st N.Y. Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug 15, 1862, three years; died July 14, 1863, at Portsmouth, Va., of remittent fever.

Countryman, David France, corp., 86th N.Y. Inf. Co. K; enl. Aug. 30, 1861, three years; wounded at battle of Mine Run, Nov. 27, 1863; pro. to corp., Nov. 1863; disch. Sept. 9, 1864.

Owen, Courtland, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Feb. 26, 1862, three years; wounded at battle of Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863; prisoner of war at Richmond; paroled about May 14, 1863.

Moore, Theron Vincent, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; pro. to corp., 1864; to sergt., April 1, 1864; taken prisoner April 8, 1864; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Moore, Theodore Van Rensselaer, private, 15th N.Y. Vet. Cav., Co. C; enl. Sept. 26, 1864, one year.

Talbot, Dennis, 1st sergt.; 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Sept. 7, 1861, three years; pro. to 1st sergt., 1863; re-enl. Dec. 20, 1863; wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864, in left shoulder.

Talbot, John Dugald Cameron, private, 189th N.Y. Inf., Co. A ; enl. Sept. 1, 1864, one year; died Oct. 15, 1864.

Cook, Abram, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; wounded at Port Hudson, June 26, 1863; disch. March 26, 1864.

Vroufan, Isaac Wardwell, private, 76th N.Y. Inf., Co. D; drafted July 18, 1863, for three years; disch. Dec. 29, 1863, for disability.

Whittemore, Abijah Webster, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; died December 26, 1862, of typhoid pneumonia.

Vaughan, Charles, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., three years; died Feb. 14, 1863.

Vaughan, James Miron, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. 1862, three years; died at New Orleans, La., Feb. 10, 1863, of typhoid fever.

Stephens, Edwin B., private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. E; enl. Sept. 12, 1864, one year.

Edwards, Stephen, corp. 16th N.Y.H. Art., Co. C; enl. Jan. 1, 1864, three years; enl. in April, 1861, and must. into U.S. service, June 15, 1861, in the 34th N.Y. Regt., Co. E; must. out June 30, 1863.

Winship, Geo. W., corp., 16th N.Y.H. Art., Co. F; enl. Jan 4, 1864, three years.

Whiting, William, private; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years; detailed as clerk for headquarters of rendesvous at Elmira, N.Y.

Huls, Benj., Jr., private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. A; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, one year.

Hayes, Jasper Newton, private, 16th N.Y.H. Art., Co. M; enl. Sept. 29, 1864, one year; disch. June 3, 1865, for disability.

Waight, Volney, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Sept. 10, 1861, three years; must. out Oct. 1864.

Hardy, Charles Orley, private, 91st N.Y.H. Art., Co. C; drafted July 18, 1863, for three years; disch. July 19, 1865.

Hardy, Simon, private, 9th N.Y.H. Art., Co. E; enl. Feb. 12, 1864, three years; disch. Sept. 30, 1865.

Mayhew, John Christopher, corp., 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Sept. 1, 1861, three years; re-enl. Dec. 30, 1863; pro. to corp., Sept. 1, 1864; disch. July 4, '65.

Timerman, Wm. John, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 26, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Whiting, Charles, private, 161st N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 5, 1861, one year; disch. May 9, 1863.

Huntingdon, John, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Feb. 19, 1864, three years; died of chronic diarrhaea at Vicksburg, Miss., July 4, 1864.

Lamson, Leonard Stockbridge, private, 16th N.Y.H. Art.; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years.

Hatch, Miles Powell, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H, one year; died at New Orleans, La., Jan. 12, 1865, from fracture of skull received Jan. 9, 1865, on steamer J. H. Dickey, which collided with steamer John Raine, near Vicksburg, Miss.

Talbot, John, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. 1862, three years; died at New Orleans, La., Jan. 30, 1865, of chronic diarrhaea.

Cardwill, Lucius Demster, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. E; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, one year; wounded Jan. 9, 1865, on the boat John H. Dickey, on the Mississippi River; disch. May 29, 1865.

Murphy, Andrew, sergt., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; disch. May 13, 1863, for disability.

Bartoo, Jesse Kellogg, corp., 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Oct. 4, 1861, three years; pro. to corp., July, 1862; wounded in left hand in battle of Chancellorsville; disch. Oct. 9, 1864.

Andrews, Jonas Dodge, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 1862, three years; disch. for disability, May 9, 1863.

McMindes, Prescott, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Aug. 14, 1861, three years; disch. Aug. 30, 1864.

McMindes, Uzal, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Sept. 25, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

McMindes, Jasper, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 25, 1864, one year; disch. Oct. 1865.

Stewart, Wm. L., private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Aug. 1861, three years; died near Gettysburg, July 12, 1863.

Edwards, Artemus Andrew, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. I; enl. March 28, 1864, three years.

Patrick, Sebert, priate; enl. Jan. 1, 1864, three years.

Reynolds, John.

Jacobs, Delos, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Aug. 17, 1861, three years; disch. Sept. 2 or 3, 1864.

Robinson, John, Jr., private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Sept. 5, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Robinson, Josiah, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 3, 1864, one year; served two years in 35th N.Y. Inf.; disch. Sept. 20, 1863.

Robinson, Samuel, corp., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; pro. to corp., Feb. 9, 1863; died at Port Hudson, La., July 14, 1863.

Winship, Wesley, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 3, 1864; died Jan. 9, 1865, on steamer John H. Dickey, on the Mississippi River, which collided with the steamer John Raine.

Towsley, Wm. Harrison, 141st N.Y. Inf.,; must. Oct. 3, 1864, one year.

Hardy, Wm., private, 9th N.Y.H. Art., Co. E; enl. Sept. 3, 1864, one year; wounded in battle of Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864, in left though; disch. July 6, 1865.

Hardy, Adrian (2d), private; enl. March 10, 1862, three years; detailed as nurse in hospital serving three years; re-enl. April, 1864, in 33d Co., 2d Bat., Vet. Res. Corps, for three years; pro. to sergt. about Sept. 1, 1865.

Towsley, Charles Alanson, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; disch. for disability, June 15, 1865.

Towsley, Amos Hubbard, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; died July 7, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhaea.

Prentice, Francis, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; died at Alexandria, Va., Sept. 16, 1862, and buried at that place.

Barnard, Horace, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 27, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Calkins, Charles, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 27, 1862, three years; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Wentworth, Augustus Hall, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. M; enl. Aug. 26, 1861, three years.

More, Ira, private, 97th N.Y. Regt., Co. G; drafted for three years; died Sept. 24, 1864, near Petersburg, Va.

Healy, Eleazer, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. C; enl. Dec. 25, 1863, three years.

Bossee, Ransom Philip, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 20, 1862, three years; died at Elmira, N.Y., Dec. 5, 1862.

Springer, Redmond, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. C; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years; died June 18, 1864, at Vicksburg, Miss., of chronic diarrhaea.

Brown, Frederick D., private, 141st N.Y. Inf.; must. Oct. 3, 1864, one year.

Gee, Edward, 141st N.Y. Inf.; must. Oct. 3, 1864, one year.

Whiteman, Jacob, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 3, 1864, one year; died at Vicksburg, Miss., March 29, 1865, of typhoid fever.

Sargent, Sumner, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Aug. 30, 1861, three years; disch. Feb. 23, 1865.

Newman, Hosea, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 20, 1862, three years; disch. June 26, 1865.

Lilly, Manley, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 27, 1862, three years; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Hadley, Wm. Wallace, private, 76th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; drafted July 18, 1863, for three years; in battle of the Wilderness, and taken prisoner, May 6, 1864; sent to Lynchburg and Danville, Va., Andersonville, Ga., Florence, S.C.; prisoner even months; disch. Sept. 8, 1865.

Hilburn, Charles Bratzman, corp., 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Sept. 9, 1861, three years; pro. to corp., Oct. 1862; wounded at second Bull Run and in the Wilderness, in right leg; taken prisoner June 14, 1864; prisoner at Libby, Andersonville, Columbia, and Florence; disch. April 27, 1865.

Hilburn, Wm. Harrison, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Sept. 6, 1861, three years; died Dec. 12, 1863, at Alexandria, Va., from wound in the head received at Mine Run; buried at Jasper, N.Y.

Talmadge, Andrew Murphy, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years.

Craig, William Henry, sergt., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 20, 1862, three years; pro. to sergt., July 1, 1863; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Taylor, Sheldon Goodrich, private, 16th N.Y.H. Art., Co. C; enl. Jan. 1, 1864, three years; died at Wilmington, N.C., March 28, 1865; first enl. in 107th N.Y. Inf., Co. K, March 7, 1862; disch. March 20, 1863.

Butler, Israel, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Aug. 17, 1861, three years; re-enl. Dec. 30, 1863; disch. July 4, 1865.

Walker, Byron, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Sept. 9, 1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg in left arm, July 2, 1863; re-enl. March 4, 1864; taken prisoner Nov. 1, 1864, in front of Petersburg; prisoner at Richmond, Va., four months; disch. June 5, 1865.

Green, Seeley Delos, private, 22d N.Y. Cav., Co. G; enl. Feb. 15, 1864, three years; served in 64th N.Y. Regt., Co. G, eighteen months; wounded at Antietam; disch. Aug. 12, 1865.

Van Fleet, Gustavus, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. I; enl. March 28, 1864, three years; died at Vicksburg, Miss., Nov. 29, 1864, of chronic diarrhaea.

Sibley, Samuel Franklin, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. E; enl. Feb. 20, 1864, three years.

Barnes, Chester, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Dec. 25, 1863, three years.

Kills, Thomas, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. C; enl. Jan. 1, 1864, three years; died at St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 15, 1864, of quick consumption.

Kirtland, John D., private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Sept. 12, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Darrow, Daniel Webster, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 29, 1862, one year.

Hutchinson, Albert, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Woodward, Moses F., private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. A; must. Sept. 12, 1864, one year; disch. Aug. 28, 1865.

Green, George Myron, private, 22d N.Y. Cav., Co. G; enl. Dec. 14, 1863, three years; taken prisoner June 29, 1864; died at Sallsbury, N.C., Dec. 2, '64.

Monroe, Andrew Jackson, private, 22d N.Y. Cav., Co. G; enl. Dec. 14, 1863, three years; died at Andersonville, Ga.

Craig, James A., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Dec. 31, 1863, three years; trans. to Battery A, at Tortugas, Oct. 1865.

Gosper, William A., private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Sept. 5, 1861, one year; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Myers, William H., must. Oct. 4, 1864.

Chase, Francis M., must. Sept. 28, 1864.

York, Charles W., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 3, 1864.

Schanck, Emory, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Feb. 29, 1864, three years; died Aug. 27 or 28, 1864, on the transport Merrimac, at sea.

Ketchum, Robert Morris, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; must. Sept. 9 or 10, 1863, three years; disch. Sept. 11, 1864.

Talmadge, Ira Stephens, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 28, 1861, three years; disch. Sept. 1863, at Baton Rouge.

McMindes, Ezra, private, 34th N.Y. Inf., Co. E; enl. May 5, 1861, two years; died Oct. 9, 1862, at Annapolis, Md.

Jackson, Levi, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Sept. 12, 1861, three years; died at Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1862, of typhoid fever.

Broughton, John, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Oct. 10, 1861, three years; died at Washington D.C., March 19, 1862.

Vroman, William, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Barnes, Levi, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 27, 1862, three years.

Marlatt, Wm. Henry Martin, corp., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; pro. to corp., Aug. 1, 1864; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Cushman, Lucius Curtis, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 20, 1862, three years; volunteered to assault Port Hudson, May 27, 1863, and received a wound in thigh; died at New Orleans, Dec. 13, 1863, of typhoid fever, and buried at that place.

Woodward, Thurlow Houston, private, 136th N.Y. Inf., Co. C; enl. Aug. 30, 1863, three years; disch. Nov. 1, 1865.

Raner, Jeremiah, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., co. B; enl. Sept. 7, 1861, three years; disch. Sept. 13, 1864.

Woodward, Philo Putnam, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Oct. 5, 1861, three years; disch. Oct. 17, 1864.

Wood, Charles, private, 36th N.Y. Inf., Co. K; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, three years; wounded at battle of Wilderness, Nov. 27, 1863; disch. June 23, 1865.

Wyckoff, Elias, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; disch. Aug. 1863.

Freeland, James, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 27, '62, three years.

Freeland, Clark, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; must. Oct. 27, 1862, three years; died at Fort Wood, New York harbor, Dec. 1862.

Quick, Francis, private, 107th N.Y. Inf., Co. F; enl. July 26, 1862, three years; wounded at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863, and Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; taken prisoner; at Libby prison eighteen days; disch. Aug. 23, 1865.

Alyord, Rufus Lee, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Sept. 6, 1862, three years; disch. May 13, 1865.

Sibley, Hosea, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; killed in action at cox's Plantation, La., July 14, 1863.

Jennings, Samuel Washington, corp. 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 26, 1862, three years; wounded at Mansfield, La., April 2, 1864; disch. May 20, 1865.

Mulhollon, Wm., private, Co. E, 34th N.Y. Inf.; enl. May, 1861, two years; disch. June, 1863; re-enl. In 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. I, Jan. 15, 1864, for three years; wounded at the explosion of a magazine at Mobile, Ala., May 25, 1865, in both shoulders; disch. Oct. 18, 1865.

Phelps, Milo, private, 111th N.Y. Inf., Co. G; enl. July, 1861, three years; taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry, Sept. 1862, and paroled; disch. Feb. 1864.

Hutchinson, Wm. Edwin, private, 102d N.Y.N.G., Co. B; enl. Sept. 12, 1864, one hundred days; disch. at New York City, Nov. 13, 1864.

Dibble, Calvin, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 5, 1862, three years; wounded at Donaldson, La., July, 1863; disch. March 8, 1864.

Prentice, William Reed, capt., 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; pro. to sergt., Oct. 27, 1862; to 1st lieut., July 14, 1863; to capt., Sept. 16, 1863; disch. at Tortugas, Sept. 20, 1865.

Dennis, Christopher, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Haven, Hiram, private, 33d N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. April, 1861, two years; died at New Orleans, La., of chronic diarrhaea, Sept. 15, 1864.

Raymond, John, private, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. G; enl. Aug. 1863, three years; disch. June 3, 1863.

Raymond, Frederick, private, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. G; enl. Aug. 1863, three years.

Raymond, Charles, private, 14th U.S. Regulars, Co. E, three years; wounded in ankle in battle of Weldon Railroad, Va.

Raymond, Josiah, private, 2d Vet. Cav., Co. G, three years; died at New Orleans, La., June 17, 1864, of smallpox.

York, James Arcelius, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. G; enl. Oct. 10, 1861, three years; probably killed at battle of the Wilderness, Va., May 10, 1864.

Erskins, Joseph, private, 86th N.Y. Inf., Co. G; enl. Oct. 10, 1861, three years; died at Washington, D.C., May 24, 1864, of smallpox.

Lason, George Washington, sergt., 76th N.Y. Inf., Co. B; enl. Sept. 25, 1861, three years; taken prisoner at battle of the Wilderness, May, 1864; prisoner seven months at Andersonville, Ga., and Florence, S.C.; wounded in the arm in battle of Fredericksburg; re-enl. Jan. 1, 1864; trans. to 147th Regt., Co. A, March, 1865; disch. June 9, 1865.

Davis, Benjamin Franklin, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 20, 1862, three years; disch. June 14, 1865, at Barrancas, Fla.

Sanford, Daniel Todd, sergt., 89th N.Y. Inf., Co. C; enl. Sept. 7, 1861, three years; pro. to sergt., Sept. 17, 1862; wounded in groin at Wire Bottom Church, May 20, 1864; disch. Dec. 6, 1864.

Butler, Jonas, private, 25th N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. May, 1861, three years; missing after the battle of South Mountain, Sept. 14, 1862.

Matteson, Gilbert, private, 141st N.Y. Inf., co. H; enl. Aug. 1862, three years; disch. July, 1865.

Eves, Philander.

Matteson, Samuel, private, 161st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 1862, three years; disch. Feb. 1864.

Starr, Elbert Augustus, private, 141st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; wounded July 20, 1864, Peach-Tree Creek; disch. March 15, 1865.

Sherwood, Myron L., must. Sept. 19, 1864, one year.

Cornelius, Ira, 161st Regt.; must. Sept. 19, 1864, one year.

Craig, Willis Edward, major, 161st N.Y. Inf.; enl. Sept. 18, 1862, three years; pro. to maj., Sept. 16, 1863; disch. Oct. 16, 1865.

Bruner, George, private, 107th N.Y. Inf., Co. K, three years.

Morey, Charles, 107th N.Y. Inf., Co. K, three years; wounded June 17, 1863.

Raymond, William, private, 22d N.Y. Cav., Co. G; must. Feb. 2, 1864, three years; died at Andersonville, Ga.

Alliger, John Matthias, private, 74th N.Y. Inf., Co. C; enl. May, 1861, three years; died of wounds received in battle of Williamsburg, Va., May 7, 1862, and buried at Williamsburg, Va.

RESIDING IN JASPER AND WENT FOR OTHER TOWNS.

Hollenbeck, David, private, 188th N.Y. Inf., Co. E; enl. Sept. 13, 1864, one year; died Feb. 6, 1865, of typhoid fever at 5th Corps hospital; City Point, Va.

Talbot, Jarvis (2d), private, 189th N.Y. Inf., Co. A; enl. Sept. 1, 1864, one year; disch. June 20, 1865.

Dennis, Daniel Walker, private, 9th H. Art., Co. E; enl. Sept. 15, 1864, one year; wounded at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864, in right hand; disch. July 22, '65.

Stevens, John, private, 141st N.Y. Inf., Co. H; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; wounded in thigh, May 15, 1864, at Resaca, Ga.; disch. March 4, 1865.

Matteson, Luther, private, 12th Vet. Res. Corps, Co. I; enl. Nov. 7, 1861, three years; first enl. in Co. G, 86th N.Y. Regt.; disch. March 13, 1864; re-enl. March 5, 1865; wounded at Gettysburg in his right arm, also at Spottsylvania O.-H. in his right arm; disch. July 14, 1865.