Tri-Counties Genealogy & History by Joyce M. Tice
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Bradford County PA
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1889-  Wellsboro Agitator - Obituaries

Mrs. Lucinda Bacon
Osceola, August 8, 1889.--Mrs. Lucinda Bacon, mother of Mrs. Charles Tubbs and of James Bacon, Esq., of Elmira, NY, died at the home of her daughter last Sunday evening at 9 o’clock, of neuralgia of the heart.  She was sick only four days.  Mr. and Mrs. Tubbs left here two weeks ago for a visit to New London, Conn., and Plymouth, Mass., and at that time Mrs. Bacon was in every good health.  Since her sickness and death the friends here have not been able to reach them either by letter or telegraph.  A tracer was sent Wednesday morning to find them if possible.  Friends in Boston have been writing in the meantime; but as they have been visiting different places of interest, no news reached them until Wednesday night.  They will reach home Thursday evening, and the interment will be either on Friday or Saturday.  Mrs. Bacon united with the Presbyterian Church in this place in May, 1848, and has led an earnest Christian life ever since.  She was never absent from church unless detained by sickness and was greatly interested in all Church work.  Being a good Bible student, she will be greatly missed in the Sunday-school, of which she was an active member.  (Tuesday, August 13, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Alexander
Last Saturday afternoon Mr. John Alexander, a well-known resident of this borough, died at his home on Jackson street after a long and painful illness.  Mr. Alexander was born in Tyrone, Ireland, in 1825.  At the age of 9 years he came to Canada with his parents.  About 35 years ago he came to this borough, where he worked at his trade of harness-making up to about 10 years ago, when failing health compelled him to give up work.  For the last year he had been in very feeble health.  John Alexander was a genial, kind-hearted man.  He had few enemies and a great many friends.  The funeral was held yesterday morning, and it was largely attended.  Rev. Mr. Chamberlayne conducted the service.  (Tuesday, August 13, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles C. Winsor
Early last Thursday morning Charles C. Winsor, M. D., died at his home in Blossburg, of typhoid fever, after a sickness of about three weeks.  About the middle of May he was prostrated by an attack of pneumonia.  He recovered sufficiently to attend to the duties of his profession, and through June and a part of July he looked after his patients with his accustomed interest and zeal, although it was apparent to all that he was much worn by his sickness.  He over-exerted himself in running to a fire in Blossburg, and was immediately taken down again.  His case was considered critical after a few days, and a council of physicians gave little encouragement for his recovery.  With remarkable vitality his system battled against the disease until a few hours before his death, when tired nature seemed to have surrendered, and Dr. Winsor passed peacefully into his eternal rest.  His death is a peculiarly sad one.  A studious, conscientious and zealous physician, thoroughly in love with his profession, is one of the most useful members of society.  Such a man was Dr. Winsor, and his death is universally regretted at Blossburg, in the surrounding country where he had practiced and in other parts of the county, where he had many friends.  He was scarcely 30 years of age, yet he had won the confidence of the people to such a degree that he had become the leading physician in his part of the county.  Charles Clarence Winsor was born in Ellery, Chautauqua county, NY.  His boyhood was spent in Jamestown, NY, where he received his education.  He married Miss Jenny Giles, of that city.  He was graduated at the Buffalo Medical College and immediately located at Arnot, where he practiced successfully for nearly five years and then moved to Blossburg.  As a citizen he was highly esteemed.  He had served as a School Director, and was elected a member of Blossburg’s Council last February.  He was a leading fireman, and was foremost in all movements requiring public spirit.  Dr. Winsor leaves a wife and two young sons.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Winsor, reside at Denver, Col., and his sister lives at Jamestown, NY.  The funeral was held at the family residence in Blossburg last Friday afternoon, Rev. Mr. Rhiel conducting the service.  The Mist Hose Company attended in a body and escorted the remains to the village cemetery, and six local physicians acted as honorary pall-bearers, while six of Dr. Winsor’s intimate friends among the business men bore his remains to the grave.  (Tuesday, August 13, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. W. B. Hepworth
Mrs. W. B. Hepworth was struck and instantly killed by an Erie freight locomotive at Addison, NY, last Wednesday.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Milburn A. Clark
Farmington, August 16, 1889.--The friends of Milburn A. Clark, for several years a resident of Farmington, will be pained to learn of his sudden death at Billings, Montana.  He had for some years been a resident of Red Lodge, Montana, and was enjoying health and prosperity, having been recently appointed Deputy Sheriff.  About two weeks ago he started for the Yellowstone valley after a car-load of hay.  In alighting from the car about 10 miles from Billings, his revolver fell from his pocket, striking in such a manner as to discharge the ball into his thigh.  He was taken back to Billings, and a physician was called, who dressed the wound and said it was not serious; but lockjaw set in, and at 7:30 of the following morning Mr. Clark died.  The sad intelligence was telegraphed to his father at Athens, Pa., and the remains were taken to Red Lodge for burial.  Mr. Clark’s sudden death in that far-off country is a sad blow to his many friends in his Eastern home.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Silas Finch
Last Friday afternoon Mrs. Silas Finch died of paralysis at her home in Lawrence township, at the age of 71 years.  She had been a member of the Presbyterian Church for a number of years.  She leaves a husband and seven children to mourn her death.  The funeral was at the Methodist Episcopal Church at Nelson.  Rev. Charles Weeks officiating.  The remains were interred in the Osceola cemetery.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John Junk
Mr. John Junk, a well-known resident of Fall Brook, died last Thursday at the age of 68 years.  He had been employed by the Fall Brook Coal Company for upwards of 25 years.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Elijah Thompson
Mr. Elijah Thompson, of Westfield, died last week Monday of quick consumption.  He was in his 54th year.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Hippolyte Beauge
Mr. Hippolyte Beauge, of Charleston township, died last Wednesday, the 14th instant, of pneumonia complicated with previous consumption of the lungs.  Deceased, who was commonly known as “Poletus” Beauge, was born 52 years ago in the State of New York, but had lived for about 50 years on the farm on which he died, and for the last 35 years, up to a few weeks ago, much of the hard work of the farm was done by his own hands.  He was a kind-hearted man, a quiet, peaceable citizen and a good neighbor.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Ellis M. Bodine
Last Wednesday morning Mr. Ellis M. Bodine died at his home in this borough after a long and very painful sickness with kidney disease.  He was in his 89th year.  Mr. Bodine was born at Jersey Shore, Pa., January 4, 1801.  He learned the trade of a tanner.  In 1827 he married Miss Margaret Sheerer, of Jersey Shore.  All their nine children are still living, namely:  Sarah, wife of Dr. H. S. Greeno, of St. Louis, Mo.; Ellen A., wife of Rev. M. F. DeWitt, of Elmira, NY; Catherine, wife of Mr. John W. Wright, Rochester, NY; Margaret, wife of Mr. C. M. Moore, of Williamsport, Pa.; Lewis T., of Kansas City, Mo; Isaac M.; Abram L., Robert W. and Ellis B., of this borough.  Mr. Bodine came to this place soon after his marriage--in 1828--and purchased the Joseph Fish tannery, which stood on the lot where Hammond’s grocery now stands.  In 1846 he built a large tannery on the corner now occupied by the Wellsboro Carriage Company’s trimming-shop.  Two years later the establishment was burned, involving a great loss to its owner.  Mr. Bodine was President of the School Board in 1835 and he always took an active interest in the cause of education.  In 1845 Mr. Bodine’s first wife died, and in 1848 he married Miss U. H. Coolidge, of Delmar, by whom he had two children, Henry F. and Ida, the latter of whom died a few years ago.  The funeral was held last Friday afternoon, Rev. Mr. Chamberlayne conducting the service.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Robert Adams
Last Friday morning Mr. Robert Adams, one of the leading farmers in Charleston township, died from the effects of an injury received about 10 days previously while he was hauling hay.  The whiffletrees broke and struck him in the abdomen, causing internal injuries.  Mr. Adams fully realized his condition, and he faced death bravely and philosophically, being able to arrange all the details of his business affairs before the final summons came.  Robert Adams was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, 69 years ago.  He came to this county with his parents and located in Charleston, May 18, 1840.  He resided upon the same farm the day of his death.  His wife and five children--one son and four daughters--survive him.  Mr. Adams was a member of the Presbyterian Church.  He was an industrious and honorable man, and while he had acquired considerable property and had loaned money for many years, it is related of him that he was never known to take usury or to distress a debtor.  The funeral was held at the family homestead on Sunday afternoon, and it was largely attended, 127 teams following the remains to the grave.  Rev. Dr. A. C. Shaw, of this borough, conducted the service.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Abram S. Keeney
Mr. Abram S. Keeney, an old resident of the county and for many years past a citizen of Tioga, died about 7 o’clock last Thursday evening.  He had been in poor health for some time, but his final sickness lasted only two weeks.  He suffered much, and of him it can truly be said that he is at rest.  He was born July 11, 1811.  He united with the Baptist Church in 1831 under the ministry of Elder Sheardown, and he was a deacon of that Church between 45 and 50 years, and had come to be generally known as “Deacon Keeney.”  He was a man of sterling integrity and a useful citizen.  He lost heavily by the failure of the bank at Tioga in 1883, but by careful management he lived comfortably to the end.  His wife, who was formerly Miss Sarah M. Crandall, of Covington, survives him.  The funeral was held at Tioga last Saturday afternoon.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ward Bailey
In Richmond, Pa., July 18, 1889, Mrs. Ward Bailey, aged 24 years.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Lucretia Holmes Close
In Memoriam., At a meeting of the Women’s Foreign and Home Missionary society at Farmington, Pa., the following resolutions were passed:  Resolved, That in the death of sister Lucretia Holmes Close, the most aged and eminent member of this Society, our hearts are filled with the deepest sorrow, again reminding us most forcibly how slight and frail are the assurances of life and how fixed and sure is death.  Resolved, That by her death this Society has lost an honored member, distinguished for her profound learning and superior ability as a Christian woman, and who was endeared to us by many pleasant associations and memories.  Resolved, That we tender our warmest sympathies to the bereaved relatives of our deceased sister.  Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the minutes and a copy be sent to the family of the deceased.  Hattie I. H. Beebe, Minnie E. Greene, Committee.  (Tuesday, August 20, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mme. Charles de Struve
A telegram has been received at the Russian legation at Washington announcing the recent death of Mme. Charles de Struve, wife of the Russian Minister to the United States, at their country residence Kielmarky, near St. Petersburg.  Mme. De Struve was 45 years of age.  She was a woman of striking personality, very popular, and had perhaps the widest acquaintance with public men of any woman in Washington.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alexander Brown Mott
Alexander Brown Mott, who died a few days ago, was himself a great surgeon and the son of a great and more celebrated surgeon, Valentine Mott.  Dr. A. B. Mott was 63 years old the last day of March.  He received a classical education in Europe, and studied medicine in New York and at Castleton, Vt.  He was one of the founders of Bellevue Hospital, and no man contributed more to its importance and usefulness.  He went into the service of the Government at the front in 1864, becoming Medical Inspector of the department of Virginia, attached to Gen. Ord’s staff.  He was one of the small group present at the surrender of Lee at Appomatox.  There was never a more kindly and gentle surgeon than Mott, his humanity going hand in hand with the firmest courage and the surest eye and hand in the profession.  In domestic and social life he was an example to follow.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Dupont
Gen. Henry Dupont, the powder-manufacturer and one of the wealthiest citizens of Delaware, died at Wilmington a few days ago at the age of 77.  He was a native of Wilmington, his father, Eleuthere I. DuPont de Nemoura, having fled from France in 1800 to escape Jacobin persecution, and settled in Delaware.  Young DuPoint was educated at West Point, and after a short service in the army he resigned and entered his father’s powder-mills at Wilmington.  In 1846 he was appointed Adjutant of State troops, and in 1861 he was made Major-General of the State militia.  His first important order required every organized military company to be mustered into the Federal service.  The Governor suspended the order, and as the disloyal sentiment was strong in parts of Delaware, DuPont advised Secretary of War Dix to send a company of troops to Wilmington.  This was done, and after the arrest of several refractory leaders, quiet was restored.  DuPont was first a Whig and then a Republican.  He was a Presidential Elector in 1868, 1876, 1880 and 1888.  He was an expert farmer, and one of the most extensive land-owners in Delaware.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Josiah Newell
Mr. Josiah Newell, one of the pioneers of Union township, died a few days ago.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Andrew Bacon
Mr. Andrew Bacon, an old resident of Union township, died a few days ago, August 12, 1889, at the age of 84 years.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. E. G. Smith
Mr. E. G. Smith, a resident of Westfield for nearly half a century, died last Wednesday in his 89th year.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. William Powers
Mrs. William Powers, of Richmond township, died last Friday, aged about 75 years.  The funeral was held on Sunday.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. R. D. Webster
Mr. R. D. Webster, of Mansfield, was taken sick last Wednesday and died on Thursday morning.  Mr. Webster was an old resident of Sullivan township.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Lee W. Bailey
Yesterday about noon Mr. Lee W. Bailey died at the home of his father, John W. Bailey, in this borough, of consumption.  The young man came home from Europe in failing health, resulting from a cold contracted in the Alps.  He had intended to spend three years in Rome and Paris in the study of painting, but was forced to return to his home after only a few months’ stay in the old country.  Since the age of seven years Lee had spent most of his time at New York city in a school for the deaf and dumb, giving especial attention to the study of art, for which he seemed to be peculiarly fitted.  He was 25 years of age.  He was a bright and talented young man, and, considering his disabling infirmity, he was wonderfully self-reliant.  He realized fully that he must die, and for weeks he had longed for the summons to come.  The funeral is to be held tomorrow at 11 o’clock.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wellington W. Webb
Early last Saturday morning Dr. Wellington W. Webb died at his home on Water street after being sick a long time with progressive paralysis.  He was in his 61st year.  The Doctor had been gradually failing in health for many months.  He fully realized the nature of his disease and freely conversed about it, philosophically speculating as to the length of his days.  Several weeks ago he lost the power of speech, and for a few weeks was confined to his bed, his decline being rapid from that time.  Wellington W. Webb was born September 19, 1828, in Chenango county, NY, being a son of Orson W. Webb.  He came to this county with his parents when he was about 12 years old.  He lived on a farm at Stony Fork and went to the country schools for a few years, afterward attending the Academy in this borough when it was under the charge of Prof. E. J. Hamilton.  He afterward attended the Oxford Academy, where he was graduated.  He then came back to Wellsboro and taught our village schools for several years.  Mr. Webb studied medicine in the office of the late Dr. Nelson Packer, of this borough.  He attended a course of lectures at the Geneva Medical College and also at the Buffalo Medical College, and he was graduated at the Vermont Medical College, at Castleton, Vt., in 1853.  Dr. Webb immediately returned to this borough and practiced with Dr. Packer for a short time.  In 1854 Dr. Webb married Miss Laura A. Catlin, of Stony Fork, and they moved to Liberty, where he practiced his profession three years.  Then he returned to this borough and settled permanently.  He had been actively at work as a physician in this community for over 30 years.  At the beginning of the war he went out with the 35th regiment as Surgeon, and later he was Surgeon at the Chestnut Hill Hospital in Philadelphia.  In 1882 Dr. Webb was appointed on the Board of Medical Examiners for Pensions in this county.  He served for seven years in that capacity, and during all that time he never missed a session of the Board and assisted in the examination of every case.  Dr. Webb was a School Director in this borough for 12 consecutive years.  He was deeply interested in the cause of education, had great taste for music and was a diligent student of science and theology.  He was an adept as a microscopist.  He was a conscientious and kind-hearted physician and a genial companion, and he was esteemed by a large circle of acquaintances.  He leaves two children, Dr. Clarence W. Webb and Mrs. George M. Spalding, both of this borough.  Mrs. Webb also survives her husband.  Recently Dr. Webb made application through B. M. Potter, Esq., for a pension, and last Thursday the allowance was made at the rate of $30 a month.  The funeral was held yesterday morning at 11 o’clock.  Rev. Dr. A. C. Shaw conducted the service at the family residence.  The pall-bearers were John L. Robinson, Henry Sherwood, S. F. Wilson, A. S. Brewster, Laugher Bache and Royal Wheeler.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Helen Cooper
Chatham, August 23, 1889.---The funeral of Mrs. Joseph Cooper took place at the church at Little Marsh yesterday.  She had been in poor health for several years.  About two weeks ago she had an attack which was very severe and from which she never rallied, and at about 4 o’clock Tuesday afternoon she passed peacefully away.  Mrs. Cooper was born at Knoxville in this county on the 10th (or 19th) of February, 1854.  Her maiden name was Helen Mosher, and she was a granddaughter of Jerry Garner, late of this township.  She married Joseph Cooper July 9th, 1870, when in her 17th year.  She experienced religion at an early age and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1869.  She devoted her life to the service of her Master, and no Christian work was undertaken in this region but her help and advice were solicited and given.  The Aid Society owes its existence to her more than to any other one person.  Her hand was always open to the needy, and no one ever went hungry from her door.  She was induced what she professed to be--a true Christian woman.  Her home was a happy one, and her children rise up and call her blessed.  She leaves a husband and three children, besides a large circle of relatives and friends, to mourn her early death.  Rev. A. G. Cole, assisted by Rev. J. W. Miller, conducted the funeral services and the remains were interred in the Boardman cemetery.  (Tuesday, August 27, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Shaw
Mr. and Mrs. Sampson Shaw, of Maple Hill, are solely bereaved.  A few days ago their 16 years old son died of spinal meningitis after only being sick two days.  There is now only one child surviving out of a family of 11 sons and daughters.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Olive Clark
Mrs. Olive Clark died at Mansfield a few days ago of cholera morbus.  She was 61 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Robert Fleming
Mr. Robert Fleming, a well-known shoemaker at Morris, died last Tuesday.  The funeral was held on Thursday, and the remains were interred in the cemetery in this borough.  He was the father of Mr. L. M. Fleming, who resides on Cole street.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Michael Hassett
Mrs. Michael Hassett, of Antrim, died on the 23d ultimo, of inflammation of the bowels.  Her age was 38 years.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Elisha Narsh
Last Thursday morning Mr. Elisha Narsh, of Blossburg, dropped dead in his door-yard while cutting wood.  He was 84 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Andrew Eke
Last Tuesday Mr. Andrew Eke, a Swedish miner, was instantly killed by a fall of coal in drift No. 1.  His son, who was working with him, was also seriously injured.  Mr. Eke was 56 years of age, and he leaves a wife and five children in Sweden.  It was deemed necessary to hold an inquest.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Eli Bacon
Mr. Eli Bacon, who died at Rogers, Ark., on the 18th ultimo, was a native of Delmar in this county, and he was an elder brother of the late Dr. Daniel Bacon, of this borough.  He was married in April, 1856 to Adaline O’May, and in the same year the couple went to Nebraska, then on the frontier, to make a home; but after an experience of two years of the hardships of pioneer life they moved back to Illinois and resided there for 25 years, and then located at Rogers, Ark.  Mr. Bacon was a successful school teacher for 30 years.  He was a Christian man and lived the religion which he professed.  His final sickness lasted about nine months.  His brothers Oliver, Simeon and Seth Bacon reside in Delmar.  He was 57 years of age.  He leaves a widow and three children.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Fanny J. Austin
Mrs. Fanny J. Austin, died last Saturday at her home in Charleston, at the age of 73 years.  She was born in Charleston, and was a daughter of Daniel and Sarah Wilson.  She was familiarly known as “Aunt Fanny” to a large circle of friends to whom she was endeared by her gentle and lovable nature.  She was a member of St. Paul’s Church in this borough.  The funeral was held yesterday afternoon, Rev. A. W. Snyder conducting the service.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Dennis Youmans
Mrs. Dennis Youmans, who lived near Nelson, died very suddenly a few days ago.  Mr. Youmans went to his work in the morning, leaving his wife and six month old child as well as usual.  During the forenoon Mrs. Gray called at the house to see Mrs. Youmans, who was her sister.  Not finding her in, and thinking the mother had gone on an errand to a neighbor’s, she took the child home with her.  Some time elapsed and Mrs. Youmans did not return.  Her husband was informed, when, a search was begun, and she was found dead in the garden, where she had gone after vegetables.  Heart disease was the cause of her death.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Z. R. Clough
At Canton, Pa., August 19, 1889, Mrs. Z. R. Clough, aged 53 years.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Campbell
At a regular meeting of the Etz Post, No. 401, G. A. R., of Tioga, Pa., held at Tioga, July 26, 1889, the following resolutions were adopted:  Whereas, It has seemed good to Almighty God to remove from our midst our late worthy and esteemed brother, James Campbell; Whereas, The relations long held by the deceased with the members of this Post render it proper that we should place on record our appreciation of his services as a brother and his merits as a man; therefore be it, Resolved, That we deplore the loss of brother James Campbell, and with deep feelings of regret softened only by the confident hope that his spirit is with those who, having fought the good fight here, are now enjoying happiness in a better world.  Resolved, That we tender to his afflicted widow and relatives our sincere condolence and our earnest sympathy in their affliction.  Resolved, That the charter of this Post be draped in black for 30 days.  Resolved, That these resolutions be entered on the minutes of this Post, and a copy be sent to the widow of our deceased brother, and that they be published in the Wellsboro Agitator.  Hiram Pickering, G. G. Reynolds, T. D. Marsh, Committee on Resolutions.  (Tuesday, September 3, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Isaac Losey
Mr. Isaac Losey, of Keeneyville, died last Friday of cholera morbus only a few hours before being attacked by the disease.  He was about 70 years of age, and he had been a lifelong resident of that neighborhood, his father, Isaac Losey, being one of the pioneers of that region.  The funeral was held last Saturday afternoon.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. L. F. Allen
Mrs. L. F. Allen died at Mansfield last Tuesday morning at the age of 55 years.  She had been an invalid for two years.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. George Kettle
Mr. George Kettle, a Harrison Valley merchant, died of typhoid fever a few days ago.  He was buried at Potter Brook by the Odd Fellows.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Male Hutchinson
Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Hutchinson, of this place, are bereaved by the death of their infant son.  The child was seven months old, and he died last Tuesday of cholera infantum.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jesse Willcox
Last Thursday evening Jesse Willcox, a young man of about 18 years, son of Mr. R. E. Willcox, died at Keeneyville of malignant diphtheria, after being sick a week.  The remains were interred the same night.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. T. B. Putnam
Last Saturday morning, Mr. T. B. Putnam, a prominent resident of Covington borough, committed suicide by hanging himself in his barn.  He had shown some symptoms of derangement for some time past.  He lost heavily by the June flood, and he brooded over his troubles.  His family had noticed his melancholy moods, and had watched his movements, but on Saturday he eluded them and sought the barn loft, where he was found hanging by a rope and dead from strangulation.  Mr. Putnam was a life-long resident of Covington.  His age was about 60 years.  He leaves a wife and two sons and one daughter.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Simon Keeney
Last Tuesday morning Mr. Simon Keeney, of Delmar, was engaged in hauling railroad ties from the mountain on Baldwin run, five or six miles north of this borough.  While he was driving down the steep hill he fell off the load, and the wagon wheels ran over his head, crushing the skull.  Mr. Mase Bennett had helped in loading the ties, and he went down the hill ahead of Mr. Keeney.  He noticed the team running away, and retraced his steps and found Mr. Keeney lying dead in the track, his arms and body showing many bruises.  Mr. Keeney was about 38 years of age.  He leaves a wife and six children.  He was a sober, industrious and warm-hearted man.  The remains were interred in the Keeneyville cemetery.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Matilda S. Dartt
Mrs. Matilda S. Dartt died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. L. P. Potter, in Charleston last Thursday morning.  She was in her 74th year.  She was born December 15, 1815.  In 1840 she became the second wife of the late Cyrus Dartt, to whom she bore three children, only one of whom is surviving.  For 17 years she had been an invalid, and for the past three years she had been afflicted with paralysis and partial blindness.  She bore her sufferings with Christian resignation and cheerfully awaited that summons which must come to all of us.  Mrs. Dartt was a charter member of the Charleston Baptist Church.  Her funeral was held at the Dartt Settlement church last Saturday, Rev. G. P. Watrous, of Knoxville, preaching the service.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Robert Brown
Last Thursday afternoon a young man named Robert Brown, about 20 years of age, was accidentally killed by a companion, Michael Hemerstine, near Trout Run.  Both the young men were employed at Weed’s mill.  They had been to Trout Run, and when about a mile above that place, walking along the Northern Central railroad, Hemerstine said to Brown that he had a self-cocking revolver.  Brown expressed a desire to see it, and Hemerstine drew it from an inside pocket of his coat.  In doing this the revolver was accidentally discharged, the ball entering Brown’s face over the right eye, causing death in half an hour.  An inquest was held on the body by Justice J. W. VanValkenburg, the verdict being that Robert Brown came to his death by an accidental shot from a pistol in the hands of Michael Hemerstine.  The parents of the deceased reside on Babb’s creek.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mary K. Wheeland
Liberty, September 4, 1889.--Departed this life, Saturday, August 31st, 1889, at the ripe age of 83 years, 9 months and 18 days, Mary K. Wheeland, widow of the late George Wheeland, Sr.  Mary K. Palmer was born in Fishing Creek, Columbia county, Pa., November 13, 1805.  She moved to Blooming Grove, Pa., while a girl and there became acquainted with George Wheeland, whom she married in 1827.  She was the mother of nine children, five of whom are living--George R., Lydia A., wife of Gen. R. C. Cox, Mary C., Charles D., and Isaac F.  Samuel, Daniel and Hannah died in infancy and William P. died of wounds received at Fort Steadman, Va.  Although she was born and brought up a Quakeress, when the Nation’s life was threatened she gave all her sons to fight for the preservation of National integrity and unity--the youngest first and George, William and Charles next.  Her eyes were wont to flash with pride when speaking of war-times.  “All my sons, my son-in-law, Robert and grandson Henry helped to fight for their country.  They were all I had.  If I had had more, I would have given them too, for our cause was just.”  For the last few years of her life she gradually failed bodily, but up to the time of her death her mind was clear most of the time.  Her last request was that her children should not wear mourning for her.  She passed quietly and peacefully away, thus closing a long, useful, Christian life.  “Mother” Wheeland, as she was familiarly called, was universally loved and respected, and it can be said of her that she “died the death of the righteous and her end was peace.”  Father and mother both laid to rest and the family scattered, a sadness hangs over their children; but such is life.  “Even so, Father, for it seemed good in thy sight.”  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Alice Russell
At Marsh Creek, Pa., September 6, 1889, Alice, daughter of Lucius and Dora Russell, aged 1 year, 2 months and 17 days.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

H. C. Davis
Lieut. Gov. H. C. Davis, of Nevada, fell dead in his garden at Carson the other morning from heart disease.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Julia Christian
Mrs. W. E. Christian, nee Julia Jackson, the only child of Stonewall Jackson, died a few days ago at Charlotte, NC.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Andrew Bedford
Dr. Andrew Bedford, who was in his 90th year, died last Tuesday night at his home in Waverly, near Scranton.  He was one of the members of the Constitutional Convention of 1837.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John A. Briggs
John A. Briggs, who died a few days ago in Brooklyn at the age of 78, was a native of Vermont, but afterward an Ohio lawyer, and his chief glory was his claim that he was influential in getting Abraham Lincoln to deliver his famous Cooper Institute address in New York.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

John A. Greene
John A. Greene, a New York journalist, died last week at Bay Side, LI., after a lingering illness.  He was well known in the newspaper circles of the metropolis, and had been president of the New York Press Club.  He was managing editor of the New York Star for a time.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Philemon Bliss
Philemon Bliss, ex-Justice of the Supreme Court of Missouri, and Dean of the Missouri University, died in St. Paul, Minn., the other morning, aged 76.  Judge Bliss was one of the early anti-slavery leaders of Ohio, and was Member of Congress from the 14th Ohio district from 1855 until 1859.  He was the first Chief Justice of Dakota.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Alfred Aylward
Alfred Aylward, the Fenian, whose exploits in the Boer was against the British made him quite a figure in the world, died at Littleton, NH, a few days ago.  Aylward was a soldier of fortune, like many Irishmen, because his own country afforded him no career or even home, as he had turned patriot and rebel then a mere boy.  He became somewhat prominent among the Fenians in 1867.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Henry Shaw
Henry Shaw, whose death occurred a few days ago in St. Louis, has preserved his name in that city by the gift of Tower Grove park, with its celebrated botanical gardens, to the city.  The gardens cover 50 acres, and the park contains 350 acres, all traversed by roads and paths.  Mr. Shaw was an Englishman by birth and as old as the century, all but 49 years of which he had passed in St. Louis, where he became an importer.  He retired from business over 30 years ago.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William C. Ludwig
Philadelphia mourns the loss of William C. Ludwig, of the great dry goods house of Ludwig, Kneedler & Co., one of the foremost business men and philanthropists of the city.  He was the close friend and trusted adviser of the late I. V. Williamson, and to his influence was no doubt due the founding of the great Williamson school.  Mr. Ludwig also gave generously to good causes, and devoted much time and labor to the establishment and conduct of several well-known charitable organizations.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Austin Allibone
Samuel Austin Allibone, whose “Dictionary of Authors” made him celebrated, died at Lucerne, Switzerland, last week Monday, in his 74th year.  He was one of the most industrious and useful of the Philadelphia literates.  He was for a while in his early life in business, but soon became known as a critic and a scholar in English literature, and devoted his learning in that line to the compilation of a “Critical Dictionary of English Literature and British and American Authors,” which occupied the greater part of his time for many years, contains notices of 46,499 writers, and was published in three volumes, the first in 1864, the second and third after 17 years.  For the last 10 years he has been librarian of the Lenox library in New York city.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Zanus F. Wilbur
Zanus F. Wilbur, perhaps the most important witness in the Government suit against the Bell Telephone Company, was found dead in his bed at Denver, Col., a few days ago.  His death probably resulted from hard drinking.  Wilbur was Chief Clerk in the Electrical department of the Patent Office at the time the Bell telephone model was submitted and the patent applied for.  Subsequently he acknowledged having been bribed by the Bell people, but denied this on the witness-stand, causing the Government a set-back in its presentation of the case.  Pending the trial of the Bell case, Wilbur was placed in charge of a secret service officer, who took him to Colorado in hopes of breaking him of his drinking habits.  In this the officer was successful for a time.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Patrick Boyle
Patrick Boyle, an old and respected citizen of Wyalusing, Bradford county, was killed a few days ago by the cars.  He had been repairing a fence on his premises, and was returning home along the track when he met a train and, stepping over on the other track, was struck by a train going in the opposite direction.  He was 82 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 10, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Constant Cook
Mrs. Constant Cook, the mother of H. H. Cook, of New York, and of Edward Cook, of Bath, died at the homestead at Bath last Tuesday night.  She was one of the early settlers in Steuben county.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Harry King
At Hughesville, Lycoming county, last Tuesday, a young man named James Mowry had just returned from a day’s squirrel-hunting, and before putting his gun away went out into the garden to fire the remaining charge from it in order to prevent any accident which might occur by a member of the family coming in contact with the weapon.  The young man, aiming at the broad side of a small barn which stood in the rear of the garden, thinking this to be the safest spot in which to empty the load, pulled the trigger,--and with the dying away of the report made by the gun came a most pitiful cry from the other side of the barn.  Mowry at once ran out, and was horrified to find Harry King, a lad of 14 years, lying on the ground, his side pierced with several of the buckshot which had gone crashing through the pine boards.  It seems that the unfortunate boy and a number of companions were playing about the barn, and the load which was intended to lodge in the boards went right through and into the boy.  The lad died four hours late after the accident.  Young King was an orphan.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Count Villiers de l’isle Adam
Count Villiers de l’isle Adam, the French poet and novelist, is dead.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Rosamond Cormer and daughter Rosalie
The mutilated bodies of Rosamond Cormer and his daughter Rosalie, aged 15, were found in their cabin near Lafayette, La., last Tuesday.  They had been murdered by a band of “regulators” who two months ago whipped Cormer and told him to leave.  His failure to do so resulted in the death of himself and daughter.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William B. Lowe
Captain William B. Lowe, of the United States Army, died last Thursday at the residence of his sister in Baltimore.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth Wallingford
Mrs. Elizabeth Wallingford of Mankato, Minn., died a few days ago, aged 93.  She was the only surviving widow of a soldier of the Revolution in Minnesota, and was the eldest except one in the United States.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Chevalier Ira Paine
Chevalier Ira Paine, the famous American marksman, died last Tuesday in Paris.  He rivaled Bogardus as a marksman, and his exhibitions in this county, as well as in Europe and Australia, made him famous.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

A. E. Touzalin
Hon. A. E. Touzalin, of Chicago, president of the Chicago, Burlington and Northern Railroad, died in Bennington, Vt., last Thursday night from hemorrhage of the lungs.  He had been in poor health for some time.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

James Reese
Captain James Reese, the celebrated boat-builder, died at Pittsburgh last Thursday of asthma after a prolonged illness.  Captain Reese was the first manufacturer in the world to make a steel-plate boat.  He was 69 years old.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Addinell Hewson
Dr. Addinnell Hewson, a distinguished physician and author, died on Thursday at his residence in Philadelphia, in his 61st year.  He made a specialty of surgery, and was the author of a work on surgery and of numerous papers in medical journals which attracted widespread attention.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

F. W. Gesswein
Christian Deyhle, aged 73, shot and killed F. W. Gesswein, a millionaire tool manufacturer of Brooklyn, in his New York office last Friday.  They had extended litigation over a patent, which resulted adversely to Deyhle.  The latter asked Gesswein to give him $500 to enter an Old Man’s Home, and Gesswein refusing, Deyhle shot him.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Gooderahm
William Gooderahm, the millionaire philanthropist and temperance advocate, died suddenly at Toronto, Ont., last Thursday night of heart disease while attending a prayer-meeting in the Home for Fallen Women.  He had just finished a prayer.  He had always enjoyed the best of health.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

H. W. Genet
H. W. Genet, well-known from his connection with the Tweed ring, died in New York city a few days ago, aged 61.  He had been State Senator and County Clerk.  He was indicted for complicity in robbing the city, but escaped before trial.  After several years he returned and was sentenced to six months imprisonment and a $5,000 fine.  He was a descendant of E. C. Genet, French Minister to the United States in 1793.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Samuel Sullivan Cox
Congressman Samuel Sullivan Cox died at his home in New York city last Tuesday evening, in his 65th year.  He was a native of Ohio and was elected to Congress four times from that State.  He moved to New York city in 1865, and had been a Representative in Congress from that city almost continuously up to the time of his death.  He was the writer of several interesting books devoted to travel and politics, and was well known as a wit and brilliant debater in the House.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

David D. Lloyd and Edward B. Rankin
Two journalists of long service and proved competency have just died,--David D. Lloyd, of the New York Tribune, better known as the author of several successful plays, and Edward B. Rankin, of the Boston Herald.  Both died in the prime of life, and both, by a noteworthy coincidence, of disease of the heart.  While Mr. Rankin was content to live the self-effacing life of a journalist, whose record is merged in that of his paper, Mr. Lloyd was of a different type, and demanded and won a personal distinction as a dramatist.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Charles III., Prince of Monaco
One of the best known sovereigns of Europe is dead.  He was Charles III., Prince of Monaco.  He was 70 years old and he had ruled 37 years.  His kingdom was the smallest in the world, having an area of but about eight and one-third square miles, an army of 72 officers and men, and a population of less than 8,000; but his people were all noble, the Monacans having been ennobled in a body by Charles V. of Spain.  In one respect, the Monacans are a fortunate people:  They pay no taxes for the support of the Government.  These are provided for, and the expenses of administration taken care of, and the Prince has been enriched by the tribute from the Monte Carlo Casino, the most famous gambling establishment in the world.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. George Dougherty
Mrs. George Dougherty died at Birney, Bradford county, last Sunday, after a long sickness.  She formerly reside in this borough and at Antrim.  The remains were brought to this place last evening and the funeral is to be held at the First Baptist church this afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Mrs. Dougherty was about 28 years of age.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Mary Wahask
Mary, the 7 year old daughter of Mr. Jacob Wahask, of Blossburg, was killed by the cars last Tuesday morning.  The child was on her way to school, and she attempted to cross the track by crawling under a car just as the train was starting for Morris Run.  She was crushed under the wheels and died three hours after the accident.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Sherman Patterson
Mr. Sherman Patterson died at the home of his uncle, Mr. R. F. Patterson, on East avenue, yesterday morning of typhoid fever.  He was a son of Mr. Charles P. Patterson, on Maple Hill.  He was in his 25th year.  The funeral is to be held at Cherry Flats this afternoon.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John M. Bosard
The sad intelligence of the death of Mr. John M. Bosard was received here last Tuesday.  Mr. Bosard died at Dunkirk, NY, last week Monday after being sick a short time with brain fever.  He had been station agent for the Fall Brook Coal Company at Lawrenceville for several years, and he was highly esteemed as a citizen.  About two weeks ago he went to Dunkirk, where he had secured a position as shipping clerk in a large factory.  After working three days he was taken sick, and he sank rapidly until the hour of his death. Mr. Bosard’s family still reside at Lawrenceville, and their daughter Mamie being dangerously sick with fever, Mrs. Bosard was unable to attend her husband’s bedside.  Mr. Bosard was 54 years of age.  He was a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows’ orders.  The Nelson Lodge and Lawrenceville Encampment took charge of the funeral, which was held at Lawrenceville last Wednesday.  The remains were interred at Nelson.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Henry Oliver and Eugene Daguier
Last evening at about 7:30 o’clock the passenger train on the Tioga railroad coming from Elmira was approaching Tioga Junction under full speed, at the rate of 25 miles an hour, when the air-brakes failed to work and the train went crashing into the Fall Brook coal train No. 52, which was standing still on the main track, about 80 or 90 rods south of the station.  Four cars were smashed and then took fire and were burned.  Mr. Henry Oliver, a bridge carpenter who resided at Union, NY, was instantly killed.  The newsboy on the train, Eugene Daguier, of Blossburg, had both his legs cut off, and he died five minutes after the accident.  Mr. Edward Bostwick, of the firm of Wing & Bostwick, of Lawrenceville, was badly injured.  One leg was thrown out of joint, and his face and hands were badly scalded.  Conductor Judd, of the passenger train, sustained a bad cut upon his head and his shoulder was broken.  The engineer, William Green, had his hands badly scalded.  Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Nevens, of Jacksonville, NY, were badly injured.  Mr. William Aspercoshly, a traveling agent from Scranton, Pa., was terribly scalded and will probably die.  George McNamie, of Tioga, had his back injured and his nose broken.  He is in a critical condition.  William Walker, of Leona, Bradford county, was badly scalded and his head cut.  John Samepool, of Lamb’s Creek; nose broken and scalp wounds.  Mrs. G. N. Wright, of Spokane Falls, W. T.; left leg broken.  Herbert Campbell, of Mansfield, badly scalded, and his injuries thought to be fatal.  Charles Pierce, Pine City, NY; left leg broken.  Mrs. Wallace Ryan, Miss Emeline Darling and Miss Estelle Ryan, of Lawrenceville; Mr. Alfred Seeley, of Trowbridge, and several others were badly injured.  It is thought that several of the injured cannot survive and that the total number of lives lost may reach seven.  Both locomotives were completely demolished.  The engineer and fireman of freight train saw the express coming and they jumped for their lives and escaped with slight injuries.  The wounded passengers were carried to neighboring farm-houses, and the Tioga and Lawrenceville physicians gave all possible assistance.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Clara May Robertson
At Keeneyville, Pa., September 10, 1889, of pneumonia, Clara May, invalid daughter of Mrs. Ellen A. Robertson, aged 12 years, 3 months and 6 days.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Child Roe
In Middlebury, Pa., September 7, 1889, of cholera infantum, the infant child of Mr. Henry Roe.  (Tuesday, September 17, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

D. H. Brotherton
Colonel D. H. Brotherton, United States Army (retired), died at Waynesboro, Pa., last Wednesday, aged 50 years.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Louis Mass
Dr. Louis Mass, famed in the Old World and New as a pianist and composer, died at Jamaica Plain, Mass., last Tuesday night of peritonitis.  He was born in Weisbaden in 1852.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Jesse Wentworth Payson
Jesse Wentworth Payson died at Hyde Park, Mass., last Tuesday, aged 74.  He was one of the great artist penman of the world and originated the lithograph copy for common-school writing books.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

T. C. Anderson
T. C. Anderson, the largest breeder of Short Horns in America, died at his residence at Sideview, Ky., last Wednesday at 3 a. m.  An hour later his youngest son, John Jay, died from injuries received some months ago.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William Allen
Colonel William Allen, principal of the McDonogh School, Baltimore county, Md., died last Tuesday, aged 52.  During the late war he was ordnance officer of Stonewall Jackson’s division.  Colonel Allen was recognized in this country and Europe as a profound mathematician.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Bob Younger
Bob Younger, a noted bandit, died in the Stillwater penitentiary in Minnesota last week Monday, of consumption, aged 35.  Bob and his two brothers, Jim and Cole, were sentenced for life for the attempt to rob the First National bank of Northfield, Minn., September 7, 1876.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

William H. Cilley
William H. Cilley, the associate of General Meigs in the construction of the celebrated Oroya railroad, died at Lima, Peru, a few days ago.  Leading residents of Lima and the School of Engineers attended the funeral, and a great number of business houses were closed as a mark of respect.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Elizabeth S. McClellan
Mrs. Elizabeth S. McClelland, widow of Dr. George McClellan and mother of General George B. McClellan and Dr. John H. B. McClellan, the distinguished surgeon, died last Tuesday at the residence of her niece, Miss Rebecca Coxe, at Drifton, Pa.  She was related to the Coxe family through the marriage of her sister to Judge Charles Coxe, the father of Eckley Brinton Coxe.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Wright Duryea
Wright Duryea, who died at Glen Cove, LI., last Tuesday, at the age of 65, had his name attached to one of the famous regiments sent by New York State to the war of the Union,-the Duryea Zouaves.  He was the eldest of seven brothers, and the others, with their father, now 92 years old, survive.  His business was starch making, and in that his inventions made him famous and wealthy.  He was also a notable scholar in electrical science, an artist and the possessor of a gallery of paintings.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. Samuel H. Gaylord
Mr. Samuel H. Gaylord, of the hardware firm of S. H. Gaylord & Co., of Blossburg, died yesterday morning of heart failure.  Mr. Gaylord was nearly 70 years of age, and he was one of Blossburg’s leading citizens.  He was upon the street Sunday, apparently in his usual health.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

“Esquire” Evans
“Esquire” Evans, a well-known citizen of Arnot, died last Tuesday of consumption after a sickness of nearly six months.  He was in his 58th year.  He was a prominent Odd Fellow, and the Blossburg Lodge conducted his funeral.  Mr. Evans leaves a wife and six children.--four sons and two daughters.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Ellen Phillips
Mrs. Ellen Phillips, wife of Mr. O. J. Phillips, died at Hammond on the 14th instant, of consumption.  She had been sick for many months.  Her age was about 40 years.  She leaves a husband and three children.  The funeral was held at the school-house last week Sunday, Rev. Mr. Campbell, of Tioga, preaching the sermon.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John R. Chubbuck
Mr. John R. Chubbuck, of Hudson, Wis., who died on the 3d instant of heart disease, was formerly a resident of this borough, being a son of the late Levi Chubbuck, a foundryman here.  He left this borough 22 years ago for the West.  John R. Chubbuck was 56 years of age, and he was a brother of Mrs. R. L. VanHorn, of this place.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. D. S. Horton
Mrs. D. S. Horton, of Roseville, died a few days ago after a sickness of only a few days.  She leaves a husband and six children.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mr. John M. Putman
Mr. John M. Putman, of Delmar, went out to his barnyard last Thursday morning to milk the cows.  He did not return, and a member of the family went out and found him dead, it being evident that he had suddenly expired and fallen off the milking-stool.  He was 69 years of age.  He leaves a wife and four adult children, his daughter, Mrs. C. Leroy Kilbourn, residing in this borough.  Mr. Putman served during the war in the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry and he was a brave soldier.  The funeral was held at Olmsville last Sunday, and it was largely attended.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Mrs. Lucy A. Seaman
At Port Allegany, Pa., August 21, 1889, Mrs. Lucy A. Seaman, of Addison, NY, aged 72 years.  (Tuesday, September 24, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Miss Nellie Kimball
Mr. and Mrs. N. R. Kimball, of this borough, are bereaved by the death of their 3 year old daughter Nellie.  The child died last Friday morning of cholera infantum, and the funeral was held on Sunday afternoon at the Freewill Baptist church.  (Tuesday, October 1, 1889, The Wellsboro Agitator, Wellsboro, Tioga Co, Pa.)

Tri-Counties Page 16141

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA

Published On Tri-Counties Site On 27 JUNE 2008
By Joyce M. Tice
Email Joyce M  Tice
Deb JUDGE Spencer typed these for us.