Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
Tioga County Post Offices, Tioga County PA
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
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The first list of Post Offices I found was on page 36 of the 1883 Tioga County History. But then by going through the 1897 History, township by township, I was able to add a LOT more as well as start dates and other information. Compiled by Joyce M. Tice. The right most colums represent the existence of the PO in the 1875 Atlas, The 1899 Directory map and the 1909 Directory Map. The implementation of Rural Free Delievery in 1903 reduced the number of post offices. The website http://www.postalhistory.com/ lists post offices by county with dates. Some of these conflict with other sources I have used. Where there are differences I have added dates in parentheses.

Early Post Office History in Tioga County

In ":the olden days" and even today there are points of confusion caused by post office proximity. In the 1880 Diary of my GG Grandfather, Joe Holly, he lists himself with an Austinville address. Austinville is in Columbia Township in Bradford County and Joe lived in Sullivan Township in Tioga County, but Austinville was the closest post office. Similarly, many families who lived on the North Road (Now Hulslander Road) in Sullivan got mail through Sylvania in Bradford County. This results not only in confusion over their location, but in incorrect records as well. Many Sullivan Township births and marriages were put in the newspapers as having occurred in Sylvania, and it is a very difficult point to keep straight for today's researchers, who, not being familiar with the territory, make erroneous conclusions. I am sure the same points of confusion exist elsewhere in areas where I am not so familiar. Even today, one of our cemetery volunteers, and user of these pages lives in Sullivan Township and has a Troy address in Bradford County. In fact, I even know people not too far from me who live in Pennsylvania and get mail through a New York rural delivery and visa versa. The same circumstance occurs on the PA-Delaware border.

All but a very few of the post offices listed here are long gone. In fact, it has resulted in a loss of "identity" to the rural communities that now have an address in Mansfield or Wellsboro. Today's newspapers record people who died at home in Mansfield, when in fact they were in Roseville or Elk Run (Bungy) or some other place that no longer exists in the eyes of the post office.

For those post offices still in existence, will you as users notify me and also the zip code for that post office? Thanks, Joyce

Post Office Township or Borough First Year First Postmaster
Notes
1875
1899
1909
Academy Corners Deerfield 1876 - 193.0 Martin Purple  
x
x
Altafts
1899-1903
Ward
Ansonia Shippen 1845
(1870-1934
John Mathers  
x
x
x
Antrim Duncan 1871 - 1959 John Hinman  
x
x
Arnot Bloss 1867 - present     
x
x
x
Asaph Shippen 1889-1938 O.S. Butler  
x
x
Austinburg Brookfield 1878-1927
x
x
Azelta Clymer 1892-1902 William H. Abbey  
x
Babb's Creek 1882-1882
Bailey Creek 1850-1866
Balsam Delmar 1895
(1891-1903)
Lizzie Hakes  
x
Barfelden Liberty  1873-1887   preceded the Hartford Postoffice, discontinued
Batchelor's Hall 1816-1819
Ben Gully 1888-1892
Billing's Camp Elk 1879-1880
Blackwells Morris name of post office was Lloyd's    
Blossburg Blossburg Borough      Now Zip Code 16912
x
x
Brookfield Brookfield 1830-1892 Isaac H. Metcalf also called Mink Hollow or Brookfield Hollow
x
x
 
Brownlee (or Summit) Duncan 1888-1907 John Bradley  
x
Canal Port 1826-1827
Canoe Camp Richmond 1821
(1812-1918)
Amos Spencer Removed to Mansfield after a short time
Canoe Camp Richmond 1868 T.J. Jelliff Reestablished
x
x
x
Carpenter Union 1869 Elisha W. Sweet At Penbryn Station on the Northern Central railroad
x
x
Charleston Charleston  1831-1904    
x
x
Chase's Mills Ward  1870-1884    
x
Chatham (early) Chatham pr to 1840 Redding Macumber transferred to Little Marsh in 1868
x
Chatham Valley Chatham 1843-1903 Henry Caton also called Shortsville
x
x
x
Cherry Flats Charleston 1846-1907 Norman Rockwell  
x
x
Clymer Clymer abt 1895 Venetta Johnson Replaces Mixtown
x
Covington Covington Borough 1822 Thomas Putnam  Now Zip Code 16917
x
x
x
Cowanesque Valley Westfield 1858/1865? Ira M. Edgecomb Formerly called Edgcombsville. Cowanesque Post Office is now Zip Code 16918
x
x
x
Crooked Creek or Holidaytown Middlebury 1829 Thomas Keeney
x
x
x
Daggett's Mills Jackson 1820s Seth Daggett Also called Spencerville and Dallasville
x
x
Dartt Settlement Charleston 1820s Col. Justus Darrt  
Davis Station See Lansing      
Delmar Delmar 1887 S. A. Hampton  
Draper Delmar 1888 E. B. Carvey  
x
East Charleston - Whitneyville Charleston 1850s Alonzo Whitney  
x
x
East Chatham Chatham 1870 R. G. Treat  
x
x
East Point Liberty 1880 P. W. Shick  
x
x
Elbridge (Eldridge) Farmington 1883 J. E. White  
x
Elk Run Sullivan 1854 Northrop Smith mail now goes through Mansfield
x
x
Elkland Elkland Borough 1822/1838 George Ryon (See Ryonsville)
x
x
Fall Brook Fall Brook Borough      
x
x
x
Farmington Center Farmington      Farmington Post Office is now Zip Code 15437
x
x
Farmington Hill Farmington 1861 Reuben T. Hall  
x
x
Furmantown Gaines 1855 William Griffin Moved to Gaines 1857
Gaines Gaines 1857 John H. Bolt From Furmantown, Now Zip Code 16921
x
x
x
Galeton ? Now Zip Code 16922
Gleason Union 1878 John Irvin  
x
Gray's Valley Sullivan 1830s John Gray  
Gurnee Gaines 1883 Patrick Smith (1892)  
x
Hammond Middlebury 1873 Alexander McLean  
x
x
x
Hammond Creek Jackson 1857 M. K. Retan Became Millertown and in 1878 Millerton
x
Hartford Liberty 1890 Harry Darling  
x
Horacetown Lawrence See 1987 History p. 542    
Hoytville Morris 1893 Q. F. Taylor  
x
Jackson Center Jackson 1894 C. H. Johnson Postoffice called Pipe Line- Jackson Center Post Offic enow Zip Code 16133
Jackson Summit Jackson 1877 H. J. Tobey  
x
x
Jobs Corners Jackson 1887 John E. Westbrook  
x
Post Office Township or Borough First Year First Postmaster Notes 1875 1899 1909
Keeneyville Middlebury 1856 R. F. Wilson  
x
x
Kennedy Delmar 1881 O. J. Navil  
x
Knapp Delmar   Daniel Knapp  
x
Knoxville Knoxville Borough 1822 Aaron Alba  Now Zip Code 16928
x
x
x
Lamb's Creek Richmond 1867 E. R. Haight mail now goes through Mansfield
x
x
x
Landrus Bloss      
x
x
Lansing  Clymer 1868 J. M. Davis also called Davis Station
x
x
Lawrenceville Lawrenceville Borough      Now Zip Code 16929
x
x
x
Leetonia Elk Township 1879 H.H. Tenbrook  
x
x
Liberty Liberty      Now Zip Code 16930
x
x
x
Little Marsh Chatham 1868 John Mowrey  Now Zip Code 16931
x
x
x
Lloyd's Morris 1862 Enoch Blackwell  
x
x
Lorenton Morris 1891 Hiram G. Mattoon  
x
Mainesburg Mainesburg Borough (no longer a borough-returned to Sullivan)    John Maine  Now Zip Code 16932
x
x
x
Malone Elk first P.O. in township  Loren Wetmore Discontinued-get mail in Marshfield (spouse of Loren was Julia Ann Butler. Loren was 1st cousin 3 times removed of Tom Wetmore)
Manhattan Gaines 1891 J. C. Gilbert  
x
x
Mansfield Mansfield Borough 1820s Asa Mann Removed from Canoe Camp - Now Zip Code 16933
x
x
x
Maple Ridge Jackson 1857 Isaac Spencer  
x
Mardin Richmond 1879 O. M. Patchen  
x
Marsh Creek Shippen 1874 Samuel Scranton  
x
Marshfield, 
Marshlands
Gaines 1860 Danforth K. Marsh  
x
x
x
Middlebury Center Middlebury 1845 Henry H. Potter  Now Zip Code 16935
x
x
x
Millerton Jackson 1857/1878   Also called Hammond Creek prior to 1878, Now Zip Code 16936
x
x
Mitchell's Creek Tioga   William K. Mitchell  
x
x
Mixtown Clymer 1830s Christopher Schoonover  discontinued 1894
x
Morris Morris      Now Zip Code 16938
x
x
Morris Run Hamilton 1850s John James  Now Zip Code 16939
x
x
Nauvoo Liberty 1840s C. A. Comstock  
x
x
Nelson Nelson 1832 Joseph M. White formerly called Beecher's Island,, Now Zip Code 16940
x
x
Newelltown Union     no post office
Niles Valley Middlebury 1859 Jerome B. Niles  
x
x
Ogdensburg Union 1845 John Irvin  
x
x
x
Old (Odle) Corner's  Farmington 1893 Mary Odle  
x
Olmsville Delmar 1883 S. A. Kilburn  
x
Osceola Osceola 1851   Formerly called Pindarville (bef. 1851), Now Zip Code 16942
x
x
x
Painter Run Tioga 1872 David Bartlett  
x
Phillip's Station Westfield 1883 E. B. Phillips  
x
x
Pipe Line Jackson 1894 C. H. Johnson In Jackson Center
x
Potter Brook Westfield      
x
x
x
Purple Brook Brookfield
x
Rising Lawrence
x
Roaring Branch Union 1862 L.L. Washburn  Now Zip Code 17765
x
x
x
Round Top Charleston 1872 Samuel Morgan  
x
x
Rutland Mill Creek - Rutland 1828 Bethuel Bentley mail now goes through Mansfield
Rutland Roseville Borough 1840 William Rose moved from Mill Creek
x
x
x
Ryonsville Elkland Borough 1822 John Ryon Name Changed to Elkland 1838
Sabinsville Clymer 1849 C. P. Douglas  Now Zip Code 16943
x
x
x
Sebring Liberty 1884 Henry Dycker  
x
Shoptown Liberty 1860s   discontinued
Somers Lane Lawrence      
x
x
Stokesdale Delmar 1877 Edward G. Schieffelin  
x
x
Stony Fork Delmar bef 1860s Hiram S. Hastings  
x
x
Sullivan Sullivan 1822 Henry Rew mail now goes through Mansfield
x
x
Sweetbrier  Delmar
x
Sylvester Brookfield
x
Tiadaghton Delmar 1882 Stephen Warriner  
x
x
Tioga Tioga Borough      Now Zip Code 16946
x
x
x
Tompkins Lawrence
x
x
Trowbridge (Trobridge) Jackson when railroad completed Henry O. Trowbridge  
x
x
Union Center Union     no post office
x
Watrous Gaines effort being made in 1897    
Wellsboro   1808 Samuel Wells Morris  Now Zip Code 16901
x
x
x
Welsh Settlement Charleston      
West Covington Covington 1869 Edwin Klock  
x
x
West Farmington Farmington 1858 C. H. House  
Westfield Westfield Borough early 1820s Henry B. Trowbridge  Now Zip Code 16950
x
x
x
Total Number PO Tioga County PA
58
93
48
Samuel L.Dengle was postmaster in 1901 at Tiadaughton Pa. My father James G.Dengle was born there Sept 29 1902. The last name was actually Dengler but the R was dropped by some family members. [Unsigned Note from a site guest]
Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
History of the Wellsboro Post Office 1890
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
The Wellsboro Post-Office.
Official History of the Office since it’s Establishment

*taken from the Wellsboro Agitator June 24, 1890.

 An old clerk in the Post Office Department at Washington, Rev. Mr. Turner, who has been in the Department forty years, has compiled the official history of the Post Office in this borough, for copy of which we are indebted to Representative McCormick.  This statement will be of much interest to local readers.
 The Post office at Wellsboro, PA, was established January 1, 1808, and Samuel W. Morris was appointed Postmaster.  He held the office until December 31, 1812.  His successors were appointed and served as follows:
 Benjamin W. Morris from January 1, 1813 to April 10, 1822.
 William Bache from April 24, 1822 to July 24, 1845.
 James P. McGill from July 24, 1845 to September 6, 1845.
 Josiah Emery from September 6, 1845 to May 18, 1849.
 George D. Smith from May 18, 1849 to April 26, 1853.
 Alexander S. Brewster from April 26, 1853 to December 18, 1855.
 Ira D. Richards from December 18, 1855 to July 20, 1860.
 Alexander D. Brewster from July 20, 1860 to March 8, 1861.
 Hugh Young from March 8, 1861 to August 29, 1866.
 Morgan Hart from August 29, 1866 to January 18, 1869.
 Joseph L. William from January 18, 1869 to January 27, 1869.
 George W. Merrick from January 27, 1869 to June 14, 1882.
 Susan R. Hart from June 14, 1882 to August 10, 1886.
 Louis Doumaux was appointed August 10, 1886 and is the present incumbent.
 It will be observed that Alexander S. Brewster was the only person appointed to the office a second time; that William Bache held the office for the longest time—23 years, 3 months and 14 days, and that Joseph L. Williams held it for the shortest time—9 days.
 The following statement, showing the gross receipts of the office and the compensation of the Postmaster at the periods named, will give a general idea of the business of the office:
 Years  Gross Receipts  Compensation
1808…………………….27.06………………….......8.22
1810…………………….31.62…………………….10.11
1820…………………….81.52…………………….26.76
1830……………………188.52……………………60.72
1840……………………525.72…………………..190.36
1850……………………848.42…………………..354.50
1860………………….1,017.59…………………..506.67
1870………………….2,014.14…………………..945.08
1880………………….3,938.11…………………1,450.00
1890………………….5,368.08………………….1,700.00


The Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, April 16, 1889
The Wellsboro Post Office
Some Account of the Business of this Office - the weight of the Mails handles in a Month

Every four years the Post office Department requires the weighing for a given period of all mail matter handled on the railroads and in the Post offices. It is understood that this is done in order to form estimates upon which to base the contracts for carrying the mails.

During the period from February 10th to March 25th the gross weight of the mail matter received at the Post office here was 8,848 pounds. The amount forwarded from the office amounted to 7,997 pounds. At this rate the weight of the mails handled at this office amounts to over eighty tons a year. We are informed that the mails have been rapidly increasing in weight during the past few years.

The gross receipts of the office for the year ending March 31st were $5,330.47. This is an increase of $200 over the gross receipts of the previous year. When the gross receipts reach $6.000 a year the Postmaster's salary will be increased to $1,800.

The salary of the Postmaster in this borough is now $1,700, it having been increased from $1,500 two years ago. During Mrs. S.R. Hart's term as Postmistress the salary was put up to $1,800; but when two-cent postage came the basis for salaries remained unchanged, and her compensation was cut down to $1,500. Recently Postmaster Doumaux has received an allowance of $250 a year for office rent, making his pay amount to $1,950. But the rent of the office cost him considerably more than the allowance, and the clerk hire and other expenses whittle his compensation down to about $1,000 net for each year's work.

Postmaster Doumaux says that when we get one cent postage, as we probably shall before long, the salary will go backward again, unless a new standard for rating is adopted by the Post office Department. A greater amount of labor, with added responsibility, is being put upon Postmaster every years, and he says that he really ought to employ another clerk in the office now, but he can't afford it upon his present salary. He has expended $1,500 in fitting up the new Post office cases during his term. He thinks that the postal service is the best equipped and the best managed department of the Government.


Tioga Eagle, Wellsboro, July 3, 1839, p.2

1582 from Williamsport by Trout Run, Oakesville, Corner Stone, Canton, Alba, Troy, Columbia Cross Roads, -out Creek and Southport, NY to Elmira, 74 miles and back daily in railroad cars and four horse post coaches.
Leave Williamsport every day at 6 a.m., arrive at Elmira same day by 10 p.m.
Leave Elmira every day at 4 a.m., arrive at Williamsport same day by 7 p.m.
[Corner Stone must have been at SE corner of Union Township where Lycoming. Bradford and Tioga Counties meet. ]


The Agitator: Wellsboro, PA., April 22, 1931
J. F. Gartland Writes History
Post Offices and Postmaster Stock Tioga County, Pennsylvania.

The many facilities for communication which we now enjoy such as the telegraph, telephone, radio and motor, steam and electric transportation systems, have not lessened the need or importance of United States Postal Service. I have gathered some information concerning the postal history of Tioga County, hoping it may be useful to those who are interested in preserving the names and data of those who took such an active part in this phase of the county's development.
The Williamson Road, the earliest post road of the county, was cut through in 1792 and ran from Painted Post, N.Y., to Lawrenceville, Tioga, Covington, Mansfield, Blossburg, Liberty, Trout Run, and on to Williamsport. Few of these intermediate towns had been founded at the time. The Newberry Turnpike, authorized in 1799, connected Williamsport and Tioga via Jersey Shore, Pine Creek, and Wellsboro. An east and west state road ran from Towanda through Sullivan, Covington, Wellsboro and thence along Pine Creek into Potter County. This road was laid out in 1806 and took some years to complete. It was many years before stage coaches were used on them, not until about 1837, the mails before that time being carried on horseback.
Post offices in the earliest days were the relay posts, that is, the inns or taverns, with "food and drink for man and beast," where horse relays were made by the king’s post riders. As the postal service gradually grew into a service for all the people and not solely for government messages, the people began to leave their letters at the relay stations for delivery by the king's messengers and that part of the tavern devoted to them was called the Post Office and the tavern keeper the postmaster. Elder Brewster, the famous Puritan divine, kept such a tavern and was the postmaster at Scrooby, England, before he led the Puritan migration into Holland, and afterwards, in 1620, to Plymouth, Massachusetts, in the Mayflower. Brewster is one of our best Tioga County names. Major Alexander S. Brewster, or "Squire" Brewster as he was affectionately called, was postmaster at Wellsboro in 1860. The early taverns of Tioga County naturally came to be the location of a number of our Post offices. They were conducted by some of our first and best settlers such as the Ford, Willard, Goodrich, Daggett, Bloss, Knox, and other families. In some other colonies no excise tax was charged on liquor sold by Postmasters on account of the public service rendered by them keeping the Post Office. Such post offices seemed incongruous how  with a ban on the sale of intoxicants, but in the early days they seemed to be a necessity and were the social centers"-- where nut brown draughts inspired. Where gray beard mirth and smiling toil retired." At a later date they lost their standing in many places. In reports of the Post Office inspector dated 1840 I read his protests against liquor being sold in places where the Post Office is located, calling them "groggeries," frequented by "grog bruisers," to the detriment of the Post Office patrons. I believe though that many a man could say of the old Tioga County taverns what now might well be said of the Penn-Wells, that:

 "Whoe'er has traveled life's dull round,
Whenever his stages may have been,
May sigh to think he still has found
His warmest welcome at an inn. “

A few months after Tioga County was organized which was 127 years ago, on March 26, 1804, the first Post Office of the County was established at Tioga.  This was on January 1, 1805. Thomas Jefferson was president. The population of the County was about 800. Tioga was given as the principal Post Office of the County in the official registry and was not until 1828 that Wellsboro overcame this prestige.
Because the Post Office service entered so intimately into the lives of the people, the postmasters were selected as a rule because they were trusted and respected by their neighbors. They were the leaders in the civic, religious, social and military life of their communities and the County.
Uriah Spencer was appointed as the first postmaster at Tioga and continued in office until July 1, 1809. He was appointed for a second term in 1835. His wife was a lineal descendent of the Rev. John Elliott, the saintly missionary to the New England Indians, Mr. Spencer was a member of the first board of County commissioners and was afterwards clerk of the courts and register and recorder. He was succeeded as postmaster by Dr. William Willard, who served from 1809 until April 25, 1811. Dr. Willard build a log house in 1798 around which grew the present town of Tioga. For many years the place was known as a Willardsburg. This log house was rebuilt in 1809 and was a combined post office, tavern and dance hall. Dr. Willard was a physician and the first one to serve as postmaster in the county. The post office directory shows William Willard Jr., succeeded his father in 1811 and it shows Thomas Putnam was postmaster in 1813. He was County Treasurer in 1813 and probably was a son of Elijah Putnam of Covington. William Willard Jr., was reappointed April 1, 1815, and served until January 1, 1819, when he was succeeded for a brief time by James Goodrich. John Berry[?] took office April 1, 1819 and served until May 31, 1821.
[unreadable words] the vicinity in 1796. Captain James Goodrich again took office and was postmaster of until 1835. He was a veteran of the war of 1812, County commissioner from 1825 to 1828 and was both tavern keeper and postmaster. After Uriah Spencer’s second term from July 1, 1835, to July 1, 1838, Alvah C. Bush, lumberman, New York financier and owner of the once famous Bush Park in Tioga, was appointed postmaster and continued as such until September 3, 1845. After the death of Dr. Willard, in 1836, Postmaster Bush put on a successful campaign for the general use of the Post Office name Tioga instead of the local named Willardsburg. During the term of Mr. Bush we find that the first notice of the railroad in Tioga County. There is a male contract dated November 1, 1839, in which Levi J. Cooley and Samuel H. Maxwell, of Elmira, N.Y., Thomas J. Magee, of Bath, N.Y.,  and Samuel Lloyd, Williamsport, PA, agree to carry the mail for the Post Office Department From Trout Run, PA, to Painted Post, N.Y., "in four horse post coaches until the railroad goes into operation" for $1,625 per annum.
This contract has an endorsement reading as follows: "21 March 1840,--Postmaster at Painted Post reports that 30 miles the railroad was put in operation on the 10th March 1840." The railroad referred to was the Corning and Blossburg railroad which was completed in 1840. This was the beginning of a new era which even now may be passing away with the coming of auto buses. We can let imagination fondly recall the Stagecoach days when the postman’s horn echoed through the hills and vales of the Tioga Valley. What an improvement in must have seemed when for the first time a spanking four horse team, presided over by a coachman with all those mannerisms that were once the accomplishment and delight of all true horsemen, drew up to the Tioga Post Office.
Doubtless there were old men there to tell of earlier days when the mail carriers went on  foot through the forest trails; the change to the pony express, and the sulky and now the Stagecoach, soon to be followed by the locomotive. Edwin C. Goodrich, a son of Captain James Goodrich, succeeded Mr. Bush as postmaster, and in turn was succeeded by William Lowell on July 1, 1846. Mr. Lowell came to Tioga in 1832. Albinus Hunt succeeded Mr. Goodrich and served until April 28, 1851. Lewis Daggett then became postmaster and remained in office until July 1, 1853. He also served a second term from 22, 1861, to May 4, 1865. Mr. Daggett was a son of Major Seth Daggett, who settled in Daggett's Mills in 1808. Henry H. Goodrich became postmaster July 1, 1853, and served until May 10, 1854. He was a son of Captain James Goodrich and a third of the family to serve as postmaster at Tioga. He was a man of culture who loved his native County and we are indebted to him for his interesting articles concerning its early days.
Charles G. Dennison then took office and served until March 31, 1856, when he was succeeded by William T. Urell, a brother-in-law of Lewis Daggett. Mr. Urell retained the place until Lewis Daggett took over the office for his second term in 1861, serving throughout the Civil War. Mrs. Sarah M. Etz was appointed May 4, 1865, the first woman postmaster in Tioga. She was probably related to Lt. Charles O.. Etz, who was killed at the battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia, July 1, 1862.
Philo Tuller succeeded to the office July 1, 1869, and served until 1885. He was a druggist and  said to be so obliging that even his political opponents wished he would change his political opinions so he might continue in office. This, however, was evidently a point at which his willingness to please ended, for their register for 1885 is a last in which his name appears as postmaster. A new administration had come into power for the first time since the Civil War. The change from a republican to a Democratic administration in 1884 and the change back in 1888 recalls that an inspector found in an old postal account book of those days over  the signature of a retiring postmaster and addressed to his successor the following doggerel: "I've kept this book and that kept it straight, and I'll keep it again in eighty-eight."
Mr. Tuller was succeeded by William T. Urell. The register for 1891 shows James T. Davis and for 1893 D. C. McAllister as postmaster. The last postmaster of whom I have a record is Sara M. Lowell, who is first shown in the register for 1897. From all accounts she was one of Tioga's best postmasters.
Dr. Abel Humphrey, who came to Tioga in 1838 and who for many years was a practicing physician and there, was a special mail agent from 1861 to 1869. What his duties were is not known to me. There is one more from Tioga who is well remembered as a credit to the Postal Service, Louis Leutner, railway postal clerk between Lyons and Williamsport for some 25 years past. It is hoped someone will complete the meager data given in this outline concerning the Tioga Post Office.

Wellsboro -- It was three years after the establishment of the Tioga Post Office before Wellsboro could boast of one, the second Post Office in the County. Samuel Wells Morris, the first postmaster, was commissioned January 1, 1808, and was succeeded by his father Benjamin Wistar Morris, January 1, 1813. Benjamin Wistar Morris was the first commission justice of the peace in the County. These two men may well be called the founders to Wellsboro. The father was a son of Samuel Morris, of Philadelphia, a fighting Quaker, who commanded the first city Troup at the battle of Princeton in the New Jersey campaign.
Benjamin Wistar Morris erected the first meeting house or church in Wellsboro. It was also used as a school. He was known as the "Squire" and in his good Quaker way held high standard of religion, education and culture in the struggling settlement. Samuel Wells Morris was educated at Princeton College and as an associate Judge presided at the first court held in Wellsboro. He was a member of the state legislature and was also congressman from the district in 1836. The first post office was located at the head of Morris Lane where the residence of Dr. Morgan L.. Bacon afterwards occupied by W. D. VanHorn, was built. It was of logs with a frame wing. The revenues of the office increase from $27.06 in 1808 a $281.52 in 1820.
The mails were received once a week from Williamsport and were carried on horseback. William Bache, Sr. took charge of the office April 10, 1822. Born in England, he came to America in 1790, settling in Wellsboro in 1812. He and Benjamin Wistar Morris were the first merchants. He was also a distiller. Bache is an illustrious name in American history. Richard Bache, son-in-law of Benjamin Franklin, was the second Postmaster General under the Continental Congress. Sarah Bache, his wife, anticipated Red Cross work during the Revolution by organizing 2500 women who engaged themselves in nursing, making clothing and other necessary war work. Many others of the Bache family have made their place in the civil, military and scientific life of the country.
The writer well knows of their fine qualities. They are personified in a granddaughter of Postmaster Bache, Mrs. Nellie Bache Graves, who is inspiring influence for good is well remembered by many men and women, now widely scattered, who came within her affectionate regard in the latter years of the 19th in the early part of the 20th century. She still continues on as at her home in Philadelphia with the same kindly heart and vivacious manner which so long have blessed those who know her and that causes all who  love her to rejoice that: "Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale, her infinite variety."
During Mr. Bache’s long term, in about 1837, stage coaches replaced the horse mounted post riders, followed in 1840 by the first railroad in the County, the Corning and Blossburg; this, however, did not come closer to Wellsboro then Tioga. The revenues of the office in 1830 increased to $188.55. James P. Magill took over the office July 24, 1845. He was editor of the Eagle, established in Wellsboro in 1838, and the first editor to become postmaster in the County. From the time of Benjamin Franklin the postmaster ship  was striven for by editors as in the early days it gave them an advantage in securing news and distributing their papers. The connection between post offices  and newspapers is shown by newspapers names still in use, such as the Post, Mail, New Letter and so on.
Mr. Magill did not serve long and was succeeded September 6, 1845, by Josiah Emery. Mr. Emery was one of our first school teachers and also editor of the Phoenix in 1837-1838, which was the second paper established in Wellsboro. He was also a lawyer and writer on local history. Stamps first came into use in the early 1840s through postmasters printing them privately. They were authorized by law in 1847 during Mr. Emery's term. Envelops   were introduced into the United States from France in 1842 as the "latest European novelty." Postage rates were based on single letter sheets, the charges running from six cents for not  exceeding 30 miles to $.25 for distances greater then four hundred and fifty miles. These rates were multiplied by the number of sheets in each letter.
In 1845 rates were reduced to five cents per half ounce for distances under 300 miles and $.10 for over that distance. On May 18, 1849 George Dwight Smith took over the office of postmaster. He afterwards became a lieutenant in the Civil War and was killed in action at the battle of South Mountain, Maryland, September 14, 1862. He was the husband of Mrs. Azubah Smith daughter of John L. Robinson, for many years of prominent banker in Wellsboro.
Major Alexander S.. Brewster succeeded postmaster Smith  April 26, 1853. He came with his parents to Tioga in 1828, moving to Wellsboro afterwards. He was admitted to the bar in 1835 when 23 years of age; was prothonotary and afterwards a justice of the peace from 1863 to the time of his death in the 90s. He combined those qualities former Vice President Stevenson had in mind when he said the  judicial procedure of his state could be improved if they would refer Supreme Court decisions to two competent justices of the peace for approval before they were promulgated.
Wellsboro was growing, the population in 1850 had increased to 620, and the postal revenues for the year were $848.42. In 1851 the "plank road" was built between Wellsboro and Tioga, "air line" stages put on and the town made more accessible to other sections of the County and especially to the railroad at Tioga  as never before. Ira D. Richard succeeded Major Brewster December 18, 1855. In 1851 postage rates were reduced to three and six cents, based on the distances established in 1845, and it 1855 the prepayment of postage was made compulsory.
Hugh Young, one Wellsboro's ablest man, took over the postmaster ship March 3, 1861, and was postmaster throughout the period of the Civil War. During the sanguinary Kansas border troubles Mr. Young, who was a brother-in-law of David Wilmot, of Wilmont Proviso fame, represented the New York Tribune as correspondent on the ground. He was a national bank examiner for many years and   was also the editor of the Agitator from 1861 to 1863. During Mr. Young's incumbency has postmaster   postage rates were reduced to three cents per half ounce in the United States regardless of distance.
Captain Morgan, a Civil War veteran and most popular citizen, succeeded Mr. Young on August 29, 1866, and in turn was succeeded by Joseph L Williams January 18, 1869. Mr. Williams held office but a short time when, being succeeded by Major George W. Merrick   on January 27, 1869. Major Merrick was a veteran of the Civil War, losing a leg in the assault on Fort Hell in 1864. He was an able and forceful man and lawyer.
Mrs. Susan R. Hart, widow of Captain Hart, succeeded to the office June 14, 1882, when Major Merrick resigned to become a candidate for state office. During Major Merrick's term, Wellsboro received its first mail by railroad from Corning, Cowanesque and Antrim line which was completed in 1872. The receipts of the office had increased from $1017.59 in 1862 to $2014.14 in 1870 and to $3938.11 in 1880. During Major Merrick's term, I believe the office was located in the store now occupied by Ed and Otis Evans and during Mrs. Hart’s term at the southwest corner of Main and Crafton streets in the store conducted now by the family of Louis Finkelstein
Mrs. Hart was the first woman to serve as postmaster in Wellsboro. For number of years she was preceptress in our schools. During her term the postage rate was decreased to two cents per half ounce and to two cents per ounce in 1885. Louis Doumaux, another veteran of the Civil War, took over the office August 10, 1886, and served until he was succeeded by James L. White on February 1, 1891. Mr. Doumaux moved the  office to the store now occupied by the Lush Brothers store and Mr. White moved it next door above to the building afterwards occupied by the Advocate office. In 1889 revenues of the office had increased to $5,368.08.
It was during this period that William B. Sullivan, an unusually able post official and true and warmhearted friend, began his long service in the Wellsboro Post Office. The affection with which he is still remembered by those who knew him is the Major of his worth. Mr. Doumaux was the last Civil War veteran to serve as postmaster in Wellsboro. His successor, Mr. White, was a son of the famous judge Robert Gray White and was a merchant for many years.
Frederick K. Wright succeeded him February 1, 1895, and moved the office to the building now occupied by Peter Fischler. Mr. Wright was a lumberman, tanner, merchant and for some time publisher, in partnership with Frank Conevery of the Gazette. He brought to the office qualities of leadership, business acumen and kindliness that made him a most satisfactory postmaster beloved by those who came under his supervision. It was during the incumbency of Mr. Wright that Miss Jennie B. King became connected with the office, in about 1897, serving until September, 1930. Cultured and able, she brought a charm and dignity to the office. She is gratefully remembered by those who had the happiness to be associated with her. Charles E. Fullwod and Joseph Gartland began their employment as clerks in the office in about 1896 and 1898, respectively.
Now came the greatest development of the Wellsboro Post Office with the induction of Arthur M. Roy, editor of the Agitator, as postmaster on February 11, 1899. This was indeed the golden period of the office, both as it related to improvements in the service but especially as it concerned those whose   good fortune it was to work under the supervision of this good and able man. He had a natural dignity and reserve of manner, and while strict he was never harsh, but always kindly and just. With the integrity, industry and thrift inherited from his Revolutionary and Scottish forbears he cared for the interests of the government with the same diligence as he did his own. Farsighted, he pressed for the development of the rural delivery service when it was not as popular to do so as it was later, and 11 routes were soon emanating from Wellsboro.
His work in establishing city delivery service in 1906, improving mail service, securing new and better quarters and equipment was exceptional. It attests his unassuming but energetic and sincere interest in the welfare of every patron of the office. In all he did he was aided by his assistant, Mr. Sullivan, who gave him that affectionate loyalty he so well deserved in which he so sincerely appreciated.
The receipts of the office increased from $5,541.31 in 1895 to $7,736.02 in 1898, and to $9,040.97 in 1903. Old stage routes began to disappear, automobiles were appearing, good roads were being talked of and a new era in the postal service had started. From now on my records are only those of memory so far as the Wellsboro office is concerned. Mr. Roy was succeeded in about 1908 by W. E. Champaign, who in turn was succeeded by Otis H. Davis in about 1916. B. F. Edwards succeeded Mr. Davis about 1924 in the present in common, Clyde W. Bailey, took over the office in March 1931. Mr. Roy moved the office in about 1900 to the southeast corner of Main and Crafton streets, where it will probably remain until the completion of the new federal building.
Wellsboro has furnished a comparatively large number of man to the postal service. In the 1880’s, 1890’s and 1900’s James W. Donaldson, Ellis J. Merrick and Terrence C. Sullivan were railway postal clerks between Lyons and Williamsport and Mr. Sullivan between New York and Dunkirk. He was afterwards in the Post Office Department at Washington.
Charles E. Jennings was a clerk in the Post Office under Mr. White, then a postal clerk  between Lyons and Williamsport and subsequently a Post Office inspector. Albert E. Wetmore, one of the first letter carriers and formerly a schoolteacher, is now a Post Office inspector at Philadelphia, able and highly respected by his superiors and colleagues.
Fay R. Furman was also an inspector for  a short period and a successful one, but decided that the variety of life and work encountered was poor exchange for a happy home in Wellsboro. Joseph Gartland has also been inspector for the past 18 years. At a later date something will be written of those men who pioneered in the early days of rural delivery.
It was not the comparatively easy work it is now in any respect. Well and favorably recalled of those good friends Charles W. Moyer, O.B. Roberts, Fred Plumley, H. L. Furman, H. M. Mathers, George B. Mathers, Addison C. Boyden, James A. Bullard, Luther H. Johnson, Darwin W. Shumway and Arthur A. Lyon. Each could write an interesting story of the early days of rural delivery before the days of paved roads when they would carry back to the office the mud from a radius of 10 miles in addition to flowers in the springtime and rattlesnakes in the summer.

Delmar-- the third Post Office to be established is listed in the directory as Delmar, Lycoming County, with Richard Moore appointed as postmaster April 25, 1811. It is also listed in 1813 with the same postmaster. Tioga County was formed from Lycoming County and the postal directories did not show Tioga County for some time after its establishment. The name Delmar comes from Virdelmar, the first syllables of Virginia, Delaware in Maryland, where a number of the early settlers came from. The Vir was dropped at an early date. Delmar is not mentioned again until its establishment once more in 1877.

Cowanesky-- Cowanesky is for shown in the directory of 1813 with William Lindsley as postmaster. Whether it is the same office established at Cowanesque Valley in 1865 and its name changed to Cowanesque we in 1889 I am unable to say. William Lindsley may be one of the Lindsleys who settled near Lawrenceville. The office did not appear in subsequent issues of the directory--Joseph F. Gartland


Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, November 25, 1931
Postoffice Cornerstone
Placed in position last Friday --- No Formal Ceremonies

The following articles were deposited in a metal box and placed in the cornerstone of the new Wellsboro Post Office building.
November 20:
List of post office employees and their signatures and service records.
List and signature of Wellsboro Burgess and Council members.
Photograph of Arthur M. Roy, former postmaster, and data pertaining to his services.
Centennial button, donated by Alfred Smart and Joseph Tota.
Photograph of Mrs. Susan R. Hart, the first woman to serve as postmaster in Wellsboro.
Signatures of the officers of the court and other county officials.
History of postal operations in Tioga county and Wellsboro, written by Joseph F. Gartland, Post Office Inspector, and former employee of the Wellsboro post office.
Account of the death of Jennie B. King, and service record during her service in the Wellsboro post office.
Directory of Wellsboro.
Yearbook of the Friday Club.
Confederate $50 bill, donated by Harry Whitney.
Paper currency, series 1874, better known as “Shin plaster,” and $1 Greenback, series 1862, donated by Frank A. Deans.
Centennial book of Wellsboro.
Current issues of the Wellsboro Agitator and Wellsboro Gazette.
Photograph of Leonard H. Harrison, donor of the site for this post office building.
List and signatures of teachers and pupils of the Wellsboro public schools.
List and signatures of School Directors.
1c piece from Bruce K. Jones, construction engineer of the building.
½, 1c, 2c stamps.
Indian head 1c piece.
List of Tyadaghton Commandery, No. 28, members and officers.
History of gas developments in this county.
Picture of entrainment of the first draft soldiers, who served during world war.
List of men from Tioga County who served during the world war.


The following articles taken from the Wellsboro Agitator Wednesday, March 30, 1932
Tioga County Post Offices
Joseph F. Gartland writes some more interesting local history.

The Westfield Post Office was established December 14, 1826.  There were at this time 10 other Post Offices in the County.  The first postmaster, Henry Trowbridge, was a prominent citizen and had held several township offices, being auditor and 1815, overseer of the poor in 1816, and supervisor in 1821.  John McGee, of Bath, held one of the early mail contracts in these days and one of the routes running into Westfield required that he should carry the mail once a week from Angeiles, New York, in two horse stages, to Genesee .  Valley, Scio, Wellsville, Center Independence, Whitesville, Spring Mills, Bingham late roses, Harrison Valley, Westfield, Knoxville, Elkland, Nelson, Ryonsville, to Lawrenceville.
 Mr. Trowbridge was succeeded by Adriel King September 14, 1830.  For some reason the office was discontinued August 7, 1838, but was reestablished March 18, 1839, with B.S. Lewis as postmaster.  He was probably an ancestor of Miss Sarah I. Lewis, of Westfield, who was elected county superintendent of schools in 1876 and 1880, the first woman in Pennsylvania to be elected to such a position.  Rev. Frances Strang succeeded to the office November 16, 1841.  He was a Methodist clergymen in the first clergymen I have a record to be commissioned as postmaster in tioga County, being appointed about 26 years before the Rev. Julius Doane, of Covington.  He was the father of Butler B. Strang, one of the County's most eminent lawyers and statesmen.
 Postmaster straining organized the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Westfield in 1850 and also built the first store in what is now the borough of Westfield.  P.  Boardman took over the office July 15, 1853, and served until succeeded by Thomas Lesch, August 9, 1856.  Daniel McNaughton, go this and justice of the peace, became Postmaster April 19, 1861, and held the position on until November 2, 1871, when Miles W. McNaughton succeeded him, holding office until September 3, 1886, when he was succeeded.  By J. Mastin William N. Hurlbert was commissioned postmaster May 24, 1889, and held the position on to Frank Strang, a descendent of Rev. Frances Strang, postmaster in 1841, January 7, 1896 him March 1, 1901 Winfred W. Marsh and brother of, editor of the Westfield Free Press and brother of Judge H.  F.  Marsh. , was the next postmaster and held the office until it was taken over by Frank M. Davis on March 3, 1915.  Lewis E.  Knapp was appointed Postmaster December 1, 1923.  He served well and faithfully as assistant postmaster for many years and with W.  B.  Sullivan, of Wellsboro, and Budd A. Clark, Mansfield, was looked upon as one of the ablest postal officials of the County.  George Sorenson, formerly of Westfield and now a newspaper editor in Oregon or Washington, was a railway postal clerk between Lyons and Williamsport some 25 years ago and is favorably recalled.

Ingham.  This Post Office was established February exchange, 1827, and lasted until June 16, 1836, when it was discontinued Doctor Ezra Wood was postmaster.  It was located between Daggett Mills and Rutland but from whence came the name I am not able to determine.

Charleston.  Dartmouth was the first name of this Post Office, which was established January 14, 1828.  The name was changed to Charleston April 23, 1821, though the locality was it and I believe still is better known as Dart Settlement vote and align first named after the Dart family and its first postmaster, Col. Justice Dartt, a soldier of the Revolution, Charleston had as its postmaster in member of the Dartt family for approximately 53 of its 76 years, it was discontinued as a Post Office February 29, 1904 with the coming of rural delivery.
 Col. Dartt who came from her man in 1811, was County commissioner in 1815 and one of the founders and trustees of the Wellsboro Academy in 1817.  The first election in Charleston Township was held at his home on March 19, 1824 and he was one of the leaders in the erection of the first Church, schoolhouse and sawmill.  Col. Dart was the great-grandfather of Arthur M. Roy, postmaster of Wellsboro, and of the Dart Brothers, so long active in the business and public life of the town.  A large number of the finest men and women of the County can look back with pride in this stouthearted ancestor.  He died a July 5, 1838.
 Cyrus Dartt, his son, succeeded him and was commissioned September 10, 1838.  He came to Charleston with his parents in 1811, when he was 11 years of age.  Before the establishment of the Dart mouth post office, the early settlers, the Wheelers, Elliott's Willard's, Shunway's, Austin's, Niles', Bailey's and Culver's received their mail at Wellsboro.  John W.  Bailey was the next Post Master and took office January 31, 1853, and served until July 31, 1861.  He was the most prominent business man of the County, engaging in Merck and title, farming and other enterprises with CG  Van Valkenburg, F. H. Wright and others.
J. Gillis Dartt was the next postmaster and served until August 29, 1866, when Cyrus Dart again took office, serving until November 18, 1871, when Andrew Tipple was succeeded by Andrew Klock, and one of the family who for so many years had been prominent and a civil and military life of the County.  Mr. Klock held office from 26, 1873 on until January 31, 1876, when James G. Dart took the office and held it until June 30, 1894, the last of the Dart's to hold the position.  Charles B. Bean was the next postmaster and served until September 30, 1897, when Julius Wetmore was appointed.  The records show that George P..  Wilson was appointed Postmaster October 7, 1903, but that the order was rescinded January 20, 1904.  And that Mr. Wetmore held the position and see the office was discontinued, February 29, 1904.

Rutland was the next office to be established in the County, and as many as the early settlers of this locality came from her man's in New Hampshire May named their Township in town after the County in the city of the same name as their native state.  The local name of Roseville, however, was used by all except in addressing mail.  The Post Office was established April 10, 1928, with Bethuel Bentley January 14, 1833, but again took over the office May 24, 1834.
 William Rose, Jr., son of the first settler, became Postmaster July 17, 1840.  Dr. Frank H. Rose, for many years a dentist in Wellsboro, was a descendent.  He was succeeded by Joel R. Watkins June 26, 1865.  Elmer R. Backus was the next postmaster being commissioned May 3, 1866.  Captain Backus at the opening of the Civil War raised a company of Calvary and enlisted for a term of three years.  After this he raised company a of General Cox's Regiment, that 207th Pennsylvania volunteers, and served until the close of the war.  After leaving Rutland he was a merchant and railroad station agent at Mansfield.
 Cornelius B. Hanyen again became Postmaster July 3, 1897, and was  a prominent merchant, succeeded Captain Backus January 10, 18 81, and in turn was succeeded by Daniel Watson, August 20 6, 1885.  Early R.  Wood, a descendent of the early settlers, took over the office on December 23, 1888 and held it until he was succeeded by John F. Wilcox on May 24, 1898.  Mr. Hanyen again became Postmaster July 3, 1897, and was followed by Tom W. Bull January 24, 1914.  And Cornelius Soper, August 22, 1918.  Bertha M. Bond was appointed next, taking office September 21, 1920, and was followed by the present Postmaster, Charles J. Cudworth, who was appointed October 8, 1925.  His forefathers were among the first to settle and Rutland.--Joseph Gartland



 Due to an error, the list of Westfield postmasters printed sometime ago failed to contain the name of E.S. Holcomb, who served ably and well from March 1, 19012 February 3, 1911.  Mr. Knapp, who was his assistant and who is the present postmaster called my attention to this period--Joseph F.  Gartland
Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, January 20, 1932
More Post Office History
The First Postmaster of Leetonia was H.H. TenBroeck, of Williamsport

I read with much interest the Tioga county post office history by Joseph Gartland, of Washington, D.C., and hoped he would cover all the post offices, but I did not find Leetonia in his items. W. Creighton Lee, of New York City, began building in 1870 a tannery at what was then known as Billings Camp, Lee & Co. having made large purchase of land, but larger ones of bark stumpage, from Silas X. Billings, of Gaines, and I was sent there as the first bookkeeper and store manger, arriving there on April 2 of that year. At that time the only buildings Lee & Co. had erected were boarding house, store, blacksmith shop and one or two houses. There were, however, a saw mill, boarding house, etc., belonging to Mr. Billings.

All the mail at that time came in from Cedar Run by an arrangement to send it up with tannery teams or send down after it. Later Mr. Billings came over from Gaines and said: “I have arranged to have a P.O. established here to be called Billings Camp. You are to be postmaster.

I received the commission, signed by David M. Key, Postmaster General at that time, and soon all P.O. equipment was sent and we were on the map. It was not long, however, until Mr. Lee’s two sons came there [Gideon and Charles] to run the tannery. Neither of them had the best of health and the father thought the mountain air and water would be beneficial to them.

Well not long after they came I began to see that they were dissatisfied with the name of the P.O. and one day Gideon said to me: “I’d like to have you select a more appropriate name for it.” I said, I presume you want “some Lee in it”? I proposed the name Leesdale and Senator John I Mitchell took the matter up with the P.O. authorities and found there was already a Leesdale P.O. in Pennsylvania, so in looking over the list of post offices found a Leetonia in Ohio and that was acceptable with the Lees. Therefore the office name was changed and a new commission sent me issued by the department and signed by Thos. L. James, P.M. General, he having succeeded D.M. Key as P.M. General.

I held the office until October 1881, and was succeeded by Jas. F. Palen, following my resignation when I removed to Salladasburg, Pa., as tannery bookkeeper and store manager of Robt. McCullough, where I remained until October 1897; then transferred to the General Office of Elk Tanning Co. at Ridgway; soon afterward appointed superintendent of Gaines tannery and then the Tioga tannery, and others following. ----- H.H. TenBroeck, Williamsport, Pa.


Agitator, Wellsboro, Pa., February 24, 1932
More History of Post Offices
Joseph F. Gartland, Formerly of Wellsboro, writes of Postmasters and Post Offices of Tioga County

Mansfield: What memories the name of Mansfield brings to her widely scattered children as they backward glance down the vista of receding years. Many a heart grows warmer as early friendships, joys and aspirations born and nurtured within the classic shades of her schools arise on the dim horizon of memory. The associations formed, the student friendships, and the anxieties of parents for children whose first absence from home was to the Mansfield Normal, made Mansfield mails eagerly watched for.

The first settlers received their mail from Canoe Camp until the Mansfield post office was established on July 1, 1824. Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams were at this time in a heated campaign for the presidency, which Adams won. “Old Hickory”, however, was a great favorite in Pennsylvania and in Mansfield especially, where later, a row of hickory trees was planted along Wellsboro street in his honor. Almon Allen, the first postmaster, was captain of the local militia and father of Professor F.A. Allen, probably the ablest administrative educator the county has produced. Professor Allen was editor of the McKean Citizen; county superintendent of McKean county schools; established and was principal of the West Chester Normal School and was principal of the Mansfield Normal School. He organized the Mansfield Soldier’s Orphan School in 1867 and also conducted for a number of years teachers institutes throughout the United States. Barrett Clark succeeded to the postmastership February 28, 1827, and in turn was succeeded by Asa Mann, who served from March 6, 1828 to January 28, 1839. Mr. Mann came from Rhode Island and located in the vicinity of the present town in 1804 and opened a store and tavern in a log house, later building a sawmill and distillery. He cleared, in about 1824, some 200 acres of land on which the town of Mansfield is now located. This clearing was known as Mann’s Field and from it the post office received its name. Appolus Pitts, who came to Mansfield from Sullivan in 1837 next succeeded the office and held it until March 29, 1842. Philemon Doud then took the postmastership and continued in office until May 6, 1845. He also was from Sullivan, his father coming there from Vermont in 1808. Benjamin M. Bailey was the next postmaster and served until December 4, 1849. He was a prominent merchant and came to Mansfield in 1840. Lyman Beach Jr., then took the office and held it until May 7, 1853. He was Justice of the Peace and a partner of J.S. Hoard. Mr. Bailey again took over the office and served until august 15, 1855, when Isaac M. Ruckman is shown as postmaster for two months being succeeded by Matthew Covell October 15, 1855. Mr. Ruckman was editor of the first newspaper published in Mansfield. The Balance, afterwards known as the Express. Oliver H. Phelps became postmaster April 10, 1856 and served until March 20, 1861. He was a prominent hotelkeeper, erecting one after he came to Mansfield in 1843. Charles V. Elliott, grandson of Levi Elliott, who came to Tioga County in 1808, took over the office and served until July 10, 1873. Doctor Elliott was a prominent physician and druggist, state representative in 1876-8, and erected what is said to have been the first brick store building in the county in 1867. He was of the Cherry Flats family of Elliotts of which Mortimer F. and Simon B. Elliott were prominent members. The Elliotts are warm hearted, likable and brilliant and have furnished the county and nation with lawyers, physicians, architects and statesmen. They are now well represented by Attorney Charles Elliott of Wellsboro. Vine R. Pratt, who was manager of the Soldiers Orphan School under Professor Allen for many years was the next postmaster his term extending from July 10, 1873 to July 6, 1877. It was during the term of the next postmaster, M.L. Clark, in 1879, that the Fair, Mansfield’s principal claim to fame, next to her schools was organized. What one would give to recall but for an hour the youthful pleasures experienced during a trip to the Fair. The horse and buggy or the democrat wagon; the early start on the clear, frosty morning; the delightful drive over pleasant country roads; the joyous, happy day; and the ride home under the harvest moon with songs and laughter, until surfeited with happiness, the welcome lights of home gleamed through the silver moonlight with their warmth of peace and contentment. Mr. Clark served as postmaster until April 6, 1886. He was a grandson of Elijah Clark who came from Massachusetts to Tioga County in 1806, and founded the family who have taken such a prominent part in the affairs of the county. Budd Clark, who served so long and well in the Mansfield post office is no doubt a descendant of this family as well as his brother who recently retired after many years as a railway post clerk cunning with Ellis Merrick, Park Colvin, J.W. Donaldson and C.E. Jennings on the Lyons and Williamsport Railway Post Office. N.A. Elliott the next post master served until July 9, 1890, being succeeded by J.A. Elliott, who served until John L. Cummings was appointed August 19, 1898. He was succeeded by Thomas H. Bailey February 13, 1907. Mr. Bailey [words unreadable] prominent farmer and hotelkeeper. Robert E. Urell succeeded him August 22, 1913, and was an unusually able postal official and gentleman. E.B. Cornwell succeeded to the position July 12[?], 1922, which closes my record.

Liberty was the next post office to be established. For many years it was better known as Block House, after such a building erected by the builders of the Williamson Road in 1792, in the style of the block house forts used as a defense against Indians. For many years it was operated as a tavern. Liberty was on the stage route between Williamsport and Painted Post, N.Y., on which the requirements of the Post Office Department were for a number of years that four horse post coaches be operated. Prior to this time, however, mail was carried on horseback. About 1815, the messenger was John Sheffer, Jr., then a boy of 13 living in Lycoming County. He covered the entire distance of 80 miles and knew every settler on the route. This day and night schedule through a wilderness over lonely roads infested with bears and panthers he kept up for over two years. What a wealth of biography in the Sheffer family, from the Revolutionary patriot grandfather to the young mail messenger and on to the civil car veteran, Francis M. Sheffer, who has since so faithfully serve his county and town as few other men have.

The post office at Liberty was established November 26, 1825, with Jacob Levegood as postmaster. He was the son of one of the twelve thrifty, God fearing Pennsylvania Dutch pioneers who took up land in Liberty in 1814, and the grandson of a Revolutionary soldier of Lancaster county. Jonathan Sebring succeeded to the office March 26, 1832; turned it over to Benjamin C. Morris, May 18, 1835, and again took it over April 21, 1836. Mr. Sebring was a surveyor, kept a tavern in the blockhouse which was noted for its good order and hospitality, and was one of the first settlers. He was the founder of a large family, cleared a fine farm and died in Wisconsin aged 96 years.

Joel H. Woodruff became postmaster September 13, 1849 and served until August 29, 1853, when Horace Fellows was made postmaster, serving until August 19, 1859. Mr. Fellows came to Wellsboro from Connecticut in 1825, after living for a time in New York State he moved to Liberty in 1840 and conducted a wollen and fulling mill there for many years. Isaac Foulkrod succeeded him and held office until April 7, 1862. Mr. Foulkrod came to Liberty in 1819. He was unusually versatile, taking up trades, professions and arts and becoming accomplished in them as his tastes or the needs of the pioneer community required. He was one of the first school teachers, a carpenter, mill-wright, blacksmith, silversmith, cabinet maker, violinist and linguist with a knowledge of French and German and a reading knowledge of Greek and Latin. His grandfather was a soldier of the Revolution.

Joel Woodruff again assumed the office and was succeeded by Benjamin W. Werline October 23, 1866, whose father came to Liberty in 1829, and was one of the first tanners.

April 2, 1869, General Robert C. Cox, took office as postmaster. This good and able man was the foremost soldier of the county. After years of brilliant leadership in the civil was where he showed himself to be the “bravest of the brave”, he took up the peaceful pursuits of a citizen among the people he loved so well. He was prothonotary for many years. William Narber, merchant succeeded General Cox October 26, 1869 and held the postmastership until August 21, 1885, and was succeeded in turn by Samuel R. Bastian June 6, 1886, also a prominent merchant and the descendant of one of the settlers who came in the early days of the town. Charles A. Miller, another merchant, became postmaster March 28, 1889 and was succeeded by John Foulkrod November 14, 1898[?], son of the former post master. Charles A. Miller again took office September 8, 1898 and was succeeded February 13, 1909 by Fred B. Miller, who was succeeded by William H. Merithew June 3, 1915. Walter R. Miller took over the office August 17, 1921, which ends by record. Enough has been said to show the postmasters of Liberty were among its foremost citizens, which is much to say in a community where all citizens are as worthy as those of this township.


This article was taken from the Wellsboro Agitator March 1, 1933
Tioga County Post Offices
Joseph F. Gartland Writes More Interesting History

Blossburg--the first record I have of this post office is under the name Canal Port.  It was established after its near neighbor, Liberty.  When the Patterson Brothers came through guiding immigrants into New York State in 1792, they discovered coal, the first in the county.  The place was then known as Peter's Camp, probably after he can't established by the builders of the Williamson Road.  Aaron Bloss, the earliest permanent settler, arrived in 1806, erected a home, afterwards a hotel, and operated the first coal mines.  In later years, about 1826, a canal was planned to connect with the Chemung Canal in New York State and it was from this the post office received its first name Canal Port.
 The canal was never built but 35 years later one of the first railroads in the United States, the Corning and Blossburg, wheeled into town.  In the meantime the coal industry brought first to Blossburg and later to other mining towns in the county a distinct ethnic group composed of Irish, Scotch, and Welch miners.  These men with their sons and daughters have brought to their county, state and nation a fame and credit that is not excelled by the representatives of any other race or workers in any other industry.
 Such names as Wilson, Dunsmore, Kerwin Rees, Bannon, Cameron, Edwards, Murray, Evans and many more like names mean something.  Tennyson’s lines fit all of these men especially do they fit William R. Wilson, statesman, close adviser to a president, Cabinet officer and a man always in the forefront in the battle for human rights.  "He truly broke his births infidious bar, and grasped the skirts of happy chance, and breasted the blows of circumstance, and grappled with his evil stars, he made by force his merit known.  And lives to clutch the golden keys, to mold a mighty state's decrees, and shape the whisper of the throne.".
 Nathaniel Knapp was the first postmaster and serve until November 3, 1828.  I find the name Eleazer R. Utter as postmaster during this period without any dates being given in the absence of any other information I think this as an error as I sometimes found in records.  On January 26, 1827, the post office name was officially changed to Blossburg in honor of the first settler, Aaron Bloss,, though it had been known as such for some time before.
 Judge Knapp, a resident of Elmira, erected a sawmill and iron furnace in 1825 and made pig iron from Blossburg ore.  He built the first store in 1826 operated mines, built homes and was the first citizen of this place.  The industries he started and which later proved so profitable to others met many difficulties in their early days and Judge Knapp had to turn over the work so well begun to others.
 He was succeeded by Aaron Bloss January 10, 1831.  Mr. Bloss, the pioneer, was a famous tavernkeeper, able businessman and good storyteller.  He first settled in the vicinity of Covington in 1801 and died where he first settled in 1843.  Dr. Joseph P. Morris succeeded him as postmaster March 27, 1838.  He came to Blossburg in 1835 and was active in mining, railroading and iron manufacturing.  He moved to Mansfield in 1854 and took an active part in school and church work.  During his term the Corning and Blossburg railroad went into operation and it is said that it was the first in United States to use coal to generate steam.
 Thomas H. Turner was the next postmaster.  He conducted a store and served from August 2, 1841, to October 17, 1843, when he was succeeded by Henry H. Welsh, who held office until July 29, 1845, when Benjamin R. Hall was connected with the Magee stage coach line between Painted Post and Williamsport; kept tavern at Liberty and in 1842 opened a hotel at Blossburg which he kept for 20 years.  Alexander H. Gaylord took over the office December 31, 1846.  He came to Blossburg in 1837 and the fact that at one time or another he held practically every local office in the gift of the people speaks well for his popularity.  At various times he was also superintendents of the glass factory, surveyor, land agent, manufacturer and lumbermen.
 F. B. Andrews was the next postmaster and served from May 8, 1849 to February sixth, 1852.  Mr. Gaylord again took office and serve this time until April 19, 1861, when James P. Taylor took the place and served until September 16, 1866, when Thomas W. Thomas was appointed.  Mr. Thomas held office until February 5, 1869, when Mr. Taylor was reappointed serving until his death, May 10, 1874.
 Joseph Maxwell succeeded him and served until the appointment of Alfred James, May 29, 1876.  Mrs. James's father, John James, was mail agent of the Corning and Blossburg railroad from 1862 until his death on March 4th, 1873.  E. H. Mosher was appointed postmaster May 7, 1886, and served until January 19, 1890.  Mr. Mosher was one of the town's most popular men and the father of Miss Flo Mosher, who married George Houck of Wellsboro, a pioneer in the bicycle and automobile industry, whose activities covered two continents.
 George D. Wilkinson succeeded him, and to turn was succeeded by Frank H. Stratton March 29, 1894.  About this time W. H. Clement and Miss Stratton, both well remembered as excellent postal officials, came into the service.  The next postmaster was Francis I. Jones, afterwords US Commissioner of Employment in the Department of Labor.  Mr. Jones was postmaster from July 19, 1898 to January 26, 1903.  He never lost his affection for his old home and his greatest delight is to talk about Tioga County with all a Welshman's enthusiasm.  Dr. Daniel O. Merrick became the next postmaster, and held office until January 18, 1912, when he was succeeded by George D. Clark, a prominent merchant and able postmaster.
 My records close with Michael C. Birmingham, who was appointed, February 7, 1916, and served, I believe, for eight years.  He was an able-bodied postman and no doubt the party in which he was taken such an interest now that it will soon be in power will use his services in some position.

Daggett--this post office the 18th to be established in the County, was opened May, 8, 1828, with Major Seth Daggett as postmaster.  The Major came to Tioga County with his parents from New Hampshire in 1807, and was long one of the foremost men in the County.  He was sheriff in 1830; engage in lumbering; built a number of sawmill; opened the first grist mill and drove the first wagon in Jackson Township.
A Descendent, Seth Daggett, was landlord of the Wilcox House in Wellsboro for number of years in the eighties and nineties and his two of a vicious daughters, Georgia and Leah, are kindly remembered by their early playmates.  The post office is located in Jackson Township one Hammond Creek and during its existence was known first as Daggett's Mills, then as Spencerville, Dallasville and last of all Daggett.  An early mail contract, 1828-1832, 100 years ago, require that mail be carried once a week by stage from Elmira New York to Southport; French Mills, called Jackson; Ingham; Rutland, called Bentley's to Mansfield."
 Joshua Spencer, who came to the Township, soon after the Daggett's, was the second postmaster taking office January 18, 1831.  He built and conducted the first hotel in the Township.  The name of the office was changed to Spencerville August 10, 1832, but restored to Daggett's Mills January 8, 1833.  The town's continued as the leading community in the Township until about 1860, when it gave place to Millerton.  Major Daggett again took over the office July 13, 1841, and was succeeded by Richard Jones 27, 1842.
 John P. Brees was the next postmaster, taking office March 8, 1847, when the name was changed to Dallasville.  This may have been done in honor of George Mifflin Dallas, of Pennsylvania, who was Vice President at the time.  Abram Miller succeeded to the postmaster ship January 28, 1848, and in turn was succeeded by John W. Joslin October 2, 1849, when the name of the office was changed to Daggett's Mills.
 Orrin B. Wells was the next postmaster and took office May 30, 1850, being succeeded by Andrew Murdough September 5, 1853, and by Abraham B. DeWitt on May 30, 1855.  Dr. Nathaniel Smith became postmaster December 17, 1858.  He was born in Vermont are Revolutionary stock and was a lawyer as well as physician and one of the County's most cultured men.  During the Civil War, while postmaster, he cared for the families of the soldiers without charge.
 One Sun succeeded him as physician in Millerton and the other, Dix W. Smith, he noted New York attorney, resided in Elmira.  Ruben Wells became postmaster or January 5, 1863, and was succeeded by William H. Ferguson June 27, 1865, who in turn was followed by John Lain February 24, 1873, and DB Lain January 18, 1877.
 William E. Compton, was commissioned next on April 11, 1890, and was succeeded by David H. Scott May 12, 1894.  On July 1, 1895, a last change the post office was made when it was changed to Daggett.  Henry F. Swazey was made postmaster and was succeeded by Jerome L. Eighmey March 19, 1904.  The office was discontinued August 30, 1904, with the coming of rural delivery.

Ansonia--this post office was established in June 21, 1828, and was first designated Pine Creek post office.  The name changed to Ansonia September 16, 1870.  It was again changed to Ebenton on March 1, 1886, and back again to its present name, Ansonia, August 15, 1894.  While known as Pine Creek the office is located at the mouth of Marsh Creek in the locality known as Manchester Mills.  About the time the name was first changed to Ansonia it moved to the Harrington home near its present location.
Daniel Fuller, the first postmaster, served from June 21, 1828, the March 24, 1832, when he was succeeded by Ugenio Cushman, who in turn was succeeded by John Mathers., November 15, 1834.  Mr. Mathers served nearly 10 years and was succeeded by Hezekiah Stowell March 7, 1841, in turn he by Cornelius Cole, June 2, 1851.
 John Dickinson was appointed next and served from July 19, 1852, the July 15, 1853, being succeeded by Deroy Harrington who, March 13, 1862, turned the office over to Horace Broughton.  Albert Harrison followed May 29, 1867, and held office until January 25, 1869, being succeeded by Nathaniel Glassmier, who served until January 9, 1872.  It was during this period the post office named Pine Creek was changed to Ansonia.  I believe after Anson Phelps while Phelps Dodge & Co.
 Ms. Ella . Leib was the next postmaster and Horace Broughton against succeeded to the post office or March 20, 1872, and George W. Harrington July 12, 1872, making three separate postmaster's in that year.  Mr. Harrington served until March 5, 1884, when John F. Howe was appointed.
 William H. Thompson was next appointed and served from June 26, 1884 to March 2, 1891.  During this term the post office name was changed to Ebenton, in honor evidently out of some one whose name was Eben.  Thomas L. Reese now became postmaster and was succeeded by Gilbert E. Tate June 30, 1894, and shortly after, August 15, 1894, the name was again changed to Ansonia.  John D. Gross was appointed postmaster May 4, 1896, Laura Gee August 22, 1898; William Mason March 5, 1902; Ida E. Foster March 18, 1913; Edwin H. Eick July 12, 1919; Casper Cleveland, February 1, 1922; Harry J. Mengee , November 25, 1922; and Perle H. Miller July 14, 1930.
 The first settlers in the vicinity of Ansonia were Jacob Fuhrman, who located at the mouth of Marsh Creek in 1804, followed by his brothers, the Harrington's and then the Dimmick's, Steele's , Bernauer's, Dickinson's, Swopes, Rexford's, Kelsey's, Gees, and Scranton's.  Their first-out let to the business world was by flat boats down Pine Creek to Williamsport.  A few years later the State Road from Towanda, Wellsboro via Ansonia to Coudersport was put through and many years later, and the 1880s the Pine Creek railroad was constructed.  For many years Ansonia was and still is probably the only post office in Shippen township.  It was for many years the center of lumbering and for many years well known to many still living whose axes rung  in it's nearby mountain forests of white Pine and Hemlock.  It's postmaster's included many of the foremost men of the County.
 Due to an error, the list of Westfield postmaster's printed sometime ago failed to include the name of E. S. Holcomb, who served ably and well from March 1, 1901 to February 3, 1911.  Mr. Knapp who was his assistant and who is the present postmaster called my attention to this—J. F. Gartland


The Agitator: Wellsboro, PA, April 19, 1933, p.1
Jos. Gartland is Promoted
Former Wellsboro Man appointed Chief Assistant Post Office Inspector

Washington, D.C., April 17 - Appointment of Joseph F. Gartland, a native of Antrim, Pa., and for years a resident of Wellsboro, and employee of the local post office, as assistant chief post office inspector. Was announced today by Postmaster General Farley.
Mr. Gartland, who has been assistant director of the postal savings system since 1920, succeeds William A. Kenyon, who has been transferred to the inspection service in New York City.
The many friends of Mr. Gartland congratulate him on his deserved advancement in the postal service.


The Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, April 19, 1933
Postmaster Met Monday
With District Chief Mail Clerks to discuss Proposed Star Route Service

Second Division, Railway Mail Service - District Chief Clerks J.D. Hardy, Chief Clerk of District 9, and J.H. Cahill, Chief Clerk of District 10, were in Wellsboro Monday. They met with postmasters and others, interested in the mail service for this section, in the Civil Service room of the Wellsboro post office.

Plans and tentative arrangements were made for star route services to the offices which will be effected by the removal of passenger trains on the New York Central operating between Lyons, N.Y., and Williamsport, Pa., such curtailment of service reported to become effective April 29.

The schedules of star route services will be announced at a later date, prior to their establishment.

The following postmasters were in attendance: Judson Campbell of Casamal[?]; Cora M. Northrop. Of Asaph; Orin Warriner, of Tiadaghton; B.F. Brann, of Antrim; C.E. Davis, of Middlebury Center; P.H. Miller, of Ansonia; Mattie J. Carson, of Slate Run; Veta C. Kern[?], of Morris; Jennie M. Wilson, of Cedar Run; Willis Campbell, of Lloyd; Lottie J. Love, of Waterville; Elmer G. Cornwell, of Mansfield; Charles Rupaber[?], of Galeton; Geo. B. Hilborn, of Cedar Run; Clyde E. Baltzer, of Jersey Shore, and Clyde W. Bailey, of Wellsboro.



The Agitator: Wellsboro, PA., Wednesday, November 22, 1933
Joseph F. Gartland Continues His Interesting Historical Articles

Crooked Creek-this post office, better known as Hollydaytown, was established January 13, 1829, With Thomas Keeney as postmaster.  There was an office called Hollidaysburg in Huntington County at this time which precluded Crooked Creek being given the name of the family who founded the village and whose vigor, patriotism and social qualities have honored and graced Tioga County for so many years.  The writer looks back over 40 years with pleasure upon the friendship of one of them, Darius D.  Holiday, whose father was one of the first settlers and whose mother was the daughter of the first postmaster.  Now some 90 years of age, he thinks the earliest days of the County with the present and there is honorable scars from the war of Rebellion received at Antietam when he fought for his Tioga County home and his country.  Crooked Creek was on the line of the early Post route established in 1810 running from Wellsboro to Painted Post the mail being carried on horseback.  Stages were used as early as 1824 for some of the trips and a route established in 1832 was described as the "Wellsboro, Charleston, Crooked Creek, tioga and Rutland route.  Once a week from Wellsboro to Tioga in two horse stages and once a week on horseback, Tioga to Rutland."
 A description of another male route in 1833 reads: "Once a week Crooked Creek are (Middlebury)’ Little Marsh, Knoxville."  He penciled note on the old records reads: "Postmaster Knoxville says the mail does not pass Westfield on this route."  Postmaster Keeney served until April 7, 1833 when he was succeeded by Edsall Mitchell who served until March 20 8, 1840.  Edsall Mitchell was born at Mitchell Creek August 27, 1793, the first white child to be born in the County.  His father was one of the very earliest settlers in the County and his son was the Honorable John I.  Mitchell, United States Senator, Justice of the Superior Court, Member of Congress, Judge of the County Court in the holder of many other offices of honor and trust.  He was truly a great and good man.  L.  L.  Carr was the next postmaster and served until December 24, 1840 when he was succeeded by Ezra Potter, who would turn was succeeded by Samuel J.  Holiday July 24, 1846.  While he was Postmaster the plank road between Wellsboro and tioga, passing through Crooked Creek was built.  This was the first paid road in the County in its construction in 1850 that the growing needs of the County which now required daily mail service at more rapid means of communication.  The memory of a "Air Line" stages on the old plank road is still vivid in the minds of many.
 Sherwood M. Warren became Postmaster next on January 9, 1851 and was succeeded by John Redington was born in Connecticut and is buried in the old Hollydaytown churchyard.  He died March 5, 1850 aged  90 years.  San Jose holiday again took over the office May 11, 1855 and held it until February 27, 1861, when he was succeeded by Ira A.  Newhall.  Benjamin Doane assumed charges of the office October 26, 1864 and held it until May 15, 1867, when Ephraim C.  Westbrook was May postmaster.  He was succeeded by a John Smith June 15, 1869, after which John Redington, either the one who was postmaster in 1852 or he descended, was commissioned February 1, 1871.  He was succeeded the next month, March 16, 1871 by Milford G. White who held the office until May 11, 1889, a period of 18 years, the longest it has been held until the incumbency of the present Postmaster Ernest S.  Hayes.
 Thomas M. Archer was appointed May 11, 1889.  He was a prominent lumber man, farmer and businessman and served as County Commissioner.  He was succeeded March 13, 1890 by William J. Brown who in turn was succeeded by Henry L.  Hayes March 6, 1891.  Ross H.  Miller was appointed next on April 10, 1899 and was followed by John W. Bailey July 3, 1908.  Mr. Bailey's ancestors were among the early settlers of the County and he possessed by intelligence and business acumen for which they are noted.  Louis G.  Davidson succeeded to the office July 27, 1909 and was in turn succeeded by Clarence A.  Keeney March 12, 1913.  The present Postmaster Ernest S.  Hayes was appointed May 20 1, 1915 and it is believed he is still an office.

Nelson--this office was established March 31, 1829, with Samuel Snow as the first postmaster.  I have been unable to secure any data concerning him.  The locality was known for a long time as Beecher's Island from a small island in the river settled early by Hopestill Beecher who was a County Commissioner and 1814.  W.  M.  Anderson became Postmaster December 22, 1831 and was succeeded by Joseph M.  White September 10, 1832 who served until October 2, 1849 when Charles Horsley took office.  Morgan Seeley, he descended on this well-known Cowanesque Valley family, became Postmaster December 9, 1852 and was succeeded by John Hammond, and early settler August 8, 1856.  Dr. Albert M.  Loop assumed office January 20, 1857.  He practiced, medicine for many years, was president of the County medical Society and a public spirited citizen.  George H.  Baxter took over the position long since discontinued. M.  B. Seeley next took the office and held it from December 6, 1881 to August 26, 1885 when Dr. Loop was again appointed postmaster.  George H.  Baxter again succeeded as Postmaster April 20, 1889, Miss Baxter May 16, 1892 and William H. Baxter in May 21, 1896.  Oliver B.  Blanchard, he descended up early settlers, prominent businessman and well-known throughout the County next succeeded to the office and held it until Frank Selph and attorney was selected for the place January 30, 1914.  He was succeeded by George E.  Selph, as acting Postmaster March 7, 1931 who held the office for a few days until the appointment of Mrs. Lena B.  Smith as postmaster in March 18, 1931.  This completes my record of Nelson.--Joseph F. Gartland


Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, October 31, 1934
Postmasters of Tioga County
Joseph F. Gartland writes some more Interesting History

Mainesburg -- This office, then in Sullivan county [should be township], was established under the name of Cory Creek, January 27, 1830, with John Maine as postmaster. Corey Creek took its name from the creek on which it was located and which was evidently named from Thomas R. Corey, taxpayer in the township as early as 1817. The name was changed to Mainesburgh on April 1, 1830. Where the business part of the town is located was once a millpond connected with a large flourmill created about 1809. John Maine erected a distillery on this mill property some years later.

There were now 20 post offices in the county and it had been 25 years since the first one was established at Tioga.

John Maine was one of the prominent citizens and served as postmaster until John Hughes was appointed, March 31, 1846. John Fox succeeded to the office next on November 26, 1847, and served nearly 23 years or until June 9, 1870. He was the first burgess. Mr. Fox opened the first store in Mainesburgh in 1832, and continued it for 40 years. During his term, in March, 1859, Mainesburg was separated from Sullivan township and organized as a borough.

Baldwin Parkhurst, a member of a family that is truly representative of this county, was the next postmaster and was appointed June 9, 1870. He was succeeded for a brief period by Aaron Dodge on July 18, 1876, and Mr. Parkhurst again took charge August 7, 1876. He was followed by Homer J. Ripley, January 24, 1882. Mr. Ripley was afterwards, I believe, Registrar and Recorder of the county and is remembered as a friendly, considerate man. The Ripley family deserves well of the people of our county because of their civic spirit and they were along religious and educational lines.

James Cudworth became the next postmaster May 7, 1886. He had also served as burgess. It was at this time the final “h” was dropped and the name of this after spelled Mainesburg. Mr. Cudworth’s parents were among the first settlers in the section.

William P. Rose succeeded Mr. Cudworth April 22, 1889. He was a descendant of the well known family who first settled in Rutland in 1806 when it was an unbroken wilderness. Mortimer R. Rose succeeded to the office April 6, 1891, followed by Joseph H. Dewitt, a prominent farmer, July 25, 1895.

Orin L. Krise came next, on July 20, 1899, followed by Merton W. Ashley, February 28, 1902, and Eathan O. Ashmley, December 29, 1916, and Forest J. Ashley on April 9, 1919. The prominent Tioga county family supplies three postmasters in succession. The present postmaster Gordon F. Stauffer, took office July 9, 1921.

The first mail service from Mainesburg was on a route listed in 1831 for once a week in four horse stages from New Milford, Susquehanna county to Wellsboro, via Montrose, Towanda, Troy, Mainesburg and South Charleston.

Brookfield – This post office, named after the township in which it was located, was established November 10, 1830, with Isaac H. Metcalf as postmaster. Mail was received once a week from Westfield. The office was located in what was locally known as Mink Hollow. Mr. Metcalf was a soldier of the war of 1812, and a justice of the peace for many years. He was succeeded March 2, 1839, by Dr. Ethel B. Bacon, and on May 12, 1841, by Ard Hoyt Bacon, and on September 7, 1844, by George W. Bacon. Mr. George Bacon and David Gardner were business partners in a retail store.

James P. Sleeper became the next postmaster on December 1, 1849. Mr. Sleeper was also a prominent merchant and occupied the store established by William Simmons.

George W. Northrup succeeded to the office May 23, 1853, followed by William H. Corwin, August 16, 1855. Mr. Corwin built the first tavern in the township in 1853. William R. Elder took over the office4 December 24, 1856, followed by Joseph W. Davis, May 25, 1859. Andrew J. Simmons, farmer and merchant became the next postmaster April 19, 1861, and served until March 22, 1880. He was the son of William Simmons, one of the township’s very early settlers and a famed hunter, businessman and farmer. He was also the first man to be married in the township.

Charles Stanborough, another merchant, took over the office on March 22, 1880, and was succeeded September 16, 1884 by Charles Kizer, and on April 3, 1888 by Robert R. Ramsey and by George O. Mannaring June 23, 1893.

The office was discontinued February 12, 1894, but was re-established April 18, 1894, with Schuyler M. Baker as postmaster. He served until October 31, 1902, when the office was discontinued and the patrons placed on a rural route emanating from Westfield.

Peterboro - This post office was established February 8, 1833 with Peter Rushmore as postmaster. Mr. Rushmore was a tanner. His establishment opened in 1820, was on the west side of Troups Creek, opposite Knoxville, where he tanned upper leather and deer hides.

Silas Rushmore succeeded as postmaster July 9, 1839, and John Rushmore January 25, 1843. The office was discontinued September 4, 1844. During its existence it received mail once a week via a route from Jersey Shore to Knoxville via Morris and Wellsboro.

Morris - This office, locally known as Babbs and Babbs Creek, the twenty-fifth in the county, was established February 25, 1833 with William Babb, justice of the peace, as postmaster. He was the son of Samson Babb, the first settle in the township, who arrived here in 1800 and erected the first sawmill. The first road was from Newberry to Wellsboro and was built partly through the efforts of the Babb family. This was completed as far as Blackwells in 1810. The post route that first supplied Morris in the 1830s was described as a once-a-week service from “Liberty, Morris Center [discontinued], Morris to Wellsboro.”

For some reason or other the office was discontinued May 6, 1854, but remained closed for only two months when it was reopened on July 6, 1854, with William W. Babb as postmaster. It is very probable he was the son of the first postmaster of that name. He was born in 1820 and was a typesetter and surveyor. He was succeeded by Job Doan, June 25, 1859, and Henry Crawford, August 10, 1859. Samuel Doane came next as postmaster March 13, 1862, and continued until May 1, 1876, when the office was again discontinued. It was re-established, however, a few months later, on August 29, 1876, with William W. Babb as postmaster once more.

Abram L. Bodine took over the office January 9, 1879. He was the son of Ellis Bodine and was proprietor of the Morris Hotel while postmaster. Robert W. Sweeney succeeded to the office September 12, 1882, and was followed by Benjamin Whitehead, a prominent merchant, September 11, 1883.

Roland R. Kelts and W.W. Tate came next on January 30, 1884, and May 13, 1887, respectively. They afterwards removed to Wellsboro and were men of high integrity who always took an active part in the social and business life of the county.

Abial Leonard, a leading businessman and citizen, next took over the office on January 29, 1889, and continued until Mr. Kelts again became postmaster October 30, 1891. Thomas J. Birmingham was appointed to succeed him December 20, 1895. Mr. Birmingham was afterwards among the first, it not the first rural carrier in Morris, and retired some time ago. He could write some interesting things of the early rural service before there were improved roads, which it is hoped he will do.

Walter Webster, a descendant of the early settlers, took over the office June 29, 1900, and was succeeded by Abial Leonard, who again became postmaster on September 26, 1901.

The present postmaster, Veta G. Kerr, was appointed September 24, 1914.

There is no section of Tioga county that could supply more material for history and romance then Morris. Indian legends and traditions; pioneer hardships and accomplishments; delightful scenery; hunting and fishing, Dixie Run picnics and camp meetings; great mills and tanneries; rugged men and beautiful women were all to be found, and imagination and memory trace and recall to many recollections of happy days spent there.

Little Marsh - This office in Chatham township took its name from a small nearby marsh on Crooked creek and was established April 20, 1833, with Dr. Allen Frazer as postmaster. Educated at the University of the State of New York, he came to Little Marsh in 1825, and was assessor, justice of the peace, surgeon of the Pennsylvania militia, postmaster and physician.

Dr. Frazer evidently had too much to do and the office was taken over July 31, 1834, by Redding Macomber. He served the longest term of any postmaster at Little Marsh. At this time the township was almost a wilderness but during the next 20 years Mr. Macomber was postmaster extensive lumbering operations took place in charge of Solomon Bennett, Nehemiah Beach, Reuben Close and others. There were at one time 11 lumber and flourmills within two miles of the post office. Mail was received once a week on a post route from Crooked Creek [Middlebury] to Knoxville.

Amasa Clark was made postmaster February 3, 1865, followed by Josephus Lockwood November 21, 1865, and John L. Mowery July 14, 1868. Edward M. Tucker served from October 5, 1876, and Edward W. Toles came next on August 13, 1879, and was succeeded by Austin D. Rice August 21, 1835, and Arthur D. Roberts April 19, 1889. Mr. Rice again took over the office May 18, 1894, and held it until succeeded by Delos E. Cooper June 17, 1897. Mr. Cooper afterwards was County Commissioner. He was succeeded by Helen M. Cooper January 25, 1906. Joseph E. Ferris became the next postmaster April 22, 1908, and served until Angie L. West was appointed August 31, 1914. James E. Ferris came next, being appointed August 6, 1916. He was the son of former Sheriff Ferris and he and his brother, Frank, were popular among the boys in Wellsboro some 40 years ago when their father was in office, and it is recalled how they were missed when they left. Humphrey C. Roberts, the present postmaster, was appointed May 13, 1920.

We now come to the post offices established in 1834, just one hundred years ago. Tioga county had been in existence thirty years and twenty-five post offices were in operation. It is difficult to realize how much they meant to the people. Methods of communication were few; there were no telephones, telegraphs, radios, railroads or automobiles swiftly carrying intelligence from one place to the other. Yet even then, by foot, horseback, sulkies and stages the mail was being carried, so far as possible, with “certainty, security and celerity” through Tioga county.

To the pioneers the postal service was truly the service so well described by Postmaster General Holt in 1859 in words now graven on the façade of the new Post office Department Building in Washington, which read:

“The Post office Department, in its ceaseless labors, pervades every channel of commerce and every theatre of human enterprise, and while visiting as it does kindly, every fireside, mingles with the throbbing of almost every heart in the land. In the amplitude of its beneficence it ministers to all climes and creeds and pursuits with the same eager readiness and with equal fullness of fidelity. It is the delicate ear trump through which alike nations and families and isolated individuals whisper their joys and their sorrows, their convictions and their sympathies, to all who listen for their coming. Naturally enough such an institution has ever been and still is a cherished favorite of the American people.”

At a later date I will write of the 1834 post offices - Grays Valley, South Charleston, Ryonsville, and Corner Stone, now discontinued and probably forgotten by all. ------ Joseph F. Gartland



The Agitator, Wellsboro, PA; Tuesday, July 24, 1888
-- Mr. Willard Middaugh is the Postmaster at the new Post office called Rising, at Lathrop's station.

Joseph F. Gartland b. 4 Oct. 1880 Antrim, Tioga County, PA [source- passport application 1918]
Fa- Joseph S. Gartland b. July 1844 Canada
Mo- Ellen Nash b. Oct. 1846 Ireland

Jane O'Connor, wife of Joseph F. Gartland
Fa- James O'Connor b. April 1842 Canada
Mo- Charlotte Woodhouse b. Oct 1854 PA


The Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, October 11, 1933
Carrier to Retire
Thomas J. Birmingham, of Morris, rural mail carrier, will be retired October 31 on account of the 30-year retirement act. Mr. Birmingham has been the regular rural letter carrier from Morris for more than 30 years. The route will be consolidated with the Lloyd route, with Arnold Blackwell as carrier.

The Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, January 12, 1938
Birmingham is Mercantile Appraiser
Thomas J. Birmingham, for many years a mail carrier and at one time Postmaster at Morris, has been appointed Mercantile Appraiser for Tioga county by Auditor General Warren Roberts.

The Wellsboro Gazette, Thursday, October 29, 1942
Attains High Office in P.O. Department
Joseph F. Gartland, Wellsboro Native, is appointed Director of Budget in Dept. at Washington

Joseph F. Gartland, Assistant Chief Post Office Inspector at Washington, D.C., native of Wellsboro, has had the great honor of being promoted to succeed Fred A. Ironside, Jr. as Director of Budget and Administrative Planning and Chairman of the Operations Board of the Post Office Department, at Washington, D.C.

Joseph F. Gartland, the third person to hold the office, became Assistant Chief Inspector on May 9, 1933, upon recommendation of Chief Inspector K.P. Aldrich because, "He desired to have as assistant a man possession in abundance the virtues of courage, vision, loyalty, and devotion to the ideals of the Inspection Service."

Joe Gartland entered the postal service on May 11, 1898 as a clerk in the post office at Wellsboro, and was appointed inspector to the Philadelphia Division, April 22, 1913. He administered the mail service for the AEF in France from 1918 to 1929. From 1923 to 1926 he was loaned to the Department of the Interior where he served with distinction as Chief Inspector in that vast organization. He was in charge of the first school of instruction for post office inspectors in August, 1930, and his skill as an instructor is reflected in the marked success of the men in his classes, according to the P.O. Department.

Throughout his long and distinguished career matters of the highest importance have been entrusted to his judgment and discretion.

Mr. Gartland, who left Wellsboro to assume duties of larger proportion, has indeed become a distinguished son of Tioga county. While a resident of Wellsboro he married a Wellsboro girl, Miss Jane O'Connor. they have one son and one daughter. During his busy career, the Assistant Chief has made fleeting visits to his home town while Mrs. Gartland has spent several summer vacations here renewing old acquaintances and calling on relatives.


Joseph Gartland - Wellsboro Cemetery 1880-1949

The Agitator, Wellsboro, PA, December 4, 1958
Thomas Birmingham, 86, of Morris, was admitted to Wellsboro Hospital Sunday. He fell down stairs at his home and fractured his left hip.

Wellsboro Gazette, Wellsboro, PA, January 4, 1984
TIMBERG, Alma - Mrs. Thomas J. Birmingham - Alma V. Birmingham, 94, formerly of Morris died Saturday, Dec. 31, 1983 at the Green Home, Wellsboro. Her husband, Thomas J. Birmingham died in 1959. Born at Arnot June 21, 1889 she was a daughter of Gustave and Johnann Timberg. She was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church at Wellsboro. Mrs. Birmingham had retired as an assistant rural mail carrier in the Morris area. Surviving are a niece Mrs. Mildred Meteyer of Henrietta NY and four grandnieces and a grandnephew. Burial will be at the convenience of the family in White Haven Memorial Park, Pittsford, NY. Memorial contributions may be made to the Trinity Lutheran Church in Wellsboro. Arrangements by the Tussey Mosher Funeral Home in Wellsboro.
 

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