L I N D L E Y.

This page is part of the Tri-County Genealogy Sites by Joyce M. Tice
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Clayton, W. Woodford, History of Steuben County, New York: with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers, (Philadelphia: Lewis, Peck & Co., 1879 (Philadelphia: Press of J.B. Lippincott)), pp. 350-355.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION.

The town of Lindley was formed from Erwin, May 12, 1837. It lies upon the southern border of the county, east of the centre, and is bounded by Erwin on the north, Caton on the east, the Pennsylvania line on the south, and Tuscarora on the west. The east and west parts of Lindley are elevated and hilly uplands, divided by the deep valley of the Tioga River, which is about one mile wide, and bounded by steep hill-sides from 400 to 600 feet high. The soil on the hills is a heavy, shaly loam, and in the valleys a rich alluvium. A large portion of the surface of the hills is still covered with forests, from which lumbering has been extensively carried on.

EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The first settlement in this town was made upon the Tioga Flats, by Colonel Eleazer Lindsley, in the year 1790. Mr. Lindsley was a native of New Jersey, and had been an active officer of the "Jersey Blues" during the Revolutionary war. Previous to 1790 he had ridden through the Genesee country to find a tract of land where he might establish himself and gather his children around him. The unhealthiness of the region around Seneca and Canandaigua Lakes prevented his settling in that region, and he chose a tract less promising for agricultural purposes, but one that promised freedom from the diseases to which the more fertile northern plains were subject.

His colony consisted of about forty persons, who, with their goods, were transported to the Susquehanna. At Wilkesbarre these were transferred to boats and poled up the river, while the horses and cattle were driven along the trails or rude roads upon the banks. They arrived at their place of destination June 7, 1790. Plows were made, and the river-flats were immediately broken. These flats were covered with rank grass, bordered by higher land covered with Indian corn-hills, which had been hilled up year after year, until so prominent as to be yet seen where undisturbed. It was on these corn-lands the first crop of the pioneers was raised. The season was too far advanced for corn, but a great harvest of buckwheat was secured. Buckwheat, corn, milk, and game constituted their food the first winter. "Old Pomp," a negro belonging to Col. Lindsley, made himself useful by pounding buckwheat in the dug-out top of a stump, with pestle hung from an old-fashioned well-sweep, from the time the ice closed the river in autumn until spring removed the impediment, and allowed the transportation of train in canoes to Shepard's mill at Tioga Point, fifty-two miles down the river. Old Pomp seems to have been something of a hunter as wel as a miller, killing three bucks at one shot as they were feeding upon the moss in the river, and being kicked over a log and into the brush and nearly killed himself, from the recoil of the gun, which he always loaded with a handful of powder, and the entire contents of the old-fashioned brass moulds,-an ounce ball and nineteen buckshot of various sizes.

Colonel and Mrs. Lindsley were members of the Presbyterian Church ar Morristown, N.J., and in this new settlement the Sabbath was strictly observed. Traveling missionaries were cordially welcomed, and when none of these were present to conduct the religious services, Col. Lindsley himself would read a sermon. In 1793 he was elected a member of the Legislature. He died at home soon after, and his remains were the first to be placed in the plat he had himself selected for the cemetery of the colony, his death taking place in June, 1794. This cemetery is situated on the left bank of the river, and contains the remains of many of the early pioneers. It is known as the Lindsley Burying-ground. His was the first death in the new colony, which lost in him an energetic and worthy founder. Col. Lindsley was accompanied to his new home in the Tioga Valley by his two sons, Samuel and Eleazer, and by his sons-in-law, Dr. Ezekial Mulford, Ebenezer Bachus, and Capt. John Seelye. David Cook and David Payne, who, in company with Mr. Bachus, built the first mill at Lindley Station, also accompanied the colony. Eliza Mulford, daughter of Dr. Ezekiel Mulford, was the first child born in Lindley, and first while female child born in the county of Steuben, her birth occurring Aug. 10, 1792. David Cook and Elizabeth Cady were the first couple united in marriage. Col. Lindsley, before his death, had erected a saw-mill, the irons for which he had brought with him from New Jersey, and which was in operation in 1790, being one of the first mills on the Phelps and gorham purchase, and the first in the Tioga Valley. This mill was located at a fall, a short distance up Watson Creek. The first grist-mill was built soon after, between this and the river. Mrs. Lindsley, after the death of her husband, kept the first public-house between Williamsport and Bath, and entertained Col. Williamson and his crew on their early journey through the wilderness. She died in Lindleytown, Nov. 20, 1806.

Many of the descendants of the Lindsley, Mulford, and Seelye families still live in Tioga and adjoining valleys. The principal descendant of the Lindsley family is Bradley Lindsley, who occupies the original home of his grandfather, much improved and beautified, but still exhibiting the old style of liberal hospitality and welcome. Charles Ford, only son of the first merchant in the valley, and grandson of Col. Lindsley, married the daughter of Gen. Cruger, of Bath, and still lives in sight of the little cemetery where sleep the colonists and many of their children. A visit to his home is a rare treat to the antiquarian, the house being filled with many mementos of early public men, as well as of the early settlers of Steuben County.

Dr. Ezekial Mulford, the physician of the colony, was a direct descendant of John Mulford, of Maidstone, Sussex, England, who was one of the first thirty-five english settlers in the State of New York, he settling on Long Island in 1639. Dr. Mulford and his wife both died within a few hours of each other during the fever of 1812, leaving a family of fifteen children. Lindsley Mulford, who was the oldest of the family, became known throughout the country as a woodsman and hunter, living a life of adventure with a young Indian for some years; finally settling down as a prosperous farmer, and dying at the age of eight-seven years.

Jeremiah and Eleazer were intimately connected with the early development of Lindleytown, which was built upon their farms, and were highly respected by the community in which they lived. Eleazer Mulford, the last survivor of the Lindsley colony, who came in 1809, died in 1871, at the age of eighty-four years. In 1811 he was married to Miss Betsey Lillibridge, who had come to the settlement to teach school. John C. and E. P. Mulford are the leading members of the family in the town, and prominent citizens. Lee and Uri Mulford, well-known journalists and writers in Steuben County, are of this family. Castilla was the father of gen. John E. Mulford, who acquired a national reputation by his connection with the exchange of prisoners during the late war. Eliza, the first child born in the colony, was the mother of rodney Bachus, the inventor.

Joseph Miller, the school-teacher of the colony, grandfather of Horace Vastbinder, informs us, in the school commissioner's report for 1826, that "the school-books used in the four districts of the town are Webster's Spelling-book, Murray's English Reader, Murray's Grammar, Walker's Dictionary, Daboll's Arithmetic, Flint's Surveying, and Moar's Geography."

Charles Seelye, who occupies the old homestead of his grandfather, Capt. John Seelye, near the Lawrenceville depot, is a son of Wm. Seelye, long a leading citizen of Lindley, and the only one left to bear the name.

Col. Gabriel T. Harrower, grandson of Rev. David Harrower, and for many years one of the leading lumbermen of Tioga Valley, served as colonel of the 161st New York Volunteers in the late Rebellion, and represented this district in the State Senate in 1871.

Of the seven slaves brought by the colony from New Jersey some of their descendants are still living in various parts of the country. "Old Pomp" fell a victim to the epidemic fever after tending the sick during the terrible winter of 1813.

Wm. More, one of the most extensive farmers in the southern part of the county, Col. G. T. Harrower, Hiram Middlebrook, S. M. Morgan, and Rev. W. H. Hill have been leading business men of Lindleytown for many years.

T. J. Presho and S. Hammond are leading business men at Erwin Centre.

Joseph Miller, one of the colony, who was in later years for a long time school commissioner, taught the first school, near the Pennsylvania line, in 1793, which shows that the first settlers of this wilderness did not remain long without the means of education for their children. Dr. Mulford loated himself near the State line, and devoted himself to his profession. Col. Lindsley sold to John P. Ryerss a portion of the northeast corner of the town, and in 1804, Jas. Ford came from the East as his clerk, bringing a stock of goods and opening the first store in the valley, near the Orr place, below Cooks Creek. Amos Halsey came after the colony, and was accidentally killed in 1802.

The first post-office was at Judge Lindsley's house, and afterwards, in 1830, at the store of Lyan & Morgan, Albert Morgan being postmaster. Rev. David Harrower, a Scotch Presbyterian preacher, resided in Lindley, and preached in the surrounding country at that date. Joshua Russell came to Lindley in 1823, settling on the Calder farm, at the mouth of Mulford Creek. Lime was burned at this point from marl, in the hills, in 1846. Coal has been found also, on the surface among the hills on this creek, in small quantities. This was one of the heaviest timbered towns in the county, no less than fourteen miles having been located along the river within the present town limits. Robert, a brother of Ben Patterson the scout and hunter, who participated in the engagement at Freeling's Fort and, other scenes of the early Indian wars, was one of the early settlers, removing from the old tavern at Knoxville, and locating at the mouth of the creek which bears his name, in 1804. Among the later arrivals previous to 1830 are found the names of E. F. Tremans, A. F. Lyon, A. C. and Julius Morgan, John P. Ryerss, Abner Thurber, Frederick Heckart, and Eber Scofield. Elam Watson has been justice of the peace almost continuously from 1830.

The Lindsley colony brought with them several slaves, who remained with their masters until years after the legislation abolishing slavery in New York. Death emancipated them from a not burdensome servitude.

The line of road past the Patterson place was in earlier days a well-known racing-ground, and the scene of many a rural frolic among the hardy pioneers and their children. The river, which is now confined to its narrow bed, covered much of the flat with its shallow waters, and fords were convenient at each settlement. Oak timber in the flats furnished acorns to fatten the half-wild hogs, and butternuts covered the ground in their season. Every family had its dug-out, and deer were shot at will in the woods or while feeding on the rich mosses in the dark shadows of the river. Col. Lindsley portioned his lands to his children and followers in long strips across the town, the old partition surveys still annoying their possessors by their inconvenient angles. The now rich river-flats were in many cases abandoned by their owners for hill farms, which, when developed, were vastly inferior in value to those they left.

From the opening of the railroad with its wooden track, and thin strap rails from Corning up the valley to the Blossburg coal-mines in 1840, the real settlement of the town outside of the valley may be said to have begun, and as the timber was taken off men began to realize the possibility of clearing away the smaller growth and making themselves homes. Their houses were built with an eye to comfort and hospitality, having large doors, through which, in winter, the heavy logs were drawn by teams and rolled from the rude sled into the huge open fireplace at one end of the large living-room.

The Lawrenceville, Pa., Station, on the Corning, Cowanesque and Antrim Railroad, is in Lindley, Lawrenceville being across the Tioga River and just over the State line. There are here, beside the depot and round-house, the junction of the Elmira and State Line, and Cowanesque branch of the Corning, Cowanesque and Antrim Railroads, a large saw-mill, and fifteen dwellings. The Valley Enterprise, of Lawrenceville, was published here at the depot by Henry C. Mills a short time in 1870.

Lindley Station, two miles farther down the valley, contains a saw- and planing-mill, two stores, furniture-shop, two blacksmith-shops, a wagon-shop, shoe-shop, hay-press, two school-houses, three churches, and thirty-four dwellings.

Lindley is the first post-office established in the town, A. C. morgan having been made postmaster in 1829. A sulphur spring of considerable note exists near the station.

Cooks, a flag-station a mile from Lindley, at the mouth of Cook's Creek, consists of the large steam-tannery of Isaac H. Bary, store, and 25 dwellings. Just across the river is the Sandt Mill settlement.

Erwin Centre is six miles from Corning, in the town of Lindley, on both sides of the river, and takes its name from having been the centre of Erwin before Lindley was taken off. There is here a flouring-mill, a store, saw- and stave-mill, two blacksmith-shops, a shoe-, and cooper-shop; post-office, school-house, and Methodist Episcopal church, and about forty dwellings.

Half a mile up the Clendenna Creek is a mill and settlement. The hills are thickly covered with farms, and dairying is extensively carried on. The three bridges span the river at Lawrenceville Depot, Lindleytown, and Erwin Centre.

ORGANIZATION.

At the first annual town-meeting in the town of Lindsley,* held in the school-house at Erwin Centre, on the 6th day of February, 1838, the following were "duly elected officers of the said town:" Supervisor, Benjamin Harrower; Town Clerk, Chauncey Hoffman; Justices of the Peace, Silas Cok, William Seelye, and Jonah Davis; Assessors, Ansel C. Smith, William Lindsley, Jeremiah Upham; Commissioners of Highways, G. A. Ryerss, Thomas Clark, Benj. Patterson; School Commissioner, Michael R. Thorp, A. B. Lindsley, James G. Mersereau; School Inspectors, D. P. Harrower, T. L. Mersereau; Overseers of the Poor, Benjamin Patterson, Jeremiah Mulford; Constables, W. A. Lindsley, Richard Marks, Abner Collins, Royal Vamilles; Collector, W. A. Lindsley. At this election it was voted to elect an officer to protect game, and to double the amount of school money.

* So spelled in the record in the clerk's office. The s was dropped out in recording, making the name Lindley, as now generally spelled.

LIST OF TOWN OFFICERS.

  Supervisors. Town Clerks. Collectors.
1838. Benjamin Harrower. Chauncey Hoffman. William A. Lindsley.
1839. William Lindsley. Edward H. Tremans. William A. Lindsley.
1840. William Lindsley. E. H. Tremans. Thomas Clark.
    A. F. Lyon.  
1841. Silas Cook. Julius Morgan. Richard Marks.
1842. Ansel C. Smith. Julis Morgan. Richard Marks.
1843. Ansel C. Smith. Gabriel T. Harrower. Joseph Rorobaugh.
1844. G. T. Harrower. M. P. Orton. Richard Marks.
1845. James G. Mersereau. M. P. Orton. Richard Marks.
1846. James G. Mersereau. Eber Scofield. Eli Harris.
1847. Henry A. Miller. Eber Scofield. James Clark.
1848. Samuel J. Mersereau. Geo. Thurber (2d). Richard Marks (tie).
    D. P. Harrower.  
1849. Samuel J. Mersereau. David P. Harrower. Richard Marks.
1850. Gabriel T. Harrower. Eber Scofield. George McLagan.
1851. Gabriel T. Harrower. Samuel Heckart. Robert Patterson.
1852. Ansel C. Smith (tie). Samuel Heckart. Joseph Collins.
1853. Eber Scofield. Samuel Heckart. Joseph Collins.
1854. Samuel Heckart. D. P. Harrower. A. J. Tillman.
1855. A. B. Lindsley. M. W. Rose. Eleazer Lindsley.
1856. G. T. Harrower. Ira Lyon. Mathew Riffle.
1857. G. T. Harrower. Ira Lyon. Mathew Riffle.
1858. Henry G. Harrower. Ira Lyon. Charles Mulford.
1859. A. C. Morgan. Ira Lyon. Vincent Hall.
1860. A. C. Morgan. Ira Lyon. George Camp.
1861. Eber Scofield. William More. Phineas Burr.
1862. Eber Scofield. William More. William C. Brown.
1863. Eber Scofield. William More. Joseph Collins.
1864. William More. Henry F. Hill. John C. Mulford.
1865. William More. Mile W. Rose. John C. Mulford.
1866. Eber Scofield. Mile W. Rose. George L. Hovey.
1867. S. M. Morgan. William More. Mathew Riffle.
1868. Eber Scofield. William More. Phineas Burr.
1869. William More. Hiram Middlebrook. I. N. Grenell.
1870. William More. George Bennett. Samuel Patterson.
1871. Mason Hammond. T. J. Presho. Ralph Cook.
1872. William More. W. H. Hill. William Cook.
1873. James C. Orr, Jr. James A. Rogers. Ira Warner.
1874. G. T. Harrower. T. J. Presho. John H. Harrison.
1875. G. T. Harrower. Thomas Carey. Asa C. Hill.
1876. William More. John C. Mulford. Robert Orr.
1877. T. J. Presho. Fred E. Thurber. John Brinnen.
1878. James A. Rogers. Fred E. Thurber. Mathew Riffle.

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

1838. Silas Cook. 1856. Ira Lyon.
  William Seelye.   Abner Thurber.
  Jonah Davis.   B. S. Colwell.
1839. Morris Johnson.   A. J. Daniels.
  William Seelye. 1857. Eber Scofield.
1840. James G. Mersereau.   Joseph Collins.
  A. C. Smith. 1858. Elam Watson.
1841. Abram B. Lindsley.   Eber Scofield.
  James G. Mersereau.   Thomas Clark.
1842. Jonah Davis. 1859. Elam Watson.
  Eber Scofield.   Eber Scofield.
1843. Elam Watson. 1860. Ira D. Lyon.
  William Farrand. 1861. Chester P. White.
  Chauncey Hoffman.   James Cook.
1844. Eber Scofield. 1862. William Seelye.
  Julius Morgan.   Charles Stocum.
1845. William W. Miller.   Elam Watson.
  Eber Scofield. 1863. Eleazer P. Mulford.
1846. Rufus W. Palmer.   Henry C. Bull.
  Silas Cook. 1864. Joseph W. Gurnsey.
1847. George Thurber.   Eleazer P. Mulford.
  Rufus W. Palmer. 1865. Charles Stocum.
1848. Abram B. Lindsley.   Elam Watson.
  Eber Scofield.   Joseph W. Gurnsey.
1849. Stilman Smith. 1866. Elam Watson.
  Eber Scofield.   Sheldon D. Clinton.
  Austin M. Smith.   Henry C. Bull*
1850. A. C. Smith. 1867. H. S. Payne.
  Henry A. Miller.   Henry C. Bull.
  Eber Scofield. 1868. Eber Scofield.
1851. J. S. Stewart. 1869. William Burr.
  A. C. Smith.   Mason Hammond.
1852. Chauncey J. More.   Charles Stocum.
  Elam Watson. 1870. Elam Watson.
  G. T. Harrower.   William Burr.
  Benjamin Patterson.   Edwin Temple.
1853. A. B. Lindsley. 1871. Isaac Sandt.
  Charles Stocum. 1872. Isaac Sandt.
  Nelson Crawford. 1873. Charles Stocum.
1854. B. L. Colwell.   William Burr.
  Ira Lyon.   Alexander Manley.
  Lewis M. Drake. 1874. Mason Hammond.
  E. Scofield. 1875. Osceola Gilbert.
1855. Atwood Fales. 1876. Elam Watson.
  Charles Stocum. 1877. Robert Patterson.
  William R. Seelye. 1878. R. S. Stowell.
  Hiram Colder.   Hamilton McHenry.

CHURCHES.

THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

was organized in Lindleytown, Saturday, June 13, 1841, under the preaching of Rev. Mr. Sheardown, five being baptized the next day, Sunday. Albert C. Morgan was chosen clerk.

July 15 the neighboring organizations met in council, and the church was organized, with Messrs. Walker and Brady, deacons. Preaching was supplied them at the school-houses until a union was effected with Lawrenceville, Pa., in March, 1844, Rev. T. W. Colby, Rev. O. G. Stevens, and Rev. Ransom Marine officiating. The organization failed to appear at the annual association after 1846, and ceased to exist as such about 1864.

THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH

was organized under the preaching of John W. Sawyer, in 1866, and a church built on the Schofield place, at Lindleytown, in 1866 or 1867.

The first trustees were Eber Scofield, Hiram Middlebrook, and John Sawyer, Class-Leader. Pastors: Revs. Welcome Smith, George Edwards, Wm. Parry, John Stacy, J. W. Sawyer, Levi Kelly, Samuel Perkins, A. W. Paul, Geo. Stoner. Rev. J. D. Osmun, the present Pastor; Present local Preacher, Elisha Hudson; Class-Leader, A. H. Knapp; Recording Steward, E. Hudson; Stewards, Francis Holbert, Ellen S. Camp. Trustees, E. Hudson, Edward Camp, Lewis Wood, Justin Reed, James Harrower. The church numbers 14 members.

THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.

This church first organized at Erwin Centre, in 1850, with Rev. Clement Young Pastor and Charles Stokum, Class-Leader,-Rev. Kasimer P. Jarvis, of Painted Post, rendering great assistance by his services. Rev. Amasa English and Rev. Francis M. Smith preached afterwards.

In 1861, the class was changed from the Painted Post to the Tuscorora charge until 1866, when it became a separate charge.

Pastors: 1868, Rev. Peter B. Clark; 1870, Rev. Stephen M. Dayton; 1874, Rev. George Wilkinson; 1875, Rev. Geo. Sherer; 1877, Rev. Andrew Purdy; 1878, Rev. Isaac Everett. Their church was built under the present, Trustees,-Hamilton McHenry, Luke Gibson, George Pepper, Simon Arnold, James Cook, and Nathan Taft,-in 1875, at an expense of $3000 and dedicated Jan. 27, 1876. James Orr is class-leader. Stewards: George Pepper, Ralph Cook, Hamilton McHenry. The church consists of 35 members.

Another class was formed at Lindleytown, Dec. 13, 1876, and Daniel F. Merritt, David I. Jones, R. S. Stowell, Wm. More, William Burr, Thomas E. Cary, and Jas. A. Rogers made trustees. Work was immediately commenced on a building, and, Nov. 15, 1877, the "Centennial Methodist Episcopal Church of Lindley" was completed. Besides the trustees, the present officers are Class-Leader, Clerk, and Treasurer, John C. Mulford.

The church has now about 50 members, and is part of the same charge with the Erwin Centre Church.

THE INDEPENDENT CHURCH OF LINDLEY

was organized under the preaching of Rev. L. D. Ayers, May 20, 1875,-G. T. Harrower, H. Middlebrook, Lorenzo D. Ayers, Elam Watson, and Isaac Sandt being the committee who drew up the articles of church covenant. Forty-five names were placed upon the roll, and Isaac Sandt, Elam Watson, and Barney Griswold were made deacons.

Trustees.-Robert Higgins, C. Terwillegar, Oliver Camp.

Treasurer.-John C. Mulford.

Secretary.-S. M. Morgan.

May 22, 1877, the church was changed to The Baptist Church of Lindley, and a delegation appointed to represent the church at the next session of the Baptist Association; 51 members were retained, and E. P. Gillett, Oliver Camp, James H. Middlebrook, James Walker, and Mathew Riffle elected trustees; S. M. Morgan, Clerk; Elam Watson, H. Middlebrook, and Ann Rifle, Deacons; and Leroy Watson, Treasurer and Collector. The pastor, Lorenzo D. Ayers, was then regularly ordained, and a church building commenced, which is now nearly completed.

MILITARY RECORD OF LINDLEY.

Harrower, G. T., col., 161st Inf.; enl. Sept. 6, 1862, three years; res. Nov. 25, 1863.

Harrower, H. G., capt. 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 1861, three years; re-enl. 86th Inf., Dec. 1863, three years; pro. to col., March 3, 1864; disch. Oct. 12, 1864.

Bradley, Elijah B., private, 107th Inf., Co. C, three years.

Booth, Elijah D., private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, three years; served nearly two years; mortally wounded at the Battle of Resaca and died in field hospital, May 19, 1864.

Booth, Geo. W., 107th Inf., Co. F, three years.

Belcher, Nelson, 107th Inf., Co. F, three years.

Boyle, Edwin, private, 50th Eng., co. F; enl. Aug. 1, 1862, three years; disch. June 28, 1865.

Clark, James, private, 15th Eng., Co. G; enl. Aug. 22, 1864, one year; pro. to 4th corp., Nov. 1864; disch. June 13, 1865.

Walker, Gilbert, private, 50th eng., co. M; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years pro. to first class; disch. June, 1865.

Morgan, S. M., maj., 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 1861, three years; pro. to capt. And ass't adj.-gen., Feb. 28, 1864; brev. maj., March 18, 1865; taken pris. at Cold Harbor, Va.; sent to Libby prison, Richmond, Macon, Ga., Charleston, S.C., Columbia, S.C.; paroled for exchange, Dec. 20, 1864; res. April 1, 1865.

Merrill, William, capt., 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. 1862, three years; pro. to capt., Aug. 1, 1863; disch. June 24, 1865.

Bradley, Oscar, 107th Inf., Co. F; enl. June 21, 1862, three years; died on Maryland Heights, Oct. 1862.

Decker, John, private, 50th Eng., Co. F; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; disch. June 13, 1865.

Elliott, Israel, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 16, 1862, three years; died Sept. 30, 1864, in hospital at Jefferson, Ind.

Houghton, Chas. A., corp., 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 19, 1862, three years; disch. June 24, 1865.

Knapp, Justice, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, three years; trans. to Eng. Corps., died March __, 186_ at Nashville, Tenn.

Knapp, Abram, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps, March 9, 1865; disch. July 5, 1865.

Lindley, George H., private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; disch. June 24, 1865.

Lindley, Wm. A., corp. 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; wounded in left leg; disch. June 24, 1865.

Ledric, Oscar, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 1862, three years.

Millard, S. W., private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; died in hospital at Elmira, N.Y.

McGilfrey, Abram, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, three years; disch. March 24, 1863, on account of disability.

Madden, Michael, sergt.,., 107th Inf., Co. F; enl. June 21, 1862; pro. to sergt. and must. out at end of war.

Merrill, Edwin, sergt., 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 21, 1862; pro. to sergt., Jan. 1, 1864; mortally wounded at Dallas and died on battle-field; buried on battle-field near Dallas.

Patterson, Samuel, private, 50th Eng., Co. F; enl. Aug. 1, 1862, three years; disch. June 28, 1865.

Treumain, Gilbert, corp., 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, three years; wouned May 15, 1864; must. out with regiment.

Treumain, Lyman, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 14, 1862, three years.

Treaumain, Warren, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 21, 1862, three years; disch. May 20, 1865.

Taft, Stephen, 107th Inf., three years.

Wall, James, private, 50th Eng., Co. F; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; pro. to artificer; disch. June 14, 1865.

Webster, Isaac, 141st Inf.

Wales, Nelson Sisson, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 15, 1862, three years; disch. with the regiment, June 9, 1865.

Wetty [Welty], William, 107th Inf.

Wheeler, Isaac, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 16, 1862, three years.

Webster, Charles, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Aug. 22, 1862, three years; disch. June 24, 1865.

Cook, Jonathan, private, 35th Inf., Co. C; enl. July 6, 1861, two years; disch. May, 1863; re-enl. Sept. 1864; wounded and died at City Point, April 11, 1865.

Harris, M. Albert, private, 161st Inf., Co. E; enl. Sept. 1862, three years; disch. Oct. 1865.

Bucher, James, private, 1st Light Art.; enl. Aug. 30, 1864, one year.

Paul, John J., private, 15th Eng.; enl. Aug. 31, 1864, one year; disch. June 13, 1865.

Romayne, Stephen, private, 15th Eng.; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, one year; disch. June 13, 1865.

Rifle, James, sergt., 15th Eng., Co. G; enl. Aug. 22, 1864, one year; pro. to sergt., Dec. 15, 1864; disch. June 13, 1865.

Brown, William, private, 50th Eng., Co. B; enl. Aug. 29, 1861, one year.

Bucher, Isaac, private, 1st Light Art.; enl. Aug. 30, 1864, one year.

Kelley, David, private, 15th Eng., Co. G; enl. Sept. 1, 1864, one year; disch. June 13, 1865.

Rifle, Daniel, private, 15th Eng., Co. G; enl. Aug. 27, 1864, one year; disch. May 12, 1865.

Hahman, Chas., private, 10th Cav.; enl. Oct. 14, 1864, one year.

White, Walter H., private, 50th Eng.; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years.

Lyon, Eleazer, 1st Pa. Rifles, Co. A; enl. April, 1861, three years; re-enl. Dec. 1863, three years; captured in Aug. or Sept. 1864; taken to Salisbury, N.C.; paroled or exchanged, and died at Annapolis, Md., March, 1865.

Orr, William, private, 50th Eng.; enl. Jan. 2, 1864, three years.

Paul, Hiram, private, 107th Inf., Co. C; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years.

Berman, Warren, sergt., 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Dec. 31, 1863, three years; re-enl. vet.; disch. July 4, 1865.

Tremain, Seth, lieut., 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; re-enl. Dec. 20, 1863; pro. to 2d lieut., 1865; disch. with regiment, July 4, 1865.

Scofield, Edward H., private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; ren-enl. Dec. 20, 1863; wounded at Petersburg, June 18, 1864; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 1865; disch. Aug. 3, 1865.

Wall, Charles B., 2d corp., 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; died at camp Goodhope, Md., of typhoid fever; buried at Lindley, N.Y.

Rifle, Hiram, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; wounded at Gettysburg; disch. at Elmira, June 8, 1864.

Colder, Hiram, private, 86th Inf., Co. I; enl. Feb. 15, 1864, three years; wounded at the battle of Spottsylvania Court-House, May 10, 1864; disch. Nov. 4, 1864.

Case, Franklin, private, 4th H. Art., Co. I; enl. June 26, 1862, three years; died at Fort Schuyler, or Schuyler's Island, Nov. 26, 1864.

Foilousbee, Isaac, 161st inf.

Pritchard, Morris, private, 141st Inf., Co. D; enl. Sept. 3, 1862, three years; trans. to Co. E, 17th Regt., Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 11, 1865; disch. June 30, 1865.

Anaidon(sp?), Solomon B., private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, three years; re-enl. vet.; disch. with regiment, July 4, 1865.

Barret, Amos C., 86th Inf., Co. I; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, three years; re-enl. vet.; disch. with regiment, July 4, 1865.

Hudson, William H., private, 86th Inf., Co. G; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, three years; re-enl. vet.; disch. with regiment, July 4, 1865.

Moran, Thomas, 86th Inf., Co. G; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, three years; re-enl. vet.; disch. with regiment, July 4, 1865.

Wigant, Harvey M., 86th Inf., Co. G; enl. Aug. 29, 1864, three years; re=enl. Vet.; disch. with regiment, July 4, 1865.

Brown, C. H., sergt., 86th Inf.; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Harrower, John G., 1st lieut., 161st Inf.; enl. July 14, 1863, three years; disch. Sept. 20, 1865.

Burr, Phineas, private, 50th Eng., Co. H; enl. Jan. 4, 1864, three years; disch. June, 1865.

Hanley, John, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; wounded at Beverly Ford, June 9, 1863; trans. to Inv. Corps; disch. Sept. 1864.

Keville, Wm., corp., 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; disch. Sept. 30, 1864.

Dougherty, John, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 21, 1861, three years; trans. to Vet. Res. Corps, Aug. 28, 1863; re-enl. April 21, 1864; disch. Nov. 18, 1865.

Vastbinder, George, private, 86th Inf., Co. C; enl. Sept. 1861.

Marsh, Henry, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Oct. 13, 1861, three years; wounded at second Bull Run battle, Aug. 26, 1862; disch. in consequence of wound, Nov. 27, 1862.

Kinney, Henry L., private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Oct. 18, 1861, three years; sick, sent to hospital at Washington, Feb. 1862, from there to Philadelphia; disch. at the latter place, June 6, 1862.

Westcott, Delos H., corp., 86th Inf., Co. C; enl. Oct. 11, 1861, three years; died in Stanton Hospital, Washington, Sept. 17, 1863.

Thurber, Henry C., 1st lieut. And adjt., 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 18, 1861, three years; pro. to sergt., Oct. 1, 1861; to 2d lieut., July, 1863; to 1st lieut. and adjt., Feb. 1864; disch. Oct. 10, 1864.

Seelye, Myron M., private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 27, 1861, three years.

Matson, William, private, 64th Inf., Co. K; enl. July 16, 1863, three years; wouned in shoulder at Weldon Railroad, Aug. 14, 1864; died at Lindley, Oct. 14, 1864.

Huggins, John, private, 68th Inf., Co. H; drafted July 17, 1863, three years; disch. Dec. 1865.

Cook, Silas, sergt. 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years.

Williams, Samuel, private, 31st Inf. (Col.), Co. F; enl. July 17, 1863, three years; disch. at Brownsville, Tex., Nov. 7, 1865.

Cowica, Demetrius, corp., 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Oct. 12, 1861, three years; disch. for disability.

Clark, Samuel, private, 1st Inf., Co. G; enl. July 13, 1862, three years; died at David's Island, Oct. 7, 1862.

Cowles, henry, 1st Pa. Rifles, Co. A, three years; re-enl. in 50th Eng.

Marah, Robert, musician, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years; died and buried at Fredericksburg, Jan. 22, 1863.

Gordon, Amasa L., private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Oct. 25, 1861, three years.

Miller, Thomas F., private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Oct. 26, 1861, three years.

McMahon, Michael, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Nov. 12, 1861, three years.

Stewart, Levi, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Oct. 6, 1861, three years; disch. June 7, 1862.

Thomas, John, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 14, 1861, three years.

Harrower, John G., 1st lieut., 1st Rifles, Pa. Vet. Res. Corps, Co. A; enl. April 21, 1861; pro. to capt. March 1, 1863; res. June 23, 1863, to accept commission of 1st lieut. and adjt. in 161st N.Y. Inf.; disch. Oct. 15, 1865.

Allington, Edgar, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Feb. 3, 1864, three years; killed at battle of Petersburg, June 18, 1864.

Campbel, William A., private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Dec. 31, 1863, three years; re-enl. vet.; disch. with regiment, July 4, 1865.

Mathews, Isaac, private, 50th Eng.; enl. Aug. 30, 1864, one year; disch. June 13, 1865.

Randall, Lyman, private; drafted July 17, 1863, three years.

Benton, Jared, private; drafted July 17, 1863, three years.

Brockway, William, private; drafted July 17, 1863, three years.

Mulford, Charles C., private; enl. Feb. 1864, three years.

Miller, Jacob, private, 89th Inf.; enl. Jan. 10, 1864, three years; died in hospital at Folly Island, S.C., April 29, 1864.

Schuyler, Henry S., private, 86th Inf., Co. I; enl. Feb. 1864, three years; missing at battle of Spottsylvania Court-House, May 10, 1864; never heard from.

Rumsay, Isaac, private, 86th Inf.; enl. Feb. 1864, three years.

Wheeler, Richard, private, 86th Inf.; enl. Feb. 1864, three years.

Fairbanks, Gardner, private, 50th Eng., Co. M; enl. Jan. 1864, three years; disch. June 26, 1865.

Hawkins, Charles, private.

Rupell, Orrin, Jr., private, 72d Ohio Inf., Co. F; enl. Jan. 1, 1862, three years; re-enl. Jan. 1, 1864, three years; disch. June 9, 1865.

Mulford, Lee, sergt., 107th Inf., Co. F; enl. June 5, 1862; pro. to corp. in 1862; to sergt., 1863; disch. at end of war.

Rifle, Andrew Jackson, private, 2d Harris L. Cav., Co. K; enl. Sept. 7, 1864, one year; disch. June 5, 1865.

Walker, Robert, 89th Inf., three years; re-enl.

Walker, James, private, 1st Pa. Rifles, Co. A; enl. June 11, 1861, three years; wounded through the neck at South Mountain, Va., Sept. 14, 1862; disch. March 4, 1863; re-enl. 2d Vol. Cav., Co. G, Sept. 20, 1863, three years; taken pris. Oct. 4, 1864; confined at Meridian, Ala., until April 26, 1865, when he was paroled; disch. April 17, 1865.

Robinson, James (sub.), private, 50th Pa. Inf., Co. K; enl., March 7, 1865, one year; disch. July 30, 1865.

Robinson, Wm. (sub.), private, 50th Pa. Inf., Co. K; enl. March 7, 1865, one year; disch. July 30, 1865.

Cook, Arthur, Jr., private, 13th H. Art., Bat. C; disch. June 21, 1865.

Demenstoy, Walton, private, 50th Eng.

Carey, Thomas, private, 2d Harris L. Cav., Co. K; enl. Sept. 7, 1864, one year; disch. June 5, 1865.

Lindsley, Henry, private, 179th Inf., Co. B; enl. March 25, 1864, three years; disch. June 8, 1865.

Lindsley, Joseph, private, 3d L. Art., Bat. K; enl. Sept. 5, 1864, three years; disch. July 15, 1865.

Reed, Myron H., enl. 1861, three months; re-enl. in 14th Inf., Jan. 1862, three years; served full term and disch. with regiment.

Cowles, A. Demetrius, private, 50th Eng.; enl. three years.

Cowles, Henry, 50th Eng.; enl. three years.

Cowles, James, private, 50th Eng.; enl. thre years.

Cook, A. Justice, private, 107th Inf.; enl. Feb. 28, 1864, three years; disch. Aug. 1865.

Sawyer, Addison, private, 86th Inf., Co. F; enl. Sept. 21, 1861, three years.