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1831-2 - 
Anne WEST Page, Voyage from Liverpool to New York 
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Below is a transcript of the diary kept by Anne West Page on voyage from Liverpool, England to New York, NY, October 11, 1831-January 2, 1832, aboard the sailing vessel Marion. She was accompanied on the voyage by her husband Thomas Page, and their four daughters, Ann Elizabeth, Marianne, Amelia Jane and Emma Lydia, and by Anne West Page’s brother Christopher West. Thomas and Anne settled in Athens, PA, where the family farmhouse still stands at Green’s Landing. The original diary is in the possession of George Page West of Baltimore, MD, a descendant of Christopher West. This diary was typed and submitted to the Tri-Counties website by Christine Page Barnes, great-great granddaughter of Thomas and Anne West Page. The family farmhouse still stands at Green’s Landing. They had 6 more children after their arrival in Athens, and some became prominent citizens of Athens, including Christine’s great grandfather, Fountain Thomas Page.
 Pictures are of Thomas Page and Anne WEST  Page, and the house they built at Green's Landing in 1832. 

Georgetown, January 1832

My very dear friends in England –

As our voyage to America was so protracted, and attended with many difficulties, and having written a little of what occurred from day to day, we flatter ourselves that it will not prove uninteresting to you, though there are many trifles respecting the children, etc., hardly worth recording; but as some of you will wish to know what they said and did, I shall give it just as I then wrote it, believing you will readily excuse all that is objectionable and invoke patience to your aid in reading so long an account. We trust that you will be enabled to adore that kind of Providence who brought us safely through all, and has enabled us to be thankful.

October 11, 1831

Then Thomas, brother Christopher, myself and the four children sailed from Liverpool in the ship Marion, bound to New York, with Captain Philips, Mr. Manchester chief mate, Mr. Mansfield second mate. Cabin passengers Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard and son, Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin and little boy, with one hundred and forty in steerage. We had a small room to ourselves. It was a fine morning. We did not expect to go out, the wind being contrary, but were towed out by a steamboat coming alongside the vessel; a part of it was dashed to pieces. Obliged to return. Another came up soon, and we kept on slowly. I sat on the deck, by the cabin. Began to write a letter to Father and Mother, to send by pilot. Was sick, could not finish, soon recovered. At two o’clock in morning, heard a rushing about. Thomas went on deck. It was a gale. All was right.

12th

Beautiful morn, very sick, soon recovered. Thomas cooked herring for dinner, which we all enjoyed. He and children laid on deck, and slept in afternoon. Isle of Mann in view all day.

13th

Strong gale from west. Very rough sea. Went on deck, the only female that ventured. Thomas and Christopher had a ducking. Children in their berth all day. Much alarmed at night.

14th

Very rough sea, wind the same. Went on deck with all the children. Much ado to keep on feet. They were greatly delighted to see the billows roll so high. Amelia said, "Oh! The ship will turn over." Ann Elizabeth and Marianne laughed. Amelia and Emma cried. Put them to bed. Five ships in view, and plenty of sea crows. Saw the coast of Ireland.

15th

Wind not so high. Rather more favorable. Plum pudding for dinner. Stayed on deck talking with captain till tea. Saw two lights. One revolving, disappearing every two minutes.

16th

Sunday, fine morn. All on deck, foul wind. Emma better.

17th

Fine morn. Very calm. Wind fair. Seven knots nearly all day. The brig Elizabeth from Quebec passed. We spoke to her. Seventeen days coming. Boiled a piece of beef, and apple dumplings. The first meat since we left Liverpool.

18th

No wind. Sea like a river. Saw some fish like crabs.

19th

Very rough sea. Wind and tide against us. Went on deck. Not very well. Coming down hatchway fell from top to bottom. Did not hurt myself much. Laid down. Thomas pared some apples. Heard him ask Ann Elizabeth, "How her mama made the crust?" Thought ‘twas time to be moving. I made them, he cooked them. Christopher was laid. Went on deck with the children. Very cold. Saw a beautiful rainbow. Rocked about very much. In eve a rope broke and let all the luggage loose. On one side, baggage rolling all over the steerage. Tins rattling. Baskets cracking. Men singing, smoking, talking, laughing, etc.

20th

Fine morn. Wind very high. Quite ahead. Rocked about very much all night. Our bones sore. Emma fell out of her berth this morn. Papa was stooped, and she came on his back. Rainy afternoon. Ann Elizabeth asked, "If we had not received a letter from either of our Grandmamas, aunts or anybody?" She said she "though we might have had a note or something by this time." For three days past Marianne’s complexion has been quite yellow. Looks better now. Mr. Manchester said she had the jaundice. Emma begins to be quite merry. Christopher not very well. I dreamed my cousin Norton was dead, and that she talked to me after. Also of Mrs. A. Brereton’s vault being opened. Saw a great many coffins.

21st

Tremendous rough sea. Rocked all night. Ann Elizabeth says, "She feels tired all over, she wishes she had stayed with one of her Grandmamas." Amelia says, "She did not expect to go to America so up and down, up and down." She does not like it. The children in their berths all day. No cooking, coffee or tea.

22nd

Very rough sea. Strong gale from west. Thomas fell down with a kettle, hurt his side. Was sick. Made a biscuit pudding for dinner tomorrow. Rocked so much could not wash the children. Much ado to keep on a seat. Frequently down on the bottom. Rather more still in the evening. Cleaned and swept the room. Now to bed in hopes of a fair wind tomorrow. My birthday, and our own wedding day.

23rd

Sunday – Wind the same. Rough sea. Went on deck. Captain carried the children, and assisted me to the farther end of the quarter deck. We all sat on the bottom. We could keep no other seat. All enjoyed our biscuit pudding. Amelia said, "it was the best dinner she had." The sea came on deck so obliged to keep down in afternoon. Thomas still suffers from his fall. Went in cabin. Captain hearing ‘twas our wedding day, drank our health. The two Mr. Rogers came in at evening, and sat with us. Thomas read "Toplady’s Hymns." Cracked a bottle of sherry.

24th and 25th

Very rough sea. Gale continues. By some means last week we lost a day. We must have lost one of the rough days last week. All thought this Monday, though it proves to be Tuesday. The Captain does not expect a fair wind until a new moon. Poor encouragement. The children ask every day if the wind is fair, and talk of what they shall have, "when they get to America." The Captain and mate take much notice of the children. Mr. Mansfield said to them this morn, "Well my little dears, you are such pictures, I do love these children. They are such pictures! You shall have such nice pears and peaches when you get to America." We agreed with a man, Bob, to cook for us, empty slops, etc., for four dollars more, until we land. It is such messing at the fires, and much danger of scalding themselves.

26th

Tremendous stormy night. Hail and rain. Much danger last night. Eleven o’clock this morn, wind dead again. Christopher called me on deck to see a ship. It was from New Orleans. Thirty five days, going full sail to Liverpool. This is out 16th day, and we are not more than six hundred miles from Liverpool.
 
 

27th

Day clear and beautiful. Wind the same. Very cold. On the deck nearly all the day, with the children. Saw some very large fish like pigs. The Captain calls Marianne the "Old Maid", says "she is an old fashioned one." Biscuit pudding. Boiled our first piece of ham. Finished our cream. Wind fair this eve. Ship goes very easy.

28th

Head wind. Clear day. Very calm. Children on deck all day talking with the Captain till tea. He expects fair wind tomorrow.

29th

A bad cold (whoever heard of a good one?) Clear day. Sea as smooth as a river. Washed the children on deck. Marianne says, "Mama, why does the sea look so neat?" Saw an immense number of the same fish. Cold not better.

30th

Sunday – Fine day. Head wind. Thomas very unwell. Self and children all bad colds.

31st

Wet morn. Head. Thomas very unwell. Ann Elizabeth very sadly with a cold.

November 1st

Bright clear morn. Head wind. Very rough sea. Thomas a little better. Light pudding with currants. Very nice.

2nd

Wind the same. Very stormy night. Thomas much better.

3rd

Thick mist morn. Wind little in favor making three knots an hour. This eve about twenty young men sat along by our door playing "Madam St. Quinton". Christopher sat it up. Caused general laughter. Thomas on deck. Children asleep. Same pudding. Have our biscuits toasted. We all like them.

4th

New Moon. Brisk head wind. Children all on deck. Made an Irish pillow case. Marianne and Amelia told Mr. Manchester "they would sleep with him" when they went to bed, they cried because they could not.

5th

Foggy morn. Head wind. Heavy sea. Plum pudding and ham.

6th

Sunday – Very stormy rough night. We could not sleep. Head wind at noon. Fair wind. Five knots. Captain playing with the children all afternoon.

7th

Fine morn. Favorable wind. Four knots. Busy all day putting things in order. Short plum dumplings. Gruel made of prepared grits with eggs, very nice.

8th

Fine morn. Favorable wind. Spoke a ship from Africa, bound to Liverpool. Saw another at a distance. Made a pillow case.

9th

Friday – Favorable wind. Eight knots. Mate told us, "We are eighteen hundred miles from New York."

10th

Now off deck. Nine o’clock. Beautiful moonlight eve. Delightful breeze all day. Captain tells us we have made in forty eight hours, five hundred and twenty miles. Hope to see land this day week. Mr. Blanchard says "I am made of no common stuff, but of everlasting." I so often go on deck where no other female dare. Very seldom any of an evening, but myself. Not one in the ship has been so well. Amelia calls Mr. Manchester her "sweetheart". Mr. B. has taught her two little pieces, which she repeats very nicely. No fire today. Some gruel at the cooks.

11th

In the Gulph. So hot could not sleep. The children took their night gowns off. Very heavy sea . Billows constantly rolling on deck. Strong gale all day. Christopher a complete ducking. Self and children a little.

12th

Fine morn. Spoke a ship. Thomas calculated the distance to New York. Told the Captain, who replied that he came "very near". Very warm. Plum pudding.

13th

Fair wind. Dined on deck. Plum pudding. Finished our raisins. Strong gale in afternoon.

14th

On the bank of Newfoundland. Much cooler. Heavy fog. Went in cabin. Captain told us we were nine hundred and sixty miles off New York.

15th

Off the banks into the Gulph Stream. Very warm. Breakfast and dinner on deck. Two violent storms in the afternoon. Thunder loud. Lightning vivid. Sold some flour, herrings, and potatoes. Made a pillow case. Remained on deck till ten o’clock.

16th

Fine day, with the exception of a few squalls. All our meals on deck.

17th

Fine day. Head wind. Our of the Gulph. Much cooler. The water quite warm in the Gulph.

18th

Fine day. Head wind. Dined on the deck. Cold rainy night.

19th

Calm, cold, foggy day. No progress till eight in the evening. Then favorable wind. Within three days sail. Sold some potatoes and flour. Emma walks about the deck now.

20th

Sunday – Rough night. Head wind. Storms all day. Saw two ships at a distance. Very cold.

21st

Rough night. Head wind. Blowing hard. Very heavy sea. Captain told us he "knocked at five this morn, expecting he should have gotten Thomas up, that he might have a ducking." Saw a ship very near us. Captain said "if we were as near New York as we seemed, we could not get in, with this wind."

22nd

Fine morn. Nice breeze. Fair from eleven till four. Emma and myself had a ducking. The wind began blowing very hard. Came off deck. A tremendour gale. Violent storm. Thunder and lightning abated at eight. Left a headwind. The most apparently stout-hearted swearing man in the ship was very much alarmed. The luggage knocked about, all over the steerage, our own kept up very well. Much as we could do to undress the children. This truly may be termed "a storm at sea". The Captain has been to sea twenty five years, and never experienced such a voyage, with contrary winds, gales, and storms. He and second mate say, "they will go to sea no more." Mr. Manchester says, "no more this winter."

23rd

Stormy night. Sails torn in pieces down side of vessel, which was put on with strong iron batts. Were in much danger. Head wind blowing very hard all day. Very cold. To bed at seven o’clock.

24th

Almost a sleepless night. Very boisterous. 7 AM. Very heavy sea, dashing on deck. Thought the vessel had split somewhere. Felt much alarmed! Thomas went on deck to see. It was four o’clock. All was right when we arose this morning. We heard the wind was fair. Could make very little sail, the ice being so very heavy against the wind. Very cold during the hurricane. Marianne and I went on deck a few moments. I slipped down, so rough could not stay. Passengers provisions begin to be very short. We dare not share them any more, as many of our own things are nearly done.

25th

Head wind. Heavy sea. Squalls all day. Very cold. Finished our own biscuit. Had twelve of the Captain’s. Had not more than a half pound sugar. Boiled a rice pudding. Enough for once more. The children very anxious to land. Always inquiring whether we are going right. When they hear the wind is fair, they say "they wonder how many knots we go?"

26th

Very rough. Squalls all night. Knocking about. Foul wind all day. Saw a ship going full sail past us. Prisoner fare for breakfast --- bread and water. Almost all begin to be very short. Captain, cabin-passengers, and crew put on an allowance this day. He intends to hail the first vessel, for provisions. Saw a small English brig. He said "that was of no use to us."

27th

Very calm, and rain. Our spirits raised this morn, as the wind was fair from eleven till three o’clock. Then head wind blowing very hard. Our prospects too bright to last long. Went in the cabin. Captain gas us a little sugar and a bit of cheese.

28th

An alarming night. Most tremendous gale from the west. Feared the children would roll out of bed. Thomas put two of them to me, and went to the others. Mrs. Blanchard fell out of her berth, and Mr. Manchester fell on the table, and broke it to pieces, and hurt himself so much he is not able to be on deck. All laid except myself. Have been paring some potatoes in hopes of fire by and by, to cook them. We dare not eat, ourselves, nor give the dear children what they want , for fear we should be much longer, and have none. For the winds and waves are continually against us. When it is calm, the wind, what little there is, is fair – as soon as it changes ahead, it blows hard. But thank God we are able to bear up with tolerable spirits at present. But we live in hopes of better days. No fire. A little gruel at the cooks. It is pitiful to hear the children asking for dinner, and we can give them none. What we have, cannot be cooked. At three o’clock this afternoon a most alarming wave rushed on deck. The water came in Christopher’s berth. Knocked the Captain down, and drove him such a distance that we thought he was gone overboard. Bruised his leg. He dares not spare the time to have it bathed. The chief mate being unable to come on deck. One man was driven with such violence, that forced him in the long boat. He clung to a rope, to save himself from a watery grave. The gale continued, fit to rip everything to atoms. But thank God, all safe at present. All the crew are becoming much worn out, continually pulling and hauling ropes night and day. Not enough to eat, and nothing to drink.

29th

We went to bed at six. The wind abated at nine. Had a tolerable night. Morning calm. Children quite merry, talking of what they "shall have when they get to New York." Amelia says "if she does not have some roast goose, and apples, she shall come back again." Every day when we cook at all, we cut about one quarter of a pound of ham, in small bits, and boil with potatoes. We made this morn, enough for two days, for fear we may not be able to cook tomorrow, but Bob robbed us of half. We had very little for breakfast. Only two meals a day.

30th

Restless nights and wearisome days are presented unto us. Truly our trials abound, yet mingled with many and great mercies. A most alarming night of wind and weather, such as the Captain said, he had never experienced. We have laid to, and are driven back, hundreds of miles these last two days. Captain is very kind. This morn sent us some biscuit, a little sugar, and a piece of cheese. The dear children were much delighted! About forth Scotchmen who were by themselves, had finished their provisions some time past, are allowed one pound bread each, for three days. No fire. No dinner today. Storms and gales. Our spirits sink, and we are weary.

December 1st

No better prospect. Gales continue blowing very hard all day. We have a little preserves left, which I spread on a crust. Rolled up and boiled, and this the children call a "nice pudding". This we eat cold for breakfast, and sometimes a little biscuit. We meet with no ship to relieve us. If we did, the sea is too heavy to send a boat out. If the wind does not change after the new moon, on Saturday, the Captain thinks of putting out to the Island of Bermuda, or St. Thomas, in the West Indies, for provisions. But he is in great hopes of a change, which keeps our spirits up. We went down to see the cabin passengers this afternoon. They are in low spirits. Captain gave Thomas a little bit of beef heart, of his own allowance. We told him it "would stay our stomachs". We each ate a little bit, and saved the rest to put in our dinner tomorrow.

2nd

Fine morn. Head wind. The children on deck. Mrs. B. gave them each a bit of biscuit, and told them "when they got to New York, they should go in a store and buy a cake," Emma says, "Oh! Mama", and looked so delighted. She gave me three and a half biscuits, which she had saved at her meals. When the children were in bed, being no fire, we sat with them till nine.

3rd

Calm morn. Our countenances brightened this morn. Wind fair. When the children heard of it, they clapped their hands, and said "Oh! A fair wind, a fair wind!" Amelia says, "I hope we shall dit there soon." I shall ask the Captain how long?" Our fair wind lasted not long. At three in the afternoon it changed ahead. A complete hurricane! If we meet with no relief in a few days, there will be no provisions on board. Two pints of water per day. All we have for everything. But one mug of coffee each, this morning. The man who cooks for us has but one herring and a little oatmeal. Mr. B. made the children a taper on a stick, which greatly pleased them.

4th

Sunday – Head wind, but not high. Very wet. Before we were dressed, we heard "there was a ship near." We were soon on deck. Our Captain boarded her. The flag of distress had not been hoisted more than half a minute, before the other tracked and came to us. After our Captain had given the usual salutation, he said we were "quite destitute of provisions, can you supply us?" Without the least hesitation the other said "Yes". This little word gladdened every heart, and we could not help shedding tears of joy, and gratitude. The sea appeared to calm on purpose for us. The chief mate and two sailors went in a boat, and brought a barrel of beef, and a round of beef. A large piece of pork. A barrel of flour, and a barrel of biscuit. Some onions, etc. Though but little among so many, yet we have abundant cause to be thankful. She was from Boston, bound for the West Indies. Had been only three days coming seven hundred miles. Gave an account of a schooner which was dreadfully shattered. The day cleared up beautifully. Boiled some potatoes, and our last little rice. Kept on deck till the children’s bed time. The wind fair. Three hours. At eight it changed, and blew very hard ahead. Thomas and I went to bed in low spirits.

5th

An alarming night. Could not sleep. A gale from the west. Rains hard, and very heavy sea. Laying to, and driven back. The sea rolls over the deck in torrents, into the cabin, through there into our room, and some oil, which was turned over, Thomas is continually wiping up. Put the children in their berths, to keep them out of the wet. Playing very happily and singing their pieces. Cold pudding. No tea, nor coffee. The children always asking for more, but we dare not give it them. We are almost ready to despair. We have so often hoped this would be the last strong gale, the last violent storm, the last time the wind would be contrary, but our hopes have always proved futile. But we are in His hands Who "rules the howling winds, and calms the raging sea," and we will still hope we may have a fair wind, that we may quickly land, where His mercies abound. We feel thankful that we are all well, although we begin to feel a little the worse for our scanty meals. Nine weeks tomorrow since we came on board. Eight since we sailed. We trust we shall be spared through this gale. Gave a poor man six potatoes, and a little coffee. I wrote no more yesterday, as I met with a most providential escape. The children were in their berth, when a very heavy sea burst on deck, with an alarming noise; and the vessel gave a sudden lurch, when a large partition board and Christopher’s trunk came with a violent force from off his berth, and dashed against my head. Thomas’ arm was hurt a little by trying to guard me. I was very much stunned, though not quite senseless. I thought the vessel had gone to pieces, and a part had struck against my head. I looked up expecting to see a hole. I went to bed, and had some vinegar on. It is not half so bad as I might expect. The whole day was most alarming. The Captain thought of himself and all going down below, and leaving the ship to herself. It was so dangerous for anyone to be on deck. He had one compass taken away. The other was much injured, and the stand driven quite away.

6th

This morn the sea very heavy. Wind not quite so high. No fire, nor dinner yesterday. Captain gave us a piece of beef, some biscuit, and four onions. A pint of water. Now hope this will be the last time we shall need take anything of him. Emma keeps asking for "a piece". Christopher in low spirits. Mr. Blanchard brought us a bit of was candle, and each child a bit of ham, which Mr. B. had saved. Asked for a little salt, as theirs was dirty. The passengers are very envious lest one should have more than another. The Captain is very kind to us, but if we had ever so much, we feel it incumbent to be frugal.

7th

Fine morn. Head wind. We are in a miserable state. Food will soon be all gone again. Those who have none, will soon take from those who have. Water very short. Last night some ham was stolen. Something must soon be done. The Captain and all on board look miserable. Gruel for breakfast. Cut a little bit of beef for our own dinner, which made it much better. Mrs. B. gave each of the children a bit of cold pudding. When they go on deck, they look for something from her bag. She sent Ann Elizabeth to me with four little bits of beef. Told her to say, "there was the pattern she promised me". The Captain told us this eve, he "should put in at the first port that there is a favorable wind for". Although in low spirits, this gives us some hope.

8th

Christopher on deck in the night, and told us on coming down, "that we had a fair wind", which we were much rejoiced at. It lasted but a few hours. We awoke at five o’clock. Vessel was rocking very much. We feared the wind had changed. Thomas went on deck to see, and found it had. The yard-arm of the fore sail broke in two. The Captain, mates and sailors all consulted together. We soon found they had concluded on going to the Bermudas, or failing this, to St. Thomas Island in the West Indies. About eight o’clock we tacked, and are now going on with a fair wind. Can make but little sail, they were so torn with the recent hurricane. The sailors have been mending them day and night. The fore-yard breaking, appears to be the occasion of hastening the Captain’s decision, which we are much rejoiced at. Some are sorry, those who have not felt want. Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard are quite in low spirits. He is engaged in a theatre in New York, and the season is getting away. Every week is an object to them. The poor Scotchmen are very glad. Though we have not been without food, yet we dare not eat, and the dread of our dear children crying for bread, when we had no prospect of procuring any for them, was very distressing. All must soon have starved. The dread of this was to us more than death. The Captain has paid every attention possible. Always on deck, and many days takes no more than a cup of coffee, drinking it on deck. Gave seven potatoes to a Scotchman, who has a wife and two children, and no provisions. Good breeze all day. About twelve days sail to St. Thomas. Calm eve. Very warm. Slept well.

9th

A ship near this morn. Soon as our flag was up, it came. The Eleanor from Boston. Our Captain asked whether they could afford us any relief, as we had nearly one hundred and sixty passengers, and had been living on his provisions the last ten days, and he was now getting quite out. The other hesitated, then said, "Yes, but it serves some of you right. You have no business to have so many aboard, and such a short supply of provisions." But the two Captains soon found they knew each other. He was very kind, and supplied us with beef, biscuit, potatoes, oil, sugar, fat ducks, a pig, water, etc. He apologized for what he had said, and after filling two boats, asked if he could do anything more for us. Our Captain returned his and all the passengers’ thanks. Though ‘twas a perfect calm, while the ship was supplying, before it left, the wind began to blow fair for New York. We tacked and have been proceeding all day, with a delightful breeze. When the fresh beef was put up, it was discovered that the only remaining barrel of beef had been stolen. The Captain suspected the Irish. A general search was made, but none found. The sailors being exasperated at their only remaining morsel being taken from them, would not let it rest, but searched again. Found it under their berth. No doubt they intended to throw it overboard. The Captain very angry, for had not a kind Providence sent us provisions this morning it might have been of serious consequence. When the children were in bed, we went in the cabin to tea. Fried beef, and onions. Had just taken our scanty meal, when the cabin passengers went to bed. The Captain sat and talked with us on deck, till twelve o’clock. Before we put out to the Indies, Thomas proposed to the passengers to send an address to the Captain to put in at some port. He told him of this, and he replied that he "should like to have it done now, that he might have it to show his shipowners." So hot we could not sleep. Ann Elizabeth did not sleep all night.

10th

Good breeze. Foggy morn. Beef and biscuit given to all. We need our flour, to make two beef dumplings. Salt enough, and lard enough, nothing to put in the crust, but we all enjoy them very much. Thomas gave the Captain the Address. He was much pleased with it. Passed through the Gulph. Have been in it twice before, but were driven back. Thomas hung up tins, and caught rain water off the sails, which is very acceptable. Going eight knots. When the foreward is finished and up, we shall go faster. Two hundred and ten miles from New York.

11th

Sunday – Fair wind. Much colder. Hope to see land tomorrow. The salt beef made us so thirsty yesterday, have no water for coffee this morn. Obliged to put the tar-rain water in our dinner. Put up the sail. The children much pleased to learn they shall soon see land. They say, "Now we shall have goose, and bread and butter." Emma begins to say almost everything. We asked her how she liked her dinner. She answered "very well". She gets the corner of her quilt, which lays over her berth, and sucks her thumb. Yesterday we let them eat as much as they wished. Ann Elizabeth said, "well, I have had a good breakfast, now I feel nice and full." One day they said, they thought if their Grandmamas knew they had no more, they would give them, out of their pantries. Captain gave them some water, when they went on deck. Man lost a piece of beef last night. Drank tea in cabin. Pork chops. Wet and very cold.

12th

Bright clear morn. Wind changed ahead at four o’clock. Should have been in this morn, if wind had remained fair. Some linen washed, they froze quite stiff. Caught some rain water. Children quite pleased because they had three meals in cabin. To bed very early, being so very cold. Saw a pilot boat.

13th

Clear bright morn. Never saw the sea so smooth. Children on deck. Captain racing them about. Too cold to stay. Boiled a bit of beef. Had some biscuit, and a little sugar of the Captain. Thank God we have as much now as we need, except water. Gave a poor woman twenty potatoes, and a little beefstew. Wrote a little more of my letter to England, but so cold could not go on. A Scotchman gave me a little ink. At twelve the wind blew a little but soon died away. Tea in cabin. The address was read, and signed. Thomas gave it to Mr. Blanchard to write. Thomas making out Manifesto for Captain.

14th

When we left the cabin, last night at nine, the wind was fair. At twelve it changed ahead, and we were again disappointed. Bright morn. Bitterly cold. Having such a poor prospect, scanty meals today, the passengers begin to be much dissatisfied, and having so little allowed, they offered Mr. Goodwin five shillings for his dinner tomorrow. The Captain promised two hogsheads and a quarter of a pound of meat, more, in cabin this eve. I asked Captain to give me two biscuit for the children’s breakfast, as we had but one and a half left, this morn. He told Jack to "give me some". We ate some biscuit, came in and gave Christopher some. He was gone to bed. Bright moonlight night.

15th

Cold snowy morn. Wind contrary. We keep on two tack. Gaining a little. If we have no gale, hope to be in on Sunday. As soon as the children were awake, they said. "We have no biscuit for breakfast." Were much pleased when I told them the Captain had given me some. Thomas writing for the Captain. Tea in cabin.

16th

Calm morn. Very cold. The wind rose fair at twelve. Going seven knots. Clearing cabin, getting anchors and cables. Preparing to land. Expect to pass Sandyhook about twelve, tonight. Gave away eighteen potatoes. Told the children I hoped this would be the last night they would have to sleep here. Marianne says, "Yes mama, and when tomorrow comes, perhaps you will say the next will be the last, and perhaps we shall never get there." Emma is greatly delighted when she hears them talk of what they shall have, when they get to New York.

17th

The people up the chief part of the night, looking for Sandyhook. About two in morn, there was a general stir. We were very near, going with a fair wind. Thomas and Christopher on deck. Saw the lighthouse, and mountains covered with snow. We were within one hours sail. At four the wind changed ahead. At eight blew strong gale from north west. Continued all day, again our hopes are blighted, and being so bitterly cold, we are obliged to go to bed. Having nothing all day but a bit of biscuit, a little tea without sugar. The dear children playing and sleeping all day, in their berths. Ann Elizabeth said "I did hope and think I should have set my foot on land today." We seem to get, as it were, to the very door of New York, but cannot get in.

18th

Gale continues all night, with hail and snow. The deck miserable. All covered with ice and snow, and ropes frozen. We are driven back now, and no land to be seen. The cook boiled us a bit of meat, and a few potatoes. Children in their berths all day. People hungry and dissatisfied. Provisions getting short. Our only consolation is – we are in the hand of Him Who "knows all our wants", and can "supply all our need", and "will deliver in time of trouble". A packet passed for Liverpool. Not near enough to send a letter --- I regret it much. Tea in cabin. Mrs. B. gave me a piece of beef, and biscuit. I gave it to Christopher. The Captain expects a fair wind.

19th

Went to bed in good spirits, when we awoke, the vessel was going canny, and we vainly hoped the wind was fair, but when morning came, found it had been ahead all night. A little tea without sugar, and very little biscuit, which we divided and served for our breakfast. About eleven, we heard the wind was fair. "Oh! A fair wind, a fair wind!" and "I am glad." Amelia says "thank God, for a fair wind, we shall soon get there now." "The Captain will soon run in now, won’t he mama?" Emma says "doose and pie." This was a false hope. The wind kept ahead all day. Thank God, He enables us to trust, and fly to Him for refuge. Many of the people swearing (quite dreadful to hear), about the wind.

20th

Dismal prospect this morning. Only two oz. biscuit allowed. Mr. Goodwin gave us a mug of coffee for a spoonful of grits, for his little boy, who has the whooping-cough. We liked it much, though no sugar. Men talking of cutting off their fingers and eating them, which makes our blood chill. About eleven, a most merciful deliverance was sent us, for which may we ever be grateful. A boat was seen approaching, written on it, "The Underwriters relief boat", which made every heart leap for joy. She soon came and plentifully supplied us with provisions. Fresh and pickled beef, pork, sheep, biscuit, cabbage, candles, etc. This fresh display of God’s goodness in the time of utmost need, caused our tears to flow with gratitude, and praise to Him who heard our prayers. When the bread was given out this morning, there was only one pound left for each person throughout the ship. Before the boat left, we had a fair wind. The packet which came out with us, has been in a month – the Meridian. The boat had been out a week looking for us. It relieved the Meridian, which was afterwards wrecked. It was with difficulty the crew and passengers were saved. A packet lost. After the "Pitch" was on board, bad news from England. Of fires at Bristoll, etc. Tea in cabin. Beef steak and onions. About seven, the signal lanthorn was put out. "Pitch" was soon on board, and the news man obtained what information he wanted, and returned. Remained in cabin till eleven, then to bed with joyful hearts.

21st

This morn at seven, we started. Reached the dock, about ten. Going in, the scenery was most beautiful. Appeared to go between two rocks. The snow looks very grand, clinging on the clefts and homes. Christopher was on deck nearly all the time, but we were so busy packing, we only remained a few minutes. I thought it the most grand and joyful sight I had ever seen. Washed and dressed the children, as soon as possible. Should have been glad of Bett’s help. Put them in the cabin, but they soon began to cry with cold. Christopher took them to the first house, a store with a nice stove in it. I went to them in about two hours. They were sitting round the stove, very comfortable. Had some cake given them. Several gentlemen asking them questions. I went to them several times. They were very happy. About two or three o’clock, we took what things we wanted, and went on shore to them. They were eating apples and oranges, and each had a cent given them. They said "they were the finest little family they ever saw." We took a little Shrub, and thanked them for their kindness, and proceeded to Captain Winnie’s boarding house, recommended by Mr. Manchester. He was full, but sent his man across the way, with Thomas, to Mr. Hopps, where we are by the fire. He took much notice of the children. We pay four dollars per week, and one for the children. Had some cold beef, for we had taken no dinner. Had tea at six, beef steak, hot cakes, toast, etc.

22nd

All slept well. The children in our room, Christopher a story higher. For breakfast --- coffee, sausage, toast, etc. Walked to the vessel, then to the ship agents, made inquiries about going to Georgetown. Advised us to go by packet to Norfolk, from thence to Annapolis, by stage to Georgetown. Leg of mutton, goose, etc. for dinner. Very sharp frost. Wrote to sister Martha.

23rd

Sat by fire at ship agents. Time Thomas and Christopher got some of the luggage out of the vessel, and put aboard packet, for Georgetown. Our Captain called in to see me. Called on Mrs. Blanchard at an Extension Board. Thomas in Broadway. Pay eight dollars per week. Had glass of good porter. They are dissatisfied with New York. She says "‘tis so vulgar to rush and run away from table, with the last mouthful scarcely down." Wrote a letter to Felthorpe, and Attlebridge. Thomas, one to brother John. Mr. Goodwin called.

24th

Thomas and Christopher went out to unpack. It rained and thawed. Turkey and boiled beef. No onions, nor bread sauce. Fine bright afternoon. Wet walking. Mr. Manchester called to see the children. Amelia and Emma were in bed. He went up to see them.

25th

Christmas day. Went to the Gothic Episcopal Church. The Minister very popular, only moral. The church had a most beautiful appearance. Long slender windows, a tall slender tree sat in each, filled with bushy green cedar, similar to the Lignumvitae shrub. Wreaths made in the same way, tastefully arranged in different shapes in various parts of the church. No Christmas berry like those in England. For dinner, roast beef, and chicken pie, called pot pie, all masked up together. I thought the dish had been broken, and that they had to put it in another. Cake custard, no plum pudding. Afternoon to Baptist Church. Good sermon. Modern built. Green Venetian blinds. Scarlet and green cushions. Carpeted all over. Handsome organ. Two stoves, rather too warm, bright clear mild day. Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin called. Their little boy very ill.

26th

Bright, clear day. Went to the Georgetown packing room. Packed some boxes. Called at our Captain’s lodging. Saw his wife and little girl. Walked through Broadway. Very extensive and pretty stores. Saw an immense boat. This day is a holiday.

27th

Bright, clear day. To the park. Captain called, and Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard. Saw a store with goods outside the door, ticketed. The young men have had a good laugh about it, said "they knew it was an Englishman." Mrs. Hoff is a widow, with four children, eldest fifteen. Four young men aboard, very agreeable.

28th

Snowing all day. Christopher set off, with intention of going to Athens, but could not get over the river. No business going on, at the vessel.

29th

Thomas about all day, after the luggage. Had to pay duty on the crate of earthenware, and casks of cutlery. Removed the boxes, chests, etc. to Georgetown post.

30th

Packing and unpacking all day. Very cold.

31st

Got all from Custom House.

1832 January 1st

To the Baptist Church. Got all ready for starting Monday. Two sleighs took in our baggage at half past five, to the steamboat office. Starting in a beautiful steamboat. At seven, breakfast on board. A great many passengers. Reached Amboy half past ten. Stage to Kingston. Sleigh to Trenton. Stage to Philadelphia. Arrived about ten. Took tea at Inn, where coach stopped. Put the children to bed with their clothes on, as we had to start at four next morn.

2

Up at half past twelve. Started in a vehicle which they call a sleigh, like a long showcase. We are knocked and jolted fifty miles. Gave the children some hot bread and milk. Then got in a stage. Ten passengers more outside. Obliged to get out to get coach and sleigh over river. Went to good fires, then another coach a few miles, then a sleigh. A fe more gentlemen obliged to turn out, and push behind, to get the horses over the bridge. The coachman found they could not get on. He said, "Gentlemen we must have wheels again. This shall be the last changing." It was getting dark, a barren place. We went in an ordinary tavern. A good fire. Four or five women quite enraptured with the children. "Never saw such dears --- so much alike – such rosy cheeks --- so near of a size." They asked numberless questions. Started again in a coach. Arrived in Baltimore at eleven. They could not take us in, where the coach stopped, as the box man said, :The housekeeper and son were gone to bed. We sat down by a hot stove, in the coach office. A gentleman gave the children and me a glass of lemonade. Thomas went to look for night lodgings. He was gone a long time, as most of the boarding houses and taverns were shut. The road being so bad made the coach late. At last Thomas returned. Found a Mr. Baker, in South St. We took our night clothes and children’s and off we set. Thomas carried Emma, and I trudged on with the rest. It was very cold and slippery. We passed the house. Could not find it. Poor children cried with cold. They saw a light. They said, "Perhaps they will let us stay here." The watchman heard us trying to comfort them, and directed us to Mr. Baker’s. It was passed twelve. We found him and two black servants waiting for us. They paid us every attention. Had some cold roast beef. Some gin and water, and went to bed, tired enough. Next morn, the breakfast bell rang before we were out of bed. The children had been awake some time, as merry as possible. I opened my eyes and saw a great black servant going across the room. We were quickly set down to an excellent breakfast. So many things, I cannot remember. Mr. and Mrs. Baker are very kind people. Mr. Baker was delighted with the children. Sent for a merchant to look at them. Amelia recited her pieces. He was much pleased with them. Mr. Baker went to the coach office with Thomas. The landlord at the Inn was Mr. Baker’s father. We told them, we should like a snack at twelve, as we should leave at one. We had roast duck, boiled fowl, sausages, mince pie, boiled Indian corn, etc. At one the coach called for us, and we reached Georgetown very comfortably, a little after six, at Mr. and Mrs. Claxton’s. They had been looking for us many weeks. Received us very kindly. We have been to a party at Mr. Wright’s. Spent a day at Washington. Had many invitations. The inhabitants appear very kind. Think we shall like the country very well. Have seen the Capital Washington. A most delightful place.

Anne West Page died April 17, 1842, in her 41st year. Proverbs 31st. 10th verse to the close of Chapter.

Bradford County PA
Chemung County NY
Tioga County PA
Published On Tri-Counties Site On 23 DEC 2006 
By Joyce M. Tice
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