Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
Clippings, Obituary,  & Scrapbook Section
Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Home Guide Disclaimer Copyright MORE Clippings Joyce New & Search

Postcard from the Tri-County Guest Submission Collection
Main Street in Blossburg
Joyce's Search Tip - February 2010 
Do You Know that you can search just the 700 pages of Clippings and Scrapbooks on the site by using the Clippings button in the Partitioned search engine on the Current What's New Page?  
You'll also find obituary and other newspaper clippings using the three county-level Obits by Cemetery buttons. Additional clippings can be found in the Birth, Marriage, and some other partitions. 

Tri County Clippings- Page Three Hundred Eighty Two

These obituaries are extracted from various newspaper that are available to us. They are arranged by newspaper and date. If you do not have the time to enjoy the luxury of sifting through our clippings they will be included in the Search Engine which you can reach from the "Front Door" of the Tri-County Genealogy & History sites by Joyce M. Tice. All Newspaper clipping in this section of the site are in the Clippings partition of the Partioned search engine that you can find at the bottom of the Current What's New page.

1889-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

F. W. Dawson
Captain F. W. Dawson, the editor of the News and Courier, was killed at Charleston, SC., a few days ago by Dr. T. B. McDow, a young married physician of that city.  Dawson was murdered because of an attempt on his part to save the honor of a servant girl in his employment.  He was an Englishman who took part in the war of the Rebellion on the Confederate side.  He was a man of much ability and was a leading citizen of Charleston, where his murder caused much indignation.  (Tuesday, March 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Adonija S. Welch
Adonija S. Welch, who was United States Senator from Florida soon after the war, died at Pasadena, Cal., a few days ago.  He was born at East Hampton, Ct., in 1821, but at the age of 18 removed to Michigan, and graduated from the University of that State in 1846.  After teaching for a while he settled in Florida, and in 1868 was elected United States Senator.  Later he became president of the Iowa Agricultural College at Ames, and was prominently identified with educational works for many years.  (Tuesday, March 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Eliza Magill
On the 19th instant Mrs. Sarah Eliza, wife of Col. James P. Magill, died at her home on North Seventh street, Philadelphia, in her 69th year.  Mrs. Magill, whose maiden name was Goodrich, was well known in this county, she being a native of Tioga and also a resident of this borough many years ago.  (Tuesday, March 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Andrew Messing
At Millerton, Pa., March 13, 1889, Mrs. Andrew Messing, aged 82 years.  (Tuesday, March 26, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. James Dewey
Mrs. James Dewey, an aged resident of Canoe Camp, died last week Sunday of pneumonia.  (Tuesday, April 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. H. N. Williams
Mrs. H. N. Williams, of Towanda, died yesterday of pneumonia, after an illness of about a week.  Mrs. Williams was well known in this borough, where she resided many years ago.  Mrs. Williams was a sister of Mr. Robert Austin and Mrs. A. G. Sturrock, of this borough.  The funeral is to be held at Towanda on Thursday.  (Tuesday, April 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Cyrus D. Garretson
A few days ago Mr. Cyrus D. Garretson was attempting to shift a belt in the saw-mill at Austin, Potter county, when he was caught and thrown to the race below, striking upon a pile of timber.  He died from his injuries about half and hour later.  He was about 48 years of age.  (Tuesday, April 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Daniel Baker
Mr. Daniel Baker, a well known citizen of Potter county, died a few days ago at the age of 65 years.  He held the office of Register and Recorder of Potter county for 18 years, he then became County Auditor and served three years.  For the past six years he had held the office of Commissioners’ Clerk.  (Tuesday, April 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Walters
At Oregon Hill, Pa., March 5, 1889, Mr. Henry Walters, aged 86 years, 9 months and 12 days. (Tuesday, April 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Jefferson Bowker
The late Mrs. Jefferson Bowker, who died on the 23d ultimo, was born in Genoa, Cayuga county, NY, where she was married and commenced housekeeping.  She and her husband soon moved to Groton, where they lived for many years, and where their large family of children grew up.  But death entered their home and the husband and father was taken, then two sons, then two daughters followed to the far off unknown.  Mrs. Bowker never remarried.  She had been visiting her daughters, Mrs. C. C. Trumble and Mrs. Silas Staples, in this county.  She died at the latter’s house in Charleston.  She had lived more than her allotted time, being nearly four score, and her death was peaceful.  The funeral was held at Keeneyville, Rev. A. G. Cole officiating.  (Tuesday, April 2, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Marcus A. Reno
Maj. Marcus A. Reno, late of the United States army, who served with Gen. Custer in the Yellowstone Sioux massacre, died a few days ago at Providence hospital.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander McCue
Judge Alexander McCue, Assistant Treasurer of the United States, who sent in his resignation recently on account of a stroke of paralysis, died at his home in Brooklyn last week.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jacob Sleeper
Jacob Sleeper, the philanthropist, died at his residence at Boston last week Sunday afternoon.  Mr. Sleeper was born in Newcastle, Me., in 1802, settled in Boston in 1825, and amassed a fortune in the wholesale clothing business and real-estate transactions.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward P. Allis
Edward P. Allis, chief proprietor of the great Reliance iron-works at Milwaukee, Wis., died last week of a combination of stomach and kidney troubles.  He was well known in the West, both through his immense business and his noble philanthropy.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Roman
James Roman, a bachelor of Middletown, Ky., who died recently, left his entire estate, valued at $30,000, to 13 negroes who had been his slaves before the war.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Adele Menard
Adele Menard, aged 17, of Minneapolis, committed suicide a few days ago by shooting.  Last summer she disappeared from home leaving a note saying she was about to drown herself.  She was found 10 days afterward masquerading in male costume.  She said she had been living in the woods.  She was to have been married in about a month after being brought back home, but her intended husband disappeared on the wedding morning.  Since then she has acted very quietly and is believed to have been insane.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jesse Gustin
Last Tuesday afternoon the six-year old son of Mrs. Kate C. Gustin, a widow residing at Stokesdale, was drowned in the small creek near the tannery at that place.  The little fellow was playing with his four year old brother and fell into the water.  The younger boy ran to the house for assistance, but when help arrived Jesse was dead, the body being found in the water a few rods below the tannery.  The remains were taken to Columbia Cross Roads, Bradford county, for interment.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucy Williams
Mrs. Henry N. Williams, who died at Towanda last week Monday, April 1, 1889, of pneumonia, was born July 9, 1860.(?)  Her maiden name was Lucy Austin, and she was a daughter of the late Hezekiah Austin, who was a resident of this borough for many years.  She was married in this borough to H. N. Williams, Esq., January 23, 1858(or 1838).  Her husband and two sons, Charles R. and Robert H., survive her.  Mrs. Williams was a beloved and most respected lady, and her sudden death is mourned by a large circle of friends.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Thomas Keegan
Thomas Keegan, 108 years old, was buried a few days ago in Blair county.  He carried a pike in the Irish rebellion of 1798.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Humbert
A quaint old resident of Fairchance, Pa., Samuel Humbert, died on a recent night, aged 80 years.  He had plenty of money, but wouldn’t spend it.  Recently he allowed his house to be sold at Sheriff’s sale becaue he loved his money too well to let it go in payment of his debts.  His house was visited by burglars some time ago and he endured great torture by burning rather than give up his treasure.  In his last hour he tried to reveal the secret to a neighbor, but death cut him short with the sentence unfinished.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Bostwick Bement
In Jackson, Pa., March 19, 1889, Mr. Bostwick Bement, aged 86 years.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Martha Knight
At Lodi, NY, March 29, 1889, Mrs. Martha Knight, mother of Mrs. Thomas Allen, of Wellsboro, and sister of the Campbell brothers(?), of Delmar, Pa.  Mrs. Knight was 72 years of age.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ann Lewis
At Fall Brook, Pa., March 15, 1889, Mrs. Ann Lewis, widow of the late John Lewis, aged 83 years.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Wilson
At Covington, Pa., March 21, 1889, Mrs. Wilson, widow of the late Robert Wilson.  (Tuesday, April 9, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Wilcox
John Wilcox, the sexton of the Baptist Church in Painted Post, dropped dead on a recent Sunday morning, just as he had his hand on the rope to ring the bell for the morning service.  He was 70 years old and had been the sexton of the Church for the past 20 years.  (Tuesday, April 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Abigail Newell
Mrs. Abigail Newell died a few days ago at her home in Union township after a lingering illness.  (Tuesday, April 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucy E. Kelsey
Mrs. L. E. Kelsey, who died of apoplexy on the 24th ultimo at Wixom, Michigan, was a former resident of this borough.  Her maiden name was Lucy E. Moore, and she was a member of the family of John Norris over 50 years ago.  Mrs. Kelsey was 69 years old.  (Tuesday, April 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. James Arrowsmith
Mr. James Arrowsmith, who died a few days ago at Gallitzin, Pa., was a former resident of this county, having served as foreman at the Arnot mines for 14 years.  He was a member of the Masonic Chapter and Commandery in this borough.  He was in his 60th year.  (Tuesday, April 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Hiram Brooks
The late Hiram Brooks, of this borough, whose funeral occurred last Thursday, was in his 83rd year; his widow is 72 years old; her sister, Mrs. Gideon S. Cook, is 79, while Mr. Cook is 81; Mrs. Cook’s brother, Alpheus Willard, was 77 last Thursday, and his wife is 75.  Before this family circle was broken last Tuesday by the death of Mr. Brooks all the persons named lived in adjoining houses on State street in this borough.  Their ages added together amounted to 466 years, or an average age of over 77.  Mr. Cook has been a Tipstaff in our courts for over 60 years, and he says he well remembers when the courts were held in the old log Court-house.  Last Tuesday evening Mr. Hiram Brooks, a well known citizen, died at his home on East avenue in this borough after many months of suffering from the enfeeblements of age.  He was in his 82 years, 4 months and 17 days.  Mr. Brooks was born in New Hampshire, November 22, 1806.  He was about 2 ½ years old when his parents moved to this county and settled in that part of Delmar township which was afterward set off as Charleston township.  He grew to manhood amid the hardships of pioneer life.  On the 18th of November, 1830, he married Lucinda Culver and began the work of clearing up the farm now occupied by his son, Mr. George D. Brooks.  The young couple were blessed with four children, three of whom are still living.  Mrs. Brooks died in 1846, and Mr. Brooks afterward married Miss Alta Willard, who survives him.  To them two children were born, one of whom, Mr. Otis Brooks, survives.  Mr. Brooks resided upon the farm which he reclaimed from the wilderness until about eight years ago, when he moved to this borough.  He had accumulated a few hundred dollars with which to make himself comfortable in his declining years, but he lost it in the Tioga bank failure.  Mr. Brooks was philosophical, however, under his misfortune.  His social, genial nature and even temper won him many fast friends.  He was a member of the Methodist Church for nearly 50 years.  The funeral was held on Thursday afternoon, Rev. Mr. Chamberlayne conducting the service, and it was largely attended.  (Tuesday, April 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Laura Pierce
At Sylvania, Pa., April 11, 1889, of paralysis, Laura, widow of Walker Pierce, aged 73 years.  (Tuesday, April 16, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Nathan Palmer
Mrs. Nathan Palmer, of Sullivan, died a few days ago after many months of great suffering.  (Tuesday, April 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Susan Robena
Mrs. Susan Robena, wife of John Robena, Jr., of Arnot, died last week Monday at the age of 28 years.  (Tuesday, April 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Rachel Simmons
Mrs. Hiram E. Simmons, of this borough, died last evening after an illness of about two months, of dropsy.  She was 49 years of age.  Her maiden name was Rachel Warriner, and she was a daughter of Mr. Hiram Warriner, of Stony Fork.  Mr. and Mrs. Simmons had been married about 30 years.  She was an excellent woman and bore her sufferings with Christian fortitude.  (Tuesday, April 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. S. Preston Moore
Mrs. S. Preston Moore, formerly of Charleston, died at Job’s Corners last Sunday.  The funeral is to be held at the house of her son, Charles N. Moore, in Charleston today.  (Tuesday, April 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ira Mudge
At Cherry Flats, Pa., April 13, 1889, Mr. Ira Mudge, in the 80th year of his age.  (Tuesday, April 23, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Count Plater
Count Plater, famous in the Polish rising, has died in Switzerland.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Michael J. Norton
Michael J. Norton, a Tammany leader and since 1881 Judge of the First district civil court in New York city, died last Tuesday from internal injuries caused by a fall.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Henriques
Alexander Henriques, vice-chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, died last week at the age of 72.  Mr. Henriques was born in the West Indies, served for a time as secretary to Sam Houston when President of Texas, and then became a broker in New York.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Don Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada
Don Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada, ex-President of Mexico, died at New York last week Sunday afternoon of bronchitis and pleurisy.  Ex President Lerdo had lived at New York in retirement since he left Mexico in 1876 on account of political troubles.  He was 64 years old and a bachelor.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Gudbrand Vigfusson
Gudbrand Vigfusson, the famous Icelandic litterateur, who died at Oxford the other day, was, during his last days filled with homesickness.  He longed to see and feel the snow once more before he died.  The wish was denied him, but, as if in irony, it has fallen heavily upon his grave, almost as soon as it was closed over him.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry C. Moore
Col. Henry C. Moore, a widely-known civil engineer, ranking high in the profession, died at his home in St. Louis recently after a long and painful illness.  He was born in Beaver, Pa., January 7, 1817, and was the son of Robert Moore, ex member of Congress.  Col. Moore received his education at Washington, Pa.  His first school-teacher was Rev. John Scott, father of Mrs. Benjamin Harrison.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Stephen Martin, Sr.
Mr. Stephen Martin, Sr., of Westfield, died last Tuesday at the age of 77 years.  The remains were interred in Farmington.  Mr. Martin was an esteemed citizen.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Q. Merrick
Last Thursday afternoon Mr. John Q. Merrick died at his home on Bacon street in this borough, from the effects of a third stroke of paralysis which he suffered on Wednesday.  About six years ago he was first prostrated, but recovered, to be stricken down again the following year.  Since that time he had enjoyed reasonably good health almost up to the day of his death.  Mr. Merrick was born at Walton, Delaware county, NY, July 24, 1812.  He learned the trade of a machinist early in life.  He married Miss Sarah M. Dickinson, of Leona, Bradford county, October 28, 1840.  The couple then moved to Williamsport, where Mr. Merrick was engaged in lumbering for several years.  In 1853 the family moved to Pike township, Potter county, near Gaines, where he bought a farm and spent 34 years of his life.  He was Justice of the Peace in Pike for over 20 years.  About two years ago Mr. Merrick purchased a place on Bacon street and became a resident of this borough.  His geniality, light-heartedness and good temper won him many warm friends in this community.  Mr. and Mrs. Merrick were blessed with four children:  Mrs. Alonzo B. Horton of this borough, Mrs. H. L. Smith of Binghamton, Mr. Clinton V. Merrick of Bradford, Pa., Superintendent of the Bradford division of the Erie railway, and Mrs. L. Bliss, who died at Troy eight years ago.  Mr. Merrick served in the 58th Pennsylvania Volunteers during the war, and he was an honored member of the George Cook Post, G. A. R., of this borough, the members of which organization attended his funeral in a body.  Revs. Mr. Chamberlayne and Dr. Shaw conducted the funeral service on Saturday afternoon, which was held at the house of Capt. A. B. Horton.  It can truthfully be said that Mr. Merrick was a man who faithfully performed his duty in all the relations of life.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Fox
At Catlin Hollow, Pa., April 3, 1889, Mrs. John Fox, aged 68 years.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. John Hogan
At Fall Brook, Pa., April 21, 1889, Mrs. John Hogan, aged 90 years.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Isaiah Jennings
At Addison, NY, April 17, 1889, Mr. Isaiah Jennings, aged 89 years, 1 month and 15 days.  Mr. Jennings was a native of this county, having been born at Lawrenceville.  (Tuesday, April 30, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Shepherd
A few days ago the 10-year old son of William Shepherd, of Mulhollen’s attempted to jump on a moving Fall Brook freight train.  He was thrown under the wheels, and his left thigh was crushed.  Surgeons amputated the limb near the hip joint, but the little fellow never rallied, and died in four hours from exhaustion.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George H. Tomb
Mr. George H. Tomb, a wealthy lumber dealer of Jersey Shore, Pa., in company with a woman named Donaldson visited a house at Gloucester City, NJ, last Wednesday evening to spend the night.  During the night some of the inmates of the house were aroused by a noise, and on investigating found the lifeless body of Tomb at the foot of the stairs.  Whether Tomb was pushed down stairs or fell accidentally is a question which the officials were at first unable to determine.  The unfortunate man had more than $20,000 in checks and bank notes and more than $5,000 worth of diamonds on his person, a handful of the loose gems being found in his pocket.  Tomb is said to have made $300,000 in the last 10 years.  He was a single man and had spent a great deal of money on horses and diamonds.  Mamie Donaldson is the divorced wife of a Philadelphian.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William H. Barnum
William H. Barnum, chairman of the Democratic National Committee died at his home in Lime Rock, Ct., last Tuesday morning.  Mr. Barnum was born in Columbia county, NY, September 17, 1818, received a common-school education and began life as clerk in a country store.  He made a large fortune in the iron business.  He was a member of the Connecticut Legislature, was in Congress five terms and was United States Senator part of a term.  He was chairman and manager of the campaign for Tilden in 1876, and had been the chairman and recognized leader of the Democracy in every campaign since, including the one just closed.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick A. P. Barnard
Dr. Frederick A. P. Barnard, president of Columbia College, died at New York a few days ago, after an illness of several months.  He had not performed any official duties for months, and had delayed his resignation in the pardonable hope of living until next June, when he would have completed a service of a quarter of a century as president.  During his administration the College, or, properly speaking, the University, made notable strides in its various departments.  The most recent, as it is probably the most important, departure from the accepted paths of education, was the establishment of a department for young women, called Barnard College in his honor.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Daniel O’Connor
Mrs. Daniel O’Connor, of Antrim, died last week Sunday, of pneumonia.  The funeral was held at St. Peter’s church in this borough last Tuesday.  She was 35 years of age, and she leaves a husband and seven children.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John J. Evans
Mr. John J. Evans, of Antrim, died last Friday morning at the home of his son-in-law, Mr. William D. Jones.  He was 84 years of age.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ruth Ann Beard
Mrs. Ruth Ann Beard, wife of William R. Beard, of Farmington, died last week Monday morning of pneumonia, at the age of 66 years.  She was an estimable woman.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Parmelia A. Smith
Mrs. Parmelia A. Smith died at her home on East avenue in this borough last Thursday at the age of 81 years.  Mrs. Smith had been a great sufferer from cancer for years, and she was doubly afflicted by being also blind.  She was the widow of David H. Smith.  For a long time the family resided in Charleston township, but for over 20 years she had lived in this borough.  Mrs. Smith was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.  The funeral was held at her late residence on Saturday morning, Rev. Dr. Shaw conducting the service.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Martha G. Farnham
Last week Monday night, about half-past 10 o’clock, several Mansfield citizens on the street were startled by a woman’s screams proceeding from a dwelling on Wellsboro street, occupied by Misses Martha and Harriet Farnham and their widowed sister, Mrs. Emily Fuller.  Responding to the appeal, they found that Martha Farnham had met a shocking death by burning.  The Advertiser says that her sisters had retired nearly an hour before to an upper room.  About half-past 10 o’clock dense smoke began to fill their room, and groping their way down stairs, they were horrified to discover the apparently lifeless body of their sister lying upon the sitting-room floor.  Her clothing, which had evidently taken fire from an overturned kerosene lamp, was nearly or quite consumed, only her shoes and a few shreds of her stockings remaining unburned.  The remains were scorched and charred almost beyond recognition.  The circumstances connected with the sad affair led to the belief that Miss Farnham’s clothing took fire near the floor from burning oil from the lamp which she carried in her hands and which she subsequently deposited upon a stand near the street door.  Retracing her steps, she was overcome by the heat and flames from her burning clothing, and fell against the casing of the door leading into the bedroom.  Here it was, with her head across the threshold, that the remains of the unfortunate woman were found.  A hole six or eight inches in diameter was burned through the carpet, near the couch under which the lamp globe and chimney had rolled, and near which the accident to the lamp, resulting in her death, had happened.  Miss Farnham had resided in Mansfield for several years.  She was nearly 64 years of age.  Justice Rhinevault, as acting Coroner, summoned a jury composed of Messrs. A. M. Pitts, L. Cummings, Thomas Judge, W. S. Farrer, Charles Holden and Frank Longbothum, who rendered a verdict on Tuesday in accordance with the above facts.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John L. Evans
An Antrim, Pa., May 3, 1889, Mr. John L. Evans, aged 84 years.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Leon Montanye
In Brookfield, Pa., April 10, 1889, Leon, only child of W. J. and Belle Montanye, aged 1 year and 6 months.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. S. P. Moore
At Job’s Corners, Pa., April 21, 1889, Mrs. S. P. Moore, formerly of Charleston, in her 69th year.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Catharine Stiles Walker
At Blossburg, Pa., April 14, 1889, Mrs. Catharine Stiles Walker, aged 87 years.  (Tuesday, May 7, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George R. Harris
Mr. George R. Harris, a well-known jeweler at Waverly, NY, was found dead in his store on a recent evening.  He was sitting at his bench, his head resting on his arm as if in sleep.  He was about 50 years of age and had been in poor health, suffering from asthma, heart disease and other complications.  (Tuesday, May 14, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Father Damien
Rev, Father Damien, widely known as the Leper Priest of Molokai, died at Kalawa, Hawaii, April 10th.  Father Damien was born at Belgium in 1840 and went to Hawaii in 1864.  For the last six years his labors were confined to the leper settlement at Molokai, where he contracted the dread disease, which cost him his life.  (Tuesday, May 14, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Count Demetrius Tolstoi
Count Demetrius Tolstoi, ex-Minister of the Interior in Russia, who died on Tuesday, was a tyrant by nature and training.  He was the originator of some of the ironclad systems of repression of the Russian people which have brought the Czar’s life in peril.  He was obliged to resign not long ago because he submitted proposals for changes in the Government which were so reactionary that the Conservatives could not consent.  (Tuesday, May 14, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. David Howells
Mr. David Howells, of Antrim, died last Wednesday of inflammation of the bowels, after a short sickness.  He was in his 28th year.  He leaves a wife and several children.  The funeral was held last Friday, and it was very largely attended.  Mr. Howell’s was an excellent miner, and as a citizen he was universally esteemed.  (Tuesday, May 14, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James P. Magill
Col. James P. Magill, who died at his home in Philadelphia on the 2d instant, was one of the pioneer editors of this country.  He came to this borough from Germantown in 1838 and established a Democratic paper called the Eagle, which flourished till 1856, when it gave up the ghost.  Mr. Magill was elected Register and Recorder of this county and served from 1845 to 1851.  Soon after his return to Philadelphia Mr. Magill was appointed a Notary Public, and he continued in office over 30 years.  The funeral was held last week Monday.  (Tuesday, May 14, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Roy Falkender
In Clymer, Pa., April 9, 1889, Roy, son of Leonard and Ella Falkender, aged 4 years.  Though so young in years, yet he had borne with remarkable patience much severe pain resulting from lung disease for a year and a half previous to his death.  The parents and friends find great consolation in knowing one so young and so innocent is transferred from this world of pain and sickness to that brighter land where sorrow is never known.  (Tuesday, May 14, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. McGahen
Mrs. McGahen, wife of Rev. J. H. McGahen, pastor of the Baptist Church at Johnson’s Creek, NY, was burned to death a few days ago by a fire caused by an overflow of gasoline from the tank of a stove.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah E. Allen
Mrs. Sarah E. Allen, a teacher in one of the public schools of Washington, was shot and killed last Friday by her worthless husband as she stood at her desk in the presence of her pupils.  The murderer then committed suicide.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Queen Mary
Queen Mary of Bavaria, mother of the insane King Otto, died last Thursday night of dropsy and cancer of the liver.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward Donaldson
Rear Admiral Edward Donaldson, aged 78, of the United States Navy, died at his home in Baltimore last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frederick Gerker
Colonel Frederick Gerker, Collector of Internal Revenue for the Philadelphia district, died suddenly of apoplexy last Thursday.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lyman K. Bass
Lyman K. Bass, formerly law-partner of ex President Cleveland at Buffalo, died from heart-failure, at the age of 54, a few days ago.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Allen Thoindike Rice
Allen Thoindike Rice, the newly appointed Minister to Russia, died suddenly in New York last Thursday of suffocation caused by swelling of the glottis.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Harney
Gen. William Harney, the oldest officer of the United States Army, died a few days ago at Orlando, Fla.  General Harney was born in 1800 was retired about 25 years ago.  He was a noted Indian fighter.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Chapin Pease
Mrs. Mary Chapin Pease, for 13 years principal of Mount Holyoke Seminary, died at Savannah, Ga., a few days ago, aged 69 years.  Her death will touch the hearts of many graduates of that famous school.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George Bennett
George Bennett, who died at Dubuque, Ia., recently at the age of 82, went out as Drum Major of the 37th Iowa, or “graybeard” regiment, as it was called, which contained some of the bravest men that ever marched to war.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

R. L. Harris
Chief Engineer R. L. Harris, U. S. N., who was on the Naval Examining Board to test the cruiser Charleston, but who became ill on the voyage from San Francisco and was incapacitated for duty, died at a hotel at Santa Barbara last Thursday.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward M. Biddle
Gen. Edward M. Biddle, secretary and treasurer of the Cumberland Valley Railroad died at Carlisle, Pa., last week at the age of 81.  He was Major of the 15th Pennsylvania volunteers, and was appointed by Gov. Curtin Adjutant-General of Pennsylvania.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Adna Anderson
Gen. Adna Anderson, of New York, committed suicide with a pistol at Philadelphia last Tuesday night, ill health being probably the cause.  Gen. Anderson was a brevet Brigadier-General of engineers during the civil war and after the war was chief engineer of the Northern Pacific railway.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Volney T. Howard
Gen. Volney T. Howard, aged 80, a prominent lawyer, died at Santa Monica, Cal., last Tuesday night.  He was a native of Maine and was elected to Congress several times from Texas.  Removing to California in 1853, he was appointed to the command of the militia in the attempt to suppress the vigilance committee in San Francisco.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Frank R. Vincent
Dr. Frank R. Vincent, one of the physicians at the sanitarium at Clifton Springs, NY, met his death last week Sunday in a very singular manner, and from all appearances was a victim in an effort to test the value of a remedy for nervous affections, which he hoped might be found of great use to medical science.  Dr. Vincent was a brother of Bishop J. H. Vincent of the Methodist Church.  He was regarded as a very able physician and a skilled surgeon.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Allen Foster
Judge Henry Allen Foster, who died at Rome, NY, a few days ago, is said to have been the senior United States Senator.  He was born at Hartford, Ct., in May, 1800, and removed to Cazenovia, NY, and was admitted to the bar.  He was elected to the State Senate in 1831 and served eight year in all in that body.  He was elected to Congress in 1837, and was appointed United States Senator in place of Silas Wright, Jr., in 1844, serving three years.  He became a member of the old “Albany regency,” and in 1863 was made Judge of the Fifth district of the New York Supreme Court.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Washington Irving Bishop
Washington Irving Bishop, the alleged mind-reader, died at New York city last week Monday morning.  He went to the Lamb’s club Sunday night, where he took part in an entertainment, and gave a successful exhibition of his dagger trick.  He then tried another trick requiring considerable mental effort and was taken ill.  He recovered almost at once so to be able to go through with the trick again, but immediately became ill again.  The physicians remained with him all night, using electrical and other appliances, but death from catalepsy followed.  The mother and wife of Bishop insist that he was not dead when the doctors desected him, but simply in a trance.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Mary Edmondson
Anna E. Dickinson’s mother died at her home at West Pittston, Pa., last week Sunday, in her 91st year.  Mrs. Mary Edmondson Dickinson came from the old Maryland and Virginia family of Edmondsons, and was born at Camden, Del., January 3, 1799.  In 1832 she married John Dickinson, of Berks county, Pa., and they lived in Philadelphia, which was her home till 1875.  Both she and her husband were Friends, and in that faith their children were reared.  Mrs. Dickinson’s children numbered two besides the famous orator, dramatist and actress,--Rev. John Dickinson, now professor of geology in the University of California at Los Angeles, and Susan D. Dickinson, who has made literature her profession.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Douglas O’Connor
Funeral services were held in Washington, on the 11th instant over the mortal part of William Douglass O’Connor, a remarkable and charming man, who was more than his fame, though that is considerable, as it is peculiar.  He was born in Boston, January 2, 1833, and as a youth began to study painting, but he was compelled to give up art for immediate means of getting a living, and went to work on the Boston Commonwealth, then a powerful anti-slavery daily.  O’Connor was then but 20 years old.  The next year he went to Philadelphia as an editorial writer on the Saturday Evening Post of that city, then a leading paper, and stayed six years, until 1861.  Then he was appointed clerk on the Light-House Board in Washington and removed thither, and the National capital was his home until his death.  Since 1878 he had been Assistant Superintendent of the Life Service.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Sol. Bunnell
Mr. Sol. Bunnell, formerly a well-known hotel-keeper and horseman in this borough, died last Friday night at Wilkesbarre of consumption.  He was about 50 years of age.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Seltz
Last Wednesday morning Mr. Henry Seltz, a well-known German resident of Galeton, committed suicide by hanging himself to a rafter in his ice-house.  Seltz had been running a bakery and restaurant at Galeton for about four years and was prosperous.  His business was increasing and his domestic relations were pleasant to all appearances.  He had a wife and five children, the eldest 13 and the youngest 6 years of age.  Seltz was about 44 years of age, and he had always enjoyed good health until two or three weeks ago, he grew very melancholy.  A few days ago he told his wife that he wanted to tell her something but dare not do it.  Last Tuesday he told her that he believed he was getting crazy and he wished some one would shoot him.  That night he prepared his bread sponge in the bakery as usual and went to bed.  About midnight Mrs. Seltz heard him get up and go out of the house.  She fell asleep and awoke about three o’clock.  As he had not returned she called his name, and receiving no answer she became alarmed and arose and made a search for him.  She found his body dead and cold hanging from a rafter in the ice house, and his hat and a lantern in the sawdust.  It was evident that he had deliberately put the noose about his neck and then jumped off the ice.  It is stated that on Tuesday Mrs. Seltz missed a small rope about 12 feet in length, which had been used in tying up a clothes basket.  She inquired about it, and Mr. Seltz said he had taken it, as he wanted to use it.  The same rope was about his neck when his wife found his body.  Mr. William F. Hamilton, acting Coroner, summoned a jury, and after hearing the evidence a verdict was rendered in accordance with the above facts, and expressing the opinion that Seltz was temporarily insane.  Mr. Seltz was a member of the Gaines Odd Fellows Lodge, and that organization took charge of the funeral on Thursday morning.  The remains were interred at Germania.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. W. H. Barber
Mr. W. H. Barber, of Hector, Potter county, a man of about 60 years, was hauling bark down a steep hill a few days ago, when the fore part of the load fell off with Mr. Barber.  He was run over by the wagon and killed.  His son was riding on another load of bark just behind and witnessed the accident.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Betsy Odgen
In Union, Pa., April 12, 1889, of pneumonia, Mrs. Betsy Ogden, aged 60 years.  (Tuesday, May 21, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Wright
William Wright, LL.D., professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge, is dead.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Theodore DeWolfe McClintock
Theodore DeWolfe McClintock, well known in literary circles and formerly of Philadelphia, died last Friday.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Laura Bridgman
Laura Bridgman, the famous deaf and blind mute of the Boston Institution for the Blind, died last Friday in her 66th year.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

George H. Calvert
Hon. George H. Calvert, one of the Newport’s most distinguished citizens died last Friday, aged 87.  He was a lineal descendant of Lord Baltimore, of Maryland.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Edward B. Lefavour
Prof. Edward B. Lefavour, of Beverly, Mass., died at his home the other morning after about one week’s illness of pneumonia.  He was for several years connected with the United States Coast Survey, and afterward was associated with Prof. Gould in his geological work.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel S. Garrignes
Dr. Samuel S. Garrignes, one of the best known scientist in Michigan, died the other morning at Ann Arbor, Mich.  It was due to his care, science and attention to the interests of the salt business that Michigan salt was forced into the market of the world in competition with the salt of other deposits.  He was State Salt Inspector from 1868 to 1881.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William White Harding
William White Harding, for 30 years sole proprietor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, died at his home in Philadelphia, a few days ago, in his 59th year.  He was a native of the Quaker city, and son of Jasper Harding, who founded the Inquirer in 1892, and began the publication of Bibles on a large scale.  This business also W. W. Harding continued, as well as large paper-mills at Manayunk, which brought him at the Centennial Exposition the medal for paper-making, printing and binding.--his being the only establishment in which all these operations were carried on.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. William Wass
Knoxville, May 24, 1889.--Mr. William Wass died at his home near Little Marsh in Chatham last Sunday morning, the 19th instant.  He was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, March 27, 1794, and was thus, on the day of his death, aged 95 years, 1 month and 22 days.  He was the oldest man in the township, and there were probably very few older in the county.  Mr. Wass came into the Cowanesqua valley in 1815, and he was one of the 13 original settlers of the township.  He was a man of great physical strength, of clear intellect and good judgment, and these qualities were of great use to him during the many years he acted as a pilot in running rafts down the river.  He retained his unusual strength of mind and body to the last.  He recognized that the great change was near, and he died in peace and in the bright hope of the Gospel.  The funeral was held last Tuesday at his late residence.  The sermon was preached by Rev. Daniel Dernelle, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Knoxville, and the excellent choir of that Church rendered several appropriate selections.  Rev. Messrs. C. B. Gardner, A. G. Cole and J. L. Box took part in the services, and a large number of relatives and friends of the deceased came together on the occasion, making it one of the largest funerals ever held in the neighborhood.  Mr. Wass had been a soldier in the war of 1812, and the remains were in charge of the James Howland Post, No. 508, G. A. R., the Fred. Jacobs Post, No. 1., Sons of Veterans, acting as an escort.  The interment took place in the Close Hill cemetery, and at the grave the burial service of the Grand Army of the Republic was read.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Cora D. Place
At Pawnee Rock, Kansas, May 8, 1889, Mrs. Cora D. Place, daughter of the late U. R. Danks, of Wellsboro, Pa.  (Tuesday, May 28, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Nathan Corwith
Nathan Corwith, for many years one of the most widely-known citizens of Chicago, died last Thursday night.  Mr. Corwith met with disastrous reverses some months ago in trying to “corner” the lead market.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

J. A. Newcome
J. A. Newcome, of Painesville, Ohio, the builder of the Painesville and Youngstown railroad, committed suicide last Wednesday in a bank at Clear Water, Kansas by shooting himself in the head.  Financial embarrassment is supported to have been the cause.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Lord
Samuel Lord, formerly of the firm of Lord & Taylor, the New York dry-goods house, died at Ashton-on-Mersey, Eng., a few days ago at the age of 86.  Mr. Lord came from England in 1824 and opened a small store in Catherine street at New York.  His struggle was hard, and as a contemporary with A. T. Stewart he endured the same self denial, was his own salesman, book-keeper and porter.  Mr. Lord retired from business about 1860 and has since lived in England.  He leaves property valued at several millions.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John Hammond
Gen. John Hammond, who died at Whitehall, NY, last Tuesday, of consumption, in his 62nd year, was a member of the 46th and 47th Congresses.  He was born at Crown Point, August 27, 1827, was graduated at the Troy Polytechnic Institute, became one of “the Argonauts of ‘49,” but returned to his native State and enlisted there in 1861, as a private.  He was soon promoted to be Captain of cavalry; and proved a thoroughly efficient officer, gaining distinction in the campaigns of 1864-5 in Virginia, where as Colonel he commanded cavalry in several important engagements, and was made Brigadier-General of volunteers toward the end of the war.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Elmer Impson
Elmer, the 11 year old son of Mrs. John Impson, of this borough, died last Thursday morning after days of suffering.  The child had inflammation of the bowels and measles and died of cerebro-spinal meningitis.  The funeral was held on Saturday.  The boy’s father died only a few months ago.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Sarah Bowen
Mrs. Sarah Bowen, wife of William B. Bowen, died at Shepherd, Mich., on the 18th ultimo after a long sickness.  She was in her 71st year.  Mrs. Bowen will be remembered by many citizens of this borough, as the family resided here from 1860 to 1871 when Mr. and Mrs. Bowen were active and leading members of the Baptist Church.  Mr. Bowen is a brother of Mr. John R. Bowen, of this borough.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Robert Shelton
Mr. Robert Shelton, of Mainesburg, died at Athens, Bradford county, a few days ago, while on a visit to his son and daughter.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Gilbert Davis
Mr. Gilbert Davis, who resided near Westfield, was kicked in the head by a horse a few days ago.  Mr. Davis soon died from the blow.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Samuel Elam Ensworth
Mr. Samuel Elam Ensworth died at his home in this borough last Friday morning, of heart-disease, in his 81st year.  He had been in poor health for some years, but was able to be about most of the time.  On Friday morning he arose and dressed himself, but soon after complained of feeling sick.  His wife got him some medicine and went out to prepare a warm drink, and when she returned to the room he had died.  Mr. Ensworth was born at Providence, R.I., November 2, 1808.  He learned the trade of a blacksmith, having been bound out at the age of 14.  Being an uncommonly active and industrious lad, he earned his time in advance and began life for himself at Solon, NY.  On the 14th of October, 1830, Mr. Ensworth and Miss Eunice Rockwell were married at Cincinnatus, NY.  After residing a few years at Solon the family came to Wellsboro in May, 1849, Mr. Ensworth having entered into business here the fall before.  The firm of Bean & Ensworth was extensively engaged in lumbering in this region and carried on a large general store on the Converse corner in this borough.  The business was very successful until the spring of 1861, when the firm lost a large stock of logs in the great flood of that year.  The following year the firm attempted to recover lost ground by putting in a still larger stock, but another freshet came and Mr. Ensworth was financially ruined.  He was full of pluck, however, and soon after engaged in lumbering in Clearfield county, and several years later he went to North Carolina, where he was quite successful in his lumbering operations.  The Southern climate did not agree with him, however, and he suffered from two strokes of paralysis and was prostrated by fever, so that his family became anxious about him and persuaded him to give up his business and return home about eight years ago.  Mr. Ensworth had for many years been a great worker in the Church and Sunday school, and he was a member of the Presbyterian Church for 60 years and an Elder in the Church in this borough since its organization 40 years ago.  Mr. and Mrs. Ensworth have had 13 children, seven of whom are still living, namely--H. Boardman Ensworth, of Brownsville, Pa.; Joseph and Arthur R., of Elmira, Mrs. George Hastings, of Stony Fork, Mrs. A. D. Griswold, of Southport, NY, and Laura E. and A. Leonard, who reside at home.  Before last Friday there had not been a death in the family for 28 years.  The funeral was held last Sunday afternoon, and it was largely attended.  Rev. J. F. Calkins and Rev. Dr. A. C. Shaw conducted the service.  Owing to the impassable roads the children residing at a distance were not able to reach town to attend the funeral, except Mr. Arthur Ensworth, who came up from Elmira on Friday, before the freshet.  (Tuesday, June 4, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Campbell
Last Tuesday Mr. John Campbell, of Tioga, a teamster employed by the Wellsboro Leather Company, was sent up to Niles Valley after a load of lime.  On his way home with the load Campbell fell off his wagon and the wheel ran over him, causing fatal injuries.  He died on Thursday morning.  He was an industrious man, and he had many friends.  He leaves a wife and one child.  (Tuesday, June 11, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Sellard
Last Tuesday morning the body of Mr. John Sellard, of Grover, who owns a farm in Union, was found on the railroad track near Canton.  The head was cut off, the man having been run over by the cars.  He had been around the evening before with three men, and the circumstances lead to the suspicion that there had been foul play.  Mr. Sellard leaves a wife and a family of five small children.  The dead man’s money and watch were found upon his person.  (Tuesday, June 11, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Nathan and D. H. Root
Mr. Nathan Root, a respected citizen of Elmira, died at his home, 421 North Main street in that city, on Thursday morning, May 30th at the age of 67 years.  He had been a great sufferer from Bright’s disease  and other maladies for nine years, and for all that time was a constant care to his devoted wife and four loving daughters.  Mr. Root was a brother of Mrs. Frank Priest, of Morris Run, who attended the funeral at Elmira on Friday and was detained in that city until Monday of last week, when she returned home to find a message announcing the death of another brother, Mr. D. H. Root, of Nauvoo, who was 62 years of age.  He was a useful citizen and esteemed neighbor and was a veteran survivor of the war for the Union, having been a member of the Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers.  Like his deceased brother, Mr. Root was afflicted with Bright’s disease, from which he had suffered for two years, and he too was cared for by a faithful and loving wife and three affectionate daughters--Mrs. Minerva Thomas, Mrs. Martha Skelly and Mrs. Louisa VanZant, all of whom reside at Nauvoo.  (Tuesday, June 11, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Jennie Wells and Miss Carrie Diehl
The sad intelligence was received at Tioga early last week that Miss Jennie Wells, a step-daughter of Mr. Barney Tabor, was among the dead at Johnstown; also her friend Miss Carrie Diehl, of Shippensburg, Pa., who has spent the summers at Tioga for six or eight years.  Miss Wells was a teacher in the Johnstown school and Miss Diehl was visiting her a few days before the close of school.  They were stopping at the hotel.  In this connection the following incident from among thousands will be of local interest:  A wealthy young Philadelphian named Hocker recently became engaged to the Shippensburg lady, Miss Carrie Diehl.  They were to be married in the middle of June, and both were preparing for the ceremony.  The lover heard of the terrible flood, but knowing that the residence of his dear one was up in the hills, felt little fear for her safety.  To make sure, however, he started for Johnstown, arriving on Tuesday.  Near the Fourth street morgue he met Mr. Diehl.  “Thank God, you are safe!”  he exclaimed, and then added, “Is Carrie well?”  “She was visiting in the valley when the wave came,” was the mournful answer, as he led the young lover into the chamber of death where the bodies were being identified by friends.  Both ladies were found and brought home.  The funeral of Miss Diehl was held at Shippensburg on Thursday, and the funeral of Miss Wells was held at Tioga on Friday.  (Tuesday, June 11, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Betsey Fellows
Mrs. Erastus Fellows died at her home--the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. E. J. Purple--in this borough late last Wednesday night.  She had been feeble for a considerable time, and apparently her death was not the result of disease but of the gradual sapping of the vital powers by extreme old age.  She is believed to have been the oldest person in Wellsboro at the time of her death, and excepting a few who were born here she had been longest a resident of the borough.  Mrs. Fellows was born in Maryland, Otsego county, NY, on the 25th day of August, 1795, her maiden name being Betsey Cole.  She evidently received a liberal education for that early day, for at the age of 17 she became a school-teacher at Coeymans, Albany county, NY.  Her first husband was Mr. Moses Johnson, whom she married in Dutchess county, NY.  In 1819 the young couple moved to Wellsboro and took up their residence in the log house on John Dort, which stood on the spot where the Farmer’s Hotel now stands, on Charleston street.  Two children were born to the pair--the late Newton B. Johnson, of this borough, and Mrs. Almira Coates, of Elkland.  Moses Johnson died in 1826, and in 1827 his widow married Mr. Erastus Fellows, and for many years the couple kept the hotel known all over the county by the name of its proprietor, in the building now called the “Farmer’s Hotel.”  Mr. Fellows was a popular landlord and his house enjoyed a large patronage although no liquor was sold in it so long as it remained in his hands.  Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Fellows.  One died in infancy, and of the others, Rachel, wife of Mr. E. J. Purple, is a resident of this borough, Homer F. and Norris W. are prominent and useful citizens of Springfield, Mo., and Mary, who became the wife of Mr. A. M. Spencer, of Canoe Camp, died quite recently.  Mrs. Fellows, although reared as a Baptist, became one of the original nine members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of this borough.  That Church was organized here in 1820, and from that time up to her death Mrs. Fellows remained a faithful member of it.  She was an excellent and helpful woman, who looked well after the ways of her household and reared a family of boys and girls who became useful and honorable men and women.  Her funeral was held at Mr. Purple’s residence on Charleston street last Sunday afternoon, and it was largely attended by the older residents of the village and surrounding country.  The services were conducted by Rev. O. S. Chamberlayne, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Rev. J. F. Calkins, the former pastor of the Presbyterian Church, made an interesting address largely of a local historical nature.  The pall-bearers were Messrs. William Bache, R. C. Cox, L. A. Gardner, Henry Sherwood, Charles Toles and Moses Wingate.  (Tuesday, June 11, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Tri-Counties Page 16139

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 27 JUNE 2008
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.